The Commercial Dispatch eEdition 8-30-13 | Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

BY SCOTT WALTERS

swalters@cdispatch.com
M
ississippi State
University will
open its football
season Saturday in Hous-
ton, Texas, with a contest
against No. 13 Oklahoma
State University.
Jack and Brenda
Collins will be making
the trip this weekend to
Reliant Stadium. Season
ticket holders for more
than three decades, the
Collins have added a
lot of road trips to their
schedule now that both
of them are retired. This
particular weekend, two
other fami-
lies will be
join them
in a large
caravan
heading to
Houston.
Travel
arrange-
ments will
be slightly different than
when Jack Collins made
his frst trip to Houston
Weather
134rd Year, No. 147
Donald Walker
High 95 Low 71
Mostly sunny
Full forecast on
page 2A.
Five Questions
1 Edvard Grieg’s Peer Gynt suites
come from the music he wrote for
what playwright in 1876?
2 The U.S.’s center of population was
in eastern Maryland at the time of
the frst census, but it’s since moved
seven states westward. What state is
it in today?
3 Rollie Fingers was only the second
relief pitcher in the Baseball Hall of
Fame. Who was the frst?
4 What colorful object in the constella-
tions Taurus was left behind by the SN
1054 supernova?
5 Who’s the only monarch since the
Norman Conquest to have three chil-
dren inherit the throne?
Answers, 8B
inside
Classifeds 7B
Comics 6B
Obituaries 4A
Opinions 6A
LocaL FoLks
Kevin Smith is a retail part
professional at Advanced Auto
Parts in Columbus.
caLendar
Saturday, Aug. 31
■ Prairie Arts Festival: West
Point’s 35th annual festival
showcases fne arts, crafts,
down-home Southern cooking,
live music, Kidsville and much
more from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information, call the
Growth Alliance at 662-494-
5121, email cwilson@west-
pointms.org or check out Prairie
Arts Festival on Facebook.
Tuesday through Sunday,
Sept. 3-8
■ Tennessee Williams Trib-
ute: The 12th annual Tribute
offers performances of Williams’
“Period of Adjustment” Sept.
3, 4, 6 and 7; “Autumn Song,”
a musical evening Sept. 5 at
MUW’s Poindexter Hall and
much more. View the schedule
at muw.edu/tennesseewilliams
or call 662-328-0222, 800-327-
2686, or email Brenda Caradine
at sbcaradine@cableone.net.
Wednesday, Sept. 4
■ Get Swept Up in Starkville:
Join the Greater Starkville
Development Partnership in this
annual beautifcation event to
spruce up for Mississippi State
football guests. For information
on how you can help, contact the
GSDP, 662-323-3322.
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
established 1879 | Columbus, mississippi
CdispatCh.Com 50 ¢ NewsstaNd | 40 ¢ home deliverY
FridaY | august 30, 2013
BY EMILY WAGSTER PETTUS
The Associated Press
JACKSON — The Mississip-
pi Supreme Court unanimously
upheld the state’s open car-
ry-gun law Thursday, allowing
it to take effect after a circuit
judge’s order had kept it on hold
about two months.
“This court now fnds that
the circuit judge erred as a
matter of law when he found
House Bill 2 to be vague and,
therefore, unconstitutional. He
also erred when
he stated that a
‘reasonable per-
son reading the
bill could not dis-
cern what the law
allows and what
it prohibits,’” ac-
cording to the
ruling signed by
Justice Randy Pierce.
Earlier this year, legislators
passed and Gov. Phil Bryant
signed the bill that says adults
don’t need a permit to carry a
gun that’s not concealed.
Several offcials, including
the Hinds County district attor-
ney, sued to block the law, say-
ing there could be chaos if peo-
ple were openly carrying guns
in public places. Circuit Judge
Winston Kidd put the measure
on hold just before it was to be-
come law July 1.
After hearing arguments,
Kidd issued an injunction July
12, saying the law was on hold
until the Legislature can clarify
it.
Justices overturned Kidd’s
injunction Thursday. They
made the ruling based on writ-
ten arguments fled by oppo-
nents and supporters of the law;
MSU game in Houston evokes
memories for Starkville fans
Miss. high court upholds open carry gun law
Rebels win Nashville thriller
David Allen Williams/Special to The Dispatch
Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace turns up feld during Thursday’s game against Vanderbilt in Nashville. The Rebels scored the
winning touchdown in a 39-35 victory with a little more than a minute left. Story, 1B.
No paper Monday
The Dispatch will not print a Monday
newspaper and offces will be closed
for Labor Day. The paper will resume
operation Tuesday.
Howlin’ Wolf festival ready to howl
BY WILLIAM BROWNING
wbrowning@cdispatch.com
On Thursday afternoon, Richard
Ramsey, the executive program direc-
tor of the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues
Festival, said “the phone calls are still
coming in.”
Where from?
“All over Mississippi,” he said, and
from Louisiana, Texas, Tennessee,
Georgia and Missouri.
He was talking about people want-
ing tickets to tonight’s 18th annual
blues festival in West Point. The show
will take place in the auditorium on the
Mary Holmes College campus. The
doors open at 6 p.m. The tunes start at 7
p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20
at the door.
Ramsey was excited about the size of
the potential crowd. The show, he not-
ed, routinely “flls up hotels from here
to Tupelo.” He was more excited about
the music the crowd is coming to see.
“The blues are alive and well in Mis-
Yokohama
groundbreaking
set for late
September
construction of
contractor parking lot to
begin next week
BY NATHAN GREGORY
t@cdispatch.com
State leaders and
Yokohoma offcials
will put shovels to the
ground next month
to begin constructing
the Japanese compa-
ny’s new Clay County
plant.
Though details of
an offcial ground-
breaking ceremony have not yet
been fnalized, Golden Triangle De-
velopment Link CEO Joe Max Hig-
gins confrmed the projected late
September time frame on Thursday.
“Company offcials are coming
in next week and will be in the area
working on various details,” Higgins
said. “We anticipate the company hi-
erarchy will be here the mid-to-later
part of September for a ceremonial
groundbreaking.”
However, dirt will be moving next
week as a temporary parking lot for
sub-contractors is constructed.
The tire manufacturing plant,
which is expected to create 2,000
jobs and have the ability to produce
one million tires a year, is slated to
open in October 2015.
Courtesy photo
The Sept. 18,
1965, game was
just the second col-
lege game played
as the Astrodome.
On Saturday, MSU
returns to Houston
to take on Oklaho-
ma State at Reliant
Stadium, which has
replaced the Astro-
dome. In this cour-
tesy photo, Carl
Cunningham (81),
Dick George (70),
and Cotton Guer-
rant (61) converge
on Mississippi
State’s Ashby Cook
as Mike Payte (84)
wraps him up.
Kidd
Law says adults don’t need permit to carry a
gun that is not concealed
See OPEN CARRY, 8A
Higgins
HoW To go
■ WHAT: Howlin’ Wolf Festival
■ WHERE: Mary Holmes College Auditorium
in West Point
■ WHEN: Doors open at 6 p.m.; music
begins at 7 p.m.
See YOKOHAMA, 8A
collins, Buckners recall frst game
in astrodome in 1965
See ASTRODOME, 8A
Buckner
See FESTIVAL, 8A
event precedes annual Prairie arts Festival
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 2A Friday, august 30, 2013
DiD you hear?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
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The Commercial Dispatch (USPS 142-320)
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Thursday
High/low ..................................... 93°/67°
Normal high/low ......................... 92°/68°
Record high .......................... 107° (1954)
Record low .............................. 56° (1968)
Thursday.......................................... 0.00"
Month to date ................................. 2.48"
Normal month to date ...................... 3.78"
Year to date .................................. 45.41"
Normal year to date ....................... 37.63"
Saturday Sunday
Atlanta 88 72 t 89 74 t
Boston 83 69 t 83 69 c
Chicago 84 68 pc 88 66 t
Dallas 102 79 pc 102 79 s
Honolulu 89 75 s 89 75 s
Jacksonville 90 72 t 91 71 t
Memphis 98 77 t 97 76 s
96°
72°
Saturday
Thundershower
95°
73°
Sunday
Partly sunny with a
t-storm
94°
70°
Monday
A thunderstorm in
the area
90°
63°
Tuesday
Mostly sunny
Aberdeen Dam 188' 163.10' none
Stennis Dam 166' 136.76' none
Bevill Dam 136' 136.39' +0.13'
Amory 20' 11.27' -0.20'
Bigbee 14' 3.69' -0.02'
Columbus 15' 5.31' -0.15'
Fulton 20' 7.26' none
Tupelo 21' 0.10' -0.10'
Last
Sep. 26
Full
Sep. 19
First
Sep. 12
New
Sep. 5
Sunrise ..... 6:26 a.m.
Sunset ...... 7:22 p.m.
Moonrise ... 1:13 a.m.
Moonset .... 3:29 p.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Major ..... 8:57 a.m.
Minor ..... 2:45 a.m.
Major ..... 9:20 p.m.
Minor ..... 3:08 p.m.
Major ..... 9:38 a.m.
Minor ..... 3:27 a.m.
Major ... 10:01 p.m.
Minor ..... 3:50 p.m.
Saturday Friday
Saturday Sunday
Nashville 95 74 t 92 73 pc
Orlando 92 73 t 91 75 t
Philadelphia 88 72 pc 86 72 pc
Phoenix 101 86 t 103 86 pc
Raleigh 91 70 pc 91 71 pc
Salt Lake City 94 66 pc 96 70 pc
Seattle 80 59 pc 81 59 pc
Tonight
Partly cloudy with a
t-storm
70°
A ThousAnd Words
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Thomas Prez and Christina Ware wait on direction from Starkville High School band director Shawn Sullivan
during practice before school Wednesday morning. The SHS football team welcomes Oxford High School tonight
for the “Little Egg Bowl.”
Friday
Say What?
“We didn’t necessarily play that well...But one of the staples of our
program...is that you play for 60 minutes and you do not blink and
you play until the whistle blows at the end of the game.”
University of Mississippi football coach Hugh Freeze. Story, 1B.
German Jewish group calls
for Roger Waters boycott
The AssociATed Press
BERLIN — A Jewish
group in the German city of
Duesseldorf is urging a boy-
cott of an upcoming concert
by former Pink Floyd band
member Roger Waters for
using an infatable pig fea-
turing a Star of David during
his show.
The director of the Jew-
ish Community in Duessel-
dorf, Michael Szentei-Heise,
said in a statement Thursday
that Waters was an “intellec-
tual arsonist” whose stage
act used “anti-Semitic and
National Socialist” imagery.
Waters, who could not
immediately be reached for
comment, is to perform his
show “The Wall” in Duessel-
dorf on Sept. 6.
The English musician
has previously rebuffed crit-
ics of the show, which has
been performed about 200
times in the last three years,
by saying it isn’t intended to
be anti-Semitic.
The infatable pig also
features other religious,
political and corporate sym-
bols.
Courtesy photo
Roger Waters performs at Morumbi Stadium in São
Paulo, Brazil, in 2007.
Looking for a Spiritual Home?
Join us for a series
of discussions of the
Catholic Faith and
your response
to God’s invitation.
Starting Tuesday, September 3
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(Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults)
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Activities Center
823 College Street • Columbus
Call 328-2927 for more information
The AssociATed Press
GILBERTON, Pa. —
Police Chief Mark Kessler
expects to be fred for post-
ing incendiary videos in
which he ranted obscenely
about the Second Amend-
ment and liberals while
spraying machine-gun
fre with borough-owned
weapons.
But Kessler, whose pro-
gun videos have garnered
hundreds of thousands of
views online, has no inten-
tion of going away quietly.
With an Internet radio
show, speaking invita-
tions to gun rallies around
the country and a newly
formed “Constitution Secu-
rity Force” that he claims
already has chapters in 45
states, the 41-year-old coal
miner-turned-cop said his
message — that the feder-
al government is too big,
too powerful and wants to
grab guns — is resonating
with a segment of the pub-
lic that believes as he does.
“The support has been
overwhelming, both na-
tional and international,”
he said. “I fnd it truly
amazing how many peo-
ple fnally said, ‘You know
what? This guy’s right.’”
Friday is the last day
of Kessler’s 30-day sus-
pension over what the
Gilberton council has said
was unauthorized use of
the weapons. The council
could decide his fate Fri-
day night.
But if Kessler’s worried
about losing job, he’s not
showing it.
“If that’s the price I got
to pay for standing up for
what I believe in, apparent-
ly for what a lot of Ameri-
cans believe in, I’m willing
to pay that price,” said Kes-
sler, speak-
ing to The
Associated
Press at a
gun range
near Gil-
berton in
nor t heast
Pennsylva-
nia.
If anything, his rheto-
ric has grown even more
menacing.
This week, Kessler
posted another pot-
ty-mouthed video in which
he displayed paper targets
with scary-looking clowns
on them, dubbed “Eric”
and “Danny.” Those hap-
pen to be the frst names of
Council President Daniel
Malloy and Vice President
Eric Boxer, whom he has
attacked on his website.
Gun-toting, foul-mouthed Pa. chief won’t back down
online videos show police chief ranting about the Second
amendment and liberals while fring machine guns
Kessler
onLine suBscriPtions
For less than $1 per month, print subscribers can get unlimited
access to story comments, extra photos, newspaper archives
and much more with an online subscription. Nonsubscribers can
purchase online access for less than $8 per month.
Go to www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
Msu sPorts BLoG
Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking
Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports
@
Friday, august 30, 2013 3A
-Hydraulic Cylinders: repair, rebuild & test
- Drive Line Specialists
- Steel Fabrication and Installation
- CNC and Manual Machine Work
- Boom Trucks/ Carry Deck / Forklifts Available
- On-Site Work: Carbon Steel, Stainless, Aluminum
- Design/Build
- Industrial and Contract work availabity
- Millwright and Equipment Relocation
807 Moss St., Columbus, MS | 662-328-8473 Cell 662-549-1104
-
Columbus Machine & Welding
Since 1967
Rev. and Mrs. Ralph Windle, Jr. will celebrate their
50
th
Wedding Anniversary on September 1
st
, 2013. The
celebration will be at the Lee Home on September 1
st
from
2pm-4pm. They have one daughter, Leigh Ann Pearson (Shaun),
two grandchildren, Sam (Blair) and Ashleigh White, two great-
grandchildren, Paxton White and Samantha Bailey. We would
like to invite all friends and relatives to attend. No gifts please.
The Lee Home’s address is 316 7th St N Columbus, MS.
correction
■ In the Aug. 8 edi-
tion of the Dispatch, we
reported that Robert
Earl Smith Jr., son of
Columbus Mayor Robert
Smith, was arrested for
DUI on Aug. 3. The sto-
ry also noted Smith had
possession of a handgun
and an assault rife at
the time of the arrest,
noting that Smith had
permits for the frearms.
The story reported
that Smith was per-
mitted to possess a
frearm because his
felony record had been
expunged. Later in the
story, a reference to
Smith’s felony “convic-
tions” was the result of
a typographical error. It
should have read “con-
viction.”
Also in the story, we
reported that Smith had
been arrested in 1998
for violation of probation
and ordered to serve fve
years. The source for
this information came
from records obtained
from the Lowndes
County Adult Detention
Center. Smith disputes
that information and re-
cords accompanying his
expungement request
show no evidence of the
1998 arrest or the proba-
tion violation. We regret
the error and apologize
to Mr. Smith.
THE ASSOCIATEd PRESS
JACKSON — The
Mississippi Supreme
Court has declined a
request from Bobby Ba-
tiste that it take a second
look at his appeal.
The Supreme Court
upheld Batiste’s convict-
ed and death sentence in
May.
Robbery was a key
element required for an
Oktibbeha County jury
to convict him of capital
murder and sentence
him to death.
Batiste was convict-
ed in the death of his
roommate. Prosecutors
say 28-year-old Andreas
Galanis of Biloxi died in
2008 from a blow to the
head after the two fought
at their apartment.
Batiste’s lawyer ar-
gued that Batiste didn’t
intend to steal Galanis’
wallet while cleaning up
after the fight. Batiste
argued that had the jury
been instructed about
intent, he might have
avoided a death sen-
tence.
The Supreme Court
rejected Batiste’s argu-
ment.
Supreme Court denies Batiste’s challenge to death sentence
oktibbeha county jury convicted him
in 2008 death of roommate
BY JEFF AMY
The Associated Press
JACKSON — Activists, city
leaders and others in Jackson
called Wednesday for a fresh en-
gagement to social and political
change in the spirit of the civil
rights movement in Mississippi.
The calls to action came from
the steps of Mississippi’s Capitol
building on the 50th anniversa-
ry of the March on Washington.
A group of about 100, including
students from Tougaloo College
and Jackson State University,
both historically black institu-
tions, surrounded a Confederate
monument outside the building.
Mayor Chokwe Lumumba
(SHOW-kway Lu-MOOM-bah)
noted that he and other rally
participants have come to the
Capitol to seek the release of
imprisoned people and fght
against proposals to crack down
on people who have entered the
country illegally.
“History didn’t stop with
Martin Luther King,” said Lu-
mumba, an attorney and one-
time civil rights activist who was
involved in a black nationalist
group decades ago. “Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King helped give a
boost to our historical progress.
Where much has been accom-
plished, we still have much to
do.”
Omari Morris, a senior at
Jackson’s Jim Hill High School,
said she came with her Jackson
church in part to protest the kill-
ing of Trayvon Martin in Florida.
“It means a lot, because what
Martin Luther King did for us,
we should pay him back,” said
Morris, 17.
Several speakers mentioned
the recent U.S. Supreme Court
decision ending requirements
that Mississippi and some other
states submit voting changes for
federal approval.
Miss. rally seeks new commitment to civil rights
“Whenever we fght, we win and we only lose
when we sit down and become complacent.”
Derrick Johnson, president
of the Mississippi chapter of the NAACP
The following arrests
were reported by the
Lowndes County Sher-
iff’s Department and the
Columbus Police Depart-
ment:
■ Armando Deante-
wanne Barry, 34, of 2307
Third Ave. S., was arrest-
ed in Winona by MDOC
Aug. 28 and charged with
violation of parole.
■ Brian Wilfred Bel-
humeur, 39, of 417 Sylvan
Road, was arrested in Wi-
nona by MDOC Aug. 28
and charged with viola-
tion of parole.
■ Deondre Tyrone
Bonner, 21, of 2420 Wash-
ington Ave., was arrest-
ed at 501 Brooks Drive,
Apt. C-24 by LCSO Aug.
25 and charged with pro-
viding false information,
possession of marijuana,
violation of probation and
three counts of failure to
appear. His court date has
been sched-
uled for
Sept. 17.
■ Re-
becca Lynn
Bu mga r d -
ner, 37, of
546 Chris-
tian Circle,
was arrest-
ed at her residence by
CPD Aug. 28 and charged
with violation of proba-
tion.
■ Sarah Elizabeth Bur-
rage, 24, of 19240 High-
way 21 S. in Philadelphia,
was arrested at the proba-
tion offce by MDOC and
charged with violation of
probation.
■ Derrico Lavelle
Smith, 32, of 115 Ma-
ple St., was arrested at
the probation offce by
MDOC and charged with
violation of probation.
■ Robert Hugh Rog-
ers, 34, of 390 Barclay
Drive, was arrested at his
residence by LCSO Aug.
28 and charged with ut-
tering forgery.
Bumgardner Bonner Belhumeur Barry
Rogers Smith Burrage
area arrests
BY SARAH FOWLER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
A Lowndes County
man is recovering after
being shot multiple times
in the face by a BB gun.
The incident occurred
at a residence at 1783
Hwy. 373 about 8 p.m.
Wednesday night, ac-
cording to the Lowndes
County Sheriff’s Depart-
ment.
Chief Deputy Marc
Miley said the victim
heard his dogs barking
outside his home and
when he went to investi-
gate, was shot numerous
times on the forehead,
neck, face and hands by
BB pellets. The victim
— who authorities de-
clined to identify — told
law enforcement he did
not see his attacker. He
then drove himself to the
hospital where he report-
ed the shooting. He was
treated and released.
Deputies responded
to the scene but were not
able to locate the alleged
shooter.
Miley said the incident
is still investigation.
Man checks on dogs, gets shot by BB gun
shooting
remains under
investigation
BY SARAH FOWLER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
More than 20 animals were
seized Wednesday night at a Lown-
des County petting zoo and their
owner is facing charges of animal
neglect.
