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August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
VOLUME 55 | NUMBER 8 | AUGUST 2013
WORLD EDITION
IBC2013
30
IBC product preview
What’s new and what’s hot? Check
out more than 100 products that will
be demonstrated at the IBC Show.
M1
IBC exhibit hall map
Make every step count as you
navigate the massive show
floor. Find our map inserted
at the back of this issue.
FEATURES
26
Today’s digital newsroom
Newsrooms today have to
be fast to keep relevant.
BEYOND THE HEADLINES
DOWNLOAD
6
SOA for broadcasters
Business tools meet media as
demands for service grow.
TECHNOLOGY IN ACTION
12
Channel branding
Coming up next: an easier way to
attract loyal viewers to your channel.
DIGITAL HANDBOOK
TRANSITION TO DIGITAL
16
Storage and
workflow
Find your assets with
proper data organization.
COMPUTERS & NETWORKS
19
ABR streaming
Learn more about this
innovative way to deliver
content over IP links that
vary in quality over time.
PRODUCTION ROOM
22
Seamless
Channel
Insertion
e technology
simplifies multiplex
management.
NEW PRODUCTS & REVIEWS
FIELD REPORT
45
Panasonic’s AG-HPX600
e camera offers
many options to create
custom workflows.
TECHNOLOGY IN TRANSITION
48
Data storage tools
Broadcasters can use these to store
Big Data effi ciently.
DEPARTMENTS
4
Editorial
50
Advertisers index
30
ON THE COVER
Our IBC Show coverage begins this
month. We have the latest offerings
from the industry here so that you
can start building your shopping
list. And, don’t forget our exhibit
hall map; your feet will thank you!
6
12
CHECK IT OUT!
We’ve added new interactive
features and content to our Digital
Edition! Look for the icons on
this page to find out which articles
have these special functions.
DIGIT
A
L

E
D
I
T
I
O
N
45
308bew02-DE.indd 3 8/2/2013 3:48:47 PM
4 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
EDITORIAL
DEPARTMENT
I
recently went to visit a new broadcast operation shortly
before its on-air launch. is wasn’t a broadcaster, but
a telco, and the program playout is by a service pro-
vider that is just being acquired by a supplier of telco
equipment and services (Ericsson). So where is the broad-
cast expertise coming from, or is it still even necessary?
e operator, BT Sport, is a new UK sports network. It
is using some well-known production companies for pro-
gramming and a facilities company to run the operation.
e sales operation is outsourced to another broadcaster,
all proving that you don’t really need to be a broadcaster
to broadcast.
Companies such as Netflix and YouTube have already
shown that on-demand content can be delivered by a
company with the knowledge
to run global content delivery
networks, and that is more of an
IT issue rather than broadcast.
BT Sport, in contrast, is airing
live sports.
So what is a broadcaster?
From the public’s point of view,
it is a brand for some channels.
e brand is indicative of the
genre and format of programs
that it carries. Who runs it,
who commissions, who sells air-time and who delivers
the channels is of no interest to the public; they don’t care.
It’s the brand that’s the thing.
New entrants to the business of channels and brands
come with a fresh approach. ey haven’t kept transmit-
ters on-air through hurricanes, seen spots lost through
VTR head clogs, dealt with cra unions and acquired all
the decades of knowledge from monochrome to color to
HD broadcasting.
For the new entrants, it’s all about the brand, buying
rights, syndicating, sales — the business of broadcasting.
e rest is an IT issue, possibly to be outsourced.
Is it the end of broadcasting as we know it? Of course
not. e public still watches the big broadcasters for most
of their television entertainment; Internet viewing is still a
small proportion of viewing in all the surveys. Over 50 or
more years, broadcasters have accumulated a huge knowl-
edge of how to run brands and how to acquire popular
programming. e unknown is how they will adapt to
multiplatform delivery and how much of the audience new
entrants such as BT Sport as well as Netflix and YouTube
will take from the legacy brands.
The fragmentation of
viewing to new platforms,
and new entrants to the busi-
ness, means that viewing is split between ever more media
companies. Yet the advertising cake is not growing apace,
so the slice gets thinner per broadcaster. Subscriptions rep-
resent another revenue source, but there is a limit as to how
much the public will pay for triple play/channel bundles or
pay-per-view. e result: Air more content for less revenue.
e answer is to find more effi cient and less costly ways to
broadcast. Program makers also feel the pressure and must
be more cost-effective in a tightening market.
Where does that leave broadcast engineers? e
forward-looking engineers will be morphing into IT
engineers with a specialty in broad-
cast operations. ey will become
someone who understands audio
and video. Broadcast engineers
will become the bridge between the
creative types and the network and
storage specialists, the traditional
IT engineers.
The business is not evolving
wholly to run on a computer sys-
tem. ere is all the paraphernalia
of live production: lenses and cam-
eras, lighting rigs, camera support, wireless links and
microphones. Much of this equipment may use embed-
ded computers, but they are essentially video and audio
equipment, not data processors. I am reminded that digital
microphones exist, but you have to search hard to find
them in use. An analog signal comes out of the micro-
phone. In the stagebox? Ah, that is a different story.
BE
What is a
broadcaster?

DAVID AUSTERBERRY, EDITOR
Send comments to: editor@broadcastengineeringworld.com
For the new entrants,
it’s all about the
brand, buying rights,
syndicating, sales
— the business of
broadcasting.
308bew03-DE.indd 4 8/2/2013 2:07:07 PM
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6 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
DOWNLOAD
BEYOND THE HEADLINES
B
roadcasters have many
challenges as the media
business evolves, driven
by new consumer devices
and the increase in mobile viewing.
National broadcasters are facing
more competition from global op-
erators. New entrants like YouTube
and Netflix have changed the VOD
landscape. Broadcasters that once
aired one channel now air a mul-
tiplex of linear channels, as well
provide catch-up and mobile servic-
es. Summing up, broadcasters must
deliver to more platforms, linear and
on-demand, in a more competitive
business environment.
To meet these challenges, a busi-
ness must become more agile. Many
other sectors have faced similar
challenges, and part of the solution
for many has been to turn to new
sofware applications, particularly
business process management (BPM)
and the service-oriented architec-
ture (SOA). Although each can be
used stand-alone, BPM and SOA are
frequently used in concert as a plat-
form to improve the performance of
a business.
Operations that use videotape were
constrained by the need for manual
handling, but as content migrates
from videotape to digital files, the way
is open to use IT-based methodolo-
gies, including BPM and SOA, to aid
broadcast operations.
What is SOA?
SOA is a design methodology for
sofware systems. SOA is not a prod-
uct, but an architecture to deploy
loosely coupled software systems
to implement the processes that
deliver a business workflow. SOA
provides a more viable architecture
to build large and complex systems
because it is a better fit to the way
human activity itself is managed
— by delegation. SOA has its roots
in object-oriented software and
component-based programming.
In the context of the media and
entertainment sector, SOA can
be used to implement a “media
factory,” processing content from the
production phase through to multi-
platform delivery.
Legacy broadcast systems
Traditional broadcast systems
comprise processing silos coupled
by real-time SDI connections, file
transfer and an assortment of control
protocols. Such systems are optimized
for a specific application and may pro-
vide a good price/performance ratio
with high efficiency.
SOA for broadcasters
Business tools help meet growing service demands.
BY DAVID AUSTERBERRY
Te tight coupling of legacy sys-
tems makes it difficult to upgrade
or replace one or more components.
Tese applications are typically cou-
pled via proprietary APIs, as shown in
Figure 1. If the sofware is upgraded
to a new version, the API can change,
necessitating changes to other appli-
cations that are using the API — work
that is usually custom.
It makes it difficult to extend to add
new functionality to the system to
meet the ever-changing demands of
multi-platform delivery and evolving
codec standards. Storage architec-
tures change with object-based and
cloud storage to become alternates to
on-premise NAS and SAN arrays.
When vendors upgrade products,
the new versions ofen do not support
legacy operating systems, leading to
the need to replace underlying com-
puter hardware platforms.
Traditional systems are just not
agile enough to easily support the
new demands of the media business.
Ofen new multi-platform systems
are tacked on to existing linear play-
out systems in an ad-hoc manner to
support an immediate demand. Te
system grows in a way that eventu-
ally becomes difficult to maintain
and operate.
Traditional systems
are just not agile
enough to easily
support the new
demands of the
media business.
Figure 1. Legacy systems use many applications, all tightly coupled by proprietary
APIs.
Business logic Business logic
Business logic
Transform
DAM
Transform
Playout Transfer
Content
repository
Resource
scheduling
Ingest
Business logic
Business logic
Media network
Linear
broadcast
Content
Web, mobile
and VOD
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8 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
DOWNLOAD
BEYOND THE HEADLINES
Monitoring — no
overall visibility
Traditional systems also suffer
from a lack of visibility of the inter-
nal processes. Individual processes
may display the status on a local user
interface, but it is diffi cult to obtain an
overall view (dashboard) of the opera-
tion of the business.
As broadcast strives for more ef-
ficiency, it is vital to have an overall
view of technical operations as an aid
to manage existing systems and guide
future investment. Many broadcasters
already have end-to-end alarm moni-
toring, but resource usage may only
be monitored for billing purposes,
and not to gain intimate knowledge
of hardware and soware utilization.
SOA in media
SOA is not new; it has been in
use for a decade or more in other
sectors including defense, pharma-
ceuticals, banking and insurance.
It developed from the principles of
object-oriented soware design and
distributed processing.
If SOA is common in other sec-
tors, why not just buy a system from a
middleware provider? e problem lies
with the special nature of media op-
erations. e media sector has lagged
other sectors in the adoption of such
systems for a number of reasons. ese
include the sheer size of media objects
and the duration of some processes.
A query for an online airline reser-
vation may take a minute at most; a
transcode of a movie can take several
hours. Conventional SOA implemen-
tations are not well suited to handling
such long-running processes.
What is a service?
A service is a mechanism to
provide access to a capability. A
transcoding application could ex-
pose its capability to transcode files
as a transform service. Examples of
services in the broadcast domain in-
clude ingest, transform, playout, file
moves and file archiving. e service
is defined at the business level rather
than the detailed technical level.
It could be said that many
broadcasters already operate service-
oriented systems; ey just don’t
extend the methodology to the ar-
chitecture of technical systems.
Services share a formal con-
tract; now service contracts are
commonplace in broadcasting and
across the M&E sector, with com-
panies calling on each other for
capabilities such as playout, subti-
tling and effects, as examples. e
service-level agreement for playout
will include quality aspects such as
permitted downtime (99.999 percent).
Service contracts operate at the busi-
ness level, and ultimately may result
in monetary exchange.
Abstraction
e business management logic
may call for a file to be transcoded
from in-house mezzanine to YouTube
delivery format, but not define the
specifics of a particular make and
model of transcoder or the detail of
The media sector
has lagged other
sectors in the
adoption of such
systems for a
number of reasons.
Implementation of an SOA circumvents the traditional lack of an overall view of internal processes.
308bew06-DE.indd 8 8/2/2013 2:04:26 PM
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10 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
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BEYOND THE HEADLINES
services, the benefits of SOA are un-
likely to be fully realized.
For broadcasters used to running
departmental silos, many with re-
al-time elements, the move to SOA
will be a radical change to the way
the business operates. However, the
advantages of the SOA and allied sys-
tems like BPM are proving attractive
propositions for the broadcaster — or
service provider — running complex
file-based operations for multi-plat-
form delivery.
e problems facing a media com-
pany looking to embrace SOA and
BPM include change management
and the sheer problems of keeping
on-air through such huge changes in
the technical infrastructure support-
ing broadcast operations.
Many media companies have em-
braced the architecture, with early
adopters using considerable original
development of such components as
service adapters — the vital link be-
tween a service like transcoding and the
workflow orchestration middleware.
e use of consultants or internal
soware services to build a media
SOA will achieve the goal, but does it
make sense for all media businesses
to go their own way?
FIMS
It was this issue on which
the Advanced Media Workf low
Association (AMWA) and the
European Broadcasting Union
(EBU) independently agreed when,
in 2010, they decided to pool resourc-
es and set up the joint Framework for
Interoperable Media Services (FIMS)
Project, which would develop stan-
dards for a framework to implement
a media-friendly SOA.
e road will be long, and many
obstacles remain to be resolved, but
the success of this project will benefit
both vendors and media companies
in the long run.
The FIMS solution aims to
provide a f lexible and cost-
effective solution that is reliable
and future-proof. It should allow
best-of-breed content processing
the file formats. is abstracts the
business logic from the underlying
technical platforms. A generic ser-
vice interface for file transform can
be defined, and then each transcoder
is wrapped by a service adaptor that
handles the complexity of the trans-
code process. To the business logic,
the transcode is simply a job. e
abstraction of the capability is a key
principle of the SOA.
In a legacy system, the ingest job
is delegated to an operator config-
ures an encoder, and then starts and
stops the encoding at the appropriate
times. e operator is functioning au-
tonomously during the processes of
the job. ese concepts of delegation
and autonomy are key to the SOA de-
sign philosophy. e encoding may
well be automated as a computer
process, but the principles remain
the same.
Because the service is abstracted,
it opens the way for broadcasters to
leverage cloud services more eas-
ily. As an example, at times of peak
transcode demand, a cloud transcode
service could be used to supplement
in-house resources. With a standard
service interface for transcoding, the
implementation can be an on-premise
or cloud-based service. e opera-
tion of the services is orchestrated by
a layer of middleware, soware that
manages business processes accord-
ing to the needs of the business.
A transform service can be used for
different business processes. For ex-
ample, a transcoder could be used to
transform files at ingest to the house
codec or used to create multiple ver-
sions of content for multi-platform
delivery. e transform services can
be redeployed to different depart-
ments as the needs of the file traffi c
change from hour to hour.
