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TH 322 Contextualized Liturgy Msgr. Paul A. Cuison, J.C.D.

1. What are the canonical implications of the sacrament of baptism?

Theological Implication of Baptism C. 204 we become incorporated into Christ and we belong to the people of God. We participate in the threefold mission of Christ according to our particular condition as priest, lay or religious. Canonical Implication of Baptism C. 96 we are incorporated in the Church and we become a juridical person. We have rights and duties and we can exercise it for as long as we are in communion and no law intervenes it. The theological effect of baptism according to Canon 204 is that through baptism: we become incorporated into Christ and we belong to the people of God. Because of this, we participate in the threefold mission of Christ ( tria munera Christi) as: o o o priest (munus sanctificandi sanctifying), prophet (munus docendi teaching) and king (munus regendi kingly).

This participation is according to his/her particular condition, whether priest, lay or religious. The canonical effect of baptism according to Canon 96 is that through baptism, we are incorporated in the Church and we become a juridical person. Hence, we have duties and rights, and we can exercise it for as long as we are in communion and there is no law that intervenes it. We are in communion through the bonds of our profession of faith, the sacraments and ecclesiastical governance. By THE SACRAMENT OF BAPTISM, ONE is incorporated into the Church of Christ, constituted a JURIDICAL Person with rights and duties. Baptized persons are: freed from sin, reborn as children of God, configured to Christ by an indelible character.

2.

What do you mean by Communio in Sacris.

What do you mean by communicatio in sacris? Canon 844 - COMMUNICATIO IN SACRIS literally means SHARING in sacred things. Paragraph 1, Catholic ministers administer the Sacraments licitly to Catholic members of the Christian faithful alone, who likewise receive them licitly from Catholic ministers alone, without prejudice to the prescripts of pars, 2,3, and 4 of this canon, and canon 861. 2. Paragraph 2, Whenever NECESSITY REQUIRES IT or true SPIRITUAL ADVANTAGE suggests it, and provided that danger of ERROR or of INDIFFERENTISM is avoided, the Christian faithful for whom it is PHYSICALLY or MORALLY impossible to approach a Catholic minister are permitted to receive the Sacraments of PENANCE, HOLY EUCHARIST AND ANOINTING OF THE SICK from nonCatholic ministers in whose Churches these Sacraments are valid. E.G., ANGLICAN, ORTHODOX, Paragraph 3, Catholic ministers administer the sacraments of PENANCE, HOLY EUCHARIST AND ANOINTING OF THE SICK to members of Eastern Church which do not have full communion with the Catholic Church if they seek such on their own accord and are properly disposed. This is also valid for members of other Churches which in the judgment of the Apostolic SEE are in the same condition in regard to the Sacraments as these Eastern Churches. Paragraph 4, If the danger of death is present or if, in the judgment of the diocesan Bishop or Conference of Bishops, some other grave necessity urges it. Catholic ministers administer these Sacraments licitly also to other Christians not having full communion with the Catholic Church who cannot approach a minister of their own community and also seek such on their own accord provided they manifest Catholic faith in respect to these Sacraments and are properly disposed. Paragraph 5, For the cases mentioned in paragraphs 2, 3, and 4, the diocesan bishop or the Conference of Bishops is not to issue general norms except after consultation at least competent authority of the interested non-Catholic or community.

General Rule: Sacraments are to be administered by Catholic ministers to Catholic faithful alone. Catholic members receive the sacraments from Catholic ministers. Comunication in Sacris is considered as sacramental or liturgical sharing or sharing in sacred things discussed in C. 844. s.1 General rule is that the sacraments are to be administered by Catholic ministers to Catholic members alone, and that Catholic members receive the sacraments from Catholic ministers. The next succeeding paragraphs are exceptions to this general rule. s.2 There are four basic conditions when a Catholic may request and receive the sacraments of penance (P), Eucharist (E)and anointing of the sick (A) from a minister of a non-Catholic church and that this reception is considered valid: a) either necessity or genuine spiritual advantage, b) physical or moral impossibility (such as serious inconvenience) of receiving the sacrament from a Catholic minister, c) the absence of the danger of error or indifferentism, and d) provided the sacrament is validly celebrated in the other church. s.3 A Catholic minister may licitly administer the sacraments of P, E, A to members of Eastern Churches and those not in full communion with the Catholic Church if all of these conditions are present: a) in favor of members of the Eastern churches with which the Catholic Church is not in full communion, b) such individuals act voluntarily (when asking for the sacraments), c) are properly disposed, and d) these churches do possess valid sacraments of P, E, A. s.4 There is a more limited exception applied to other Christians not in full Catholic communion. A Catholic minister may licitly administer the sacraments of P,E, A to other Christians not in full communion with the Church provided these conditions are met: a) a serious need (whether danger of death or, in the judgment of the diocesan bishop or of the conference of bishops, other grave necessity) b) inability to approach their own minister c) a voluntary request by the recipient d) manifestation of Catholic faith concerning the sacrament in question and e) a proper disposition to receive the sacrament. s.5 No general norms will be issued on the matters in the three preceding paragraphs without consultation with at least a local authority of the respective church or community and preferably with some superior authority.