Lisa Perkins, of 170 Lisa Perkins
Road in Columbus, is facing multi-
ple charges of animal neglect after
21 animals were seized from her
property.
Perkins owns Back 40 Petting
Farm. The petting zoo is located
off of Hwy 12 East in Lowndes
County.
Horses, dogs, rabbits, donkeys
and a bull were among the ani-
mals seized, according to a press
release issued by the Lowndes
County Sheriff’s Department. The
animals were transported to the
Golden Triangle Horse Rescue.
The release said the sheriff’s
department frst learned of the al-
leged neglect through an anony-
mous tip.
Perkins has not been charged.
The incident is still under investi-
gation.
According to the Lowndes
County Adult Detention Center,
Perkins has no prior arrest record.
Local petting zoo owner under investigation
21 animals seized
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detailed biographical informa-
tion and other details families
may wish to include, are avail-
able for a fee. Obituaries must
be submitted through funeral
homes unless the deceased’s
body has been donated to
science. If the deceased’s
body was donated to science,
the family must provide offcial
proof of death. Please submit
all obituaries on the form
provided by The Commercial
Dispatch. Free notices must be
submitted to the newspaper
no later than 3 p.m. the day
prior for publication Tuesday
through Friday; no later than 4
p.m. Saturday for the Sunday
edition; and no later than 7:30
a.m. for the Monday edition.
Incomplete notices must be re-
ceived no later than 7:30 a.m.
for the Monday through Friday
editions. Paid notices must be
fnalized by 3 p.m. for inclusion
the next day Monday through
Thursday; and on Friday by 3
p.m. for Sunday and Monday
publication. For more informa-
tion, call 662-328-2471.
Mary Byrd
WEST POINT —
Mary Ellen May Byrd,
90, died Aug. 29, 2013,
at H.C. Watkins Memo-
rial Hospital in Quit-
man.
Services are Satur-
day at 11 a.m. at Calvert
Funeral Home with
Jerome Key offciat-
ing. Burial will follow
in Memorial Garden
Cemetery. Visitation is
today from 5-7 p.m. at
the funeral home.
Mrs. Byrd was born
June 27, 1923, to the late
Alma Elon Foster May
and Ubes Pittman May
Sr. She was formerly
employed as a dietitian
with the West Point
School System. She was
a member of West End
Baptist Church.
In addition to her
parents, she was pre-
ceded in death by her
husband, Oliver Carroll
Byrd; brothers, William
Jefferson May and Cecil
Allen May; and sister,
Annie Ophelia May
Young.
Survivors include her
daughter, Elaine Byrd
of Hattiesburg; sons,
Thomas Carroll Byrd
of Biloxi and Oliver
Wayne Byrd of Quit-
man; sister, Katherine
Elon May Byrd Dill of
Columbus; brothers,
Ubes Pittman May,
James Adrian May and
Harley Eugene May,
all of West Point;eight
grandchildren and 15
great-grandchildren.
Memorials may be
made to West End Bap-
tist Church, P.O. Box
388, West Point, MS
39773.
Tommy Cherry
LOUISVILLE — The
Rev. Tommy Cherry, 68,
died Aug. 29, 2013, at
his residence.
Services are Sun-
day at 2 p.m. at Ellison
Ridge Baptist Church
with the Rev. Paul
Blanchard offciating.
Burial will follow in the
church cemetery. Visita-
tion is Saturday from
5-8 p.m. at the church.
Nowell Massey Funeral
Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Mr. Cherry was born
Oct. 23, 1944, to the
late Thomas Wayne and
Georgia Frye Cherry.
He was formerly the
pastor at Sabougla
Baptist Church, Fair-
view Baptist Church,
Yellow Creek Baptist
Church and Ellison
Ridge Baptist Church.
He was a veteran of the
U.S. Navy.
In addition to his
parents, he was preced-
ed in death by his sister,
Susie Coffman.
Survivors include his
wife, Lorraine Cherry
of Louisville; daughter,
Beth Wasson of Green-
ville; sister, Donna Kay
Morton of Marshall;
brother, Eddie Cherry
of Marshall; and three
grandsons.
Pallbearers are Wil-
lie Sloan, Clyde Prisock,
Edward Stokes, Tim
Flora, Larry Hemphill,
Tony Trosper, Charles
Johnson and David
Livingston.
Memorials may be
made to Ellison Ridge
Baptist Church, c/o
Kathy Carr, 13 Ellison
Ridge Church Road,
Louisville, MS 39339.
Robert Noble
WEST POINT —
Robert T. Noble, 78,
died Aug. 23, 2013, at
North Mississippi Medi-
cal Center.
Services are Sat-
urday at 11 a.m. at St.
Paul United Methodist
Church with Maggie
Little offciating. Burial
will follow in West Point
Memorial Gardens. Vis-
itation is today from 3-6
p.m. at Carter’s Mortu-
ary Services Chapel.
Mr. Noble was born
July 15, 1935, to the late
Dave Noble and Janie
M. Noble Sherard. He
was formerly employed
as an electrician.
Survivors include his
wife, Charlene Noble of
West Point; sons, Rob-
ert Noble of Douglas-
ville, Ga., Kevin Noble,
Dennis Noble, Perry
Scott Noble and Keith
B. Noble, all of Phila-
delphia, Pa.; daughters,
Crystal Noble and
Alicia N. Robinson, both
of Philadelphia, Pa., and
Tracy Hancock of Co-
lumbus, Ohio; brother,
Samuel Sherard of Phil-
adelphia, Pa.; sisters,
Arlene Mackey, Roberta
Kilgo, Betty Marks and
Lily Bell Sherard, all
of Philadelphia, Pa.; 29
grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren.
Rosie Hargrove
COLUMBUS —
Rosie J. Hargrove, 67,
died Aug. 26, 2013, at
Baptist Memorial Hospi-
tal-Golden Triangle.
Ser-
vices are
Sunday at
2:30 p.m.
at New
Beginning
Full Gos-
pel Church
in Colum-
bus with
Glenn Jefferson offci-
ating. Burial will follow
in Memorial Gardens.
Lee-Sykes Funeral
Home of Columbus is in
charge of arrangements
Ms. Hargrove was
born Dec. 16, 1945,
to the late Walter and
Elihie Gregory. She
was a member of New
Beginning Full Gospel
Church.
In addition to her
parents, she was pre-
ceded in death by her
sister, Lula Williams;
and brother, Robert J.
Gregory.
Survivors include her
daughters, Robi Neal
of Jackson, and Teresa
Gregory of Columbus;
son, Terrance Hargrove
of Columbus; stepson,
Michael Hargrove of
Columbus; sisters,
Mary Martin of Tuscan,
Ariz., Annie Ruth Hub-
bard and Dorothy Blu-
itt, both of Columbus,
and Nancy Prude of
Hattiesburg; brothers,
Walter Gregory Jr. and
Lester Gregory, both of
Atlanta, Charles Greg-
ory of Colllinsville, Ill.,
and Mark Gregory of
Hattiesburg; and seven
grandchildren.
Pallbearers will be
Jasper Hubbard III,
Eddie Hubbard, Gath-
er Williams Jr., Larry
Williams, Eldridge P.
Langford III and Roder-
ick Sunivelle.
W.M. Tate
COLUMBUS —
Bro. W.M. Tate, 71,
died Aug. 24, 2013, at
Baptist Memorial Hospi-
tal-Golden Triangle.
Services are Satur-
day at 2 p.m. at Chris-
tian Hill
Missionary
Baptist
Church in
Brooksville
with the
Rev. Bobby
Bowen
offciating.
Burial will
follow in Christian Hill
Missionary Baptist
Church Cemetery. Lee-
Sykes Funeral Home of
Columbus is in charge
of arrangements.
Bro. Tate was born
Oct. 31, 1941, to the
late Carrie B. Tate and
Roosevelt Tate. He was
a member of Christian
Hill Missionary Baptist
Church.
In addition to his
parents, he was preced-
ed in death by his wife,
Ruth S. Tate; sisters,
Lue Ren Taylor and
Ruth Mae Tate; broth-
ers, Robert Henry Tate
and Charles Hargrove.
Survivors include his
daughter, Gloria Cobb
of Columbus; sons,
Johnny W. Jones of
Columbus, and Bernett
Jones of Brooksville;
sisters, Lena Howard,
Carrie Dupree and
Helen Jackson, all
of Memphis, Tenn.,
and Magnolia Tate of
Columbus; brothers,
Walter Hargrove of
Memphis, Ben Har-
grove and Robert Earl
Tate, both of Columbus;
and 13 grandchildren.
Elbert Upton
ALICEVILLE, Ala.
— Elbert D. Upton, 81,
died Aug. 28, 2013, at
his residence.
Services are Satur-
day at 11 a.m. at He-
bron United Methodist
Church with the Rev.
Roger Short offciat-
ing. Skelton Funeral
Home of Reform, Ala.,
is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mr. Upton was born
Dec. 24, 1931, to the
late Elbert Ernest Up-
ton and Mattie Lee Mc-
Bride Upton. He was a
member of Hebron Unit-
ed Methodist Church
and a retired employee
of Huyck Felt Company.
He was a veteran of the
U.S. Air Force.
In addition to his
parents, he was pre-
ceded in death by his
wife, Martha Elizabeth
Upton.
Survivors include his
sons, Douglas Upton of
Daleville, Ernest Upton
of Oklahoma City, Roy
Upton of Aliceville,
Ala., and Gene Upton of
Tuscaloosa, Ala.; broth-
er, Robert Earl Upton
of Livingston, Texas;
eight grandchildren, 10
great-grandchildren and
three great-great-grand-
children.
Memorials may be
made to Hebron Unit-
ed Methodist Church
Cemetery Fund, P.O.
Box 409, Aliceville, AL
35442.
Carita Embree
WEST POINT —
Carita Lucile Embree,
93, died August 28,
2013, at North Missis-
sippi Medical Center in
West Point.
Graveside services
are Tuesday at 1 p.m. at
Memorial Park Ceme-
tery in Memphis, Tenn.,
with the Rev. Kirby
Lloyd offciating. Visi-
tation is Monday from
3-5 p.m. at Robinson
Funeral Home.
Ms. Embree was
born April 1, 1920, to
the late Ruby Anna
Stevens and William
Neal Lofton. She was a
member of First Chris-
tian Church.
In addition to her
parents, she was pre-
ceded in death by her
husband, Walter Em-
bree.
Survivors include
her son, Walter Lofton
Embree of Hollywood,
Fla.; daughters, Gloria
Cox of Houston; seven
grandchildren and 12
great-grandchildren.
Memorials may be
made to Palmer Home
for Children, P.O. Box
746, Columbus, MS
39701.
Fred Schlosser
VERNON, Ala. —
Fred Franklin Schloss-
er, 79, died Aug. 27,
2013, at his residence.
Services are Satur-
day at 2 p.m. at Calvary
Baptist Church with
Will Corbett and Ed
Gosa offciating. Burial
will follow in Fellowship
Baptist Cemetery in
Vernon, Ala. Visitation
is today from 6-8 p.m.
at Chandler Funeral
Home.
Mr. Schlosser was
born Oct. 11, 1933, to
the late Fred Joseph
and Tezzie Schlosser.
He was employed as a
band director.
In addition to his
parents, he was preced-
ed in death by his son,
Joseph Milton Schloss-
er.
Survivors include his
wife, Sylvia Schlosser
of Vernon; daughter,
Suzy Rawls of Ver-
non, Ala.; son, Mark
Schlosser of Marietta,
Ga.; one grandchild and
great-grandchild.
Memorials may be
made to Calvary Baptist
Church, P.O. Box 672,
Vernon, AL. 35592; or
to the American Heart
Association, P.O. Box
840692, Dallas, TX.
75284-0692.
Charlette Liss
ABERDEEN —
Charlette P. Liss, 69,
died Aug. 29, 2013, at
the Specialty Hospital
in Meridian.
There will be no
funeral services. Visi-
tation will be at Calvert
Funeral Home.
Ms. Liss was born
Sept. 13, 1943, to the
late Jewel Catherine
Golson and Charlie
Puckett. She worked as
a secretary.
Survivors include her
husband, John L. Liss
of Aberdeen; sister, Bev-
erly Robinson of Wilm-
ington, N.C.; brothers,
Charles Stafford of
Broomfeld, Colo., and
Don Puckett of Colum-
bus, Ga.
Lena Johnson
STARKVILLE —
Lena Mae Johnson, 87,
died Aug. 21, 2013, in
Starkville.
Services are Sat-
urday at 11 a.m. at
First Baptist Church
Longview in Starkville
with the Rev. Dr. Larn-
zy Carpenter Jr. offci-
ating. Burial will follow
in First Baptist Church
Longview Cemetery in
Starkville. Visitation is
today from 12-6 p.m. at
West Memorial Funeral
Home of Starkville.
Survivors include her
adopted son, Damion
Poe of Starkville.
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 4a Friday, august 30, 2013
Andy McBrayer
Graveside Services:
Saturday, Aug. 31 • 11 AM
Crystal Ridge Baptist
Church Cemetery
Louisville, MS
Visitation:
Friday, Aug. 30 • 6-8 PM
Gunter & Peel Funeral Home
gunterandpeel.com
We Welcome
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Andy McBrayer
Mr. Clarence Anderson “Andy” McBrayer,
age 66, of Columbus, Mississippi, passed away
unexpectedly on Wednesday, August 28, 2013.
A native of Louisville, MS and a graduate
of Louisville High School, Andy retired from
Mitchell Engineering (CECO) after 44 years of
service. Andy married the love of his life, Carol
Ann, in 1966 and moved to Columbus to start
a family. He was a longtime member of Sover-
eign Grace Baptist Church where he served
as the Church Clerk for many years. He was a
wonderful example of what a husband and dad-
dy should be and loved his family. He was a qui-
et and unassuming man who served his Lord
and is with him now. Andy was a man of his
word who had character and integrity, teaching
his children to always be kind and respectful to
others.
He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Car-
ol Ann Hisaw McBrayer; son, Scott McBrayer
(Nici) of Homewood, Alabama; and daughter,
Kimberly McBrayer Eubanks and her husband,
Shay, of Atlanta, Georgia. He is also survived
by his beloved granddaughters, Kaitlin and Jor-
dyn; brothers, Eddie McBrayer, J.W. McBray-
er, and Albert McBrayer; sisters, Betty Fisher,
Ann Jenness, Martha O’Shia, Margie Brown,
and Peggy Pace. Andy also had an extreme
closeness and love with his wife’s brothers and
sisters and extended family who will miss him
greatly. The family will receive friends Friday
evening from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at Gunter
and Peel Funeral Home, located at 903 College
Street in Columbus. Graveside services will be
held at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, August 31 in
Louisville, Mississippi at Crystal Ridge Baptist
Church Cemetery, the same church where they
were married. Services are under the direction
of Gunter and Peel Funeral Home.
Memorials honoring the life of Andy Mc-
Brayer may be directed to your favorite charity.
View all Gunter & Peel obituaries and
sign the guestbook online
www.gunterandpeel.com
AreA obituAries
Hargrove
Tate
See OBITUARIES, 5A
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By JOSH LEDERMAN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Months after
gun control efforts crumbled in Con-
gress, Vice President Joe Biden stood
shoulder to shoulder Thursday with
the attorney general and the top U.S.
frearms offcial and declared the
Obama administration would take
two new steps to curb American gun
violence.
But the narrow, modest scope of
those steps served as pointed remind-
ers that without congressional back-
ing, President Barack Obama’s ca-
pacity to make a difference is severely
inhibited.
Still, Biden renewed a pledge from
him and the president to seek legisla-
tive fxes to keep guns from those who
shouldn’t have them — a pledge with
grim prospects for fulfllment amid
the current climate on Capitol Hill.
“If Congress won’t act, we’ll fght
for a new Congress,” Biden said in the
Roosevelt Room of the White House.
“It’s that simple. But we’re going to get
this done.”
One new policy will bar mili-
tary-grade weapons that the U.S. sells
or donates to allies from being import-
ed back into the U.S. by private enti-
ties. In the last eight years, the U.S.
has approved 250,000 of those guns
to come back to the U.S., the White
House said, arguing that some end
up on the streets. From now on, only
museums and a few other entities like
the government will be eligible to re-
import military-grade frearms.
The ban will largely affect anti-
quated, World War II-era weapons
that, while still deadly, rarely turn up
at crime scenes, leaving some to ques-
tion whether the new policy is much
ado about nothing.
“Banning these rifes because of
their use in quote-unquote crimes
is like banning Model Ts because so
many of them are being used as get-
away cars in bank robberies,” said Ed
Woods, a 47-year-old from the Chico
area of northern California.
Woods said he collects such guns
because of their unique place in
American history. He now wonders
whether he’ll be prohibited from pur-
chasing the type of M1 Garand rife
his father used during World War II.
The U.S. later sold thousands of the
vintage rifes to South Korea.
“Someday my kids will have some-
thing that possibly their grandfather,
who they never had a chance to meet,
is connected to,” Woods said in an in-
terview.
The Obama administration is also
proposing to close a loophole that it
says allows felons and other ineligible
gun purchasers to skirt the law by
registering certain guns to a corpora-
tion or trust.
Powers limited, Obama,
Biden seek action on guns
AP Photo/Susan Walsh
Vice President Biden, center, fanked by Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) Director Todd Jones, left,
and Attorney General Eric Holder, speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday,
after the ceremonial swearing-in for Jones.
one new policy would bar military-grade weapons
the u.s. had given to allies from being imported
Obituaries
Continued from Page 1A
Mary Humbers
SULLIGENT, Ala.
— Mary Florence
Humbers, 83, died Aug.
28, 2013, at the Fayette
Medical Center in Fay-
ette, Ala.
Services are today at
1 p.m. at Norwood Fu-
neral Home with Glenn
Hughes and Regan Rye
offciating. Burial will
follow in Macedonia
Cemetery.
Ms. Humbers was
formerly employed as a
seamstress at Munsin-
gwear. She was a mem-
ber of Pleasant Ridge
Baptist Church.
She was preceded in
death by her parents,
Robert Riley and Fran-
ces Sweeton Walden
Humbers; and brother,
Arie Humbers.
Jerry Lutz
COLUMBUS — Jerry
Lutz, 79, died Aug. 29,
2013, at Baptist Memo-
rial Hospital-Golden
Triangle.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Lowndes
Funeral Home.
cdispatch.com
6A Friday, august 30, 2013
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
Other editOrs
When Congressman Steven Palazzo heard of pos-
sible plans for bringing the nation’s nuclear waste to
Mississippi, he declared: “Not now, not ever.”
While Palazzo represents only one of four con-
gressional districts in the state, those four words
should be the rallying cry of all Mississippians.
As the two-term Republican explained on Tues-
day, “Whatever plans are brewing for a possible
nuclear waste facility, I think now is the time to send
a clear message: no nuclear waste in Mississippi.
Not now, not ever.
“Nuclear storage wouldn’t even be an issue had
the Obama Administration not shuttered plans to
complete the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repos-
itory in Nevada. We’ve already spent $12 billion in
taxpayer dollars and nearly two decades of work on
the Yucca site, and that should be our focus going
forward.”
Yet there are those who want Mississippians to fo-
cus on making a quick buck by hauling used nuclear
fuel rods from around the nation to Mississippi and
storing them until the fuel rods are reprocessed.
As in the 1980s, the Richton salt dome east of
Hattiesburg is mentioned as a possible site for this
nuclear enterprise.
Of course, a few adjustments in federal and state
law would have to be made.
As the Associated Press reported this week,
“Right now, it’s illegal to reprocess nuclear fuel in
the United States, a ban in place since the 1970s.
There’s also a state law against storing nuclear mate-
rial underground.”
But Jason Dean and Patrick Sullivan seem to
think the promise of thousands of jobs and millions
of dollars in tax revenue will overcome such obsta-
cles.
Dean, with the Butler Snow law frm in Jackson,
and Sullivan, president of the Mississippi Energy
Institute in Jackson, speak of positioning Mississippi
to take advantage of a nuclear windfall.
We hear something else.
We hear talk of shredding public policy put in
place because, after much debate decades ago, Mis-
sissippians decided they did not want to be ground
zero for the nuclear waste industry.
We hear talk of yet again promoting Mississippi
as some backwater so desperate that it will grab any-
thing - - even if it glows in the dark - - to make a dollar.
It is the same kind of talk from the same kind of
people who want to put oil and gas rigs on the hori-
zon and oil pipelines through pristine watersheds.