Planning for a SOA
Migrating from traditional tightly
coupled systems to use SOA principles
is a big step for a media business. e
effi cient operation of SOA requires
detailed analysis of business needs
and definition of services. It also re-
quires rigorous planning of the IT
infrastructure, computers and net-
works for effi cient operation of the
services. Without the involvement
of senior management down to IT
XML messages
A/V essence
Transform
DAM
Dashboard
Transform
Playout
Transfer
Content
repository
Ingest
Media bus
Enterprise service bus
Linear
broadcast
Content
Web, mobile
and VOD
User command
and control
Business logic Orchestration Middleware
Figure 2. SOA loosely couples autonomous services with a central orchestration
engine calling services to deliver the business requirements.
Migrating from
traditional tightly
coupled systems to
use SOA principles
is a big step for a
media business.
308bew06-DE.indd 10 8/2/2013 2:04:52 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 11
DOWNLOAD
BEYOND THE HEADLINES
products to be integrated with media
business systems.
e FIMS team released V1.0 in 2012
as an EBU specification, Tech 3356.
ree service interfaces have been spec-
ified: transform, transfer and capture.
e FIMS Project has expanded on
the conventional SOA with additional
features to meet the needs of media
operations. Specifically FIMS adds
asynchronous operation, resource
management, a media bus and security.
Asynchronous operation allows for
long-running services. A transcode
may take hours; conventional SOA
implementations allow for processes
that complete in seconds or minutes.
Although services are loosely cou-
pled to the orchestration, jobs can
still be run with time constraints.
is may be simply to start a job at a
certain time, but services can also be
real time, like the capture and playout
of streams. In these cases, the job re-
quests for the service will also include
start and stop times for the process.
For playout, this concept is no differ-
ent from a playlist or schedule.
SOA typically is based on an en-
terprise service bus (ESB) that carries
XML messages between service pro-
viders and consumers. A media bus
provides a parallel bus to the ESB to
carry the large media essence files.
Many file-based operations will al-
ready have media IP networks that can
be adapted to provide the platform for
the media bus, as shown in Figure 2.
The future
Soware methodologies like SOA
and BPM help media businesses
manage file-based operations in
more effi cient ways and better serve
the needs of multi-platform deliv-
ery. ey provide a holistic approach
to running business operations that
provide better visibility of opera-
tions and simpler ways to leverage
cloud services.
ey have proved successful in
other sectors and are ready to meet the
unique needs of the media sector.
BE
David Austerberry is the editor of
Broadcast Engineering World.
The following are available on the
Broadcast Engineering website:
• FIMS and SOA
• Media services: Services
architecture enables functional
flexibility
• Brad Gilmer talks about FIMS at
NAB 2013
Send questions and comments to:
editor@broadcastengineering.com ?
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12 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Technology in AcTion
Beyond the heAdlines
C
hannel branding has been in
existence for as long as there
have been channels, except
for several decades it was re-
ferred to as station identification.
In the early days, TV branding was
simple. It had to be. Even in the early
1970s, a VTR cost as much as a row of
houses, and there were no viable com-
puter graphics. Cometh the channels,
cometh the technologies!
Today hundreds of TV channels are
easily accessible, affordable technolo-
gy for branding is in a totally different
league of availability and affordabil-
ity, and branding exists whether we
like it or not. However, such power
needs to be used with discretion.
Good branding gives the viewers
a good impression, and so creates a
bias toward that channel. Rather than
leaving viewers to come to their own
conclusions, broadcasters can then
actively manage that impression and
expand the branding as the channel
becomes more popular.
Bugs — good and bad
Tere are many ways a channel can
brand itself and typically, for a major
channel, all methods are used. Te
channel ID, or bug, usually placed
in the top lef or right corner, is most
popular. Aesthetically, this has to do
its job of labelling the channel with-
out distracting viewers from watching
the program. It’s up to the graphic
designer to get it right. Technically,
displaying the bug involves keying
a graphic over the channel’s output,
perhaps in a downstream keyer. Some
are transparent; some are solid. Today
we would hope the keying avoids
producing ragged edges, implying
some profiled key rather than the
old hard key. To achieve this 40 years
ago using the equipment of the time
was not easy. Today it can be simple
and inexpensive.
Some channels like to animate
the bug. Tis means there must be
some form of video replay to run
this video and key. As humans are
historically hunter-gatherers, and so
programmed to notice movement —
even in peripheral vision — viewers
are bound to be distracted by the bug.
Tis may be counterproductive and
turn the viewer away.
Tis simplest form of branding
is important as viewers should im-
mediately, or within milliseconds,
recognize the channel by the bug/
logo when surfing the many avail-
able channels. However, the bug is
very basic and not likely to encourage
viewers to watch and stay loyal to the
channel. So there is usually a range
of other elements that make up the
complete channel branding package.
Creating a brand
Channel branding is much more
than establishing an identity; it is
about creating a brand that will get
viewers to watch the channel and
Channel branding
Coming up next: an easier way to attract
loyal viewers to your channel.
By Don Ash
keep watching, as well as recommend
the channel to others. Multichannel
broadcasters will want to promote
across all their channels and plat-
forms. Channel branding is all
about gaining viewers and keep-
ing them watching your channels
and, for commercial channels,
increasing revenues.
Competition for viewers is greater
than ever, so channels are demanding
ever more powerful ways to promote
their brand within what is usually an
extremely limited budget. Te good
news is that, today, with the advances
in technology, the process of achiev-
ing the required on-air look can be
flexible and high quality. At the high
end, many branding systems, includ-
ing some channel-in-a-box (CIB)
systems, can meet and exceed the
requirements cost-effectively. Unlike
the early days, the on-air technology
no longer limits channel-branding
presentation. Tis throws the chal-
lenge back to the artists, designers
and even the accountants, to supply
effective branding materials, as, from
the broadcast engineering position,
Branding elements can comprise a variety of graphical elements, from the ever-
popular “bug” to cross-channel branding, but it is wise to start the promotion
before the show ends to avoid losing viewers to other channels.
308bew07-DE.indd 12 8/2/2013 2:06:31 PM
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14 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
TECHNOLOGY IN ACTION
BEYOND THE HEADLINES
New branding technology allows news channels to create templates for current
weather information, for instance, by taking metadata from the Internet.
we can present it on-air. It is up to
the channel’s creative powers, not
the technology.
Typically, graphics experts will
have produced the designs, and these
designs need information — text to
be added when it goes to air. Using
traditional TV equipment for video,
stills, text, animation, on-air mixing,
keying, sizing, positioning, timing
and sequencing, it can get complicat-
ed to do this live. For this reason, the
packages are pre-recorded so all that
has to happen to put the piece to air
is simply to replay the clip and cut it
on-air. at is possible with clips of
some length, but attempting to cue a
two-second bumper or sting — all a
part of the on-air look — would be
asking too much of VTRs. One way
around this is to pre-record every
break — sacrificing flexibility and
increasing workload. Another is the
cart machine, a mighty, elaborate
electromechanical wonder that could
do the job, but at a considerable cost.
Flexibility
Today with the agility of disk
storage, CIB, and other file-based
playout and graphic systems, the
whole workflow changes, becoming
more effi cient, much lower cost and
reliable. What stays the same are the
original graphic elements and their
choreography, which are designed
by experts. But now they are created
on computers and delivered as files.
Any additional branding elements
can be pre-programmed and added
live on-air with up-to-date informa-
tion from last-minute scheduling or
from Internet or metadata. e dy-
namic display of the graphics, videos,
new text, etc. is run live by the on-air
graphics engine.
Given the flexibility of modern
on-air graphics systems, there are
many ways the channel can grab
the viewers’ attention and deliver
the message that will keep them
on-channel. For example, as one
program is finishing a quick crawl,
a lower third or squeeze back can
show the ‘Coming Up Next’ — or, for
multichannel broadcasters, ‘Starting
Now On ...’ — messages over the end
credits. is can be effective with, or
without, a voice over. However, wait-
ing until the program ends is too late,
as viewers could already be scanning
other channels. Of course, the con-
tent of the message is important;
giving information about upcoming
similar programs could well attract
current viewers.
Channel branding vehicles can
comprise items such as trailers, break
bumpers, line-up menus, forthcom-
ing programs, and cross-platform and
cross-channel branding. But all this
needs to be delivered in such a way as
not to disturb or deter viewers from
watching the channel. For instance,
music channels create templates for the
singer/group and song title. Different
templates are oen used for differ-
ent shows, but the information comes
from the metadata of the clip, or from
the MAM, and is automatically shown
aer the clip starts and again near the
end. Also using the same metadata
or MAM, the coming-up-next clips
can be created and shown, even if the
music clips are interactive and shown
in viewer-rating order.
News channels can create tem-
plates for latest information. is can
be news tickers, share prices, weather
and exchange rates. ese may take
the metadata from a database, or the
Internet, to keep the information
current. Information can be shown
concurrently or sequentially with
added graphics generated by the com-
puter. So arrow-up, arrow-right and
arrow-down graphics can indicate the
direction of share-price movement
from the last-shown data or from the
day’s opening prices.
Remote channels
e most developed CIB systems
can comprise just commercial off-
the-shelf hardware and CIB soware.
Given reliable operation, playout sys-
tems based on this technology can
run fully redundant automatic remote
playout anywhere in the world via
the Internet. is can make deliver-
ing a TV station anywhere, complete
Channel branding
vehicles can comprise
items such as trailers,
break bumpers, line-up
menus, forthcoming
programs, and cross-
platform and cross-
channel branding.
308bew07-DE.indd 14 8/2/2013 3:15:32 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 15
TECHNOLOGY IN ACTION
BEYOND THE HEADLINES
The following are available on the
Broadcast Engineering website:
• Branding graphics
with local branding and content, an
economic reality, even for small audi-
ences. It enables the whole operation
to be run from an established broad-
cast center to worldwide locations at
a cost that makes sense.
Advertisement insertion systems
allow network content to be locally
branded. Targeting advertisements
for specific audiences with ad inser-
tion and digital program insertion, a
station can use local or network ad-
vertising to maximise the business
potential for the local audience.
All in a box
Some CIB systems offer a cost-
effective turnkey file-based solution
that combines video playback and rich
branding graphics — both generated
from the same box. en good graph-
ics and some simple programming is
all that is needed for the channel to be
considered one of the best available.
Modern viewers
Today’s viewers are far better
equipped than in past decades. Many
have PVRs and tend to watch pro-
grams later. ey will skip adverts
and many of the channel-branding
messages that link the programs.
is is another reason for the brand-
ing to start before the program ends
— even before the final credits. A
strap or crawl in the final minutes
of the program is becoming more
commonplace, as are lower thirds.
Lower thirds, however, really need to
be previewed to make sure that they
do not interfere with the program.
at can make this option more
labor-intensive.
Cross-platform branding is also
popular with most channels. Having a
website available for viewers to watch
other programs has distinct advantag-
es, as there is no PVR to fast forward
over the adverts and branding mes-
sages. Websites are also there to sell
channel-branded and other third-party
products, giving the broadcaster anoth-
er branding opportunity.
Social media also plays a key
role in channel branding. It allows
users to create, share and exchange
information and ideas. Many view-
ers comment about programs they
are watching on Twitter, Facebook,
LinkedIn and MySpace using hash
tags. ese hash tags allow chan-
nels to access more branding
opportunities, as well as deliver mes-
sages to both viewers and their social
media contacts.
Today many TV channels are in-
tegrating social media into their
programs, so to appear more live and
interactive with their viewers (al-
though many are computer-generated
with basic moderation to remove un-
wanted messages). A modern NRCS
can take feeds from news wires but
can also handle social message feeds
for the news program, website and
back to the social media feeds.
Channel branding is here to stay,
and it will continue to be a challenge
for broadcasters who strive to achieve
the best branding at the least cost. All
TV channels realize that the better the
channel branding, the better the bot-
tom line. Now, the second screen also
has to be incorporated into the chan-
nel-branding package, but automation
has to play a critical part in channel
branding, otherwise costs will rocket.
Branding is also about having good
programs. Good branding cannot
make up for bad programs; however,
good branding can make a channel
seem better than others showing sim-
ilar programming. is is especially
important for, say, music channels
that have access to essentially similar
music videos. Here branding can, and
does, make a difference.
BE
Don Ash is managing partner and director
of sales at PlayBox Technology.
Send questions and comments to:
editor@broadcastengineering.com ?
John M
DK-Technologies.com
DKyMETERyisytheyperfectyandyaffordabley‘Oneyboxysolution’yforyanyyAudioy
zyLoudnessyapplication.yVerticalyoryHorizontal,yLoggedyoryReal-timey
-yDKyMETERydeliversyoutstandingymeteringyprecisionyandyclearyread-outs,y
notymerelyyonyLoudness,ybutyacrossytheyfull range of audio metering tools
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308bew07-DE.indd 15 8/2/2013 3:15:51 PM
16 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
TransiTion To digiTal
DigitAlhAnDbook
C
ontent creation and distri-
bution have moved from a
tape-only infrastructure to
one that must now support
multiple hard media types, including
portable and fixed disks, as well as solid-
state memory. All of this requires
increasing amounts of mass storage,
and with that, more sophisticated and
complex workflows. With more con-
tent being handled in file-based form,
emphasis must now be placed on file
storage in the broadcast plant.
Integrated network storage
File-based data and digital con-
tent today can be stored and accessed
using essentially three types of ar-
chitectures, currently based on
the hard-disc drive (HDD): direct
attached storage (DAS), network at-
tached storage (NAS) and storage
area networks (SAN). In a DAS
system, storage devices are di-
rectly connected to — and ofen
physically integrated within — a
workstation or other client system;
one form of DAS is a set of hard drives
within a workstation, not necessarily
connected to a network.