Catholic faithful from a non-Catholic minister: A Catholic faithful may lawfully request and receive the sacraments of Penance, Eucharist, and Anointing of the sick from a non-Catholic minister provided that: 1. Either there is necessity or genuine spiritual advantage 2. It is physically or morally impossible of receiving the sacrament from a Catholic minister 3. There is the absence of error or indifferentism 4. These sacraments are validly celebrated in the church of the non-Catholic Minister. Catholic minister to non-Catholic members: A Catholic minister may lawfully administer the sacraments of Penance, Eucharist, and Anointing of the Sick to non-Catholic members provided that: 1. They are in danger of death or there is a serious need 2. They cannot approach their own minister 3. they spontaneously ask for it 4. they are properly disposed 5. these sacraments are valid in their churches A Catholic faithful may lawfully request and receive the sacraments of P,E,A from a non-Catholic minister provided that: 1. Either there is necessity or genuine spiritual advantage 2. It is physically or morally impossible of receiving the sacrament from a Catholic minister 3. There is the absence of error or indifferentism 4. These sacraments are validly celebrated in the church of the non-Catholic Minister. A Catholic minister may lawfully administer the sacraments of P,E,A to non-Catholic members provided that: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. They are in danger of death or there is a serious need They cannot approach their own minister They spontaneously ask for it They are properly disposed These sacraments are valid in their churches

UBI SOCIETA IBI IUS WHERE THERE IS SOCIETY, THERE IS A LAW WHY IS THERE A LAW IN THE CHURCH? It is not to save souls but the primary aim is to put a just order, giving what is due, JUSTICE. WHAT DOES THE CHURCH ENVISION CANON LAW TO BE?

Part of the mystery of the Church LG 8 EXPLAINS IT. The Church is a composition of Human and Divine elements, the mystery of human person of Christ and divine person of Christ. What are the human and divine realities pointed out here? HUMAN - VISIBLE ORGANIZATION Society structured with hierarchical organs Visible society Earthly Church DIVINE Community of faith, hope and love Mystical Body of Christ Mystical Community Church endowed with Heavenly things

WHAT IS THE MEANING OF CANON LAW? Canon law is the dimension of justice in the Church that regulates intersubjectivity relations that exists in the Church as a visible society.

3.

Explain the nature of the sacred liturgy as public celebration.

The liturgical actions are always public, not private. It should always be seen in the context of being a celebration of the Church as a sacrament of unity. The mass, in these instances, is a sacrament of unity. Even sinners should feel welcome.

The liturgical action represents the Church as a sacrament of unity.

Canon 837 The liturgical actions are always public, not private. It should always be seen in the context of being a celebration of the Church as a sacrament of unity. The mass, in these instances, is a sacrament of unity. Even sinners should feel welcome. The liturgical action represents the Church as a sacrament of unity. An act of worship is considered liturgical if it is: offered in the name of the church done by persons who are lawfully deputed done through actions approved by ecclesiastical authority. Liturgy is the celebration of the mystery of Christ and in particular his paschal mystery. Through the exercise of the priestly office of Jesus Christ the liturgy manifests in signs and brings about the sanctification of humankind. The worship which is due to God is offered by the mystical body of Christ that is, by its head and by its members, Sanctification through words and sacraments and glorification through prayers. The Liturgy is not a private action; a priest can celebrate mass alone because the Church is present. Even if a priest is celebrating the mass alone, that mass is not a private mass, liturgy by its very nature is public because it is offered in the name of the Church. According to Canon 837.1, Liturgical actions are not private actions but celebrations of the Church itself which is the Sacrament of unity, that is, a holy people gathered and ordered under the bishops. Therefore, Sacred Liturgy is always public celebration. Liturgical actions therefore belong to the whole body of the Church and manifest and affect it; they touch its individual members in different ways, however, according to the diversity of order, functions and actual participation . Par. 2, Inasmuch as liturgical actions by their nature entail a common celebration, they are to be celebrated with the presence and active participation of the Christian faithful where possible.