Because they always see the bottom line above
everything else.
As Dean told the state Senate Economic Develop-
ment Committee this week, “We see (nuclear) fuel
rods no longer as a waste product, but as a commod-
ity.”
And of course Dean does not see Mississippi
getting stuck with radioactive waste no one else
wants. As the AP reported, Dean “said the proposal
doesn’t include permanent underground storage,
saying that’s the role for the stalled Yucca Mountain
repository in Nevada. Instead, Mississippi would
accept the waste in giant concrete casks, reuse most
of it and ship the remainder to Nevada.”
If, of course, the Nevada site is ever ready.
As Louie Miller, the state director of the Sierra
Club, said: “What if we move all these casks into
storage here and the federal law is never reversed
and we’re left holding the bag? You’re not going to
convince me they’re not going to use the Richton salt
dome.”
That does appear to be hinted at on the Mis-
sissippi Energy Institute website, where Sullivan
promotes “leveraging the nuclear industry friendly
characteristics and geology of the state.” This “may
involve Mississippi providing solutions for spent fuel
storage/disposal and nuclear fuel reprocessing. …
actions need to be taken in the near term to position
Mississippi with key regulatory/government agen-
cies as a state open to opportunities in this arena.”
Somehow, we cannot help noticing that the word
“temporary” is not in front of the phrase “solutions
for spent fuel storage/disposal.”
Yet even if it were, Mississippi’s response to this
“opportunity” should still be:
Not now. Not ever.
The Biloxi Sun-Herald
slimantics
Monday is Labor
Day, a holiday that
really has no traditions
associated with it. The
day is more commonly
used as a day to cele-
brate the approaching
end of summer.
At its inception in
1894, the holiday was
intended to be a day
set aside for Ameri-
cans to celebrate the
economic and social
contributions of work-
ers. President Grover
Cleveland signed the
bill offcially making
the frst Monday of
September as a federal
holiday as a means of
placating union mem-
bers in the wake of a
bitter strike against
the Pullman Company.
This year, the
original intent of the
holiday has emerged
again, mainly because
of two issues that have
captured national
attention. First, fast-
food workers in 58
U.S. cities protested
this week for what they call a
“living wage” of $15 per hour and
the right to form a union without
fear of reprisal. Noting that many
fast-food titans, companies such
as KFC and McDonald’s, have be-
come some of the richest corpora-
tions in the world on the backs of
a labor force of low-paid workers,
the push for raises has become a
legitimate social issue.
The second issue at play that
brings the original intent of Labor
Day to the forefront involves
the Affordable Care Act, which
will require companies with 50
or more employees to provide
health insurance. Opponents of
the law known as Obamacare
have said the measure will induce
many small businesses to lay off
employees or reduce worker’s to
less than 30 hours per week to
avoid the requirement. Hence, it
is called a job killer.
Both issues should give us
pause to consider an important
question as our nation continues
to struggle to recover from the
Great Recession of 2008: “What
obligations does a company have
to its employees?
Does an employee have a right
to company-supported health
insurance? What about pensions?
What voice does an employee
have in the workplace? Does the
voter have a right to organize and
negotiate terms of employment?
Or should all rights concerning
hours, pay and conditions be re-
served for the employer alone?
In Mississippi, a staunch
“right to work” state dominated
by conservative politics, workers’
rights are very limited. It is no
coincidence that Mississippi is
frst in the nation when it comes
to the per-capita minimum-wage
jobs and that is has the
lowest per-capita in-
come outside of West
Virginia.
In recent years,
state leaders have
lured companies to
Mississippi through
huge tax breaks and
give-aways, always
touting the state’s
“quality of workers,”
which is essentially
code for “non-union
workers.”
As a result, the in-
dustries that relocate
to Mississippi can be
assured of relatively
cheap labor. Why out-
source to India when
you can outsource to
Mississippi, after all?
Of course, it’s
diffcult to arouse
much indignation
in a state where the
crushing weight of
poverty makes those
factory jobs a coveted
thing. In Malaysia, a
worker may work for
a dollar a day simply
because if he won’t
there are others who will. To a
lesser degree, the same princi-
ple applies in Mississippi. Given
the choice between competitive
wages and benefts and the risk
that a factory will fnd some other
place to operate, it’s hard to say
no to those jobs, especially when
the state’s power structure is so
closely aligned with those big
companies.
As it has always been in a
capitalist economy, there is a
fne balance between creating an
environment where businesses
can prosper and protecting the
legitimate interests of workers.
Mississippi has never seemed
much interested in fnding that
balance, unfortunately, which is
why the state still operates under
what amounts to a feudal eco-
nomic system and the disparity
between the haves and have-nots
continues to swell. That is why
there are few states with a smaller
middle class than Mississippi.
It is also a terrible drain on
our economy. Any economist will
tell you: low-paid workers make
terrible consumers.
The popular distraction,
groomed and promoted by our
business-cozy elected offcials, is
that the real problem is too many
lazy people who simply won’t
work. It’s hard to generate much
sympathy for that group of people.
Yet for all those who we condemn
as welfare moochers, companies
like Walmart, whose low wages
and limited hours force many
of its workers to rely on federal
subsides to make ends meet, gets
a pass. Walmart is one of the most
proftable companies in the world,
mind you.
And what of the fast-food work-
ers? In the past, many of those
workers were teens and young
adults, who worked those jobs for
spending money or just to get a
start in the working world. That
demographic, heavily infuenced
by the Great Recession, has
changed. Today, the average age
of a fast-food worker is 29. These
people are trying to make a living.
They are having a tough go of it.
On a more personal note, my
mother worked in a garment
factory for almost 30 years. As
a child, I remember her coming
home, bone-weary, sitting down at
the kitchen table and unwrapping
the tape she used to cover her
blood-drenched fngers. To max-
imize her earnings, she worked
“production,” which meant she
went far beyond her daily quota of
work. For each extreme garment,
she got a small bonus. She didn’t
get rich, though. But it did keep
food on the table.
The company she worked for
was owned by one of the most
prominent families in town. They
got rich on the backs of people
like my mother. This family
became so rich that they started
“giving back” to the community
in the form of building parks or
contributing the charities. In
this way, they became not only
wealthy, but much-loved.
Meanwhile, my mother
unwrapped the blood-soaked
bandages from her fngers every
day, without complaint, mainly
because there was no one to
complain to.
When she retired, she got a
$25 gift certifcate.
The family that owned the fac-
tory is still rich and still morally
bankrupt.
I think of this when I hear
some company that is threatening
to cut back hours to avoid lawful
obligations. I have no sympathy
for them. Those tactics may be
perfectly legal and even endorsed
by conservatives, but it is mor-
ally wrong. It tells me all I need
to know about just how little the
company cares about its employ-
ees.
I am fortunate to work for a
company that does care about
its employees, a company that
provides health insurance for its
employees even though it is not
required to do so.
That’s the kind of company I
want to do business with.
That is also why I won’t shop
at Walmart and why, if I become
aware of any company that
decides to cut employee hours
to avoid providing benefts, I
will make every effort to do my
business with that company’s
competitor.
This Labor Day, I’ll eat some
barbecue and celebrate the ap-
proach end of the summer.
But I will also think about
people like my mother and her
blood-drenched fngers.
Slim Smith is the managing
editor of The Dispatch. His email
address is ssmith@cdispatch.com.
Refecting on the original meaning
of Labor Day
Nuclear waste?
‘Not now, not ever’
today, the
average age
of a fast-food
worker is 29.
these people
are trying to
make a living.
they are hav-
ing a tough go
of it.
Slim Smith
EDITOR/PUBLISHER
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By JULIE PACE
AP White House Correspondent
WASHINGTON — Presi-
dent Barack Obama on Thurs-
day prepared for the possibility
of launching unilateral Amer-
ican military action against
Syria within days as Britain
opted out in a stunning vote by
Parliament. Facing skepticism
at home, too, the administra-
tion shared intelligence with
lawmakers aimed at convincing
them the Syrian government
used chemical weapons against
its people and must be pun-
ished.
Despite roadblocks in form-
ing an international coalition,
Obama appeared undeterred
and advisers said he would be
willing to retaliate against Syria
on his own.
“The president of the United
States is elected with the duty
to protect the national security
interests in the United States of
America,” White House spokes-
man Josh Earnest said.
Even before the vote in Lon-
don, the U.S. was preparing to
act without formal authorization
from the United Nations, where
Russia has blocked efforts to
seek a resolution authorizing
the use of force, or from Capitol
Hill. But the U.S. had expected
Britain, a major
ally, to join in the
effort.
Top U.S. off-
cials spoke with
certain lawmak-
ers for more than
90 minutes in a
t el econference
Thursday eve-
ning to explain why they believe
Bashar Assad’s government was
the culprit in a suspected chem-
ical attack last week. Lawmak-
ers from both parties have been
pressing Obama to provide a le-
gal rationale for military action,
to specify objectives and to lay
out a frm case linking Assad to
the attack.
Afterward, the House Demo-
cratic leader, Rep. Nancy Pelosi
of California, pointedly sided with
Republican Speaker John Boeh-
ner of Ohio in urging the adminis-
tration to do more to engage with
Congress on the matter.
U.S. readies possible solo action against Syria
By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON —
Being short on cash may
make you a bit slower in
the brain, a new study sug-
gests.
People worrying about
having enough money to
pay their bills tend to lose
temporarily the equivalent
of 13 IQ points, scientists
found when they gave in-
telligence tests to shoppers
at a New Jersey mall and
farmers in India.
The idea is that fnancial
stress monopolizes think-
ing, making other calcula-
tions slower and more diff-
cult, sort of like the effects
of going without sleep for a
night.
And this money-and-
brain crunch applies, albe-
it to a smaller degree, to
about 100 million Amer-
icans who face fnancial
squeezes, say the team of
economists and psycholo-
gists who wrote the study
published in Friday’s issue
of the journal Science.
“Our paper isn’t about
poverty. It’s about people
struggling to make ends
meet,” said Sendhil Mul-
lainathan, a Harvard econ-
omist and study co-author.
“When we think about
people who are fnancially
stressed, we think they are
short on money, but the
truth is they are also short
on cognitive capacity.”
If you are always think-
ing about overdue bills, a
mortgage or rent, or col-
lege loans, it takes away
from your focus on other
things. So being late on
loans could end up costing
you both interest points
and IQ points, Mullaina-
than said.
The study used tests
that studied various as-
pects of thinking includ-
ing a traditional IQ test,
getting the 13 IQ point
drop, said study co-author
Jiaying Zhao, a professor
of psychology and sustain-
ability at the University of
British Columbia.
The scientists looked at
the effects of fnances on
the brain both in the lab and
in the feld. In controlled
lab-like conditions, they
had about 400 shoppers at
Quaker Bridge Mall in cen-
tral New Jersey consider
certain fnancial scenari-
os and tested their brain
power. Then they looked
at real life in the felds of
India, where farmers only
get paid once a year. Before
the harvest, they take out
loans and pawn goods. Af-
ter they sell their harvest,
they are fush with cash.
Mullainathan and col-
leagues tested the same
464 farmers before and
after the harvest and their
IQ scores improved by 25
percent when their wallets
fattened.
Financial stress may hit
your brain and wallet
AP Photo/Bernat Armangue
Israeli soldiers drive a tank at a staging area in the Golan Heights,
near the border between the Israeli-controlled Golan Heights
and Syria, Thursday. United Nations experts are investigating the
alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria as the United States and
allies prepare for the possibility of a punitive strike against Syrian
President Bashar Assad’s regime, blamed by the Syrian opposition
for the attack. The international aid group Doctors Without Borders
says at least 355 people were killed in the Aug. 21 attack.
Despite roadblocks in forming an
international coalition, Obama appeared
undeterred and advisers said he would be
willing to retaliate against Syria on his own
Obama
Study suggests worrying about
money causes people to temporarily
lose the equivalent of 13 IQ points
By JOAN LOWy
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Fed-
eral inspection teams have
been conducting spot safe-
ty checks of rail shipments
of crude oil from the boom-
ing Bakken oil region in
Great Plains states in re-
sponse to last month’s rail
disaster in Canada, U.S.
offcials said Thursday.
The offcial name of the
inspections is “Operation
Classifcation,” although
Cynthia Quarterman,
head of the Pipeline and
Hazardous Materials Safe-
ty Administration, said she
prefers to call them the
“Bakken Blitz.” They are
being carried out jointly
with the Federal Railroad
Administration and began
last weekend, although
they weren’t publicly dis-
closed until Thursday.
Last month, an unat-
tended train carrying oil
from the Bakken region
came loose and derailed,
sending tank cars hur-
tling into the center of
the lakeside Quebec town
of Lac-Megantic near the
Maine border.
New safety
inspection blitz
of oil shipments
launched
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 8A Friday, august 30, 2013
NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING
ON THE PROPOSED BUDGET AND
PROPOSED TAX LEVIES FOR THE
UPCOMING FISCAL YEAR FOR
THE CITY OF COLUMBUS
Te City of Columbus will hold a Public Hearing
on its proposed budget and proposed tax levies for
fscal year 2013-14 on Tuesday, September 3, 2013
at 5:00 p.m. in the Courtroom of the Columbus
Municipal Complex, located at 1501 Main Street in
Columbus, MS.
Te City of Columbus is now operating with
projected total budget revenue of $22,932,418. 22.4
percent or $5,140,000 of such revenue is obtained
through ad valorem taxes. For next fscal year,
the proposed budget has total projected revenue
of $22,864,570. Of that amount, 22.3 percent or
$5,106,000 is proposed to be fnanced through a
total ad valorem tax levy.
Te decision to not increase the ad valorem tax
millage rate for fscal year 2013-14 above the current
fscal year’s ad valorem tax millage rate means you
will not pay more in ad valorem taxes on your
home, automobile tag, utilities, business fxtures
and equipment and rental real property, unless the
assessed value of your property has increased for
fscal year 2013-14.
Any citizen of the City of Columbus is invited to
attend this Public Hearing on the proposed budget
and tax levies for fscal year 2013-14, and will be
allowed to speak for a reasonable amount of time
and ofer tangible evidence before any vote is taken.
w w w . m a k b c o . c o m
100 Russell Street • Suite 8
Starkville, MS • 662.323.5491
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Open carry
continued from Page 1a
they did not hear oral ar-
guments.
The main sponsor of
House Bill 2, Republi-
can Rep. Andy Gipson of
Braxton, said Thursday
that he’s pleased with the
justices’ unanimous rul-
ing.
“It just confrms, in a
very real sense, the right
to keep and bear arms,”
Gipson told The Associat-
ed Press.
Democratic Sen. John
Horhn of Jackson is one
of the 10 elected offcials
who sued to try to block
the law. Horhn voted for
House Bill 2 in the spring
but later said he regret-
ted that vote because he
believes the law could put
law enforcement offcers’
lives in danger if people
with no frearms training
are carrying guns.
“Not even the state Su-
preme Court in Mississip-
pi is free from the powers
of persuasion of the Na-
tional Rife Association,”
Horhn said after the rul-
ing Thursday.
NRA fled a legal brief
in support of the law.
Republican Bryant,
like many supporters of
the law, has said it re-
states the right to bear
arms that’s in the Missis-
sippi Constitution.
“I am very pleased that
the court has agreed that
House Bill 2 is consistent
with the Constitution so
that law will now take ef-
fect statewide,” Bryant
said in a news release
Thursday.
Attorney General Jim
Hood, a Democrat, de-
fended the open carry law
in court. Hood issued a
nonbinding legal opinion
June 13 that says guns can
still be banned in court-
houses and other public
buildings. At many plac-
es, including the Capitol,
courthouses, city halls
and public parks, offcials
have posted signs to show
that weapons are prohib-
ited.
Bryant has said he has
no argument with guns
being banned in govern-
ment buildings. Even with
the open carry law taking
effect, a previous state law
bans most guns on school
and college campuses.
Hood said a question
about another Mississippi
gun law still awaits reso-
lution.
A local school board
attorney has requested
an attorney general’s
opinion about enhanced
concealed carry permits
— the type of permit that
requires a person to un-
dergo frearms training.
Hood said a law specifes
that a person with an en-
hanced concealed carry
permit may take a fre-
arm to a sporting event.
He said that because the
enhanced concealed car-
ry law appears to confict
with another law that
bans guns on campus, his
staff is analyzing the law
to provide guidance on
whether schools or uni-
versities can prohibit all
frearms, even those car-
ried by someone with an
enhanced permit.
Opinions issued by the
attorney general’s offce
are nonbinding but pro-
vide guidance to govern-
ment bodies as they set
policies.
Yokohama
continued from Page 1a
Kajima Associates/
Architects & Engineers
out of Atlanta was select-
ed in July to oversee con-
struction of the project’s
frst phase. The frm has
not announced who it will
sub-contract for any of the
projects components.
In April, Yokohama
offcially entered a fnan-
cial partnership with the
state to construct the
four-phase plant in Clay
County. It is expected to
become fully operational
in 2023. The frst phase of
the plant is to provide 500
jobs.
Yokohama will invest
$1.2 billion — $300 million
for each phase — while
the state has committed
$130 million, including
$70 million in the form of
general obligation bonds
for the frst phase.
In the meantime, Yo-
kohama management
have located at the Thad
Cochran Research, Tech-
nology and Economic
Development Park at Mis-
sissippi State University
while the frst phase of
construction takes place.
The plant will be at the
Prairie Belt Powersite,
which the Link helped
develop prior to luring the
Japanese tire manufactur-
ing frm to Clay County.
Astrodome
continued from Page 1a
in 1965. Freshly out of
college, Jack Collins
and a few of his buddies
attended the frst-ever
college football game in
the Astrodome where
Mississippi State defeated
the University of Houston,
36-0.
“Everyone was excited
because the Astrodome
was like the frst indoor
place to watching a sport-
ing event,” Collins said.
“It was a new idea and a
new concept, so every-
body was pretty wide-
eyed. Obviously, stadiums
have come a long way
since then.
“I remember going
to the game more than
a lot of others because it
was the frst time to play
indoors like that. It was a
new experience.”
The game, played on
Sept. 18, 1965, was just
the second college game
playing in the facility. Tul-
sa had beaten Houston,
14-0, there a week earlier.
Late in the MSU victo-
ry over Houston, Bull-
dogs’ back-up quarter-
back Bill Buckner entered
the contest and threw
two touchdown passes,
the frst TD passes ever
thrown at the Astrodome.
Johnny Buckner —
younger brother of Bill
Buckner and one of fve
Buckner brothers —
attended the game as an
8-year-old.
“He had a great ca-
reer,” said Johnny Buck-
ner, who is now the pastor
at New Horizons Fellow-
ship Church in Starkville.
“I remember people
shouting out ‘Buckner,
Buckner, Buckner’ to get
him in because they loved
to see him throw.”
Bill Buckner was a
high school classmate
and longtime friend of
former MSU athletic
director Larry Temple-
ton. The two went to
Starkville High School
together. There was a
brief parting of the ways
when Buckner played and
starred for two seasons
at East Mississippi Junior
College. Templeton, who
was a student worker in
the athletic department
at MSU, helped recruit
Buckner back to play at
MSU.
“Bill was a standout
athlete,” Templeton said.
“He had a great career
at East Mississippi. That
is why there was a lot of
excitement when he came
to MSU.”
Buckner threw 47
touchdown passes in
two seasons under the
legendary East Missis-
sippi coach Bob “Bull”
Sullivan. Prior to the 2011
national championship
team, the 1963 Lions were
considered the school’s
best team.
After one season at
MSU, Buckner trans-
ferred to Delta State
University to complete his
career. Buckner earned
team MVP honors at
Starkville High, EMJC
and Delta State.
Buckner joined the
Mississippi Sports Hall
of Fame earlier this year.
Previously, he was induct-
ed into the Mississippi
Community College Hall
of Fame, the Delta State
Hall of Fame and the East
Mississippi Community
College Hall of Fame.
“Bill had tremendous
arm and had a great
career on many different
levels,” Mississippi Hall of
Fame executive director
Rick Cleveland said. “The
frst touchdown (at the
Astrodome) is just part
of his lore. And after his
playing career, he kept
giving back to the game.
That is quite a compli-
ment to the type of person
he was.”
Buckner, who was
recently diagnosed with
leukemia, was taken in
the 1967 National Football
League draft by the Atlan-
ta Falcons. His profession-
al career included leading
the Huntsville Hawks of
the Continental Foot-
ball League to division
championships in 1968
and 1969.