With a DAS system, the storage
devices cannot be directly shared
with other clients, making effi-
cient workflows hard to implement:
Management systems are complex,
and many copies of the content will
exist in different places, making
version control extremely difficult.
However, when combined with a fast
interface, DAS systems can provide
fast data access, because each stor-
age device specifically supports the
system in which it is integrated. For
this reason, DAS has long been the
preferred solution in post-production.
But the use of DAS in broad-
cast workflows is rapidly declining,
because higher-bandwidth data net-
works have now made shared network
storage practical, resulting in im-
proved efficiencies and productivity.
Because DAS has the limitation that
stored data cannot be shared with
others for collaborative work, and
is difficult to coordinate and man-
age, content managers have been
switching to NAS, which allows the
stored content to be shared simul-
taneously among multiple clients.
NAS storage also has the advantage
of utilizing cost-effective high-speed
Ethernet interconnectivity, further
improving workflows.
A storage area network (SAN) is a
dedicated network that connects disk
storage devices directly to managing
servers, using block-storage proto-
cols; file management is lef up to the
controlling server. SANs have also
provided a method to readily access
shared content, using a specialized
high-speed optical fiber or GigE net-
working technology. With SANs,
access to data is at the block level,
similar to the physical-layer storage
on a hard-disk drive. SANs offer the
benefit of fast, real-time content sys-
tems, but that performance comes at
a financial cost. In order to provide
wide access to the content, SANs were
ofen combined with NAS, whereby
the latter filled the need for near-on-
line storage, with content archived in
Storage and workflow
Findyourassetswithproperdataorganization.
By Aldo Cugnini
a lower-cost, slower-access storage
tier. A SAN also requires a third-party
file system to be located on each client
system accessing the data on the stor-
age network with specialized network
adaptors. Tis makes interoperability
with other, more common file systems
a challenge.
In contrast, network attached
storage, as shown in Figure 1, oper-
ates at the file level, providing both
storage and a file system. Because of
the rapid drop in the cost of build-
ing and maintaining GigE networks,
as well as the increased performance
level of NAS networks, many content
producers and distributors are now
moving toward NAS technology for
content storage. In the past, in order
to assure 100-percent reliability, users
would rely on dual-redundant DAS
or SAN servers with redundant net-
work interfaces, so there would be no
single point of failure. But one of the
problems with DAS/SAN storage is
scalability; when content managers
need more storage, higher-speed ac-
cess, or more supported users, these
legacy systems most ofen required
redundant capacity, increased com-
plexity or completely new build-outs.
In contrast, a NAS system ofen can
scale easily, keeping up with perfor-
mance and storage needs, allowing for
Figure 1. NAS storage consolidates workflow assets.
Workstations
Local area network
Servers
Network
attached
storage
308bew09-DE.indd 16 8/2/2013 3:17:13 PM
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18 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
TransiTion To digiTal
DigitAlhAnDbook
growth, while combining the conve-
nience of a single expandable file
system with ease of use and uncom-
plicated management. NAS servers
ease system administration issues,
improve file sharing and reliability,
and provide high-speed performance.
By adding support for multiple pro-
tocols, Unix and NT users can share
stored files without requiring any spe-
cialized sofware on the clients. NAS
file network protocols include FTP,
HTTP and NFS, providing compat-
ibility with data management and
content editing systems, and allowing
versatile operating sofware to man-
age files, users and permissions easily.
Reliability and QC
For reliability, file storage systems
will ofen be grouped into redundant
clusters, with fail-safe prioritization.
One common way of doing this is in
a Redundant Array of Independent
Drives (RAID) storage cluster, which
uses either mirroring (full redun-
dancy) or mirroring combined with
striping (distributed data) to allow all
data to be accessible even if a num-
ber of drives fail. Mission-critical
drive systems can also be equipped
with redundant power supplies (or
with battery backup) and fans, with
nearly every component hot swappa-
ble, including the drives. In addition
to providing drive diagnostics, health
monitoring modules are available that
can anticipate and head off failures;
capacity expansion can be as simple
as adding more drive modules to an
existing system.
Solid-state drives (SSD), which
have gained popularity in small
laptops and netbooks, are based
on rapid-access Flash memory,
and would seem to be the next
phase of mass-storage technology.
SSD memory, which offers higher
speed and reliability than the Flash
memory used in USB thumb drives,
could offer performance gains com-
pared with disk-based storage.
However, SSD is probably several
years from practicality in the produc-
tion environment, because of high
cost, capacity limitations and unprov-
en long-term reliability. Although a
consumer-grade HDD currently
runs about E75 for a 1TB (terabyte =
1000GB) 2.5in drive, an SSD of the
same capacity and form factor would
cost about E450. Tat’s about E0.08/
GB for the HDD and E0.50/GB for the
SSD. (One hour of uncompressed 10-
bit 1080i requires 585GB.)
Today’s broadcast/production
workflow includes many component
processes. On the content ingest side
are satellite, Internet, and mobile asset
sources and interfaces. On the playout
side are various destinations, config-
ured for real-time and file-based I/O
that include wired and wireless inter-
faces. In between these sits the asset
management/browsing/editing/ar-
chiving functions, which invariably
rely on multiple storage solutions.
Transcoding to multiple platforms
is already of growing importance,
and with the ever-growing amount of
content that must now be processed
— much of it from amateur sources
— quality control has become a criti-
cal issue. Although human input had
served this function in the past, the
sheer volume of production material
now requires automated QC to keep
up, much of it available offline, in fast-
er-than-real-time capacity. In addition
to the high-level function of detecting
(and correcting when possible) file er-
rors, sophisticated sofware can now
detect and re-process incorrect video
formats (resolutions and frame rates)
and levels (skin tones, black levels);
digital artifacts like blockiness and
contouring can be flagged for re-
coding if possible. Sofware can now
monitor audio characteristics as well,
and provide a safeguard for dropouts
and even the now-important loudness
requirements of ATSC A/85, EBU
R-128 and EBU Tech 3341.
Future storage
requirements
Content handlers and producers
that have not yet upgraded to state-
of-the-art file storage will soon hit a
critical situation that will weigh heav-
ily on their CAPEX plans. Although
cloud solutions may offer a temporary
fix, data security and ease of manipu-
lation mean that a more permanent
and integrated solution must be ad-
dressed now.
BE
Aldo Cugnini is a consultant in the digital
television industry.
The following are available on the
Broadcast Engineering website:
• Terry White: His theories,
predictions and storage
workflow
Send questions and comments to:
aldo.cugnini@penton.com ?
Advanced Workflow Tutorial by Stan Moote from Harris Broadcast
308bew09-DE.indd 18 8/2/2013 3:17:19 PM
August2013|broadcastengineeringworld.com 19
Computers & Networks
DigitAlhAnDbook
i
f you have been working with
video over IP for a while, you
probably are aware of at least two
approaches for streaming content
over IP networks. Te first involves
moving professional video from the
venue back to the television network
facility, and the other is best-effort
streaming over the Internet.
Te first provides highly reliable
transmission over highly managed
networks, probably based on the
SMPTE 2022 family of standards.
Te second involves using video serv-
ers to stream content on the Web to
end-user computers, with less than
reliable results. Video freezes, audio
dropouts and total loss of the feed
are commonplace.
Professional transmission of video
over IP is reliable, but it is relatively
expensive, it requires the grooming
of networks to ensure available band-
width, and the technology is not
deployed in desktop computers and
smart phones. Te second provides
less than perfect results for people
who are trying to consume broad-
cast content on something other
than a television set. Broadcasters
and media companies needed a
different alternative.
ABR concept
Te solution comes in the form of
adaptive bit rate streaming (ABR).
ABR is a technique that is used in sev-
eral products, from Apple, Microsof
and others. While the specifics of the
technology vary, the concept is the
same. ABR technology allows the
streaming of video and audio over the
generic Internet without the afore-
mentioned problems by varying the
bit rate of the content being sent to the
consuming device, depending upon
the status of the link between sender
and receiver near the time the content
is to be consumed. Basically, the serv-
er sends high bit-rate content when a
high bit-rate connection is available to
the consumer, and it switches to lower
bit-rate content when the speed of the
connection is reduced.
Tere is a key concept behind ABR,
which allows everything to fall in to
place. Question: If you are receiving
a stream from a server, and you ini-
tially have a great connection, but you
move to a location with a poor con-
nection, how does the server know to
switch you from a higher bit-rate feed
to a lower bit-rate feed? Te answer is
that it doesn’t! It is the receiver that
requests the change.
Tis is a key concept in ABR. ABR
differs significantly from the video
over IP streaming that came before
it. ABR is a content pull technology,
meaning that it is the receiver that
requests the content, rather than
ABR streaming
learnmoreaboutthisinnovativewaytodeliver
contentoveriPlinksthatvaryinqualityovertime.
By Brad gilmer
the server that is pushing content to
the receiver.
In a system where the receiver pulls
content, the receiver knows whether
it has a high bit-rate connection to
the server or not. How does it know?
Tere are several ways for the receiver
to determine this. One technique is
to monitor video buffer levels in the
receiver. If the amount of video in the
buffer is decreasing, then the band-
width of the content is greater than
the available connection. Basically,
you are taking video out of the buf-
fer and feeding it to the display faster
than it is arriving at the input of the
receiver. If the amount of video in the
buffer is increasing, then the band-
width of the content is lower than
the available connection; the oppo-
site condition is true. You are taking
video out of the buffer and feeding it
to the display slower than it is arriving
at the input of the receiver.
Figure 1. As available link bandwidth changes, the receiver requests content encoded
at lower or higher bit rates.
Available
link
bandwidth
1.8Mb/s
800Kb/s
264Kb/s
E
n
c
o
d
e
d

b
i
t

r
a
t
e
Time
308bew10-DE.indd 19 8/2/2013 3:18:00 PM
20 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
Computers & Networks
DigitAlhAnDbook
In older IP streaming systems, if
the buffer in the receiver is being
depleted, at some point the buffer
empties and the video freezes (a buf-
fer underflow). Tere is nothing the
receiver can do about it.
But what if the receiver can talk
with the server? What if the re-
ceiver is able to choose between
several “channels,” all of which
contain identical content, but
compressed at a different bit
rate? And what if the receiver is able
to ask the sender to change the “chan-
nel” being sent to it dynamically? Te
receiver could monitor its buffer con-
dition. If the buffer was becoming
depleted, the receiver could ask the
server to send a lower bit-rate version
of the same feed. If the bit rate of the
content is low enough, it will arrive
much more quickly than the previ-
ously streamed high bit-rate content,
allowing the buffer to fill to a safe level.
Tis approach solves the freezing prob-
lem caused by buffer underflows.
But what about moving from a low
bit-rate connection to a higher one?
Te receiver continuously monitors
the available bandwidth. Exactly
how it does this varies from imple-
mentation to implementation,
but in one case, the receiver
probes the network by trying
to download a file that is essen-
tially bandwidth unlimited. It
notes the link speed, waits for some
period and then tries the download
again. If the receiver notices that more
bandwidth is available over a period
of time, it requests a higher bit-rate
“channel” from the server.
In many cases, users viewing an
ABR feed are unaware that “chan-
nel” switches are being made in the
background. In well-engineered ABR
systems, the steps between ABR “chan-
nels” are chosen to reduce drastic
changes in quality as the receiver moves
from one “channel” to another. Of
course, if the user is watching a feature
movie on a high-quality display and
the feed degrades quickly from high
bandwidth to low bandwidth, then
he or she is likely to see a difference.
However, if the change takes place over
the course of a few minutes, most users
will not see the difference. In any case,
a gradual loss of quality is much less
noticeable to end viewers compared to
a video freeze.
How exactly does this mechanism
work? How are the different “channels”
created? When a piece of content, a
feature-length movie, for example,
is ingested into an ABR system, it is
typically encoded at several different
bit rates. Te exact bit rates depend
upon the implementation, but, for our
example, let’s say we code at 1.8Mb/s,
800Kb/s and 264Kb/s. When the movie
is ingested, three separate renditions of
308bew10-DE.indd 20 8/2/2013 3:18:09 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 21
COMPUTERS & NETWORKS
DIGITAL HANDBOOK
Send questions and comments to:
editor@broadcastengineering.com ?
the movie exist on the server — one
for each bit rate. is may seem like
a waste of space, but it means that at
any time, when the receiver requests
a different bit rate, that coding rate al-
ready exists.
Chunking content
Here is another key concept of
ABR systems: Content is “chunked”
into many small files. A system may
chop up the recorded content into
three-second segments. So when the
whole ingest process is finished, a
single movie has been ingested and
converted into a number of three-
second chunks or files coded at
1.8Mb/s, the same movie has been
chunked into three-second files at
800Kb/s, and again, the same movie
has been chunked into three-second
files at 264Kb/s.
When a receiver sees that its buf-
fer is draining faster than it is being
refilled, the receiver sends a request
for the next chunk at a lower bit rate.
Assuming the same network condi-
tions, the lower bit-rate chunk can
be delivered more quickly, so the re-
ceiver buffer fills more rapidly. If this
lower bit-rate content can be delivered
quickly enough, then the receiver con-
tinues to request three-second chunks
from this lower bit-rate version until
network congestion improves.
Importantly, the chunking on each
file takes place at exactly the same time
so that the switch between the end
of one chunk of higher bit-rate con-
tent and a lower bit-rate chunk is not
disruptive to the viewer. Put anoth-
er way, the chunks are time-aligned
across different bit-rate renditions of
the movie. Chunk 1235 of the 1.8Mb/s
version is exactly the same content as
chunk 1235 of the 264Kb/s version.
Figure 1 on page 19 ties all of these
concepts together. In the top portion,
you can see that the available band-
width between the server and the
receiver changes over time. In the
lower portion of the figure, you can
see that the receiver requests high-
er or lower encoded bit-rate chunks
depending upon available link band-
width. is is the essence of ABR.
More to learn
ere is a lot to learn about ABR
technology. I hope that this introduc-
tory article whets your appetite and
that you will read more about this in-
novative way to deliver content over IP
links that vary in quality over time.
BE
Brad Gilmer is executive director of the
Video Services Forum, executive director
of the Advanced Media Workflow
Association and president of Gilmer
& Associates.
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308bew10-DE.indd 21 8/2/2013 3:18:17 PM
22 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
PRODUCTION ROOM
DIGITAL HANDBOOK
T
elevision broadcasting
changes quickly and is
being shaped by new usages
and services. Program offer-
ings and live events access continue
to grow significantly. Every day, news
and sports contribution feed provid-
ers face the challenge of juggling the
number of programs they must de-
liver and available bandwidth. As the
number of programs is not constant,
broadcasters and service providers
need to continually optimize the use
of their bandwidth on their transport
multiplexes. Today, this process is pri-
marily done by a manual intervention
with limited scalability.
e MPEG standards offer an al-
ternative way of managing bandwidth
constraints dynamically named
Piecewise CBR, which can be used
to address this challenge and make
the operational workflow as effi cient
as possible. is new mode allows
a dynamic and seamless change of
the video elementary stream bit rate.
Operators in a truck or in a facil-
ity can use it to adapt and optimize
the bandwidth allocated to each sig-
nal with no interruption of service.
Seamless Channel Insertion (SCI)
provides flexibility and opens au-
tomation possibilities in complex
contribution networks.
Multifeed contribution
context
Sports television program provid-
ers know well that the duration of a
soccer game is not always 90 minutes,
and the game may go into overtime.
Tennis finals can be delayed because
of rain, and a golf tournament could
last longer than expected. In this sit-
uation, a new channel may need to be
added in the multiplex while other
programs are unexpectedly overlap-
ping the scheduled transmission slot.
Hence, the sports feed distributor
could face a peak of usage in its mul-
tiplexes because the line-up of feeds
to deliver becomes too important
at the time. Live feed turn-around
operations are oen subject to im-
mediate changes, but it is unlikely
that world feed distributors will get
in touch with satellite or fiber ser-
vice providers to instantly adapt the
Seamless Channel
Insertion
The technology simplifies multiplex management.
BY NICOLAS MOREAU
bandwidth capacity. erefore, an
extra bandwidth capacity margin
will be rented and saved to be used
“just in case.”
On the technical side, in
a typical contribution mul-
tiplex, multiple-program
transport stream (MPTS),
each program bit rate needs to
be taken into account when booking
or planning the transport bandwidth
capacity. is capacity will depend
on the number of programs to turn
around, including their specifica-
tions, such as the video format, the
number of audio channels, the type
of audio and the targeted video qual-
ity. erefore, optimizing the use of
the bandwidth in the multiplex can
become complex.
The challenge: Avoiding
service disruption when
applying changes
As the program line-up could vary,
the operator needs to free some band-
width in the broadcasted multiplex
to add a new channel in it. Moreover,
this needs to be done without af-
fecting the current services on-air.
Contribution content distributors,
such as Eurovision, from time to time,
need to adjust the video bit rate of
each video encoder in the same mul-
tiplexed MPTS.
Contribution video encoders con-
figured in classic CBR need to stop
and restart to produce a new MPEG-2
transport stream with a new video bit
rate. is induces a stream discontinu-
ity and therefore a “black” screen. Even
if this “pause” is generally short at the
encoder level, any MPEG-2 transport
stream disruption will cause a disrup-
tion at the decoder level, or should we
say, at the viewer level.
Optimizing the use
of the bandwidth in
the multiplex can
become complex.
Definition
Seamless Channel Insertion (SCI) is based on the open/nonproprietary standard
called Piecewise CBR. Piecewise CBR extends the conventional constant-bit-rate
mode (CBR) for digital video compression by allowing the change of the program bit
rate on demand and without any disruption at the receiving end. Between each bit-rate
change, the program is encoded at a constant bit rate. Because it relies on features
offered by the MPEG open standards at both transport stream and elementary stream
levels, Piecewise CBR feeds can be decoded without change using existing MPEG
receiver devices.
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24 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
Production room
DigitAlhAnDbook
Considering that the new channel
added in the multiplex line-up has to
start at a time that may not be con-
venient for the other channels to be
interrupted, this could lead to stress-
ful situations for the operators.
In order to fit one or more chan-
nels in the multiplexed MPTS, the
video bit rate of each current encoder
needs to be reduced. Te MPTS needs
to remain continuous, without dis-
ruption, even if a program is added
or removed. Adding or removing
a program in the multiplex should
not impact the continuity of the
other programs.
SCI rate control
Real-time video compression
with MPEG-2 or H.264 technology
can provide two common types of
streams with regards to the bit rate
control. A bit rate control algorithm
in the encoder is necessary to ensure
that the buffers at the encoder and de-
coder do not underflow or overflow[1].
Constant-bit-rate control is com-
monly used in the video contribution
domain as it provides a constant bit
rate that is mandatory for bandwidth
planning and video quality assur-
ance. Variable bit rate (VBR) is not
commonly used in the contribution
domain or primary distribution as it
provides streams with bit rates that
change, regardless of the targeted av-
erage video quality it maintains.
Still, VBR control has the interesting
particularity of allowing the change of
the elementary stream bit rates while
maintaining the consistency of the
output MPEG-2 transport stream. Te
SCI rate control mode is based on this
VBR rate control mode, except that
the video elementary stream will be
changed according to the operator’s
request and not as a result of a video
encoder algorithm.
Tis has no impact on the MPEG-TS
multiplexing, which combines the
elementary streams (video, audio
channels and null packets) at the
encoder level. Te output is a trans-
port stream with a constant bit
rate[2], which contains a video el-
ementary stream running at a new
bit rate. Hence, the size of the MPTS
at the output of the multiplexer is
not changed.
Starting from four HD services
running at 12Mb/s each, the operation
procedure for adding a fifh channel
into the multiplex using SCI would be
as follows:
• Te operator calculates 48Mb/s ÷
5 = 9.6Mb/s;
• Te operator assigns a new 9.6Mb/s
bit rate to each encoder service by
using a manual entry (typically using
a dedicated Web graphic interface or
a network management system that
controls the encoders over SNMP).
Eurovision‘s use
of Seamless Channel Insertion
Eurovision is a distributor of sports and news content for the world’s broadcast
and media platforms. As such, Eurovision faced the issue of its television program
line-up changing regularly.
“The content broadcasted is very versatile, especially in terms of duration on-
the-air,” says Eurovision special project director, Puiu Dolea. “The distributed
services line-up can be reshaped several times within the same day. We needed
more flexibility from our encoding platform.”

ATEME has implemented SCI rate control in its Kyrion line of contribution encod-
ers at the request of Eurovision, allowing operators to change video bit rates on
the fly with no service interruption. The streams delivered to EBU members and
affiliates are still constant bit rate, but their bit rates can now be changed with-
out affecting the consistency of the entire turn-around multiplex. There was no
impact, no change of firmware or disruption on the receiver side following the
implementation. ATEME’s Kyrion CM5000 contribution encoder supports SCI.
Seamless bit rate transition
48Mb/s MPTS multiplex
Service 1
12Mb/s 9.6Mb/s
Service 2
12Mb/s
9.6Mb/s
Service 3
12Mb/s
9.6Mb/s
Service 4
12Mb/s
9.6Mb/s
New channel
Service 5
Service 1 9.6Mb/s
Service 2 9.6Mb/s
Service 3 9.6Mb/s
Service 4 9.6Mb/s
Service 5 9.6Mb/s
Figure 1. Example of a 48Mb/s multiplex of four services being modified to five services
Seamless bit rate transition
Service 1
12Mb/s
Service 2
12Mb/s
Service 3
12Mb/s
Service 4
12Mb/s
Service 1 9.6Mb/s
Service 2 9.6Mb/s
Service 3 9.6Mb/s
Service 4 9.6Mb/s
Service 5 9.6Mb/s
Figure 2. Example of a 48Mb/s multiplex of five services being modified to four services
308bew11-DE.indd 24 8/2/2013 3:19:19 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 25
PRODUCTION ROOM
DIGITAL HANDBOOK
e new service bit rate is applied al-
most instantaneously;
• Once the four original encoders
have been set to their new output bit
rates, the operator can enable the fih
encoder to stream to the multiplexer.
(See Figure 1.)
Starting from five HD services
running at 9.6Mb/s each, a channel
is removed as the program line-up
changes to four services:
• e operator switches off the un-
wanted service;
• e operator calculates 48Mb/s ÷
4 = 12Mb/s;
• e operator assigns a new 12Mb/s
bit rate to each encoder service. e
new service bit rate is applied almost
instantaneously, in this case allow-
ing an enhanced quality for those
services that remain in the multiplex.
(See Figure 2.)
Control options
When SCI mode is selected, this
allows the operator to set a new
output bit rate at any time for each
encoder service from the Web GUI
or over an SNMP command. e
new value will be applied almost in-
stantaneously. Implementation into
the user’s interface of the encoders
allows the operator to control the
stream easily. Using an SNMP inter-
face, the multiplex operator is able to
integrate this new functionality into
a network management system and
therefore perform even more complex
multiplex bandwidth management
functions. By allowing operators to
create a bandwidth schedule, the op-
erator is able to know in advance the
bandwidth he or she needs to book
from the satellite service provider at
a certain date and time.
Conclusion
Getting the most of the allocat-
ed capacity is an exciting prospect
for contribution feed broadcasters.
However, it could quickly become
highly challenging as the layout of
the television programs line-up in
the MPTS can change depending on
the nature of the events. SCI, an al-
ternate rate control mode available
in some MPEG-2/MPEG-4 contribu-
tion encoders, while remaining in full
compliance with the standards and
best practices, provides a new level of
operating flexibility to broadcasters.
is new technology will help contri-
bution professionals plan and manage
a feed multiplex or a turn-around feed
bouquet at its best, without wasting
bandwidth for the “just in case” situ-
ation that may or may not occur.
[1] Bit-Rate Control Using Piecewise,
Approximated Rate–Distortion
Characteristics, Liang-Jin Lin, Member,
IEEE, and Antonio Ortega, Member,
IEEE - IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON
CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR
VIDEO TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 8, NO.
4, AUGUST 1998
[2] ISO/IEC13818-1 - Information
technology — generic coding of mov-
ing pictures and associated audio
information: Systems
BE
Nicolas Moreau is senior product
marketing manager at ATEME and in
charge of the product marketing of the
Kyrion contribution encoders
and decoders.
The following are available on the
Broadcast Engineering website:
• The form factor of Ultra HD TV
will be its undoing
• If 4K imagery is on the way,
then the question becomes how
soon?
Send questions and comments to:
editor@broadcastengineering.com ?
+1 (217) 344-1243 / sales@cobaltdigital.com / cobaltdigital.com
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ENGINEERING FOR TOMORROW’S BROADCASTTM
308bew11-DE.indd 25 8/2/2013 3:19:27 PM
26 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Feature
TodAy’s digiTAl newsroom
26 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
The changing demands of news consumers has
contributed to the rise of a new breed of digital
newsroom outfitted with fast, scalable systems.
308bew18-DE.indd 26 8/2/2013 2:09:36 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 27
FEATURE
TODAY’S DIGITAL NEWSROOM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 27
T
he advent of the 24-hour
news cycle and the tremen-
dous number of broadcast
outlets covering local, re-
gional and global news are driving
a technology revolution in today’s
newsrooms. Being relevant and gain-
ing and keeping viewers depends on
speed and agility. In the newsroom,
time is money.
Quickly and reliably executing
the entire production workflow is
critical to news organizations. End-
to-end live broadcast technology
enables stations to gather, prepare
and broadcast news as it breaks.
Within this workflow, integrated
editing, storage, and archiving tools
and soware are delivering new
speed, reliability and capabilities.
TODAY’S
Nonlinear editing tools provide
timeline editing with no rendering
required for fast-turnaround news
production and to improve rough-
cut edits by adding text, graphics and
voice-over recordings.
Highly flexible storage solutions,
based on scalable and modular ar-
chitecture and including metadata,
enable operators and journalists to
browse and search by keywords, and
to edit content. Content can also be
instantly accessed throughout the en-
tire network for production, editing
or playout. Today’s editing, storage
and archiving tools are more nimble
and robust than ever before, bringing
new levels of speed, productivity and
reliability to newsrooms and to our
daily news.
Newsrooms today have to be fast to keep relevant.
BY HENRY ALEXANDER
digital newsroom
Creating the workflow
Moving the production workflow
from tape-based to digital was the
first step of innovation and ushered in
a tremendous change to the industry
and to those who work in televi-
sion news. But the innovation hasn’t
stopped there. Advances across the
workflow — greater integration, more
speed and new agility — are making
newsrooms themselves more scalable,
flexible and streamlined, and thereby
more cost effi cient. Modular and open
systems are delivering outstanding re-
turns on investment. Let’s take a look
inside the digital newsroom, an ex-
ample of which is shown in Figure 1
on page 28, and see how it all happens.