Buckner’s 20-year
coaching career included
stints as a head and assis-
tant coach in both high
school and junior college.
Buckner coached at
Starkville High and Kos-
ciusko High, before later
becoming head coach
at both East Mississippi
and Hinds Junior College.
The coaching career also
included stints at MSU
and Delta State.
After his coaching
career ended, Buckner
spent 25 years as the state
director of the Fellowship
of Christian Athletes.
With the assistance of
legendary Delta State
baseball coach Boo
Ferriss, Buckner helped
organize the original
FCA chapter on the MSU
campus.
“I was tickled to death
for him (about his selec-
tion to the Mississippi
Sports Hall of Fame),”
Templeton said. “It’s a
big honor for him and his
family.”
Follow Dispatch sports
reporter Scott Walters on
Twitter at @dispatchscott.
Festival
continued from Page 1a
sissippi,” he said. “And
we’re going to set Missis-
sippi on fre for what it’s
known for.”
The festival Ramsey
organizes is named for
Howlin’ Wolf, a legend-
ary blues performer born
Chester Arthur Bennett
in West Point in 1910.
Ramsey operates a mu-
seum dedicated to Wolf,
who gained worldwide
fame during his career,
on Westbrook Street. The
museum is open today
from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The performers slat-
ed to take the stage to-
night in West Point in-
clude Mark “Muleman”
Massey with organist
Billy Earheart, who
played with Hank Wil-
liams Jr.; Ben Prestage, a
one-man band who plays
four instruments at once;
Homemade Jamz, a trio
from Tupelo consisting of
three siblings; and New
Orleans musician Bry-
an Lee, who is known as
“the Braille blues daddy.”
Ramsey said the fact
that the Howlin’ Wolf Me-
morial Blues Festival is
taking place inside with
air conditioning is rare
for Mississippi blues fes-
tivals. He then added,
“That doesn’t hamper
our ability to have a good
time.”
A guitar will be raf-
fed off during the show.
Food and drinks will be
served.
Asked what type of
crowd he expects, Ram-
sey laughed and said he
knows elementary-aged
children are coming and
he also knows an 84-year-
old is going to be in the
crowd.
“We don’t discrimi-
nate,” he said. “The blues
knows no boundaries and
that’s what we are about.”
As for the single best
location to watch the
show, it’s already taken.
“I’m the M.C.,” Ram-
sey said. “I’ve got the
best seat in the house.”
On Saturday in West
Point the Prairie Arts
Festival will take place
in West Point. About 300
fne arts, crafts and food
vendors will be open to
the public from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. There will be live
music all day, a 5K run/
walk in the morning (reg-
istration begins at 7 a.m.
at 510 E. Broad St.), a car
show and other attrac-
tions.
For more information
on the Prairie Arts Fes-
tival go to wpnet.org/
wp_paf.htm.
For more information
on the Howlin’ Wolf Me-
morial Blues Festival go
to wpnet.org/Howlin_
Festival.htm.
When was the last time you picked up a piece of litter?
BY SCOTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
POPLARVILLE — A.J.
Stamps spent the past
nine months learning a
new position.
The East Mississippi
Community College soph-
omore defensive back
proved Thursday night at
Dobie Holden Stadium he
could be pretty good at it.
Once signed to play
wide receiver, Stamps
showed his pass-catching
abilities on the defensive
side, with a game-clinch-
ing 100-yard interception
return during No. 8 EM-
CC’s 49-6 season-opening
victory against Peal River
C.C.
“I knew what to do
when I caught that ball,”
BY TERESA M. WALKER
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
— University of Missis-
sippi football coach Hugh
Freeze may have a high-
ly-rated crop of freshmen
to coach. Senior Jeff Scott
made sure his new team-
mates left their frst col-
lege game as winners.
Jeff Scott ran 75 yards
for a touchdown with 1
minute, 7 seconds left,
and Ole Miss rallied twice
Thursday night to beat
Vanderbilt University 39-
35 in a wild season opener
for both teams.
Vanderbilt went up 35-
32 on a 34-yard TD pass
from Austyn Carta-Sam-
uels to Steven Scheu with
1:30 left. But Scott beat
the Commodores for a TD
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
BATESVILLE — If
someone who had never
seen a football game just
happened to be at South
Panola High School on
Thursday, they still would
have noticed two special
tailbacks.
South Panola High’s
Darrell Henderson and
West Point High’s Aeris
Williams combined for
10 touchdowns in a back-
and-forth thriller between
two of the state of Missis-
sippi’s traditional powers.
Henderson, who said
after the game he had
“screwed up pretty bad”
last week, proved he be-
longed in the same cat-
egory with Williams, a
Mississippi State Univer-
sity verbal commitment,
in a 55-33 victory. The
5-foot-9 junior had 18
carries for 184 yards on
18 carries and six touch-
downs (four rushing, a
5-yard touchdown pass
from Rip Kirk, and a 65-
yard kickoff return).
“Once I got the frst
touchdown, I knew I
could break free all night
because my offensive line
created big holes against
a physical West Point
team,” Henderson said.
Henderson showed his
explosiveness by touch-
ing the ball four times
and scoring three touch-
downs and going for a
frst down.
As well as Hender-
son played, South Pano-
la coach Lance Pogue
praised Williams, West
Point’s senior workhorse.
“Aeris Williams is the
best running back I’ve
faced in my 21 years of
coaching football, and
I just think in a career
night, my guy showed
he’s a playmaker, too,”
Pogue said. “Henderson
is so dynamic and dan-
gerous with the ball in his
hands, and we had to just
smarten up as coaches
and make sure he got the
football.”
Williams, arguably
the most heralded se-
nior running back in the
state, simply ran through
a nine-man front en route
to a 31-carry, 181-yard
performance. He had
touchdown runs of 50, 38,
5, and 1 yards.
“I’m so proud of my
offensive line and whole
team for not giving up and
fghting with a lot of heart
and courage,” Williams
said. “When I produce big
runs, it’s a team effort of
guys up front doing their
job. If we continue to pay
hard and get better, we’ll
be really tough later in
the season.”
In the second half,
West Point coach Chris
Chambless tried to rally
the Green Wave by lining
Williams up in the Wild-
cat formation so he could
take the snap.
“I don’t like running
him as much as I did to-
night because we have a
season to play, and I can’t
do that to him much more
this season,” Chambless
said. “He’s a warrior for
us, though, and we know
we can always make plays
when he has the football.”
Williams had 114 yards
in a second half that saw
West Point (0-1) score
on back-to-back drives
to cut its defcit to 41-33
with 3 minutes, 16 sec-
onds remaining. In the
fourth quarter, Williams
touched the ball 11 of 15
times and gained positive
yardage on every play.
“I don’t see it as I’m
taking over a game or
I’m taking this team on
my back,” Williams said.
“I see it as 11 guys doing
their job better than we
had all night. When it was
41-33, if we could’ve got-
ten the ball back again,
I believe we would’ve
scored.”
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013
College Football
See EMCC, 4B
See OLE MISS, 4B
See WEST POINT, 2B
Mississippi State University vs. Oklahoma State University, 2:30 p.m., Saturday
Keys to
the Game
Perkins Jones
MSU Players to Watch
nLaDarius Perkins,
Sr., RB: The Greenville
native leads arguably the
deepest MSU backfeld in
recent history. Perkins was
also named to the 2013
preseason All-Southeastern
Conference second team
as voted on by the record
243 voters at SEC Media
Days. Already a preseason
All-SEC pick by Athlon
Sports, The Birmingham
News and Phil Steele,
Perkins fnished second in
the league last season in
all-purpose yards per game
(125.8) and became the
ninth player in MSU history
to rush for 1,000 yards in
a single season (1,024).
2.
nCan Mississippi State
University get pressure on
the quarterback?: Geoff
Collins was promoted to full
defensive coordinator duties
to specifcally get players to
put the quarterback on the
ground. If his “juice” and
“mayhem” defense can’t get
confusing looks from whoever
is playing quarterback at
Oklahoma State, everything
else in the play will likely be
bad for the Bulldogs.
With frst-year OSU offensive
coordinator Mike Yurcich
arriving from Shippensburg
University in Shippensburg,
Pa., Collins may need to
adjust on the fy during
the game to whatever new
wrinkle the Cowboys coaching
staff has as they juggle the
two signal callers.
“They have one quarterback
that makes great decisions
and another one that can
run really well with a good
accurate arm,” Collins said.
“(Defensive line coach)
David Turner does a great job
coaching his group up but the
key will be pressure in that
pocket. We have to get that
quarterback moving in a way
he doesn’t want to.”
nWho wins tempo
battle?: When asked
Monday, Mississippi
State University offensive
coordinator Les Koenning
admitted he can’t be too
intensely focused on trying
to win the tempo battle even
against a fast paced passing
offense such as Oklahoma
State University on Saturday
in the 2013 Texas Kickoff
Classic in Houston. Last
season Oklahoma State
relied on the big play by
averaging the nation’s fourth-
most total yards per game
with 547 yards per contest
but was 113th of 124
Division I schools in time of
possession.
Former MSU quarterback
Matt Wyatt, who is a radio
co-host of the Head to Head
program on 100.9, said
Wednesday if the Bulldogs
punt more than “three or four
times” they’ll lose.
“You don’t know when those
opportunities in a game
are going to come about for
you to score so you want to
score,” Koenning said. “Is
there a need to slow things
down? You would say yes but
it’s not one of these deals
where I don’t want to score
until a certain amount of time
has passed.”
1.
5.
nDoes MSU QB Tyler
Russell develop chemistry
with his receivers?: MSU
new wide receivers coach
Billy Gonzales has looked
at the statistics from the
returning players at his
position group and it’s not a
pretty picture to view. Of the
28 touchdown catches from
2012, Perkins, junior wide
receiver Robert Johnson and
senior tight end Malcolm
Johnson tied with two.
Russell conducted daily
pitch-and-catch sessions
in the sweltering heat of
Starkville summer months
to help the new and
inexperienced wide receivers
start understanding the
nuances of the system.
By Matt Stevens
n
mstevens@cdispatch.com
4.
nDoes MSU’s secondary
grow up against OSU’s “Air-
Raid offense?: While it’s
a legit concern and worry
for MSU fans, the players
wearing maroon and white
in the secondary are fed up
listening to analysts break
down how they match up with
OSU. They’re tired of hearing
about the Cowboys’ high
octane, tempo pass offense
facing a youthful MSU
defensive backfeld. They’re
mad at what they perceive
the disrespect they’re getting.
In short, they’re ready – or at
least they think they’re ready.
“Everybody has been saying
we’re the weakest part of
the defense or the team,
and we’re not trying to hear
that,” Mississippi State junior
safety Jay Hughes said.
nHow many touches does
MSU running back LaDarius
Perkins get?: MSU coach
Dan Mullen and his coaches
have decided to become a lot
more sabermetric with their
offense. The “Moneyball”
system revolves around the
touches for Perkins. This is
why the player, who could
likely go down as the second-
most prolifc rusher in MSU
history, is being considered
for punt return duty. “The big
issue when you start getting
into SEC play is changing
the feld position,” Koenning
said. “If we can sustain those
long drives and get in the end
zone, that’s the goal right
there. Do we want big plays?
Yes, but we have to put in
our guys hands and make
sure they can do something
positive with it.”
3.
nTV: WKDH-WTVA / ESPN2
nRADIO: WWZQ-AM 1240, WAMY-AM 1580, WKBB-FM 100.9,
WXWX-FM 96.3, WLSM-FM 1071, WFCA 107.9 FM
On The Air
nChris Jones, Fr., DL: Fans
should watch where the fve-
star freshman sensation
lines up — at defensive end
or defensive tackle. At 305
pounds, Jones has grown
to the size of being able
to handle either position
on the MSU defensive line
and when asked if he’ll be
moved around in his frst
college football game, MSU
defensive coordinator Geoff
Collins was more than coy.
“Never know,” Collins
said. “I guess we will know
Saturday.”respond naturally
knowing it’s about them going
out and playing smart.”
Prep Football
Henderson, Williams run wild in So. Panola’s win against West Point
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
West Point High School senior running back Aeris
Williams rushed for four touchdowns Thursday in a
season-opening loss to South Panola High in Batesville.
Mitch Deaver/Special to The Dispatch
East Mississippi Community College running back
Lakenderic Thomas, of West Point, steps to the outside
Thursday against Pearl River Central C.C.
David Allen Williams/Special to The Dispatch
University of Mississippi running back Jeff Scott had
the game-winning touchdown in the fnal minutes
Thursday to lift the Rebels past Vanderbilt University.
grEaT SCOTT
Late score lifts Ole Miss past Vanderbilt
EMCC rolls to victory
But a fatigued West Point de-
fense couldn’t stop Henderson from
scampering 68 yards for a touch-
down on the Tigers’ next offensive
play to end West Point’s chances.
“We wanted to throw it early and
try to get their big people moving side
to side so we could wear them down
in the second half,” said Pogue, whose
Mississippi High School Activities As-
sociation defending Class 6A champi-
ons improved to 2-0.
Henderson said he took the
matchup between South Panola’s
rushing attack and West Point’s de-
fensive front personally.
“I didn’t care for people saying
they were so big and physical and
they would overpower us,” Hen-
derson said. “My teammates and I
needed to come out and punch them
in the mouth, and that’s exactly
what we did.”
After the game started with six-
straight possessions that produced
one frst down, South Panola put up
its highest point total since beat-
ing Tupelo 56-14 on Oct. 14, 2011.
Chambless addressed his team’s de-
fensive effort after the game, saying
he wasn’t concerned with the late
scores the host Tigers tacked on.
“Everybody is going to freak out
about the points given up and jump
off the bandwagon, but I believe in
these kids and stick with us folks,”
Prep Football
Today’s Games
Columbus at Noxubee County, 7 p.m.
(WMSV-FM 91.1)
Aberdeen at New Hope, 7 p.m.
(WWZQ-AM 1240, WAMY-AM 1540)
Oxford at Starkville, 7 p.m. (WKBB-FM 100.9)
Hamilton at Caledonia, 7 p.m.
Amory at Senatobia, 7 p.m. (WAFM-FM 95.7)
Wilkinson County at Louisville, 7 p.m.
East Webster at Noxapater, 7 p.m.
Heritage Academy at West Lowndes, 7 p.m.
(WiFi Sports Network, go to HeritagePatriots.
com to click link)
Immanuel Christian at Winona Christian, 7 p.m.
East Rankin Academy at Starkville Acad. 7 p.m.
(WLZA-FM 96.1)
Oak Hill Academy at Marshall Academy, 7 p.m.
Hebron Christian at Humphreys Academy, 7 p.m.
Central Academy at Strider Academy, 7 p.m.
Lamar School at Winston Academy, 7 p.m.
New Life at Victory Christian, 7 p.m.
South Lamar at Lamar County, 7 p.m.
(WJEC-FM 106.1)
Pickens County at Fayette County, 7 p.m.
Pickens Academy at Sparta Academy, 7 p.m.
NOTE: WJEC-FM 106.1 in West Alabama will
broadcast games featuring teams in Lamar
County, Ala. each week. WNMQ-FM 103.1 (The
Team) will broadcast West Point High games,
while WMSV-FM 91.1 will broadcast Columbus
High games. It was unknown at press time if
WTWG-AM 1050 was going to broadcast New
Hope High games this season.
High School Football Radio Scoreboard Shows
The following stations will broadcast high school
football scoreboard/call-in shows each week
during the season:
n Miss 98 Scoreboard Show
Hosted by Neal McCoy and Adam Gore
WWMS-FM 97.5 — 10-11 p.m.
nThe Friday Night Scoreboard Show
Hosted by Jason Crowder
WFCA-FM 107.9 — 10-11:30 p.m. (The fnal 30
minutes will be devoted to college football.)
nFriday Night Under the Lights
Hosted by Russ Robinson and Jay White
(Video simulcast available at www.fnutl.com)
WMAB-FM 89.9 10 p.m.-Midnight
nMississippi Network Scoreboard Show
Hosted by Dixon Williams
WKBB-FM 100.9 — 10 p.m.-Midnight
High School Football Television Scoreboard Shows
nWCBI (CBS), WTVA (NBC), and WLOV (FOX)
will have shows dedicated to prep football each
week. WCBI’s EndZone show and WTVA/WLOV’s
Friday Night Fever will follow the nightly newscast.
Prep Volleyball
Saturday’s Matches
Heritage Academy at Jackson Academy
Tournament
College Football
Saturday’s Games
MSU vs. Oklahoma State (Houston), 2:30 p.m.
Alabama vs. Virginia Tech (Atlanta), 4:30 p.m.
Texas State at Southern Miss, 6 p.m.
College Soccer
Today’s Matches
MSU vs. Florida Atlantic (Fort Myers), 4 p.m.
Northwestern State at Ole Miss, 7 p.m.
Georgia State at Alabama, 7 p.m.
Arkansas-Pine Bluff at Southern Miss, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s match
Mississippi State at Florida Gulf Coast, noon
Sunday’s matches
Southeastern Louisiana at Southern Miss, 1 p.m.
Mercer at Alabama, 7 p.m.
Ole Miss at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
College Volleyball
Today’s matches
Alabama vs. Seton Hall (West Point, NY), 11 a.m.
Southeast Missouri at Mississippi State, 1 p.m.
Ole Miss vs. UMBC (Washington), 4 p.m.
UALR at Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Jackson State at Southern Miss, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Matches
UALR at Mississippi State, 1 p.m.
Southeast Missouri at Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Junior College Soccer
Today’s Matches
Women: Itawamba at Jones, 5 p.m.
Men: Itawamba at Jones, 7 p.m.
CALENDAR
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 2B Friday, august 30, 2013
Baseball
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 79 56 .585 —
Tampa Bay 75 57 .568 2½
Baltimore 71 61 .538 6½
New York 70 63 .526 8
Toronto 60 74 .448 18½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 78 56 .582 —
Cleveland 71 62 .534 6½
Kansas City 69 64 .519 8½
Minnesota 57 75 .432 20
Chicago 56 76 .424 21
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 78 55 .586 —
Oakland 75 58 .564 3
Los Angeles 60 72 .455 17½
Seattle 60 73 .451 18
Houston 44 89 .331 34
Thursday’s Games
Detroit 7, Oakland 6
Kansas City 3, Minnesota 1
L.A. Angels 2, Tampa Bay 0
Baltimore 3, Boston 2
Atlanta 3, Cleveland 1
Seattle 3, Houston 2
Today’s Games
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 8-6) at N.Y. Yankees
(Sabathia 11-11), 6:05 p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 8-7) at Toronto
(Buehrle 10-7), 6:07 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 7-7) at Detroit (Porcello
10-7), 6:08 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 4-7) at Boston
(Dempster 6-9), 6:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Hendriks 0-2) at Texas (Darvish
12-5), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 8-7) at Milwaukee
(W.Peralta 8-13), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Walker 0-0) at Houston (Peacock 3-4),
7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 8-5) at Oakland (J.Parker
10-6), 9:05 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Baltimore (Feldman 4-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova
7-4), 12:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 13-10) at Toronto (Dickey
10-12), 12:07 p.m.
Cleveland (Kazmir 7-6) at Detroit (Ani.Sanchez
11-7), 6:08 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 4-10) at Boston
(Peavy 10-5), 6:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Williams 5-10) at Milwaukee
(Estrada 6-4), 6:10 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 10-13) at Houston
(Keuchel 5-7), 6:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 5-10) at Texas (Garza 3-2),
7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 8-2) at Oakland (Gray 1-2),
8:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Baltimore (W.Chen 7-7) at N.Y. Yankees
(P.Hughes 4-13), 12:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 9-8) at Toronto (Happ
3-4), 12:07 p.m.
Cleveland (Salazar 1-2) at Detroit (Verlander
12-10), 12:08 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 1-0) at Boston
(Doubront 10-6), 12:35 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 13-6) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 9-8), 1:10 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 12-6) at Houston
(Oberholtzer 3-1), 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 8-10) at Texas (Blackley
2-1), 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 6-13) at Oakland
(Griffin 11-9), 3:05 p.m.