• Ingest. Ingesting live video feeds
is where the production process
308bew18-DE.indd 27 8/2/2013 2:10:36 PM
28 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Feature
TodAy’s digiTAl newsroom
begins. In the most productive news-
rooms, any SD or HD feed can be
ingested, most often through an
encoder platform or server-based
technology. Best-of-breed encoders
support all codecs and formats, and
can be configured either as an encod-
er or playout channel for maximum
infrastructure flexibility. Intelligent
server technology handles all in-
gest functions, recording multiple
video feeds and making this media
available throughout the production
workflow for simultaneous preview,
rough editing, archiving, playback
or post-production. A process of
loop recording can ensure that no
incoming feeds are missed during
recording, even when they’re not
scheduled or managed. Te feeds
are then available throughout the
production network.
Regardless of ingest method, the
ingest process must be managed. In
today’s workflows, this is most ofen
achieved through integrated produc-
tion management applications that
give the user complete control of pro-
duction workflow, from ingest control
and metadata management to on-the-
fly editing and playout scheduling,
ofen from a single intuitive interface.
Ease of use is key, with the goal of
enabling every member of a produc-
tion team to use the system without
extensive training. Talent should
be focused on operating and edit-
ing tasks, not on figuring out how to
use complex systems. Tese systems
Production Remote access
Web browsing
and clipping
Tape
digitization
Central
newsroom
Ingest
Post-production
Playout
control
Archive
management
Home viewers
worldwide
Mobile
device users
Files
Figure 1. The new digital newsroom is fast, integrated and tapeless — and
capable of making news available to consumers on a range of devices.
Sky News Arabia uses EVS XS servers, IPDirector video production management suite, Xedio CleanEdit editing applications
and XStore SAN storage in its digital newsroom.
308bew18-DE.indd 28 8/2/2013 2:11:04 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 29
FEATURE
TODAY’S DIGITAL NEWSROOM
must also integrate with third-party
resources. System and components
accessibility is critical, as it helps
streamline all aspects of the workflow
and save resources.
A discussion of media ingest is not
complete without addressing storage.
e ability to easily access and browse
stored media is a critical aspect of the
entire workflow and can be a signifi-
cant stumbling block if not handled
correctly. Footage from ENG crews
can be imported directly — in the
right format and codec — with simple
tools that enable editing, browsing,
transfer and transcoding of all clips
to central storage. ese manage-
ment tools send all media to central
storage, oen removable storage plat-
forms well suited to live broadcast
operations. Regardless of media origi-
nation, these systems offer short- and
long-term archiving of clips, audio/
video feeds and highlights with all as-
sociated metadata, where editors can
easily browse and search content by
keyword or edit media content. Media
can also be accessed throughout the
entire network for production, edit-
ing or playout.
• Content management and time-
line news editing. Once content is
quickly and effi ciently ingested and
stored, it needs to be ready for imme-
diate editing and preparation for air.
Workstations are equipped to allow
users to browse incoming feeds and
prepare rough-cut edits by creating
simple playlists. Playlists can then be
pushed to nonlinear editing systems,
allowing access to any frame in a clip
for additional editing, or directly to
playout if required.
is allows editors to use the wide
range of nonlinear editing and news
cutting tools available in the mar-
ketplace today, and greatly improves
the speed and quality of their media
editing. For instance, timeline edit-
ing with no required rendering is
used to improve rough-cut edits by
adding text and graphics, to prepare
news reports, and to enable voice-over
recordings. Support for multiple for-
mats and resolutions on the same
timeline and robust metadata man-
agement features are other examples
of tools that can increase editing
speed and quality.
• Post-production integration.
Digital workflows should fully in-
tegrate cra editors with ingest and
production processes and online
storage, facilitating rapid file ex-
change with external post-production
applications. Editing suites often
use plug-ins to enable rapid post-
production file rendering so playout
begins as soon as editing is completed.
Production systems should seamlessly
integrate with all major editing so-
ware from Avid, Apple and Adobe.
• Playout. Like other parts of the
digital production workflow, there
is more than one option for playout.
Server technology, encoder/playout
systems or even off-the-shelf news-
room control systems (NRCS) such
as ENPS can accommodate playout.
e key is interoperability. Playout
technology — either via a server
or encoder — and soware-based
management technology must inter-
operate to achieve successful playout
operations, ensuring all clips and as-
sociated metadata can be accessed,
complete playlist functions are facili-
tated, and news stories are managed
across the news workflow. Additional
tools and soware enable capabilities
such as live slow motion and timeslip
operations for fast review of events,
or delay of events so that nothing
is missed.
• Web service integration. As media
organizations move to push their news
over multiple platforms, Web service
integration is an increasingly impor-
tant part of the process. Metadata is
added to the workflow system, indi-
cating which platform should receive
media files and the type of content
contained within the file.
One size does not fit all
ere are many options, both in
terms of system architecture and so-
ware and hardware, to achieve highly
reliable and digital workflows. ere
are now turnkey, yet feature-rich, sys-
tems designed for small and regional
newsrooms. ere is no right answer,
only the best fit for an individual news
organization. How many feeds must
be handled? Is the newsroom oper-
ating globally, regionally or locally,
and is this reality likely to change?
Parameters such as budgets, future
plans and existing infrastructure can
all play a part.
Integrated digital systems provide
the ability to scale and evolve with a
broadcaster’s needs. ey need to be
nimble to accommodate technology
advancements, organizational chang-
es or new workflow approaches. Yet
building these types of systems re-
quires long-term commitment and
trust between broadcaster and tech-
nology provider.
New challenges are sure to emerge.
Many news providers are now oper-
ating as multiplatform providers,
making news available online, on
radio, and to a range of connected
devices — including mobile phones
and laptops — so consumers can ac-
cess news at all times, wherever they
are. is capability is critical to lever-
aging greater revenue and reaching
larger audiences in the future. ere’s
a new breed of newsroom: It’s tape-
less. It’s fast. It’s scalable. And it’s fully
interoperable.
BE
Henry Alexander is SVP, entertainment
and news, at EVS.
Send questions and comments to:
editor@broadcastengineering.com ?
There are many options, both in terms
of system architecture and software
and hardware, to achieve highly
reliable and digital workflows.
308bew18-DE.indd 29 8/2/2013 2:11:30 PM
30 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
IBC 2013
PRODUCT PREVIEW
30 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
308bew16-DE.indd 30 8/2/2013 3:31:43 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 31
IBC 2013
PRODUCT PREVIEW
PRODUCT PREVIEW
2013
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 31
IBC is a big event for everyone in the business of content creation, manage-
ment, and delivery of electronic media and entertainment. Second only to NAB
in visitor numbers, it attracts exhibitors and attendees from all over Europe
and beyond.
For most visitors, it’s all about meeting with vendors, attending the confer-
ence sessions and general networking. Outside the conference and exhibition,
there are special events for those at the top and for aspiring entrants. The IBC
Leaders Summit allows C-level executives to meet and discuss strategy in this
fast changing business. For those just out of college looking to the sector for
their futures, the IBC Rising Stars program will introduce young people to the
industry with presentations from senior professionals, as well as guided tours
of the show floor.
This preview highlights some of the many products releases at the show. For
many of the readers, the primary reason for attending the show is to find out
what is new. Exhibitions still present a special way to discover new products,
something that the web has not yet ousted. There is nothing like the show-and-
tell from a product manager for a real insight into a new product.
Broadcast Engineering will be providing video interviews during the show on
key new product introductions, and we are again running our BE@IBC blog
(broadcastengineering.com/blog/beibc) with news and product announcements
in the run up to the show.
308bew16-DE.indd 31 8/2/2013 3:31:50 PM
32 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
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advanced design in size and position to
minimize bumps between sections of
track; specialized wheel material prevents
bumps and shake in motion.
www.telemetricsinc.com
stand: 11.e37
CLOuD COntent stOrAGe
MAnAGeMent systeM
Front Porch Digital LYNXdr,
LYNXlocal
LYNXdr is a hosted disaster recovery ser-
vice that allows global media enterprises
to centralize critical assets and consoli-
date operations; LYNXlocal is a simple
extension to LYNX that operates locally
as an appliance, caching cloud content
and providing integration to specialized
systems if needed; LYNXlocal is billed as
a service element at a low monthly rate.
www.fpdigital.com
stand: 7.D14
ViDeO streAMinG AnD
reCOrDinG AppLiAnCe
Matrox Video Monarch HD
Small, easy-to-use video streaming and
recording appliance designed for pro-
fessional video producers who need to
simultaneously stream a live event and
record a mastering-quality version for
post-event editing; provides these two
independent delivery channels in an in-
tegrated unit; from any HDMI input
source such as a camera or switcher, the
unit generates an H.264-encoded stream
compliant with RTSP or RTMP protocol.
www.matrox.com
stand: B.729
CeLLuLAr newsGAtHerinG
pLAtFOrM
Dejero LIVE+ Platform Version 2.9
New remote control feature gives
broadcast operators an easy means of con-
trolling Dejero’s LIVE+ Transmitter and
LIVE+ VSET mobile ENG systems from
any studio or remote location using any
HTML5-enabled Web browser, including
those running on mobile devices; an up-
dated codec is able to product much better
audio quality at similar bit rates than
previous versions; update also includes
improvements to transmission reliability.
www.dejero.com
stand: 11.C21
sAteLLite terMinAL
Vislink Advent MsAt
Fully integrated satellite terminal, capa-
ble of supporting either a 90cm or 120cm
antenna; new motorized version is a full
tri-band optioned system that can sup-
port X, Ka and Ku band configurations,
capable of delivering HD video and data
from anywhere in the world; feeds can
also be swapped in the field; motorized
version offers improved data throughput
rates of up to 10Mb/s, making it ideal for a
first-on-the-scene broadcast uplink.
www.vislink.com
stand: 1.A9
MeDiA trAnsFOrMAtiOn
pLAtFOrM
Wohler RadiantGrid
Version 8 release contains new media
processing engine that provides faster-
than-real-time content transformation;
performs complete intelligent analysis
of all inbound media while retaining
technical metadata at container, essence
and frame levels; brings optimized video
pipeline features such as anamorphic
video handling, 2K/4K support and
higher bit depths of up to 16-bit YUV;
adds full color legalization in both the
PAL and NTSC domains; enables fully
compliant OTT offerings for Microsof
Smooth Streaming, MPEG-DASH, HLS,
H.265/HEVC and more.
www.wohler.com
stand: 10.B10
308bew16-DE.indd 32 8/2/2013 3:31:58 PM
August2013|broadcastengineeringworld.com 33
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
Shotgun mic
DPA Microphones d:dicate 4017C
Combines 4017 shotgun capsule with
compact C preamp to create mic that
is ideal for boom recording in tight
spaces and rooms where ceiling height
is limited; offers same functionality as
4017B-R, which is the shotgun micro-
phone in a Rycote Windshield; 4017C-R
offers smaller Rycote Windshield to give
outside broadcasters, journalists and lo-
cation filmmakers everything they need
for clear, directional sound regardless of
weather or environmental conditions.
www.dpamicrophones.com
Stand: 8.D76
ViDeo monitor
Flanders Scientific cm320tD
32in, 10-bit panel with 1920 x1080 native
resolution; CFE2 (custom LUT import),
simultaneous monitoring of two inputs;
suited for all post-production applica-
tions, but also a capable field monitor with
weight (9.5kg) and power consumption
(max 50W) on par with smaller monitors.
www.flandersscientific.com
Stand: 10.F39
BAtch-proceSSing
louDneSS tool
NUGEN Audio LMB
New optional feature will analyze and
correct MXF files without converting
to WAV format; option saves corrected
files to MXF format and preserves all
other data in file; supports OP-Atom
and OP1a formats, as well as PCM audio
data (including D10-encoded PCM);
offline file-based loudness analysis and
correction program designed for rapid
assessment and correction of files for
loudness and true-peak content; com-
pliant with ITU-R BS. 1770 and EBU
R128-based specifications.
www.nugenaudio.com
Stand: 7.F07
monitoring AnD
control SyStem
Axon Cerebrum
Simultaneously monitors, controls all ele-
ments of broadcaster’s infrastructure; will
target all applications where some form
of broadcast facility monitor or control is
required; brings together all requirements
for safe, flexible broadcast operation.
www.axon.tv
Stand: 10.A21/B21
contriBution encoDer
ATEME Kyrion CM5000
High-performance encoder for contribu-
tion, distribution links; features unique
FPGA design, permitting complete sof-
ware upgradability from SD to HD or 4:2:0
to 4:2:2; feature upgrades include a solu-
tion for video multiplex operators called
the Seamless Channel Insertion (SCI),
based on open standard/nonproprietary
Piecewise CBR control rate mode; allows
broadcast contribution network operators
to smoothly insert or remove channels in
an MPTSystem.
www.ateme.com
Stand: 1.D71
4K mini-conVerter
AJA Video Systems hi5-4K
Provides simple 4K monitoring connection using four 3G-SDI outputs to 1.4a HDMI
inputs; enables a flexible 3G/HD-SDI to HDMI conversion for HD workflow; audio
embedded in the SDI input is passed as embedded audio in the 4K HDMI output.
www.aja.com
Stand: 7.F11
Launch extra channels and
ON-DEMAND
SERVICES

without extra manpower
MediaGeniX
Hall 3, Booth C59
308bew16-DE.indd 33 8/2/2013 3:32:04 PM
34 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
Archive mAnAgement
service
SGL Broadcast Notification Service
New subscription service enables material
to be transferred directly into the archive;
archive management is further enhanced
by the addition of intelligent amalgama-
tion services including optimizing tape
and tape-head usage without limiting ac-
cess to individual files; separate elements
of an amalgamated archive can still be
identified and easily retrieved; allows
users to subscribe to messaging about
processes, material and hardware for ef-
fective workflow monitoring.
www.sglbroadcast.com
stand: 7.J15a
Fluorescent light pAnel
Photon Beard Square One
Fluorescent lighting panel measures 1f
square (30cm), and produces more light,
more economically; includes eight 5/8in
diameter fluorescent tubes that deliver
the equivalent of 110W of balanced il-
lumination, but at only 64W; dimmable
for maximum flexibility; can be pow-
ered either direct from AC power or for
approximately one hour with a V- or
Gold-mount camera battery.
www.photonbeard.com
stand: 11.D43
DAW
Avid Pro Tools 11
Latest version enables audio professionals
to take on the most demanding produc-
tions with new, high-powered audio and
video engines, 64-bit architecture, ex-
panded metering and direct HD video
workflows; offline bounce delivers mixes
up to 150 times faster than real time; low-
latency input buffer ensures ultra-low
latency record monitoring without sacri-
ficing plug-in performance.
www.avid.com
stand: 7.J20
soFtWAre ApplicAtion
For yellobriks
LYNX Technik yelloGUI
Complementary software application
permits select yellobriks to be config-
ured over USB using a PC and a MAC;
gives users an enhanced level of yellobrik
configuration for advanced features and
settings; user interface, like the yellobrik
modules, is designed to be simple and in-
tuitive; once the module is connected, a
virtual image of the module is displayed
showing the user all switches, controls
and module indicators.
www.lynx-technik.com
stand: 8.c70
leD Fresnel
videssence viDnel vn100
100W, high color rendering LED Fresnel
fixture; provides single shadow and fo-
cusing characteristics essential to Fresnel
fixtures while using a fraction of the
power of tungsten units; fixture gener-
ates strong directional beam of adjustable
light with even coverage of 3200K color
(5600K optional); delivers flicker-free
dimming without color shif.
www.videssence.tv
stand: 11.b12
logo keyer
Crystal Vision MultiLogo
Logo keyer provides three layers of key-
ing from variety of internal and external
sources, including a 4GB or 8GB video
store which can hold up to 500 still or
animated logos; included MultiLogo
Control Sofware makes it easy to get
graphics on screen; can embed up to four
audio groups into its video outputs, with
audio mixing allowing output audio to be
generated from a mix of audio embedded
on video input and a voiceover sourced
from either the two internal audio stores
or from an external AES input.
www.crystalvision.tv
stand: 2.b11
File-bAseD meDiA
processing soFtWAre
Digital Rapids Transcode Manager 2.0
Powered by the Kayak technology plat-
form; designed to seamlessly blend media
transformation and workflow processes
while providing operational efficiency and
agility for applications from production
and archive to multiscreen distribution;
advanced capabilities include automat-
ed decision-making with rich metadata
support, flexible visual workflow design
tools, and easy integration of new and
emerging technologies.
www.digitalrapids.com
stand: 7.F33
4k cAmerA
blackmagic Design
production camera 4k
High-resolution 4K digital film cam-
era with innovative large Super 35 size
sensor and professional global shutter;
combined with precision EF mount op-
tics and high-quality Apple ProRes 422
(HQ) file recording; supports the new 6G-
SDI video connection for use in live video
production; high-resolution LCD display;
built-in capacitive touchscreen.
www.blackmagicdesign.com
stand: 7.h20
option For tm7/tm9
AuDio monitor
rtW blits
Part of the SW20013 sofware license re-
cently issued by the company; designed
to generate and analyze BLITS test sig-
nals; BLITS (Black & Lane’s Ident Tones
for Surround) enables testing for channel
allocation, level and phase of 5.1 sur-
round signals.
www.rtw.de
stand: 8.D92
308bew16-DE.indd 34 8/2/2013 3:32:12 PM
August2013|broadcastengineeringworld.com 35
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
TrAnscode fArm
conTroller
AmberFin iCR Transcode
Farm Controller
Builds on multiformat transcode capa-
bilities by significantly increasing the
flexibility and versatility of a multinode
transcode environment; brings im-
proved resilience and robustness while
simultaneously generating cost savings
through more versatile network licens-
ing capabilities.
www.amberfin.com
stand: 7.H39
Audio And
wAveform moniTor
dK-Technologies PT0800
Offers an extended collection of
high-quality video and waveform mon-
itoring tools; video section is flanked
by an audio toolbox, complete with bar
graphs, moving coil emulation, the com-
pany’s StarFish display technology and
FFT spectrum analysis; complies with
all major broadcast standards; includes
loudness and true peak logging; allows for
virtually any combination of audio and
video tools to be viewed and adapted to
the specific application and use.
www.dk-technologies
stand: 8.B60
mulTiviewers
Miranda Kaleido-MX/
Kaleido-Modular-X
Combine weight, space and power ef-
ficiencies with video scaling quality;
designed to be easy to select, configure
and install, whether in large studios or
OB trucks; Kaleido-Modular-X I/O cards
enable monitoring systems to be created
within a 3RU, air-cooled Densité 3 frame;
Kaleido-Modular-X modules use a pow-
erful CPU to drive advanced features
and provide excellent video and graphics
quality, including the ability to split pro-
cessing between frames.
www.miranda.com
stand: 8.d41
PlAyouT And disTriBuTion
AuTomATion sysTem
Pebble Beach Systems Marina
New is the SmartPanel, a user-config-
urable feature that gives customers the
ability to design their own control pan-
els within the Marina user interface;
SmartPanel brings system manage-
ment benefits by improving reporting
and traceability, as commands made via
the SmartPanel are incorporated into
Marina’s AsRun log.
www.pebble.tv
stand: 8.B58
usB Hd Audio inTerfAce
Yellowtec PUC2
Offers support for Windows and OSX;
powered via USB; offers AES-3 digi-
tal audio (XLR) and balanced analog
line-level audio (XLR) connectivity si-
multaneously; delivers up to 192kHz at
24-bit with a dynamic range of 105dB;
features zero-latency monitoring that
allows users to monitor their recording
signal in real time; an AUX output lets
users connect a pair of headphones for
quick checks of the audio signal.
www.yellowtec.com
stand: 8.A51
sTudio Audio moniTor
Tsl sAm1 3Gm+mAdi
Designed for both fixed and mobile broadcast facilities, as well as systems integrators
who have embraced MADI; provides multiple-source monitoring of up to 20 channels
of audio from MADI, embedded HD-SDI, AES and analog sources on a user-configu-
rable screen; provides immediate access to any combination of formats.
www.tsl.co.uk
stand: 10.B41
Analyse your
SCHEDULE
COST
and stock value in real-time
MediaGeniX
Hall 3, Booth C59
308bew16-DE.indd 35 8/2/2013 3:32:17 PM
36 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
VirtuAl trAcking
cAmerA heAd
Shotoku SX-300VR
Pan-and-tilt head features high-accuracy,
real-time data output, as well as compat-
ibility with a wide range of camera and lens
configurations; combines with the Serial
Position Interface (SPI) for frame-syn-
chronized high-resolution data tracking;
VISCAM Fluid-Leaf Drag System supplies
smooth continuously adjustable pan-and-
tilt drag with enhanced torque and high
levels of operator control; capable of sup-
porting payloads up to 39kg.
www.shotoku.co.uk
Stand: 11.F40
mediA ASSet mAnAgement
Snell Momentum
New features include an HTML5 browser-
independent interface, a Published Web
Services API to allow simple interactions
among business systems, and complete
integration with Snell’s ICE channel-in-
a-box and Morpheus automation systems;
now includes support for an even broader
range of external systems; configurable
sidecar XML export allows increased
interoperability with extender systems;
Enhanced FTP watch folder support sim-
plifies electronic delivery workflows and
reduces media transfers.
www.snellgroup.com
Stand: 8.B70
mAm SyStem
NOA Audio Solutions mediArc
Features new enhancements for inclusion
of rich media, including full support for
videoscene detection, updated streaming
servers for easier intranet content preview
of rich content and video content; adds
ability to launch retranscoding export op-
erations via API from lossless compressed
video archive formats.
www.noa-audio.com
Stand: 8.d91
heAdend
Rohde & Schwarz R&S AVHE100
Can now handle multiple multiplexes on
a single R&S AVS100 processing platform;
just one device is needed to generate mul-
tiple physical layer pipes (PLPs) for the
DVB-T2 standard; has just a few hard-
ware components, making it compact;
core components are the R&S AVS 100
audio/video server and the R&S AVG100
audio/video gateway.
www.rohde-schwarz.com
Stand: 7.e25
teSt And meASurement
Phabrix rx range
Rack-mount modular range features
8-channel support with a high resolu-
tion rasterized 1920 x 1080 output and
new waveform instrumentation dis-
played with full-size picture scaling;
features multichannel loudness support
and full Dolby E, D and D plus decode,
as well as a new 4AES card; physi-
cal layer analysis can now support four
channels simultaneously.
www.phabrix.com
Stand: 8.e35
AutomAted PlAyout
OASYS Chameleon
Amalgamates sofware modules to deliver
an optimal playout configuration; adapts
to broadcast environment, fitting seam-
lessly into existing workflows; modular
sofware is focused around playout, using
either OASYS sofware or partner sof-
ware, with an energy efficient footprint.
www.oasys.com
Stand: 8.B16
Video ProceSSor
lawo V_pro8 V1.0.4
Can now handle 2x surround downmix
(downfold) engines per SDI output; with
this new capability, users can create stereo
downmixes from 5.1 to 7.1 discrete sur-
round audio tracks and embed these on
the outgoing SDI so that stereo is always
present along with the discrete surround
audio channels; additional enhancements
include the ability to monitor embedded
audio via MADI, level adjustment (-60dB
- +12dB) for the audio outputs and a new
Dolby E aligner function.
www.lawo.de
Stand: 8.c71
cAmerA-mounted FiBer
trAnSPort SyStem
MultiDyne SilverBACK-4K
Supports 4K; enables users to seamlessly
transmit any camera signal — including
Ultra HD video, HD-SDI video, audio,
intercom, control data, GPIOs, tally and
power — over a single hybrid copper and
fiber cable; available in two versions — a
feature-rich model with a video option for
viewfinder of monitor viewing in the field
and a low-cost model without the view-
finder/monitor viewing option.
www.multidyne.com
Stand: 10.d46b
4k Video trAnSPort
Net Insight Lossless
4K transport system
Provides compressed 4K transport using
the company’s Nimbra 640 MSR, 10G
Trunk and JPEG 2000 modules; in addition
to JPEG 2000 compressed video, module
can uniquely run all uncompressed SDI
and ASI video formats, ranging from ASI
to 3G-SDI, per port configurable.
www.netinsight.net
Stand: 1.B40
kVm mAtrix Switch
guntermann & drunck
controlcenter-digital
Features a modular design consisting of
interchangeable input and output cards
(I/O cards); has 288 ports available; ca-
bling system is done via CAT cable and
fiber optics (also in mixed mode); com-
patible with all system components of the
DVICenter series; supports the transpar-
ent transmission and switching of USB
2.0 and RS232 signals.
broadcast.gdsys.de
Stand: 4.B60
308bew16-DE.indd 36 8/2/2013 3:32:25 PM
August2013|broadcastengineeringworld.com 37
IBC2013
Product Preview
Playout software
controller
EVS Nano Air
Designed for TV studio and on-stage
entertainment productions; requires
no configuration; provides instant con-
trol of all EVS production servers; when
combined with EVS XS, XT3 or XSnano
servers, it becomes a reliable, cost-ef-
fective multichannel playout solution;
enables simultaneous playback for both
SD and HD clips and playlists to multiple
destinations, including background stu-
dios and stage screens.
www.evs.com
stand: 8.B90
fiBre channel
host Bus adaPter
ATTO Technology Celerity
Available in single-, dual- and quad-
channel configurations; ideal system for
users looking to achieve the highest I/O
and data throughput for advanced video
and enterprise-class IT applications; of-
fers driver support for Windows, Linux,
Mac OS X, VMware and more, providing
a single connectivity system for cus-
tomers with heterogeneous operating
system environments.
www.attotech.com
stand: 7.f41
ott Platform
Visual Unity vuMedia 2.0
Major new feature is the integration of
the company’s vuEasy next-generation
online video platform; vuEasy cloud-
based service alleviates the need for
businesses to build an expensive, in-house
and resource-intensive media library by
allowing them to publish their content
online; supports live streaming of HD
video and allows graphics and other audio
and visual material to be associated with
video or audio files, for brand promotion
or to generate advertising revenue.
www.visualunity.com
stand: 14.114
308bew16-DE.indd 37 8/2/2013 3:32:31 PM
38 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
Audio technology
reseller
HHB Communications
Company will be demonstrating a range
of MADI, audio and loudness metering,
measurement and correction tools, in
addition to a selection of portable audio
recorders, broadcast consoles, loudspeak-
ers and microphones, Avid Pro Tools
sofware and hardware, and Mogami
“Cable for Life” cables.
www.hhb.co.uk
stand: 8.d56
diAlogue enhAncement
Fraunhofer IIS Dialog
Enhancement Technology
Allows TV audiences to individually ad-
just the volume of dialog, music or sound
effects within a single broadcast program;
audiences can adjust volume to best suit
their personal choice, listening environ-
ment and hearing capabilities to better
understand speech and dialogues on TV
or radio; compatible with all existing
transmission and playback equipment.
www.iis.fraunhofer.de
stand: 8.B80
commentAry mixer
Glensound Electronics GS-GC5/USB
Provides a complete USB audio inter-
face; features interfacing facilities for
two commentators plus a spare (guest);
mic/phantom/line switchable inputs on
XLR, with broadcast-quality mic amps
and “Referee” compressor/limiter system
developed specifically for sports broad-
cast inputs; two headphone outputs for
each commentator, one on a 6.35mm
jack socket for high-impedance connec-
tions, and one on a 3.5mm jack socket for
low-impedance.