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 81 52 .609 —
Washington 68 65 .511 13
Philadelphia 61 73 .455 20½
New York 60 72 .455 20½
Miami 49 83 .371 31½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 78 55 .586 —
Pittsburgh 77 56 .579 1
Cincinnati 75 59 .560 3½
Milwaukee 59 74 .444 19
Chicago 56 77 .421 22
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 78 55 .586 —
Arizona 68 64 .515 9½
Colorado 63 72 .467 16
San Diego 60 73 .451 18
San Francisco 59 74 .444 19
Thursday’s Games
N.Y. Mets 11, Philadelphia 3
Washington 9, Miami 0
Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 0
Atlanta 3, Cleveland 1
Today’s Games
Philadelphia (Halladay 3-4) at Chicago Cubs
(Samardzija 8-11), 1:20 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 9-9) at Washington
(Zimmermann 15-7), 6:05 p.m.
St. Louis (S.Miller 12-8) at Pittsburgh (Liriano
14-6), 6:05 p.m.
Miami (Fernandez 10-5) at Atlanta (Teheran
10-7), 6:30 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 8-7) at Milwaukee
(W.Peralta 8-13), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 13-9) at Colorado (Manship
0-4), 7:40 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 7-13) at Arizona
(Delgado 4-4), 8:40 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 8-11) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu
12-5), 9:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 11-6) at Chicago Cubs
(Rusin 2-3), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 6-3) at Washington
(Haren 8-11), 6:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 13-8) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett
6-9), 6:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Williams 5-10) at Milwaukee
(Estrada 6-4), 6:10 p.m.
Miami (Ja.Turner 3-5) at Atlanta (Minor 13-5),
6:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (G.Reynolds 0-2) at Colorado
(J.De La Rosa 14-6), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 3-4) at Arizona
(Cahill 5-10), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 8-8) at L.A. Dodgers
(Capuano 4-7), 8:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
St. Louis (J.Kelly 6-3) at Pittsburgh
(Undecided), 12:35 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 13-6) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 9-8), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 10-11) at Chicago
Cubs (Arrieta 1-1), 1:20 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 11-5) at Colorado (Nicasio
8-6), 3:10 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 3-7) at L.A. Dodgers
(Greinke 13-3), 3:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 4-10) at Arizona (Corbin
13-4), 3:10 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 2-5) at Atlanta (A.Wood 3-2),
4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 6-6) at Washington
(Ohlendorf 3-0), 7:05 p.m.
Basketball
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
x-Chicago 20 8 .714 —
Atlanta 14 12 .538 5
Washington 14 15 .483 6½
Indiana 12 15 .444 7½
New York 11 17 .393 9
Connecticut 7 21 .250 13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
x-Minnesota 21 7 .750 —
x-Los Angeles 20 8 .714 1
Phoenix 14 13 .519 6½
Seattle 15 14 .517 6½
San Antonio 10 18 .357 11
Tulsa 9 19 .321 12
x-clinched playoff spot
Thursday’s Game
Seattle 78, Connecticut 65
Today’s Games
Indiana at New York, 6:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Tulsa, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Atlanta at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Connecticut at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Football
NFL preseason
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 3 1 0 .750 93 103
N.Y. Jets 3 1 0 .750 105 80
Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 84 101
Miami 2 3 0 .400 104 89
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 3 1 0 .750 98 67
Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 77 89
Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 90 89
Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 60 111
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 106 63
Cleveland 3 1 0 .750 75 68
Baltimore 2 2 0 .500 119 97
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 56 93
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 2 2 0 .500 71 104
Kansas City 2 2 0 .500 82 60
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 101
San Diego 1 3 0 .250 68 112
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 4 0 0 1.000 106 53
Philadelphia 2 2 0 .500 87 91
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 78 93
N.Y. Giants 1 3 0 .250 71 85
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 3 1 0 .750 97 80
Carolina 3 1 0 .750 92 68
Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 66 115
Atlanta 0 4 0 .000 65 108
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 3 1 0 .750 107 63
Chicago 2 2 0 .500 100 96
Green Bay 1 3 0 .250 37 71
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 67 104
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 0 0 1.000 110 36
Arizona 3 1 0 .750 68 55
San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 96 43
St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 76 94
Thursday’s Games
Cincinnati 27, Indianapolis 10
Detroit 35, Buffalo 13
N.Y. Jets 27, Philadelphia 20
Miami 24, New Orleans 21
Washington 30, Tampa Bay 12
Jacksonville 20, Atlanta 16
New England 28, N.Y. Giants 20
Carolina 25, Pittsburgh 10
Minnesota 24, Tennessee 23
Cleveland 18, Chicago 16
Kansas City 30, Green Bay 8
Houston 24, Dallas 6
St. Louis 24, Baltimore 21
Arizona 32, Denver 24
Seattle 22, Oakland 6
San Francisco 41, San Diego 6
CFL
EAST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Toronto 5 3 0 10 244 206
Hamilton 4 4 0 8 203 219
Montreal 3 5 0 6 195 239
Winnipeg 1 7 0 2 167 247
WEST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Saskatchewan 7 1 0 14 264 177
Calgary 6 2 0 12 258 200
B.C. 5 3 0 10 207 203
Edmonton 1 7 0 2 188 235
Today’s Game
Hamilton at B.C., 9 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Winnipeg at Saskatchewan, 3 p.m.
Monday’s Game
Edmonton at Calgary, 4 p.m.
Tuesday’s Game
Montreal at Toronto, 6:30 p.m.
Soccer
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 12 7 5 41 41 35
New York 11 9 6 39 38 34
Sporting K.C. 11 9 6 39 36 26
Philadelphia 10 8 8 38 37 37
New England 10 9 6 36 34 24
Houston 10 8 6 36 29 28
Chicago 10 10 4 34 30 34
Columbus 8 12 5 29 29 34
Toronto FC 4 12 9 21 22 34
D.C. 3 17 5 14 15 41
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 13 8 6 45 48 33
Los Angeles 12 9 4 40 40 32
Portland 9 4 12 39 37 26
Colorado 10 7 9 39 33 27
FC Dallas 9 7 10 37 36 38
Seattle 11 8 4 37 31 26
Vancouver 10 9 6 36 36 33
San Jose 9 10 7 34 28 37
Chivas USA 5 14 6 21 24 45
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Today’s Games
New England at Toronto FC, 7 p.m.
Portland at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Seattle FC at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
D.C. United at New York, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 1
Houston at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Chivas USA at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
National Women’s
Soccer League
Championship
Saturday’s Game
Portland vs. Sky Blue FC, 7 p.m.
PGA European Wales Open
At Twenty Ten course at Celtic Manor, Newport, Wales
Purse: $2.8 millionYardage: 7,378; Par: 71
First Round
Espen Kofstad, Norway ...........................................................................................35-29—64
Chris Wood, England .............................................................................................. 34-32—66
Richard Green, Australia.........................................................................................33-33—66
Mark Foster, England ..............................................................................................33-34—67
Tjaart Van Der Walt, South Africa .......................................................................... 36-31—67
Gregory Bourdy, France ..........................................................................................34-33—67
Emiliano Grillo, Argentina ....................................................................................... 36-32—68
Robert Rock, England ............................................................................................. 36-32—68
Mikko Ilonen, Finland .............................................................................................. 38-31—69
Peter Uihlein, United States .................................................................................... 37-32—69
Maximilian Kieffer, Germany................................................................................... 32-37—69
Robert Coles, England ............................................................................................35-34—69
Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark .......................................................................................35-34—69
Liam Bond, Wales....................................................................................................33-36—69
Paul McGinley, Ireland ............................................................................................ 36-34—70
Gregory Havret, France ...........................................................................................33-37—70
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, Spain ...................................................................... 35-35—70
Simon Wakefield, England ...................................................................................... 34-36—70
Alessandro Tadini, Italy ............................................................................................37-33—70
Ricardo Santos, Portugal ........................................................................................ 38-32—70
Damien McGrane, Ireland ....................................................................................... 35-35—70
Keith Horne, South Africa ....................................................................................... 34-36—70
Raphael Jacquelin, France ..................................................................................... 34-36—70
Christian Cevaer, France .........................................................................................37-33—70
Callum Macaulay, Scotland .................................................................................... 35-35—70
David Drysdale, Scotland ....................................................................................... 36-34—70
LPGA Tour Safeway Classic
At Columbia Edgewater Country Club, Portland, Ore.
Purse: $1.3 million / Yardage: 6,475; Par 72 (36-36)
First Round
a-denotes amateur
Pornanong Phatlum ................................................................................................. 32-32—64
Lexi Thompson ........................................................................................................ 33-32—65
Sandra Gal ............................................................................................................... 34-32—66
Cristie Kerr ...............................................................................................................33-33—66
Lizette Salas ............................................................................................................ 34-32—66
Heather Bowie Young ..............................................................................................34-33—67
Austin Ernst .............................................................................................................33-34—67
Juli Inkster ................................................................................................................34-33—67
Eun-Hee Ji ...............................................................................................................33-34—67
Ilhee Lee ..................................................................................................................34-33—67
Stacy Lewis ..............................................................................................................33-34—67
Mo Martin .................................................................................................................33-34—67
Sydnee Michaels ..................................................................................................... 35-32—67
Ai Miyazato ..............................................................................................................34-33—67
Se Ri Pak .................................................................................................................34-33—67
Gerina Piller ............................................................................................................. 36-31—67
Sarah Jane Smith ....................................................................................................34-33—67
Yani Tseng ...............................................................................................................33-34—67
Michelle Wie ............................................................................................................ 32-35—67
Chie Arimura ............................................................................................................34-34—68
Karlin Beck ............................................................................................................... 32-36—68
Dori Carter ...............................................................................................................33-35—68
Sandra Changkija ....................................................................................................33-35—68
Paz Echeverria ........................................................................................................34-34—68
Natalie Gulbis .......................................................................................................... 32-36—68
Sarah Kemp .............................................................................................................35-33—68
Brittany Lang ...........................................................................................................34-34—68
Pernilla Lindberg .....................................................................................................34-34—68
a-Kristina Merkle .....................................................................................................33-35—68
Jane Park .................................................................................................................33-35—68
Suzann Pettersen ....................................................................................................33-35—68
Jiyai Shin ..................................................................................................................35-33—68
Amy Yang ..................................................................................................................31-37—68
Sun Young Yoo ........................................................................................................33-35—68
Nicole Castrale ........................................................................................................36-33—69
Jodi Ewart Shadoff ..................................................................................................33-36—69
Thursday’s Golf Scores
Football: NFL
By HOWARD FENDRICH
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — They were Hall of Famers
like Tony Dorsett, Super Bowl MVPs like
Mark Rypien, and longtime backups like Don
Strock.
In all, more than 4,500 retired players
began suing the NFL two years ago, saying
the league concealed what it knew about the
long-term dangers of concussions and did not
properly care for the head injuries that were
long an accepted part of the game.
Under a tentative settlement announced
Thursday, the NFL agreed to shell out more
than three-quarters of a billion dollars, near-
ly all going to any former players — not just
those who went to court — with dementia or
other concussion-related health problems,
even if the cause was not the very on-feld vi-
olence that fueled professional football’s rise
in popularity and proft.
The deal stipulates that it is not to be con-
sidered an admission of liability by the NFL.
“It’s a good day because we’re getting help
for those who need help,” Rypien told The
Associated Press, “and a sad day, because we
didn’t get this done earlier to help guys in the
past.”
Rypien had two diagnosed concussions
during 11 seasons as a quarterback in the
NFL, including a championship with the
Washington Redskins in 1992.
“I’m relieved; I don’t know about pleased.
There are probably too many details to work
through that we don’t all understand yet,
quite frankly,” said Rypien, who has dealt
with depression and diffculty remembering
conversations. “But I’m relieved that both
sides came together to protect the game we
all love and help the players of the past and
tomorrow. And to especially help those who
League set to pay
more than $750M
to settle lawsuits
See LAWSUIT, 5B
bRiEFLy
Local
Starkville volleyball beats New Hope
Khris Carr had eight kills, four blocks, and six digs Thursday
night to lead the Starkville High School volleyball team to a 3-2
victory against New Hope. Set scores were 25-22, 10-25, 25-13,
22-25, 15-8.
Vicky Vo had two aces, 13 assists, and two digs, April Reese
had five kills and three digs, Allie Wilson had five digs, Tanita
Thompson had three aces and two kills, Kayla Minor had five aces,
one kill, and four blocks, and Courtney Wilson had four aces and
three digs for the Lady Yellow Jackets (3-1 regular season).
The Starkville High junior varsity team improved to 4-0 with
a 2-1 victory against New Hope. Set scores were 11-25, 25-16,
16-14.
Caledonia softball team loses to Kosciusko, beats
Leake Central
Emily Hicks, Alex Burns, Nicole Kifer, and Holli Carter had sin-
gles Thursday, but the Caledonia High School slow-pitch softball
team lost to Kosciusko 4-3.
The Lady Confederates gave up four runs in the first inning,
but their defense held the rest of the way and played another
strong game, according to coach Robin Elmore.
On Tuesday, Alex Burns singled and Stephanie Wilkes singled
to help Caledonia defeat Leake Central 2-1 in nine innings.
Caledonia was losing 1-0 until the bottom of the seventh
inning when it tied the game and forced extra innings.
“It was a great defensive effort,” Elmore said. “I have never
seen the kids play with so much heart and desire.”
Makayla Taylor had a single, Lauren Duckworth had two
singles, and Hope Harbin (winning pitcher) had three singles.
In the junior varsity game, Duckworth had a home run in a 5-4
victory against Leake Central.
MSU
Women’s soccer teams goes to Florida for Embassy
Suites Classic
FORT MYERS, Fla. — The Mississippi State University
women’s soccer team will kick off a four-game road trip at 3:30
p.m. today with a match against Florida Atlantic University in the
Embassy Suites Classic hosted by Florida Gulf Coast University.
MSU (1-1) will play FGCU at noon Sunday.
n Volleyball team opens season with Maroon Classic: At
Starkville, the volleyball team will begin its 39th season at 1 p.m.
today with a match against Southeast Missouri State in its first
match in the Maroon Classic at the Newell-Grissom Building
MSU will continue play in the two-day event with a match at 7
tonight against the University of Arkansas-Little Rock.
MSU will play UALR at 1 p.m. and SEMO at 7 p.m. Saturday,
while SEMO and UALR will only play once at 4 p.m. today.
Admission to all volleyball matches is free. Schedule posters
and cards will also be available at each of this weekend’s matches.
n Women’s basketball team finalizes 2013-14 schedule:
At Starkville, a 15-game non-conference slate will provide the
ideal build-up to a challenging 16-game Southeastern Conference
slate for the women’s basketball team in 2013-14.
MSU’s schedule includes 18 home dates, with 10 of those
coming in the non-conference.
The schedule for second-year coach Vic Schaefer’s squad
holds 16 potential opponents that advanced to the postseason a
year ago, with 11 of those coming in SEC play. The Bulldogs host
five NCAA tournament teams in league action.
“We are excited about our non-conference and conference
schedules. We have 11 teams in the conference that made post-
season and that in itself is a challenge, and then you add to that the
opportunity to possibly play UCLA, N.C. State, James Madison and
Middle Tennessee, teams that made either the NCAA Tournament
or WNIT,” Schaefer said. “We have a good mixture of competition
that will allow our young kids to play early and get some confidence,
but we have to be ready from the start when we travel to Houston
and open on the road against a talented and well-coached Cougars
team.”
Fans will get their first look at the Bulldogs Nov. 4 when the
team hosts Shorter in an exhibition game.
MSU will play host to Jackson State University on Nov. 13
in its home opener. The complete schedule is available at www.
hailstate.com
Ole Miss
Women’s soccer team plays host to Northwestern St.
OXFORD — The University of Mississippi women’s soccer
team will return to action at 7 tonight when it plays host to North-
western State University at the Ole Miss Soccer Stadium.
Ole Miss (2-0) defeated the University of Louisiana-Lafayette
and the University of Alabama at Birmingham to open the season.
— From Special Reports
West Point
Continued from Page 1B
South Panola 55, West Point 33
West Point 0 14 7 12 — 33
South Panola 6 22 13 14 — 55
First Quarter
SP—Rip Kirk 5 pass to Darrell Henderson (kick failed).
Second Quarter
SP—Oluwain Hoskins 1 run (Kirk pass to Antavion Reed).
WP—Aeris Williams 50 run (Omar Lemus kick).
SP—Henderson 2 run (Matthew Williams kick).
WP—Lacequiu Starks 43 run (Lemus kick).
SP—Henderson 65 kick return (Williams kick).
Third Quarter
SP—Henderson 27 run (Williams kick).
WP—Williams 38 run (Lemus kick).
SP—Henderson 1 run (kick failed).
Fourth Quarter
WP—Williams 5 run (kick failed).
WP—Williams 1 run (kick failed).
SP—Henderson 68 run (Williams kick).
SP—Roosevelt Jones 43 run (Williams kick).
Team Statistics
WP SP
First Downs 16 12
Rushes-Yards 52-282 33-250
Passing Yards 43 158
Comp.-Att.-Int. 6-7-0 10-21-0
Return Yards: 83 147
Turnovers 1 1
Penalties 5-57 8-74
Individual Statistics
RUSHING: West Point—Aeris Williams 31-181, Lacequiu Starks 6-58, Roger
Thomas 3-17, Josh Ewing 7-15, Dason Thomas 5-11; South Panola—Darrell
Henderson 18-184, Roosevelt Jones 2-45, Tavian Bibbs 2-19, Oluwain Hoskins
10-16, Rip Kirk 1-(-14).
PASSING: West Point—Ewing 6-7-0-43; South Panola—Kirk 10-21-0-158.
RECEIVING: West Point—Williams 4-31, Steffon Moore 2-12; South Panola—
Henderson 4-61, Hoskins 1-49, Antavion Reed 3-32, Tydrecus Bradford 1-9,
Cole Rotenberry 1-7.
Chambless said. “I saw a lot of pos-
itives out of tonight’s performance,
the most encouraging being our
team never quit.”
West Point, which lost its third-
straight season opener to South
Panola, will play host to Starkville
next week. South Panola will play at
Meridian next week.
Follow Matt Stevens on Twitter @
matthewcstevens.
Tennis
U.S. Open
Thursday
At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center, New York
Purse: $34.3 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Men
Second Round
Dmitry Tursunov (32), Russia, def. Guillaume
Rufin, France, 7-6 (4), 1-1, retired.
Janko Tipsarevic (18), Serbia, def. Dudi Sela,
Israel, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1.
Richard Gasquet (8), France, def. Stephane
Robert, France, 6-3, 7-5, 7-5.
Roger Federer (7), Switzerland, def. Carlos
Berlocq, Argentina, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1.
David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Roberto Bautista
Agut, Spain, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 6-2.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Andreas
Haider-Maurer, Austria, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5.
Jack Sock, United States, def. Maximo
Gonzalez, Argentina, 7-6 (3), 1-6, 7-5, 6-2.
Daniel Evans, Britain, def. Bernard Tomic,
Australia, 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Nikolay Davydenko,
Russia, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4.
Tommy Robredo (19), Spain, def. Frank
Dancevic, Canada, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1.
Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Sam Querrey
(26), United States, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5), 6-7 (5), 6-4.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (22), Germany, def.
Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 6-3, 6-2, 5-7,
6-2.
Milos Raonic (10), Canada, def. Pablo Andujar,
Spain, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4.
Feliciano Lopez (23), Spain, def. Bradley Klahn,
United States, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 7-5.
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Rogerio Dutra Silva,
Brazil, 6-2, 6-1, 6-0.
John Isner (13), United States, def. Gael Monfils,
France, 7-5, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (4).
Women
Second Round
Jelena Jankovic (9), Serbia, def. Alisa
Kleybanova, Russia, 6-3, 6-2.
Kaia Kanepi (25), Estonia, def. Anna
Schmiedlova, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-1.
Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Patricia
Mayr-Achleitner, Austria, 6-2, 6-3.
Sabine Lisicki (16), Germany, def. Paula
Ormaechea, Argentina, 6-2, 6-3.
Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Sara Errani (4), Italy,
6-3, 6-1.
Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Sorana Cirstea (19),
Romania, 7-5, 6-1.
Ekaterina Makarova (24), Russia, def. Bethanie
Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-4, 6-4.
Roberta Vinci (10), Italy, def. Lucie Safarova,
Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-1, 6-2.
Angelique Kerber (8), Germany, def. Eugenie
Bouchard, Canada, 6-4, 2-6, 6-3.
Christina McHale, United States, def. Elina
Svitolina, Ukraine, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (27), Russia, def. Peng
Shuai, China, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4.
Karin Knapp, Italy, def. Elena Vesnina (22),
Russia, 6-1, 6-4.