www.glensound.co.uk
stand: 8.e72
cellulAr Bonding
solution
teradek Bond Pro
Camera-back HD H.264 bonded cel-
lular solution is designed for broadcast
cameras with Gold-mount or V-mount
power systems; its modular design and
ease of use make it a simple addition to
any broadcast rig; its light weight and low
power consumption allows camera oper-
ators to quickly maneuver within tight
spaces and broadcast live for long periods
of time without interruption or fatigue.
www.teradek.com
stand: 11.A43, 11.d21
network monitoring
system
Thomson Broadcast Wavetracker
Cost-efficient network monitoring system
has a dedicated customer support portal;
performs all state-of-the-art functions
required for configuring and monitor-
ing a Tomson Broadcast Transmission
network; native nomadic support of
Wavetrack enables the network opera-
tor to safely and freely add or remove
equipment from the system via tablet
or smartphone directly on-site; graphi-
cal charting interface allows operators to
check the status of the network at a glance
or to access up-to-date documentation on
any item of equipment in the network.
www.thomson-broadcast.com
stand: 8.c11
mPeg ts monitoring
interfAce
Volicon Observer 7.1
Features a broader array of inputs to sup-
port ASI, QAM, 8-VSB, DVB-T/T2 and
DVB-T, as well as MPEG TS interfaces;
available on all Observer TS systems
— including Enterprise, Pro and Scout
systems — the new interface simplifies
deployment and configuration for receiv-
ing off-air channels.
www.volicon.com
stand: 7.g23
AutomAtic remote
PlAyout
PlayBox technology edgeBox
Offers fully redundant automatic remote
playout anywhere in the world via the
Internet; makes a TV station, complete
with local branding and content, an eco-
nomic reality — even for small audiences;
comprises two parts — one integrated at
the broadcast center with the existing
traffic, storage, MAM, ingest, transcoding
and file transfer systems, and the other
at the remote site, which includes playout
equipment and monitoring.
www.playbox.tv
stand: 8.c30
monitor series
Plura Broadcast SFP-3G series
Consists of the 17in SFP-217-3G, 21in
SFP-221-3G, 24in SFP-224-3G and 32in
SFP-232-3G full HD 1920 x 1080 precision
broadcast LCD panels; various Plura SFP
modules are designed to fit every possible
broadcast application; features include a
6 x 6 built-in crosspoint switcher, closed
caption (708/608), three preset program-
mable functions, and a 1RU universal
control panel with Ethernet capabilities
for global Plura SFP monitors control.
www.plurabroadcast.com
stand: 8.c73
nrcs
octoPus newsroom octoPus7
Fully-featured, cost-effective, platform-
independent NRCS runs natively on
Mac OS X, Linus and Windows; features
Assignment Desk, a planning tool that
includes a state-of-the-art linking tool, a
modern planning calendar, a chat room
for every assignment folder using the
built-in user-to-user-messaging system,
user notifications of new assignments and
more; additional features include Social
Media Integration, which introduces
Twitter trending topics, and Topic Bins,
which introduces a way to organize and
share information in the newsroom.
www.octopus-news.com
stand: 7.g11
308bew16-DE.indd 38 8/2/2013 3:32:39 PM
August2013|broadcastengineeringworld.com 39
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
AutomAtic de-flickering
system
I-MOVIX d-flicker
Designed for use with SprintCam Vvs HD
and X10/X10+ systems; provides an effi-
cient solution to the flickering problem
to deliver flicker-free, ultra-slow-motion
shots in real time, revealing the beauty of
the action; solves problems with distract-
ing lighting.
www.i-movix.com
stand: 11.c55
broAdbAnd AntennAs
Jampro JVD-U, JCD-U
Now available for both VPOL and CPOL
polarization; vertically or circularly po-
larized system enclosed by full cylindrical
radome for environmental protection and
minimal urban visual impact; broadband
over band IV/V, allowing multiple UHF
channels to be transmitted at the same
time; designed for DVB-T2 (ISDB-T or
ATSC digital TV application) channels;
ships fully assembled and tested.
www.jampro.com
stand: 8.b96
mini-converter
AJA video systems roi
Mini-converter allows an operator to
simply select, surround and click to in-
sert computer video into an SDI stream;
offers real-time scaling of computer
DVI-D and HDMI outputs to baseband
video over SDI; region of interest (ROI)
scaling control for selective source
screen isolation and resolution match-
ing; DVI-D loop through enables SDI
signal conversion while maintaining
DVI-D monitor connection.
www.aja.com
stand: 7.f11
live video-over-cellulAr
solutions
liveu smart grip and
Xtender technology
Included technology includes LU70
backpack with proprietary internal and
external antenna arrays, belt-clip or cam-
era-mounted LU40-S device, weighing
less than 0 .7kg, LU-Smart mobile app sys-
tems (including its patent-pending Smart
Grip device), LU-Lite sofware-only solu-
tion (Win and Mac); and LiveU integrated
Xtender antenna; all products are incor-
porated into the LiveU Total ecosystem by
the company’s unified management plat-
form, enabling control rooms to manage
multiple video feeds from units operating
in diverse locations.
www.liveu.tv
stands: 3.A63, 3.A68
compAct control desk
Custom Consoles Module-R Lite
Designed for use in production suites
with limited space or in large facilities
requiring multiple rows of desks; has
a front-to-back depth of 875mm; op-
tion of fitting monitor display screens
above the rear edge of Module-R Lite
desks makes even more efficient use of
space; is available with the same wide
range of matching equipment pods and
storage modules as the Module-R, with
correspondingly adjusted front-to-back
dimensions if required.
www.customconsoles.co.uk
stand: 3.A54
dtv monitoring system
Agama Technologies DTV
Monitoring Solution
Version 4.5 introduces new at-a-glance
Worst Channels dashboard widget,
showing top problematic services as
experienced by viewers; features im-
provements in Enterprise Server’s
Timeline Correlation view, which shows
monitoring correlation overviews intelli-
gently aggregated by service or location;
other improvements include enhanced
user interface performance, additional
metrics available in the Performance
Management application layer, new pos-
sibilities in OSS/BSS integration APIs to
extract data about monitored devices
and more.
www.agama.tv
stand: 4.A71
mAm system
Dalet Galaxy
Features revamped user-friendly, ergo-
nomic interface and industry-standard
BPM workflow engine tailored for media
organizations; automates many tasks
and processes; simultaneously managing
multiple and diverse workflows across
many different systems; uses a variety
of data exchange and integration paths,
including SOA-compliant tools as well
as Dalet Xtend connectors that simpli-
fy third-party integrations with NLEs,
broadcast servers, HSM, automation
systems, traffic and broadcast manage-
ment systems; supports a wide variety of
media formats and actively participates
in groups promoting industry standards
including FIMS and AS02.
www.dalet.com
stand: 8.b77
ott system
SatLink Communications OTT system
New OTT system designed for broadcast-
ers, telecom and mobile operators as well
as ISPs; offers transcoding, live content
streaming and management tools for mo-
bile and tablet devices on Apple, Android,
Windows 8 platforms and onto PCs and
connected TVs.
www.satlink.tv
stand: 5.A17
308bew16-DE.indd 39 8/2/2013 3:32:45 PM
40 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
Spoken word SeArch
Nexidia Dialogue Search v1.4
Sofware tool searches in seconds for any
spoken word or phrase across massive
media libraries; reduces logging and tran-
scription costs; integrates directly with
media management and editing applica-
tions; requires no training; new features
include an Adobe Premiere Pro exten-
sion, AAF Export, the Dialogue Search
RESTful API to provide Nexidia search
capabilities within any application, and
a new proximity-based search for finding
a word or phrase spoken within a certain
number of seconds of another.
www.nexidia.tv
Stand: 3.A46
File-bASed workFlow
AutomAtion SoFtwAre
Aspera Orchestrator
New features include full failover support,
integrated Active Directory and LDAP
support, and multi-tenant capabilities;
also offers an expanded plug-in library for
many transcoding, watermarking, qual-
ity control, antivirus, ad insertion, asset
management and other solutions.
www.asperasoft.com
Stand: 7.k30
SAtellite redundAncy
Switch
Bridge Technologies VB273
Module is designed for Bridge
Technologies’ new carrier-grade intelli-
gent redundancy switching solution for
satellite uplinks; works with a VB272 and
VB120 in a redundant chassis to moni-
tor two signals from dual production
chains and switch to the backup chain
if the main chain fails; a sophisticated
automatic decision engine uses Bridge’s
advanced ETR290 analysis functional-
ity and compares error condition results
against user-defined rules.
www.bridgetech.tv
Stand 1.A30
ott Subtitling SyStem
Screen Subtitling Systems
ott subtitling
Proprietary served Web video playback
ensures that subtitles are displayed in the
style intended regardless of the player;
system allows viewers to select language
or turn captions off, without the need to
re-encode the video or host multiple cop-
ies; text is clear (not affected by the video
compression); uses standard subtitle file
formats; can automatically adjust broad-
cast version for the web via EDL.
www.screensystems.tv
Stand: 1.c49
trAnSport SyStem
Nevion Flashlink HD-TD-10GMX-6
Is part of Nevion’s Flashlink transport
system family; is a high-density six-
channel HD/SD-SDI multiplexer into a
10Gb/s optical stream; all streams can
be asynchronous to each other, allowing
multi-standard video transport over the
same fiber link; CWDM and long-haul
optics are available as options.
www.nevion.com
Stand: 1.b71
SyStemS integrAtion
ServiceS
OKNO-TV
Provides systems integration services for
broadcasters, content owners and media
service providers; employs a multination-
al team of industry experts; features an
independent and consultative methodol-
ogy to television systems and workflow
design that places the client at the heart of
the project and allows for a fully tailored
solution to be created; offices in London
and Moscow.
www.okno-tv.co.uk
Stand: 9.c30
video delivery
Scheduling SoFtwAre
mediagenix what’son
New features include updates to rights
management, VOD scheduling and auto-
mated secondary event planning, which
allows the rule-based placement of
program menus, branding and the pro-
motion of content or VOD services with
the push of a button.
www.mediagenix.tv/en
Stand: 3.c59
plug-in legAlizer For
Apple FinAl cut pro X
Eyeheight complianceSuiteFCX
Plug-in legalizer, safe-area generator
and graphic measurement toolset for the
Apple Final Cut Pro X video production
suite; allows file-based workflows from
concept to playout by enabling users to
verify and conform their content prior to
submission to any file-based quality-con-
trol system, all from within their familiar
Final Cut environment; designed for use
with high-end video source files used for
broadcast content production.
www.eyeheight.com
Stand: 8.b97
compAct cAmcorderS
canon XA25 hd, XA20 hd
Well-suited for run-and-gun style vid-
eography or ENG; designed for extreme
mobility and portability; feature multiple
shooting-assist functions and enhanced
key components, such as a Genuine
Canon wide-angle 20X HD zoom lens
with an ENG-style “rocker” zoom con-
trol and built-in real-time optical image
stabilization; additional features include
simultaneous recording of multiple bit
rates and 1080p HD formats, including
60p and native cinematic at 24p, on two
separate SD cards.
www.canon.com
Stand: 11.d21
video delivery controller
SeaWell Networks Spectrum
New technology ensures and establishes
per-session security and identification in
multiscreen video delivery; enables oper-
ators to monetize, manage and optimize
their services.
www.seawellnetworks.com
Stand: 14.182
308bew16-DE.indd 40 8/2/2013 3:33:08 PM
August2013|broadcastengineeringworld.com 41
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
DSLR pRompteR
Autocue
Designed specifically for DSLRs; mounts
in front of the DSLR, directly to a stan-
dard set of 15mm DSLR rails; this makes
the prompter extremely lightweight; as
a result, DSLR users can mount a range
of accessories onto the rails as normal;
available in two variants — the first
uses a universal iPad mount (includ-
ing the iPad Mini and other tablets) and
the second an 8in monitor; an optional
bar at the top of the hood with a num-
ber of ¼-width threads allows further
accessories like on-camera lights and
microphones to be deployed.
www.autocue.com
Stand: 11.F45
NLe
Avid Media Composer 7
New version features accelerated, sim-
plified file-based workflows including
optimized HD delivery from high-res
source material and automated media
operations; also offers Interplay Sphere
for Mac support, extending real-time
production everywhere; new Master
Audio Fader enables inserting RTAS
plug-ins to tweak tones and optimize
overall program loudness for broadcast
regulation adherence.
www.avid.com
Stand: 7.J20
IRD
2wcom FlexDSR02+/FlexDSR04+
Compact 1U IRD for professional audio
contribution via satellite and IP; features
versatile inputs for up to four different
programs with analog or digital output,
a full regional insert system, SIRC for in-
band control via satellite and automatic
weightbalancing of quality parameters
and program source switching (satellite,
IP-line, ASI, SD card) in case of failure;
supports latest codecs; offers built-in
monitoring of operational parameters.
www.2wcom.com
Stand: 8.e78
WoRkFLoW SyStem
TMD Mediaflex CI
Provides the ability to design workflows
and use business analytics to derive valu-
able information; use of analytics means
that the system itself can make intelli-
gent decisions based on business rules
developed by the organization, deliver-
ing huge productivity benefits; rules can
be established that drive content through
transcoding and transwrapping farms
to automatically generate content that
is quality-assured and with the right
metadata in the right places.
www.tmd.tv
Stand: 2.C58
moNetIzAtIoN teChNoLogy
Vimond Platform
Monetization Engine
New features are user administered
through the Vimond Control Center
(VCC); Product Packaging feature makes
it easy for publishers and service providers
to bundle channels and package content
into sellable products in one interface;
Ad Cue Points feature includes markers
on the timeline that serve as cues to the
VCC media player on where to insert ads;
these markers allow content publishers
to choose where to insert advertisements
into live and on-demand streams by sim-
ply clicking on the video timeline.