Alize Cornet (26), France, def. Ajla Tomljanovic,
Croatia, 6-2, 6-2.
Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Galina
Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-0.
Simona Halep (21), Romania, def. Donna Vekic,
Croatia, 6-2, 6-1.
Ana Ivanovic (13), Serbia, def. Alexandra
Dulgheru, Romania, 6-2, 6-1.
Petra Kvitova (7), Czech Republic, def. Bojana
Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-2, 6-4.
Alison Riske, United States, def. Mona Barthel
(28), Germany, 6-4, 6-2.
Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def. Michelle
Larcher de Brito, Portugal, 6-3, 6-1.
Julia Glushko, Israel, def. Sachia Vickery,
United States, 7-5, 6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Aleksandra
Wozniak, Canada, 6-3, 6-1.
Camila Giorgi, Italy, def. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan,
6-4, 7-6 (8).
Caroline Wozniacki (6), Denmark, def. Chanelle
Scheepers, South Africa, 6-1, 6-2.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def. Victoria
Duval, United States, 6-2, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Jamie Murray, Britain, and John Peers,
Australia, def. David Marrero and Fernando
Verdasco (9), Spain, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
Daniele Bracciali, Italy, and Lukas Dlouhy,
Czech Republic, def. Paolo Lorenzi and
Andreas Seppi, Italy, 7-5, 7-5.
Ryan Harrison, United States, and Robert
Lindstedt, Sweden, def. Steve Johnson and
Michael Russell, United States, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (8).
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, and Mikhail
Youzhny, Russia, def. Mariusz Fyrstenberg and
Marcin Matkowski (8), Poland, 6-4, 6-4.
Andre Begemann and Martin Emmrich,
Germany, def. Alex Kuznetsov and Bobby
Reynolds, United States, 6-4, 6-2.
Jonathan Erlich and Andy Ram, Israel, def.
Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Scott Lipsky
(11), United States, 6-2, 6-3.
Austin Krajicek and Denis Kudla, United
States, def. Martin Klizan and Michal Mertinak,
Slovakia, 6-3, 6-2.
Julien Benneteau, France, and Nenad Zimonjic
(7), Serbia, def. Tomasz Bednarek, Poland, and
Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 6-1, 7-6 (4).
Jaroslav Levinsky and Jiri Vesely, Czech
Republic, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, and
Ken Skupski, Britain, 6-3, 6-3.
Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, and Divij Sharan,
India, def. Robin Haase and Igor Sijsling,
Netherlands, 6-1, 7-5.
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Federico Delbonis and Leonardo Mayer,
Argentina, 7-6 (1), 6-2.
Brian Baker and Rajeev Ram, United States,
def. Paul C. Oosterbaan and Ronnie Schneider,
United States, 6-0, 6-4.
Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (3),
Spain, def. Tobias Kamke and Florian Mayer,
Germany, 5-7, 7-5, 6-1.
Daniel Nestor and Vasek Pospisil, Canada,
def. Mahesh Bhupathi, India, and Philipp
Petzschner, Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (4).
Michael Llodra and Nicolas Mahut (14), France,
def. Jarmere Jenkins and Mac Styslinger,
United States, 6-3, 6-2.
Treat Huey, Philippines, and Dominic Inglot
(16), Britain, def. Julian Knowle and Jurgen
Melzer, Austria, 6-2, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (5).
Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (4),
Czech Republic, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland,
and Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (4).
Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (2),
Brazil, def. James Blake and Jack Sock, United
States, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2.
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and Jean-
Julien Rojer (5), Netherlands, def. Jerzy
Janowicz and Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 2-6, 6-2,
6-3.
Women
First Round
Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (7),
United States, def. Natalie Grandin, South
Africa, and Darija Jurak, Croatia, 6-1, 6-3.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Marina Erakovic
(13), New Zealand, def. Lourdes Dominguez
Lino, Spain, and Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-4, 7-6
(4).
Timea Babos, Hungary, and Francesca
Schiavone, Italy, def. Oksana Kalashnikova,
Georgia, and Alicja Rosolska, Poland, 7-6 (5),
6-2.
Sania Mirza, India, and Zheng Jie (10), China,
def. Annika Beck, Germany, and Monica Puig,
Puerto Rico, 6-2, 6-2.
Ashleigh Barty, Australia, and Casey Dellacqua
(8), Australia, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania,
and Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-4, 6-1.
By JOHN ZENOR
The Associated Press
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
— The offensive guys are
hogging much of the atten-
tion at the University of Ala-
bama these days. Seriously.
Stingy defense has been
the biggest calling card of
the top-ranked Crimson
Tide’s recent reign over
college football, while the
offense has chugged along
productively and with more
modest fanfare even with a
succession of star tailbacks.
Maybe that will change
this season. The Tide ap-
pears to have the deepest
collection of offensive play-
makers of any Alabama
team during this run of
three national titles in four
years entering the team’s
season opener Saturday
against Virginia Tech Uni-
versity in Atlanta.
Quarterback AJ McCa-
rron has receivers galore,
led by Amari Cooper, plus
a rising star in tailback T.J.
Yeldon leading the way in
the backfeld. If the offense
steals some of the attention
from the defense, Alabama
safety Vinnie Sunseri is OK
with that.
“Our offense is amaz-
ing,” Sunseri said. “We’ve
got great receivers, great
running backs and a great
quarterback. The offensive
line is doing unbelievable.
If we’re behind them a little
bit, that’s fne with me. We
don’t like the hype, we just
go out there and play. We’re
players.”
Chances are, the de-
fense that has been the na-
tion’s stingiest for each of
the past two national title
seasons will still be formi-
dable.
The offense has been
pretty good, too.
The last four Tide teams
have ranked no worse than
22nd nationally in scoring
offense and two tailbacks, a
receiver and a couple of of-
fensive linemen have been
frst-round NFL draft picks
during that span.
Plus, last year’s offense
set Alabama records for
total offense, total points
and passing touchdowns
under frst-year offensive
coordinator Doug Nuss-
meier. A powerful offen-
sive line paved the way for
that group, but is replacing
three starters.
The big men can take a
backseat this time. Cooper
and Yeldon both are presea-
son All-Southeastern Con-
ference picks who gained
1,000 yards in receiving or
rushing, respectively, last
season.
By AdAm miNicHiNO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
The transformation is
nearly complete.
After three years as a
starter for the Columbus
High School football team,
the scales suggest Corey
Brown hasn’t changed all
that much. But the num-
bers disguise the fact that
although Brown hasn’t
changed several weight
classes, he has moved into
an even bigger role for the
Falcons.
This season, the 6-foot-
1, 255-pound Brown hopes
to continue
to be a dual
threat for
Columbus.
Slated to
play defen-
sive end and
tight end,
Brown and
Col umbus
will kick off the 2013 sea-
son at 7 p.m. when they
take on Mississippi High
School Activities Associ-
ation defending Class 4A
state champion Noxubee
County.
Columbus, West Point,
and New Hope didn’t play
last week when nearly
all of the rest of the state
opened the campaign.
Starkville started its re-
turn to Class 6A with a
17-0 victory against Nox-
ubee County. Last year,
Starkville won the MH-
SAA Class 5A state title.
Brown and the Fal-
cons have their sights set
on the postseason, too.
A year ago, Columbus
won seven games and re-
turned to the playoffs for
the frst time since 2005.
A loss to Madison Central
in the frst round whet-
ted the team’ appetite for
more. Reclassifcation
by the MHSAA moved
Columbus into a new dis-
trict with Starkville, Mad-
ison Central, Northwest
Rankin, Clinton, Green-
ville, Murrah, and Warren
Central.
“I just want to give
the best effort I can to
the team and try to lead
them,” Brown said. “I just
want to take it all on. I
know the coaches and my
teammates expect things
out of me.”
Brown also has played
defensive tackle and full-
back at Columbus. He said
he doesn’t want to scream
and fuss at his teammates
and hopes to implement
lessons he has learned
from previous team lead-
ers, including players like
Damian Baker, who is now
at Northwest Mississippi
Community College, and
current senior Trace Lee.
Columbus High foot-
ball coach Tony Stanford
said Brown has put a lot
of time in the weight room
and understood that was a
huge part of improving in
the state’s highest classif-
cation.
“He is one of the stron-
gest players we have on
the team,” Stanford said.
“That is a challenge we
made to all of our players
when we got here. We told
them if they would get in
the weight room we would
get stronger and we would
get where we could com-
pete with the people we
have to play.
“I feel we are compet-
ing. When we got here
fve years ago, we weren’t
competing, we were just
out there messing around.
Now we compete every
ballgame. Sometimes we
get beat. Sometimes we
win. Most of the times, we
are in the games.”
Like many Falcons,
Stanford said Brown has
transformed himself in
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com Friday, august 30, 2013 3B
Prep / College Football
College Scores / Schedule
Thursday’s Games
EAST
Delaware 51, Jacksonville 35
Fordham 51, Rhode Island 26
Towson 33, UConn 18
SOUTH
E. Kentucky 38, Robert Morris 6
Middle Tennessee 45, W. Carolina 24
Mississippi 39, Vanderbilt 35
Pikeville 13, Morehead St. 10
S. Utah 22, South Alabama 21
SE Louisiana 45, SE Missouri 7
South Carolina 27, North Carolina 10
Tennessee Tech 63, Cumberland (Tenn.) 7
Tulane 34, Jackson St. 7
UCF 38, Akron 7
UT-Martin 31, Chattanooga 21
Wake Forest 31, Presbyterian 7
MIDWEST
Ball St. 51, Illinois St. 28
Bowling Green 34, Tulsa 7
Grand View 21, Drake 16
Indiana 73, Indiana St. 35
Kent St. 17, Liberty 10
Minnesota 51, UNLV 23
North Dakota 69, Valparaiso 10
Northwestern St. 23, Missouri St. 17
W. Illinois 42, Hampton 9
Youngstown St. 28, Dayton 10
SOUTHWEST
Cent. Arkansas 58, Incarnate Word 7
FAR WEST
Fresno St. 52, Rutgers 51, OT
Montana St. 42, Monmouth (NJ) 24
Montana St.-Northern 14, Dickinson St. 0
Portland St. 57, E. Oregon 17
San Jose St. 24, Sacramento St. 0
Southern Cal 30, Hawaii 13
Utah 30, Utah St. 26
No. 6 South Carolina 27,
North Carolina 10
North Carolina 0 7 3 0—10
South Carolina 17 3 7 0—27
First Quarter
SC—Roland 65 pass from Shaw (Fry kick), 13:41.
SC—FG Fry 39, 4:53.
SC—Whitehurst 29 pass from Thompson (Fry kick),
:44.
Second Quarter
NC—Q.Davis 4 pass from Renner (T.Moore kick),
9:35.
SC—FG Fry 26, 1:32.
Third Quarter
NC—FG T.Moore 20, 7:51.
SC—Davis 75 run (Fry kick), 7:38.
A—81,572.
NC SC
First downs 18 17
Rushes-yards 36-99 38-228
Passing 194 178
Comp-Att-Int 26-43-0 12-21-0
Return Yards 21 22
Punts-Avg. 6-40.3 5-33.2
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 6-55 7-53
Time of Possession 30:27 29:33
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—North Carolina, Morris 15-69, Blue 8-37,
Q.Davis 1-2, Williams 1-2, Renner 11-(minus 11).
South Carolina, Davis 12-115, Wilds 12-64, Shaw
12-43, Carson 2-6.
PASSING—North Carolina, Renner 26-43-0-194.
South Carolina, Shaw 11-20-0-149, Thompson 1-1-
0-29.
RECEIVING—North Carolina, Q.Davis 4-39, Thorpe
4-9, Ebron 3-32, M.McNeill 3-24, Switzer 3-15, How-
ard 2-32, Morris 2-18, Blue 2-13, Tapley 2-1, Tabb 1-11.
South Carolina, Jones 4-21, Roland 2-75, Byrd 2-22,
Whitehurst 1-29, Ellington 1-17, Brent 1-9, Owens 1-5.
Mississippi 39, Vanderbilt 35
Mississippi 10 0 15 14—39
Vanderbilt 0 21 7 7—35
First Quarter
Miss—FG Ritter 30, 10:22.
Miss—Brunetti 1 run (Ritter kick), 6:04.
Second Quarter
Van—Tate 3 run (Spear kick), 11:47.
Van—Matthews 55 pass from Carta-Samuels (Spear
kick), 10:18.
Van—Seymour 3 run (Spear kick), 3:27.
Third Quarter
Miss_Brunetti 3 run (Ritter kick), 10:25.
Van—Tate 3 run (Spear kick), 4:51.
Miss—Wallace 3 run (Treadwell pass from Wallace),
:27.
Fourth Quarter
Miss—Wallace 1 run (Ritter kick), 9:05.
Van—Scheu 34 pass from Carta-Samuels (Spear
kick), 1:30.
Miss—J.Scott 75 run (Ritter kick), 1:07.
A—40,350.
Miss Van
First downs 28 19
Rushes-yards 37-206 33-126
Passing 283 300
Comp-Att-Int 31-47-0 21-36-2
Return Yards 13 2
Punts-Avg. 4-44.8 5-40.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 4-49 5-40
Time of Possession 29:14 30:46

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING_Mississippi, J.Scott 12-138, Wallace
18-48, R.Nkemdiche 1-11, Walton 2-6, Brunetti 2-4,
K.Moore 1-0, Team 1-(minus 1). Vanderbilt, Seymour
5-43, Tate 18-43, Kimbrow 5-33, Carta-Samuels 5-7.
PASSING_Mississippi, Wallace 31-47-0-283. Van-
derbilt, Carta-Samuels 21-36-2-300.
RECEIVING_Mississippi, Treadwell 9-82, Engram
5-61, Moncrief 5-56, Logan 5-39, J.Scott 4-25, Holder
3-20. Vanderbilt, Matthews 10-178, Krause 6-66, Tate
3-13, Scheu 2-43.
Top 25
No. 24 USC 30, Hawaii 13
Southern Cal 3 17 0 10—30
Hawaii 0 5 0 8—13
First Quarter
USC—FG Heidari 20, 7:05.
Second Quarter
Haw—Laurel Safety, 14:06.
Haw—FG Hadden 42, 11:43.
USC—Agholor 19 pass from Kessler (Heidari kick),
4:18.
USC—Shaw 35 interception return (Heidari kick),
2:49.
USC—FG Heidari 52, :00.
Fourth Quarter
USC—FG Heidari 22, 13:10.
USC—Davis 3 run (Heidari kick), :42.
Haw—Kirkwood 60 pass from Graham (Woolsey
run), :30.
A—39,058.
USC Haw
First downs 23 15
Rushes-yards 45-192 31-23
Passing 172 208
Comp-Att-Int 15-29-1 16-41-4
Return Yards 43 11
Punts-Avg. 6-43.3 9-38.2
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 9-75 4-48
Time of Possession 33:28 26:32
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING_Southern Cal, Madden 18-109, Davis 14-
74, Allen 4-18, Isaac 1-4, Kessler 3-1, Lee 1-(minus 4),
Wittek 4-(minus 10). Hawaii, Poueu-Luna 1-19, Wily
9-14, Langkilde 8-12, Lakalaka 4-11, Saint Juste 2-3,
Graham 7-(minus 36).
PASSING_Southern Cal, Kessler 10-19-1-95, Wittek
5-10-0-77. Hawaii, Graham 16-41-4-208.
RECEIVING_Southern Cal, Lee 8-104, Grimble 3-18,
Agholor 2-35, Madden 1-10, Pinner 1-5. Hawaii, King
3-30, Kirkwood 2-84, Langkilde 2-18, Gant 2-17,
Haynes 2-15, Moleni 1-11, Harding 1-10, Wily 1-9,
Kemp 1-8, Lakalaka 1-6.
State
Tulane 34, Jackson State 7
Jackson St. 0 0 0 7—7
Tulane 13 7 7 7—34
First Quarter
Tul—FG Santos 22, 10:12.
Tul—Darkwa 5 run (Santos kick), 5:26.
Tul—FG Santos 34, 2:15.
Second Quarter
Tul—Shackleford 14 pass from Montana (Santos
kick), 5:41.
Third Quarter
Tul—Darkwa 1 run (Santos kick), 3:30.
Fourth Quarter
Tul—Breaux 11 pass from Montana (Santos kick),
9:38.
JcSt—Ingram 9 run (Deising kick), 4:34.
A—20,992.
JcSt Tul
First downs 18 16
Rushes-yards 48-112 43-158
Passing 244 150
Comp-Att-Int 15-29-4 7-16-0
Return Yards 8 34
Punts-Avg. 5-36.8 5-42.0
Fumbles-Lost 6-2 2-0
Penalties-Yards 9-78 4-27
Time of Possession 33:57 25:59
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Jackson St., Gooden 20-57, Ingram 7-24,
Ivy 10-22, Ja.Moore 6-8, Wells 2-3, Moll 1-0, Mont-
gomery 2-(minus 2). Tulane, Darkwa 13-50, Kelley
6-41, Rounds 8-23, Boutte 1-20, Thompson 7-19,
Butler 1-6, Montana 7-(minus 1).
PASSING—Jackson St., Ivy 9-17-2-133, Ingram 6-12-
2-111. Tulane, Montana 6-14-0-144, Powell 1-2-0-6.
RECEIVING—Jackson St., Pendleton 3-95, Singleton
3-74, Moll 2-19, Gooden 2-16, Tucker 2-9, Ja.Moore
1-25, Douglas 1-4, Dani.Williams 1-2. Tulane, Grant
3-82, Butler 1-28, Kelley 1-15, Shackleford 1-14,
Breaux 1-11.
Top 25 Schedule
Saturday’s Games
No. 1 Alabama vs. Virginia Tech at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio St. vs. Buffalo, 11 a.m.
No. 3 Oregon vs. Nicholls St., 3 p.m.
No. 5 Georgia at No. 8 Clemson, 7 p.m.
No. 7 Texas A&M vs. Rice, Noon
No. 10 Florida vs. Toledo, 11:21 a.m.
No. 12 LSU vs. No. 20 TCU at Arlington, Texas, 8 p.m.
No. 13 Oklahoma St. vs. Mississippi St. at Houston,
2:30 p.m.
No. 14 Notre Dame vs. Temple, 2:30 p.m.
No. 15 Texas vs. New Mexico St., 7 p.m.
No. 16 Oklahoma vs. Louisiana-Monroe, 6 p.m.
No. 17 Michigan vs. Cent. Michigan, 2:30 p.m.
No. 18 Nebraska vs. Wyoming, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Boise St. at Washington, 9 p.m.
No. 21 UCLA vs. Nevada, 9 p.m.
No. 22 Northwestern at California, 9:30 p.m.
No. 23 Wisconsin vs. UMass, 11 a.m.
No. 25 Oregon St. vs. E. Washington, 5 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
No. 9 Louisville vs. Ohio, 2:30 p.m.
Monday’s Game
No. 11 Florida St. at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Weekend Schedule
Today’s Games
EAST
Morgan St. at Army, 6 p.m.
SOUTH
Samford at Georgia St., 6 p.m.
FAU at Miami, 7 p.m.
MIDWEST
W. Michigan at Michigan St., 7 p.m.
N. Dakota St. at Kansas St., 7:30 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Texas Tech at SMU, 7 p.m.
Southern U. at Houston, 7:30 p.m.
FAR WEST
N. Arizona at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
EAST
Villanova at Boston College, 11 a.m.
William & Mary at West Virginia, 11 a.m.
Albany (NY) at Duquesne, 11:10 a.m.
Georgetown at Wagner, Noon
Holy Cross at Bryant, 2 p.m.
Penn St. vs. Syracuse at East Rutherford, N.J., 2:30 p.m.
Sacred Heart at Marist, 5 p.m.
SOUTH
Campbell at Charlotte, 11 a.m.
Elon at Georgia Tech, 11 a.m.
Toledo at Florida, 11:21 a.m.
FIU at Maryland, 11:30 a.m.
Louisiana Tech at NC State, 11:30 a.m.
BYU at Virginia, 2:30 p.m.
NC Central at Duke, 3 p.m.
Edward Waters at Alcorn St., 4 p.m.
Virginia Tech vs. Alabama at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Jacksonville St. at Alabama St., 5 p.m.
Furman at Gardner-Webb, 5 p.m.
Savannah St. at Georgia Southern, 5 p.m.
CCSU at James Madison, 5 p.m.
Reinhardt at Mercer, 5 p.m.
Maine at Norfolk St., 5 p.m.
VMI at Richmond, 5 p.m.
Coastal Carolina at SC State, 5 p.m.
Austin Peay at Tennessee, 5 p.m.
Charleston Southern at The Citadel, 5 p.m.
Washington St. at Auburn, 6 p.m.
Old Dominion at East Carolina, 6 p.m.
Alabama A&M at Grambling St., 6 p.m.
W. Kentucky vs. Kentucky at Nashville, Tenn., 6 p.m.
Miami (Ohio) at Marshall, 6 p.m.
McNeese St. at South Florida, 6 p.m.
Texas St. at Southern Miss., 6 p.m.
Warner at Stetson, 6 p.m.
UAB at Troy, 6 p.m.
Georgia at Clemson, 7 p.m.
MIDWEST
Purdue at Cincinnati, 11 a.m.
S. Illinois at Illinois, 11 a.m.
Buffalo at Ohio St., 11 a.m.
UMass at Wisconsin, 11 a.m.
UC Davis at South Dakota, 2 p.m.
N. Illinois at Iowa, 2:30 p.m.
Cent. Michigan at Michigan, 2:30 p.m.
Temple at Notre Dame, 2:30 p.m.
Howard at E. Michigan, 5 p.m.
Murray St. at Missouri, 6 p.m.
Butler at S. Dakota St., 6 p.m.
N. Iowa at Iowa St., 7 p.m.
Wyoming at Nebraska, 7 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Rice at Texas A&M, Noon
Mississippi St. vs. Oklahoma St. at Houston, 2:30 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette at Arkansas, 3 p.m.
Ark.-Pine Bluff at Arkansas St., 6 p.m.
Idaho at North Texas, 6 p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe at Oklahoma, 6 p.m.
Houston Baptist at Sam Houston St., 6 p.m.
Wofford at Baylor, 6:30 p.m.
Concordia-Selma at Abilene Christian, 7 p.m.
Panhandle St. at Lamar, 7 p.m.
New Mexico St. at Texas, 7 p.m.
Prairie View at Texas Southern, 7 p.m.
LSU vs. TCU at Arlington, Texas, 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Colgate at Air Force, 2 p.m.
Langston at N. Colorado, 2:35 p.m.
Nicholls St. at Oregon, 3 p.m.
E. Washington at Oregon St., 5 p.m.
San Diego at Cal Poly, 6:05 p.m.
UTSA at New Mexico, 7 p.m.
E. Illinois at San Diego St., 7 p.m.
Stephen F. Austin at Weber St., 7 p.m.
Appalachian St. at Montana, 8 p.m.
Nevada at UCLA, 9 p.m.
Boise St. at Washington, 9 p.m.
Northwestern at California, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
SOUTH
MVSU vs. Florida A&M at Orlando, Fla.,
10:45 a.m.
Ohio at Louisville, 2:30 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman at Tennessee St., 7 p.m.
FAR WEST
Colorado vs. Colorado St. at Denver, 5 p.m.
Monday’s Game
EAST
Florida St. at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Junior Colleges
East Miss. Comm. College 49,
Pearl River C.C. 6
EMCC 21 14 7 7 — 49
PRCC 0 0 6 0 — 6
First Quarter
EMCC—Dontreal Pruitt 16 pass to Antoinne Adkins
(Drew White kick).
EMCC—Pruitt 25 pass to Brandon Bell (White kick).
EMCC—Pruitt 18 pass to Kameron Myers (White
kick).
Second Quarter
EMCC—Pruitt 60 pass to C.J. Bates (White kick).
EMCC—A.J. Stamps 100 interception return (White
kick).
Third Quarter
PRCC—Detrick Goff 6 run (pass failed).
EMCC—Bates 62 punt return (White kick).
Fourth Quarter
EMCC—Preston Baker 1 run (White kick).
Team Statistics
EMCC PRCC
First Downs 24 10
Rushes-Yards 35-120 42-129
Passing Yards 280 99
Comp.-Att.-Int. 23-36-0 5-16-3
Return Yards 275 95
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 1-1
Penalties 5-25 4-20
Individual Statistics
RUSHING: EMCC—Lakenderic Thomas 12-45,
Dontreal Pruitt 8-23, Todd Mays 7-33, Kameron
Myers 1-16, Preston Baker 5-38, Drew White 1-(-31),
Team 1-(-4); PRCC—Scottie Merrill 10-20, Darrell
Robinson 7-9, Will Gross 4-9, Charles Ducksworth
1-(-2), Detrick Goff 16-73, Gemriah Williams 1-10,
Shaun White 3-10.
PASSING: EMCC—Dontreal Pruitt 21-33-259-1, Todd
Mays 2-3-21-0; PRCC—Will Gross 1-8-7-2, Shaun
White 5-7-92-1.
RECEIVING: EMCC—Terrence Barron 6-52,
Antoinne Adkins 4-62, Kameron Myers 3-27, Bran-
don Bell 2-39, Brandon Acker 2-19, C.J. Bates 4-78,
Dontreal Pruitt 1-(-7), Isaac Johnson 1-10; PRCC—
Darrell Robinson 1-1, Shaun Jones 1-14, Rusty Clark
2-68, Akeem Pollard 2-16.
Itawamba C.C. 40,
East Central C.C. 7
Itawamba C.C. 10 17 6 7 — 40
East Central C.C. 0 0 7 0 — 7
First Quarter
ICC —Emmit Dendy 21 FG
ICC—25-yard pass Griff Loftis to Shante Rogers,
(Dendy kick).
Second Quarter
ICC—16-yard pass Loftis to JaNardeon Jones,
(Dendy kick).
ICC—Dendy 21 FG
ICC—8-yard pass Loftis to Archie Dennard, (Dendy
kick).
Third Quarter
EC—60-yard pass Jacori Taylor to Hakeem Parker
(kick good).
ICC—30-yard pass Loftis to Jaquez McMillian (kick
failed).
Fourth Quarter
ICC—10-yard run Chris Ingram (Dendy kick).
ICC Statistics
Griff Loftis (Mooreville) 27-of-45 passing for 331 and
four touchdowns, zero interceptions.
Tobia Lofton (Forest) 12 carries, 94 yards
Chris Ingram (Southaven) 12 carries, 77 yards, one
touchdown
Brown
Falcons’ Brown looks
to be team leader
By mATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — Foot-
ball fans in Starkville and
Oxford will have two Egg
Bowl games to pay atten-
tion to this season — a big
one and little one.
At 7 tonight, the
Starkville and Oxford high
school football programs
hope to start an annual tra-
dition they have dubbed the
“Little Egg Bowl” when the
teams meet in Starkville.
Before the game, which
will be Starkville’s home
opener, a trophy will be pre-
sented. After the game, one
school will get to take that
trophy home for the season.
“We stressed with our
kids today that anytime
we get to play for a tro-
phy it means something,”
Starkville coach Jamie
Mitchell said. “I think they
are fred up about being the
start of something special.”
When the Mississip-
pi High School Activities
Association announced
Starkville High would move
from Class 5A to Class 6A
in 2013 and be in the same
region as Madison Central,
a common non-conference
opponent for the Jackets,
Mitchell had an idea to put
some spice into his sched-
ule. His notion was simple:
Take the passion of the
Mississippi State Universi-
ty-University of Mississippi
rivalry and translate it to
Friday night.
“I think it’s a game we’d
like to play every year be-
cause it’s a game that has
emotion to it,” Mitchell
said. “We immediately this
offseason called (Oxford
coach) Johnny (Hill) and
there was excitement on
both ends for this match-
up.”
The Starkville High
players, who have grown
up watching the Egg Bowl
game during Thanksgiving
break, are enjoying having
a new rivalry game that
could stretch beyond the
Golden Triangle area.
“People around school
and around town are al-
ready telling us how im-
portant it is to beat a school
in Oxford in anything,”
Starkville senior linebacker
and co-captain Taylor John-
ston said. “We are fred up
about playing our version of
Ole Miss, and the practices
this week have been at a
higher level.”
Starkville defeated Ox-
ford 28-7 in the quarterf-
nals of the Class 5A state
playoffs last season. The
Yellow Jackets contained
All-State quarterback Park-
er Adamson in the victory,
but Mitchell liked what he
saw from Adamson so much
he called him to offer him a
spot on the Alabama-Mis-
sissippi All-Star Game ros-
ter after the season.
“I love the way they con-
tinually throw it all over the
place and do it with success
no matter who is back there
slinging it,” Mitchell said.
“(Adamson) was so good,
but they have a sophomore
(Jack Abraham) that does it
well this year, too.”
Oxford (1-0) defeated
Jackson Prep 32-20 in its
home opener last week. It
will try to start 2-0 for the
third time in the past four
years. Starkville defeated
Class 4A champion Noxu-
bee County 17-0 last week.
Oxford will try to load up
its air attack on a secondary
that features two players —
Darius Grayer and LaDor-
rious Pittman — playing on
both sides of the ball. The
Chargers like to line up in
four- or fve-wide receiver
sets and dare you to stop
their quick-strike attack.
“We’re going to stop the
run because that’s what we
do, and I’m not giving up
the game plan by saying
that,” Johnston said. “We
have to force turnovers and
bad throws when we make
them one dimensional later
in the game.”
Starkville, Oxford will
play in Little Egg Bowl
See BROWN, 4B
By ScOTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
POPLARVILLE — East
Mississippi Community
College football coach Bud-
dy Stephens really enjoys
defensive touchdowns.
Another one of Ste-
phens’ favorite things is a
special teams score.
The No. 8 Lions scored
one of each Thursday night
in a 49-6 victory against
Pearl River C.C. at Dobie
Holden Stadium to make
Stephens feel like a proud
papa on graduation morn-
ing.
A.J. Stamps ended the
frst half with a 100-yard
interception return for a
touchdown. C.J. Bates ran
a punt back 62 yards for a
score in the third quarter.
“We have tremendous
amount of speed all over
the feld,” Stephens said. “I
think you will see us have
the ability to break open
games in more ways than
ever before.”
It was the frst time in
Stephens’ six seasons at
EMCC that the team scored
a defensive touchdown and
a special teams touchdown
in the same game.
Two quarterbacks for Lions
EMCC entered the season opener with
sophomore quarterback Dontreal Pruitt as
the undisputed starter.
Pruitt didn’t disappoint as he was 21 of
33 for 259 yards and four touchdowns. After
a three-and-out first possession, EMCC
scored on four-straight possessions.
“Dontreal is really a leader in every
sense of the word,” EMCC sophomore wide
receiver Brandon Bell said. “We have a lot
of confidence in him. He makes the offense
go.”
Todd Mays transferred to EMCC after
redshirting one season at Arkansas State
University. Mays was one of the state of
Mississippi’s top quarterback prospects
when he graduated from Olive Branch High
School.
Mays is expected to see time as a
running back and quarterback this season.
On Thursday, Mays quarterbacked the final
possession. Despite holding a 42-6 lead,
EMCC ran the hurry-up offense to near per-
fection. May finished with seven rushes for
33 yards and was 2 of 3 for 21 yards.
With the game clock expiring, former
Starkville High standout Preston Baker
scored his first collegiate touchdown on a
1-yard dive.
“There will be a lot of situations where
(Pruitt and Mays) are out there at the same
time,” Stephens said. “There are some un-
believable options are we are looking at.”
Noteworthy
Stephens improved to 5-1 in season
openers. ... The Lions have now won sev-
en-straight games against teams from the
South Division. ... The EMCC four take-
aways on defense included two intercep-
tions by Stamps, one by Allen Sentimore,
and a fumble recovery by Isaac Johnson.
... The Lions had 400 yards of total offense,
a mark they reached in eight of 10 games
last season. ... The victory spoiled the
PRCC coaching debut of William Jones,
who spent the past five seasons as defen-
sive coordinator with EMCC. ... PRCC has
now dropped four-straight season openers.
... EMCC will play East Central C.C. next
week. ECCC lost to No. 16 Itawamba C.C.
40-7 Thursday night
Lions do damage on
defense, special teams
From Special Reports
FULTON — Sopho-
more quarterback Griff
Loftis threw four touch-
down pass, and Tobias
Lofton rushed for 94 yards
Thursday night to lead the
No. 16 Itawamba Commu-
nity College football team
to a 40-7 season-opening
victory against East Cen-
rtal C.C.
Loftis, of Mooreville,
was 27 of 45 for 331 yards.
He threw touchdown
passes of 25, 16, 8, and 30
yards.
Chris Ingram, of South-
aven, added 77 yards and
a touchdown as to help
ICC amass 524 yards of
total offense on Military
Appreciation Night.
Freshman kicker Em-
mitt Dendy, of Houston,
put the Indians on the
board with a 21-yard
feld goal at the 5-min-
ute, 19-second mark of
the frst quarter before
Shante Rogers, of Itawam-
ba Agricultural, capped a
69-yard drive with a 25-
yard touchdown catch in
the closing seconds of the
frst quarter.
ICC took a 17-0 lead
early in the second quar-
ter after turning a fumble
into a 16-yard scoring toss
to JaNardreon Jones, of
Noxubee County, before
a second 21-yard feld goal
by Dendy put the Indians
ahead 20-0 with 8:12 to
play in the frst half.
ICC will travel to Sum-
mit next week to face
Southwest Mississippi
C.C.
n Southwest Mississippi C.C. 19,
Northwest Mississippi C.C. 15: At Sen-
atobia, Former Columbus High School
standout Damian Baker rushed for 143
yards on 27 carries, but the Bears scored
19 unanswered points to rally in the
MACJC season opener for both teams.
Despite outgaining the Bears 366-
237, the Rangers were just 1-for-4 in the
red zone and had two special teams mis-
cues and a turnover on downs late in the
fourth quarter.
Chris Jones had 20 carries for 114
yards and a touchdown to lead South-
west. Jamil Golden was 10 of 18 for 89
yards and a touchdown.
Karsten Miller was 17 of 30 for 193
yards with two touchdowns and an inter-
ception for Northwest.
Former Pickens County High School
standout Terrien Steele had four tackles
for the Bears.
Northwest will return to action at
6:30 p.m. Thursday night when it plays
host to No. 9 Copiah-Lincoln C.C. at
Bobby Franklin Field.
Loftis leads ICC past ECCC
Alabama offense taking
attention from defense
See ALABAMA, 4B
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 4B Friday, august 30, 2013
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Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for
AdvoCare 500, at Hampton, Ga., FS1
6 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying
for AdvoCare 500, at Hampton, Ga. (same-day
tape), FS1
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 p.m. — Texas Tech at SMU, ESPN
7:30 p.m. — North Dakota State at Kansas
State, FS1
GOLF
11:30 a.m. — Web.com Tour, Hotel Fitness
Championship, second round, at Fort Wayne,
Ind., TGC
2 p.m. — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, frst round, at Norton, Mass., TGC
5:30 p.m. — LPGA, Safeway Classic, second
round, at Portland, Ore., TGC
7:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Shaw Charity
Classic, frst round, at Calgary, Alberta (same-
day tape), TGC
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:10 p.m. — Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs,
WGN
6 p.m. — Regional coverage, St. Louis at
Pittsburgh or Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, MLB
6:30 p.m. — Miami at Atlanta, Fox Sports
South
SAILING
4 p.m. — Louis Vuitton Cup, fnals, race 13, at
San Francisco (if necessary, same-day tape),
NBC Sports Network
SOCCER
9 p.m. — MLS, Portland at Real Salt Lake, NBC
Sports Network
TENNIS
Noon — U.S. Open, men’s second and women’s
third round, at New York, ESPN2
6 p.m. — U.S. Open, men’s second and wom-
en’s third round, at New York, ESPN2
Saturday
AUTO RACING
5 p.m. — IRL, IndyCar, pole qualifying for Grand
Prix of Baltimore (same-day tape), NBC Sports
Network
6:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Great Clips - Grit Chips 300, at Hampton, Ga.,
ESPN2
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
11 a.m. — Buffalo at Ohio St., ESPN2
11 a.m. — Villanova at Boston College,
ESPNEWS
11 a.m. — Purdue at Cincinnati, ESPNU
11 a.m. — William & Mary at West Virginia, FS1
11 a.m. — Massachusetts at Wisconsin OR
Southern Illinois at Illinois, Big Ten Network
11:21 a.m. — Toledo at Florida, WCBI
11:30 a.m. — Florida International at
Maryland, Fox Sports South
Noon — Rice at Texas A&M, ESPN
2:30 p.m. — Teams TBA, ESPN2/WKDH-WTVA
2:30 p.m. — Mississippi State vs. Oklahoma
State, at Houston, Texas, ESPN2 / WKDH-WTVA
2:30 p.m. — Temple at Notre Dame, WTVA
2:30 p.m. — BYU at Virginia, ESPNU
2:30 p.m. — Central Michigan at Michigan OR
Northern Illinois at Iowa, Big Ten Network
3 p.m. — Nicholls St. at Oregon, FS1
3 p.m. — Louisiana-Lafayette at Arkansas,
SportSouth
4:30 p.m. — Virginia Tech vs. Alabama, at
Atlanta, ESPN
6 p.m. — Washington State at Auburn, ESPNU
6 p.m. — Kentucky vs. W. Kentucky, at Nash-
ville, Tenn., ESPNEWS
6 p.m. — Miami University at Marshall, CBS
Sports Network
6:30 p.m. — Wofford at Baylor, SportSouth
7 p.m. — Wyoming at Nebraska, Big Ten
Network
7:07 p.m. — Georgia at Clemson, WKDH-WTVA
8 p.m. — TCU vs. LSU, at Arlington, Texas,
ESPN
9 p.m. — Boise St. at Washington, FS1
9:30 p.m. — Northwestern at California, ESPN2
GOLF
7:30 a.m. — European PGA Tour, Wales Open,
third round, at City of Newport, Wales, TGC
Noon — Web.com Tour, Hotel Fitness
Championship, third round, at Fort Wayne, Ind.,
TGC
2 p.m. — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, second round, at Norton, Mass.,
TGC
5:30 p.m. — LPGA, Safeway Classic, third
round, at Portland, Ore., TGC
7:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Shaw Charity
Classic, second round, at Calgary, Alberta
(same-day tape), TGC
HORSE RACING
3 p.m. — NTRA, Woodward, Bernard Baruch,
and Forego, at Saratoga Springs, N.Y., NBC
Sports Network
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon — Regional coverage, Baltimore at N.Y.
Yankees or Kansas City at Toronto, MLB
6 p.m. — Regional coverage, St. Louis at
Pittsburgh or Cleveland at Detroit, MLB
6 p.m. — Miami at Atlanta, Fox Sports South
6 p.m. — Chicago White Sox at Boston, WGN
SOCCER
6:40 a.m. — Premier League, Hull at
Manchester City, NBC Sports Network
8:55 a.m. — Premier League, Fulham at
Newcastle, NBC Sports Network
11:30 a.m. — Premier League, Sunderland at
Crystal Palace, WTVA
7 p.m. — MLS, DC United at New York, NBC
Sports Network
TENNIS
2:30 p.m. — U.S. Open, third round, at New
York, WCBI
on The air
Brown
Continued from Page 1B
the weight room. Brown’s
development has been par-
ticularly important since he
is a fxture on the Falcons’
defense. His contributions
to the defensive line last
season played an integral
part in helping Columbus
get back to the Class 6A
North State playoffs. With a
lot of experience returning
across the front line, Stan-
ford is looking to Brown to
be an even bigger contribu-
tor this season.
“He came in a big kid as
a freshman and had a lot of
speed,” Stanford said. “He
was able to beat people with
his speed his frst year. He
realized as he went along
he wasn’t going to be able to
continue to do that because
people were learning about
him. He realized he was go-
ing to have to get stronger
and still use his speed plus
strength. Now he is strong
enough to take on double
teams and get off blocks
and make plays he couldn’t
make when he was a fresh-
man and a sophomore.
“If he will get his attitude
right and continue working
like he always has, he can
be one of the main leaders
on the team because a lot of
the young players look up
to him. They have watched
him play this will be for four
years, and all of them want
to be like him.”
Stanford said a key for
Brown will be showing that
intensity and hard work ev-
ery day because he is some-
one who can help set the
tone on the team.
Brown, who weighted
240 pounds as a freshman,
said he is trying to be
someone who does that by
example and more vocally.
He said leading by example
comes more naturally and
that he is fnding his voice
for what he hopes is an im-
pressive senior season.
“I try to encourage them
and to tell them not to give
up and try to get them to fo-
cus on what we want to be
this year,” Brown said.
Brown would like to fol-
low in Baker’s footsteps and
play in college. He knows
he has a lot more to learn
and plenty of room to grow.
That’s why he believes he
has made strides but feels
the transformation is still
taking place.
“When I was in ninth
grade I didn’t know the
weight room was so import-
ant,” Brown said. “Talent
can only take you so far. I
grew up and realized (go-
ing into my junior year) you
have to put a little extra in.
It takes hard work to get
where you want to be.
“My sophomore year,
I was kind of scared to do
some things. Learning the
game, I realized you have to
have confdence. I am very
confdent. I like taking on
any challenge. I know it isn’t
going to be the easiest job,
but I feel I can get it done.”
Alabama
Continued from Page 3B
Four of the nation’s top
tailback recruits join Jalston
Fowler, Kenyan Drake, Dee
Hart, and Yeldon in the
backfeld. Freshmen Der-
rick Henry, who set the na-
tional high school record for
career rushing yards, and
Altee Tenpenny, at least,
could see early action.
“I feel like we have con-
fdence in both those guys
that they can go in and play
well if they need to,” Tide
coach Nick Saban said.
Whoever emerges as No.
2 typically gets a bunch of
carries for the Tide, which
had two 1,000-yard rush-
ers last season. Eddie Lacy
was a second-round pick by
Green Bay.
“T.J. Yeldon’s a premier
back,” Virginia Tech line-
backer Jack Tyler said.
“He’s good at just about
everything. He can catch
the ball. He can run down-
hill. He’s quick. He’s fast.
He’s explosive. He’s a good
back. They’re the full pack-
age and that’s why they’re
the No. 1 team in the coun-
try. But if we want to be the
defense we want to be, the
No. 1 defense in the coun-
try, we have to stop teams
like this.”
Ole Miss
Continued from Page 1B
and the fourth lead change.
“We stole one tonight,”
Ole Miss coach Hugh
Freeze said. “We didn’t
necessarily play that well,
particularly defensively in
the second half. But one of
the staples of our program
since I’ve been here is that
you play for 60 minutes and
you do not blink and you
play until the whistle blows
at the end of the game.”
Vanderbilt had a f-
nal chance to extend the
Southeastern Conference’s
longest winning streak, but
Cody Prewitt intercepted a
pass off Jordan Matthews’
hands with 26 seconds left.
That allowed the Rebels to
snap a three-game skid to
Vanderbilt, the last a 27-26
loss in Oxford last year.
“I knew we had to make
something happen,” Scott
said. “Last year, it was very
painful. They came back. It
was basically the same situ-
ation. We didn’t want to go
through that again and feel
that pain. We can’t. It is a
long ride back home.”
Bo Wallace keyed
the Rebels’ rally from 11
points down, running for
two touchdowns and con-
necting with highly touted
freshman Laquon Tread-
well for the two-point con-
version.
The Commodores gave
up 29 points in the second
half, their most since al-
lowing 20 to the University
of Florida in their last loss
Oct. 13. The loss snapped
a seven-game winning
streak for Vanderbilt before
its frst sellout in a home
season opener since 1996
against the University of
Notre Dame.
“The game is never won,
just like it was never won last
year when we were down at
their place and came back
and won,” Vanderbilt coach
James Franklin said. “They
did the same thing to us.
We got a taste of our own
medicine.”
Freeze came in with
possibly the best recruiting
class in Ole Miss history,
and he put nine on the feld
in their frst game. Tread-
well started and caught a
team-high nine passes for
82 yards, and freshman
tight end Evan Engram had
fve catches for 61 yards.
EMCC
Continued from Page 1B
Stamps said. “There was
not a doubt that I was going
to take it back to the house.
Even though I am on de-
fense now, I have the same
mind-set every game. I feel
like I can score a touch-
down every time we play.”
In his frst career start,
EMCC sophomore quarter-
back Dontreal Pruitt threw
four touchdown passes
over his team’s frst fve
possessions. During this
same stretch of play, PRCC
managed 18 yards of total
offense.
The Wildcats then f-
nally found a rhythm. On
its best drive of the night,
PRCC moved to the EMCC
4-yard line. Up against the
frst-half clock expiring,
PRCC quarterback Will
Gross could not choose be-
tween two open receivers
on a fourth-and-3 play. In-
stead, Gross split the differ-
ence, threw over the mid-
dle and Stamps took it from
one end zone to the other
for a 35-0 halftime lead.
“He is fast,” EMCC
coach Buddy Stephens
said. “That is why we put
him on defense. We needed
more speed on defense. To
A.J.’s credit, he has learned
all of the nuisances of the
position. He has Southeast-
ern Conference potential.
He can play this game on
the highest level. I think
you saw tonight what he
did in his frst game on de-
fense.”
Stamps was a dominat-
ing force on defense all
night. The former Vicks-
burg High School standout
had his frst interception on
PRCC’s frst possession.
Stamps also had a sack, a
tackle for loss and a pass
break-up on a 2-point try
after PRCC’s lone touch-
down.
EMCC frst-year defen-
sive coordinator Jordan
Lesley had indicated whole-
sale changes were not in
store for the defense, but
do expect a minor tweak
here or there. Apparently,
the frst tweak is to play
the game at a much higher
speed.
“We do everything a lot
faster than we were doing
it,” Stamps said. “It’s now
go, go, go. It is all about
speed. It’s now a fast-break
defense to go along with
our fast-break offense. You
saw tonight that we can
have some real fun with
what we are doing on de-
fense now.”
The Lions forced four
turnovers and allowed 228
yards of total offense. PRCC
only had 84 yards in the
frst half and ran only 27 of-
fensive plays in the second
half. Starting quarterback
Will Gross completed more
passes to Lions (two) than
to his own team (one) in the
opening half.
“We took a hard look
at our defense and we
simplifed some things,”
Stephens said. “Now, it is
much more read and react.
Jordan is doing the things
on defense and that we have
been doing on our offense.
So now our two styles com-
plement one another more.
“Getting some more
speed on defense was the
key. We had to shuffe
some personnel and we
had to get the right people
in place. To see this kind of
defensive effort in the frst
game tells you the plan is
defnitely in place.”
Offensively, EMCC
rolled up 400 yards of total
offense and 24 frst downs.
Three of the Lions’ fves
scoring drives were in the
magic two-minutes or less
range. Pruitt completed 21-
of-33 passes for 259 yards.
Last season, Stamps
would be catching pass-
es from Pruitt. Now, he is
one of the sophomore sig-
nal-caller’s biggest fans.
“You saw the poise of a
veteran out there,” Stamps
said. “He made the right
reads. He made the right
calls. You saw him really
get into a rhythm on of-
fense. When we are in a
rhythm on offense, some
special things can hap-
pen.”
Former Heritage Acade-
my standout Brandon Bell
caught a touchdown pass,
as did Antoinne Adkins,
Kameron Myers and C.J.
Bates. Bates also scored on
a 62-yard punt return.
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
DOONESBURY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY:
Twenty
years ago,
my oldest sister,
“Olivia,” loaned
me $3,000 at
a time when I
was struggling
to make ends
meet. I promised
to repay the loan
at the end of the
year. The time
came and I wrote
her a check for
the full amount,
but she didn’t
cash it. She said
she didn’t need
the money and the loan was
forgiven.
Fast-forward 20 years:
While Olivia has remained
fnancially stable, I am now in
a better place fnancially be-
cause of an inheritance. After
learning about this inheritance,
Olivia asked me for the money
back!
Because I can afford it,
I plan on repaying her, but I
can’t get over her surprising re-
quest. Do you have any words
of wisdom to help me make
sense of this? — UNSETTLED
SIBLING
DEAR UNSETTLED: Your
sister may have forgiven
the loan all those years ago
because she thought repaying
her would have
caused you
fnancial stress.
Now that she
knows you’re
well able to give
her the money,
she would like to
have it. You and
I don’t know why
she’s asking for
it, but trust me,
there is ALWAYS
a reason.
DEAR ABBY:
I have been
talking to “Ricky”
for about two
months. I’m
28 and he is 27. A couple of
weeks ago we decided to date
exclusively. This morning,
Ricky found out that his ex is
three months’ pregnant with
his child. I knew he was last
intimate with her three months
ago, but we were both kind of
shocked.
I don’t have kids and I
prefer not to date men who do,
let alone one who has a baby
on the way. However, I do care
about Ricky and could defnite-
ly see us together. After this
bombshell, I’m not sure what
I want to do. Any advice would
be appreciated. — THROWN
FOR A LOOP IN PHILADELPHIA
DEAR THROWN FOR A
LOOP: After this bombshell, the
person who has some serious
decisions to make is Ricky, Will
this cause him to reunite with
his ex-girlfriend? Is the baby
really his child? If so, what will
be his responsibility fnancially
and morally? If he stays with
you, do you WANT to help raise
another woman’s child?
Until you have a better
idea of what lies ahead, my
advice is to do nothing, You
have known Ricky for only two
months, and while you could
see a future for the two of
you, can you also see one that
includes the three — or FOUR
— of you? I’m including the ex
in the equation, because she’ll
be a part of it. Forever.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
What teens need to know
about sex, drugs, AIDS and
getting along with peers and
parents is in “What Every Teen
Should Know.” Send your
name and mailing address,
plus check or money order for
$7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby,
Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Shipping and handling are
included in the price.)
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Aug.
30). You’ll enjoy a degree of
fame this year. You may have
to cope with people whose
interests are opposed to your
own, but this is part of what
makes you stand out favorably
in September. October shows
you successfully representing
your talent and the talent of
others. December and May
will be your biggest fnancial
months. Aries and Libra
people adore you. Your lucky
numbers are: 6, 49, 29, 4
and 35.
ARIES (March 21-April
19). You can get approximate-
ly the same hamburger on
three out of four corners of the
main thoroughfare. In cases
where the differences are
minimal, you’ll fnd it so hard
to choose that you’re likely not
to choose anything at all.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). Don’t take anything too
personally now. Instead, focus
on what needs to change to
get a desired result. This is
likely to start with a resolution
to think positively and take the
action steps to support those
thoughts.
GEMINI (May 21-June
21). You have an advantage
in competitive environments
because you don’t do what the
other competitors are doing.
You remember or discover your
own strengths and lead with
those.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). Unfortunately, many
people are self-involved and
myopic. That’s why when you
meet a like-minded curious
and observant type, as you will
today, it’s important to make
the effort to befriend that
person.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
The person who is making ev-
eryone laugh may be doing so
intentionally for the fnancial
beneft. As one Greek trage-
dian said, “It is a proftable
thing, if one is wise, to seem
foolish.” — Aeschylus
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Important decisions are on the
docket. You’re not interested
in the choice that seems like
the best one to everyone
around. You want the solution
that actually is the best be-
cause it’s the right ft for you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You could do it alone, but that
would be stealing someone’s
chance to help you. Giving
you their help will raise their
self-esteem, skill level and
commitment to your relation-
ship.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). Consider that the person
who is less than friendly
toward you may be under an
enormous amount of pressure.
Lead the way with your love,
compassion and patience.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21). You may feel torn
between your need to keep
things moving and your desire
to be nice. Consider issuing a
gracious invitation for some-
one to join you on your way to
another destination.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). When you make people
laugh, you create such a posi-
tive feeling for all involved that
you want to repeat it over and
over. Alas, the laws of comedy
dictate that it’s only really
funny the frst time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). You have a very unobtru-
sive way of getting information.
Your best lead will answer the
question that starts out: Do
you know anyone who might
have some ideas about...?
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). Your cosmic gift of the
day is poise. Your actions will
be graceful; your gestures,
well received. You could really
take advantage of this by
taking a social risk or going
dancing.
Horoscopes
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com Friday, august 30, 2013 5B
Lawsuit
Continued from Page 2B
need help right now, who have
cognitive issues and those
whose quality of life has been
taken away.”
The settlement, unprece-
dented in sports, came after
more than a year of discussions
between the sides and two
months of court-ordered medi-
ation. Subject to approval by a
federal judge, it came exactly
a week before the frst game
of the 2013 season, removing a
major legal and fnancial threat
hanging over the sport.
U.S. District Judge Anita B.
Brody in Philadelphia is expect-
ed to rule on the settlement in
two to three months but said it
“holds the prospect of avoiding
lengthy, expensive and uncer-
tain litigation, and of enhancing
the game of football.”
The settlement applies to all
past NFL players and spous-
es of those who are deceased,
a group that could total more
than 20,000, and will cost the
league $765 million — the vast
majority of which would go to
compensate retirees with cer-
tain neurological ailments —
plus plaintiffs’ attorney fees,
which could top $100 million. It
sets aside $75 million for med-
ical exams and $10 million for
medical research.
Individual payouts would be
capped at $5 million for men
with Alzheimer’s disease; $4
million for those diagnosed
after their deaths with a brain
condition called chronic trau-
matic encephalopathy; and $3
million for players with demen-
tia, said lead plaintiffs’ lawyer
Christopher Seeger.
“We got what we wanted, let’s
put it that way,” Seeger said.
The NFL takes in revenues
of more than $9 billion a year,
a fgure that will rise when new
TV contracts start in 2014.
Commissioner Roger Good-
ell did not comment on the set-
tlement.
“We thought it was critical
to get more help to players and
families who deserve it rath-
er than spend many years and
millions of dollars on litigation,”
NFL Executive Vice President
Jeffrey Pash Executive Vice
President Jeffrey Pash said in
a statement, the only comment
issued by the league Thursday.
“This is an important step that
builds on the signifcant chang-
es we’ve made in recent years to
make the game safer.”
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 6B Friday, august 30, 2013
Sudoku
YESTERDAY’S ANSWER
Sudoku is a number-
placing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difficulty
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.
Third time lucky
WHATZIT ANSWER
ACROSS
1 Unwise
undertaking
6 Cowboy contest
11 Parting word
12 Big name in TV
talk
13 Car sticker
14 Heat unit
15 At any time
17 Spot
18 Decline
20 Painter’s medium
22 Compass trace
23 Not strict
26 Prolonged attack
28 Noted
consumerist
29 Edison’s
collection
31 Hot drink
32 Aware of
33 Anatomy subject
34 Elbow
36 High point
38 Director
Kurosawa
40 Light bender
43 Miser Marner
44 Snow house
45 Informs
46 Yo-Yo Ma’s
instrument
DOWN
1 Rage
2 Exalted poem
3 1989 007 flm
4 Head out
5 End-of-year time
6 Hogwash
7 She loved Hamlet
8 Michael Caine flm
9 Tombstone name
10 “Dear me!”
16 Sturgeon eggs
18 Fig pollinator
19 Sills song
21 Travel stops
23 Spring period
24 Call for
25 Serving aid
27 Army bigwig
30 Summit
33 Canal sight
34 Years gone by
35 Tom Joad,
for one
37 Sweeping
39 Dray puller
41 Costa del —
42 Cattle call
Are you curious about the Catholic faith?
Would you like to learn more?
St. Joseph Catholic Church
invites you to our
RCIA inquiry sessions.
Beginning Wednesday
September 4th, 7:00 p.m.
in the Parish center.
For more information, please call
Fr. Lenin Vargas at 323-2257
St. Joseph Catholic Church
607 University Drive
Starkville, MS 39759
StJoseph_8.30.indd 1 8/29/13 2:10 PM
Religious bRiefs
Beneft program
Christian Hill MB Church in
Bigbee Valley hosts a beneft
program for Bobby Bowen
Aug. 31, 6 p.m. For informa-
tion, contact Queen Harris,
662-738-4204 or Ella Skinner,
662-738-5347.
Music lessons
Wesley United Methodist
Church, 511 Airline Road,
offers lessons in piano, guitar,
and beginner organ weekday
afternoons. $80 per month.
Contact Wesley UMC, 662-
328-8644.
Dance lessons
Wesley United Methodist
Church, 511 Airline Road,
offers group dance classes for
children ages 4-7 on Monday
afternoons. $35 per month
per child. Contact Wesley
UMC, 662-328-8644.
Homecoming
Sand Creek MB Church,
3818 Rock Hill Road in
Starkville, hosts their annual
homecoming Sept. 1, 10:45
a.m. Dinner will be served. For
information, call Curtis Moore,
662-312-0240.
Homecoming
Yeates Chapel celebrates
homecoming services Sept. 1,
2:30 p.m. The guest speaker
is Kenneth Calvert from King-
sport, Tenn.
Celebration
St. James United Method-
ist Church hosts a celebration
Sept. 1 in honor of Susie
Dickerson of Harbor Commu-
nity Church of God in Carson,
Calif.
Inspirational speaker
First Independent Meth-
odist Church, 417 Lehmberg
Road, welcomes inspirational
speaker, Bobby Boothe Sept.
1, 11 a.m.
Gospel celebration
The Gospelation Singers of
Columbus present an Evening
of Praise Gospel celebration
Sept. 1, 4 p.m. at St. John
MB Church on Motley Road.
For information, contact Petro
Jordan at 662-418-0513.
Rosh HaShanah
Congregation B’nai Israel,
717 Second Ave. N., hosts
Rosh HaShanah evening ser-
vice and Oneg Sept. 4, 7:30
p.m. and morning service
Thursday, 10 a.m.
Pastoral anniversary
Piney Grove MB Church cel-
ebrates the anniversary of the
Rev. Michael E. Reed Sept. 5,
7 p.m. The guest speaker is
the Rev. Al Lathan of Third Mt.
Olive MB Church.
Basketball tournament
Charity-Fairview Basketball
Tournament is Sept. 6-7 at the
Bobby L. McCarter Sr. Family
Life Center, Tarlton Road in
Crawford. $75 registration per
team. Admission $4. For infor-
mation, call Adreanna Brown,
601-788-4786.
Fall sale
Mathiston United Meth-
odist Church on Highway
15 in Mathiston hosts a fall
sale Sept. 7, 8 a.m. to noon.
Homebaked items and white
elephant items available. For
information, call Jimmie Whitt,
662-263-4987.
Appreciation program
Sand Creek Chapel MB
Church, 3818 Rock Hill Road
in Starkville, celebrates ap-
preciation day Sept. 8, 10:45
a.m. Dinner will be served.
For information, call Marilyn
Trainer, 662-323-8366.
Church anniversary
Pleasant Ridge MB Church,
2384 Highway 389 in Wood-
land, celebrates the 131st
church anniversary Sept. 8,
2:30 p.m. The guest speaker
is the Rev. Gerald Valliant of
Kyles Chapel in Vardaman.
Appreciation program
Full Gospel Ministries,
1504 19th St. N., hosts an
appreciation celebration for
Maxine Hall Sept. 8, 4 p.m.
Pastoral anniversary
The Sixth Ave. MB Church
celebrates the 26th pastoral
anniversary of the Rev. Bobby
E. Woodrick Sr., Sept. 8, 3
p.m. The guest speaker is the
Rev. Glenn Wilson of Friend-
ship MB Church.
Gospel meeting
Caledonia Church of Christ
hosts a gospel meeting Sept.
8, 10 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., and
Sept. 9-11, 7 p.m. nightly. The
guest speaker is Keith Wilson.
For information, call 662-356-
6017.
Church anniversary
Calvary Faith Center, High-
way 373 N., celebrates their
church anniversary Sept. 8, 3
p.m. The guest speaker is the
Rev. Jonathon Tucker of New
Albany. For information, call
662-328-6833.
Church anniversary
Shiloh Full Gospel MB
Church celebrates their 192nd
church anniversary Sept. 8,
3 p.m. The guest speaker is
Therman Cunningham of Oak
Grove MB Church. For informa-
tion, call 662-327-9575.
Usher program
Faith Harvest Church hosts
an usher program Sept. 8,
3 p.m. The guest speaker is
Tommy Williams of Bibleway
Progressive Church.
Revival
New Zion Pilgrim Baptist
Church hosts a fall revival
Sept. 10-12, 7 p.m. nightly.
The guest speaker is the Rev.
James Howell of Bethlehem
Baptist Church.
Revival
United Christian Baptist
Church hosts a fall revival
Sept. 10-12, 7 p.m. nightly.
The guest speaker is Milton
Glass of New Green Grove
Church. For more information,
call the church offce 662-327-
0604.
Kol Nidre
Congregation B’Nai Israel,
717 Second Ave. N., hosts
Kol Nidre Sept. 13, 7:30 p.m.
and Y’om Kippur Sept. 14, 10
a.m., 3 p.m. 5:30 p.m. and
6:30 p.m.
The Gospelation Singers
www.cdispatch.com
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