www.vimond.com
Stand: 14.B10
WIReLeSS tRANSmItteR
Sennheiser Skm 9000
Fully compatible with all microphone
capsules from evolution wireless G3 and
2000 series; three new permanently polar-
ized condenser capsules — ME 9002, ME
9004 and ME 9005 — feature a revolu-
tionary shock-mount design that delivers
ultra-low handling noise and maximum
pop suppression.
www.sennheiser.com
Stand: 8.D50
3g pRoDuCtIoN SWItCheR
Ross Video Vision Octane 3G
New 1080p (3G) processing technology
has been added to Vision Octane series
of production switchers; built on the stan-
dard Octane production engine but with
new state-of-the-art FPGA devices that
allow 1080p production; accommodates
1080p50 or 1080p60 production but also
adds dual 2D DVE resizers with combiner
to every MLE key as well as two more DVE
channels for transitions; makes it possible
to create eight box shots on every MLE in
the system and transition them dynami-
cally; each MLE now has 8GB of storage
for still and animated graphic playout.
www.rossvideo.com
Stand: 9.C10
DIgItAL WIReLeSS AuDIo
NetWoRk
Neutrik XIRIUM
Professional multichannel wireless net-
work combines digital transmit and
receive paths for superior sound qual-
ity, reliability, and easy installation and
operation; based on the future-oriented
DIWA (Digital Wireless Audio) technol-
ogy within 5GHz frequency band.
www.neutrik.com
Stand: 8.C90
WoRkFLoW AutomAtIoN
AND mANAgemeNt
Primestream FORK 4.5
Production Suite
Manages the automation of the most
complex broadcast workflows; upgrade
introduces FORK Workflow Manager
1.0, a new FORK module that makes
workflows visible and enables users to
conceptualize and control their produc-
tion workflows in an entirely new way;
also features workflow integrations with
the most popular craf editors, including
Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple Final Cut Pro
and Avid Media Composer.
www.primestream.com
Stand: 7.D21
308bew16-DE.indd 41 8/2/2013 3:33:21 PM
42 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
TrAnsporT sTreAm
compliAnce sysTem
cobalt Digital spotcheck
Designed to offer a no-guesswork solu-
tion for video and audio compliance;
provides ATSC A85 and EBU R128
monitoring, metering and logging;
new features include frozen frame and
black frame monitoring, as well as silent
audio detection.
www.cobaltdigital.com
stand: 10.B44
ip encoDer/TrAnscoDer
Digigram AQILIM *SERV/FIT
Enables multiple HD/SD IP streaming
resolutions and formats, H.264 codec
encoding and MPEG-2 transcoding ses-
sions from up to two SDI inputs; features
integrated HLS, MPEG-TS and Flash
streaming support to connect with key
CDN providers; provides complete live
multiscreen delivery system for WebTV,
OTT and IPTV applications.
www.digigram.com
stand: 8.c51
AnTennA
Alan Dick Broadcast UHF
Broadband antenna
Available for both VPOL and CPOL
polarization for UHF Bands IV and V;,
designed as low to medium power sys-
tems, with a special focus on roofop
deployment; vertically or circularly polar-
ized system enclosed by a full cylindrical
radome for environmental protection and
minimal urban visual impact; allows mul-
tiple UHF channels to be transmitted at
the same time; rugged marine brass and
aluminum construction guarantees long
life; ideal for DVB-T2 [ISDB-T or ATSC
digital TV application] channels.
www.alandickbroadcast.com
stand: 8.B99
sTB sofTwAre
Espial STB Client
Based on RDK, HTML5 and WebKit; of-
fers operators an easy cloud-based system
to achieve new levels of service innovation,
deliver a highly personalized solution and
embrace new business models.
www.espial.tv
stand: 5.B10
ViDeo serVice moniToring
Mariner xVu for Multiscreen
Monitors the user experience throughout
the entire TV delivery chain and across
a wide range of devices — such as tab-
lets, smart phones, PCs, Macs, smart TVs,
set-top boxes and mobile gaming devices
— and networks, including broadband,
wireless, and Wi-Fi, significantly reduc-
ing operational costs for multiscreen TV;
features an easy-to-use interface that lets
operators view subscribers’ service per-
formance to identify and isolate service
issues quickly.
www.marinerpartners.eu
stand: 14.530
newscAsT AuTomATion
sofTwAre
Mosart Newscast Automation 3.4
Allows users to assign more advanced con-
tent sequences to shortcuts or to send such
content directly to the studio walls; also
features enhanced drivers for CasperCG
and Orad graphics, as well as Studer audio
(now using EmBER); the automation sys-
tem in the updated sofware now supports
an unlimited number of video server chan-
nels; newsroom enhancements include
support for Mosart commands in foreign
MOS items and the ability to select the
iNEWS interface as FTP or MOS.
www.mosart.no
stand: 5.c28
meDiA AsseT AnD
workflow
NETIA
Latest version of the company’s MAM
platform allows users to manage all pro-
cesses with within the global production
environment — from editing through
post and distribution — through simple,
easy-to-manage workflows and task auto-
mation, and accessed through one unique
and straightforward interface; gives op-
erators the ability to connect all of their
partners and vendors within a single
production ecosystem, simplifying the
sharing and managing of media assets.  
www.netia.com
stand 1.A29
4k cApTure cArD
Blackmagic Design
Decklink 4k extreme
Full Ultra HD 4K capture and playback
using 6G-SDI and HDMI 4K support;
includes single- and dual-channel SDI
connections for both regular 2-D and
3-D stereoscopic workf lows, as well
as full resolution color RGB 4:4:4 cap-
ture and playback; includes dual-link
6G-SDI, HDMI 3-D/4K and analog com-
ponent, composite, S-video connections;
works in SD, HD and Ultra HD 4K; in-
cludes AES and analog balanced audio,
16-channel SDI audio, genlock, deck
control, broadcast-quality up/down/
crossconversion, plus built-in SD/HD
internal keyer.
www.blackmagicdesign.com
stand: 7.H20
ViDeo quAliTy roBoT
Witbe S4402
Able to replicate end-user actions on any
viewing devices, such as set-top boxes,
smart phones, tablets, game consoles,
connected TVs and PC/Mac clients; de-
ployed by service providers, content
owners and device manufacturers to au-
tomate testing of new services, new apps
or new devices before launch and monitor
the quality of live and on-demand video
services delivered to any type of fixed and
mobile terminal; new carrier-grade, rack-
able unit is designed for deployment in
data centers and test labs.
www.witbe.com
stand: 4.c74
connecTeD workflows
Quantel QTube
Technology connects different geogra-
phies and different systems together;
Enterprise sQ, QTube and revolutionQ
combine to give broadcasters a global
production ecosystem, enabling them to
make compelling content more quickly,
easily and efficiently.
www.quantel.com
stand: 7.A20
308bew16-DE.indd 42 8/2/2013 3:33:29 PM
August2013|broadcastengineeringworld.com 43
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
Video trAnsport chAssis
Artel Video Systems DL4360x DigiLink
Integrates a set of solutions for con-
tribution video transport with video
and Ethernet routing and switching;
low-power, compact, 3RU chassis fea-
tures 12-function module slots with a 60
x 60 non-blocking video and Ethernet
switch; this design eliminates exter-
nal cross connects while keeping video
or Ethernet signals in native format;
chassis monitoring and management is
made simple via external status LEDs,
a feature-rich HTTP interface and
SNMPv2 capabilities.
www.artel.com
stand: 2.A20
UniVersAl Video cArds
riedel communications Mn-c-opt-
hdMi, Mn-hdo-4io
Support a variety of small form-factor
pluggable optical transceivers; enable
the flexible configuration of MediorNet
systems for bi-directional transport of
analog composite video, HDMI, DVI and
optical or coaxial SDI signals; depending
on the SFP transceivers installed, each
card can provide a combination of either
four HD (1.5G) or two 1080p (3G) bi-di-
rectional video signals or analog video,
HDMI, DVI or optical SDI video I/O.
www.riedel.net
stand: 10.A31
prodUction interfAce
Blue Lucy Media Miura
ProductionWeb
Provides global access to the company’s
media management and video process-
ing tools; enables all production workflow
management operations — from ingest
through sub-clipping (partial restore) and
fulfillment — to be managed through a
highly customizable operational interface
from anywhere with Internet access; al-
lows private or public production clouds
to be created, enabling secure decentral-
ized operations.
www.bluelucy.com
stand: 7.J40
MediA Asset
MAnAgeMent systeM
Media Power Arkki
Allows users to store, catalog, retrieve and
manage content; its search engine features
a rough-cut and sub-clip generation facil-
ity that enables users to find content in
seconds; designed to be easy to manage,
with workspace customization and sys-
tem utilization monitoring; accessible via
a Web interface.
www.mediapower.it
stand: 7.J42
color correction tool
SMPTE CamBook 3
Allows engineers to align and set up
cameras to REC 709, compare/match
camera makes and models, and test
lenses for colorimetry and resolution;
serves as a useful reference in produc-
tion — both on set and in post for color
correction of images; features a number
of popular DSC test elements, including
the CamAlign colorbar/grayscale with a
patented “SpectroGray” spectrophoto-
metrically neutral grayscale, a 12-chip
colorbar with four standard skin tones,
resolution trumpets, and both 16:9 and
4:3 framing lines.
www.smpte.org
stand: 8.f51f
UhdtV plAyoUt systeM
Thomson Video Networks Ultra HD
playout system
Emerging HEVC compression standard
will pave the way for broadcasting in
the upcoming Ultra HD picture format;
new HEVC playout system, powered
by the company’s own HEVC tech-
nology, enables broadcasters to trial
and demonstrate Ultra HD content on
their networks.
www.thomson-networks.com
stand: 14.A10
MAster sync generAtor
dK-technologies pt5300
In master sync applications, new LTC fall-
back function allows the PT5300 to align
with the internal high precision clock, a
feature that is important to users work-
ing in situations where GPS coverage is
patchy or inadequate; in slave sync ap-
plications, the LTC engine enables the
PT5300 to genlock to VITC time-code
derived from the black-burst input.
www.dk-technologies
stand: 8.B60
schedUle creAtion
And MAnAgeMent
playBox technology scheduleBox
Web-based client/server solution for
creating and managing advanced sched-
ules; operating within a web browser, the
GUI handles template-based TV broad-
cast planning, offering straightforward
management of single or multiple TV
channels; program schedules with daily,
weekly or monthly views, and program
block management per TV channel, are
available; gaps and overlaps are easily
identified in the program blocks.
www.playbox.tv
stand: 8.c30
oB signAl
trAnsport plAtforM
Bluebell PW140
Designed for OB and infrastructure ap-
plications; offers universal SDI signal
transport over fiber in a compact 1RU
frame; features a processor that provides
simultaneous multiplexing and de-multi-
plexing of the signals presented to it from
the I/O cards; initial base configuration
provides 6 x bidirectional HD-SDI signals
over two fibers or 10G Ethernet; when
used with CWDM optical multiplexing,
96 x HD-SDI signals can be transported
over a single fiber.
www.bluebell.tv
stand: 10.f24
WeAther VisUAlizAtion
systeM
MeteoGraphics WeatherPresenter
New function is Webview for broadcast-
ing full-screen website content; allows
broadcasters to integrate live news from
the online world and draw viewers to
their online offering; with the new so-
cial media integration, broadcasters can
interact directly with viewers and reach
new audiences; the day’s story can be il-
lustrated and personalized by integrating
user-generated videos or images and hy-
perlocal weather observations.
www.meteographics.de
stand: 2.c48
gAteWAy
Rohde & Schwarz R&S AVG050
Features an integrated satellite receiver;
includes a DVB-S/DVB-S2 demodulator
than can receive and decrypt incoming
transport streams from a satellite.
www.rohde-schwarz.com
stand: 7.e25
308bew16-DE.indd 43 8/2/2013 3:33:34 PM
44 broadcastengineeringworld.com|August2013
IBC2013
Product Preview
Advertisers marked in red
Live production switcher
Snell Kahuna 360
Features exclusive FormatFusion3 tech-
nology that supports a mix of SD, HD,
1080p and 4K; features a new set of con-
trol panels that provide a flexible, quick
and reliable access control interface for
all types of television programming; new
panels offer OLED buttons with user-as-
signable thumbnails, a touch screen at
the M/E level rather on the separate GUI
for quick navigation, and the ability to
assign RGB values to buttons for clear,
confident operation.
www.snellgroup.com
stand: 8.B70
XdcAM cAMcorder
Sony PMW-300
Semi-shoulder-mount camcorder com-
bines the benefits of 1/2-type Exmor
Full HD 3CMOS sensor technology
with 50Mb/s HD recording at MPEG
HD422; includes Sony’s advanced signal
processing technology to suppress noise
effectively and create noticeably clearer
images; high bit rate ensures excellent
capture of fast-moving objects.
www.pro.sony.eu
stand: 12.A10
production server
EVS XT3
Updated server offers greater flexibility
and advanced HD workflow operations,
along with instant delivery of multicam
footage to second screens and live slow
motion in Ultra HD; has been designed
to continuously record live feeds from two
4K cameras, while generating instant re-
plays and highlights; supports up to three
4K channels on each server — either two
records and one replay or one record and
two replays.
www.evs.com
stand: 8.B90
BroAdcAst workfLow
MAnAgeMent
Primestream FORK Xchange Suite 2.5
Gives broadcasters instant cloud access
to content on their FORK Production
servers from any Windows, Mac or tablet
device; is an add-on to the FORK sof-
ware platform; introduces the Xchange
Shot List Editor add-on module, which
gives editors a fast and nimble way to edit
content living inside the FORK environ-
ment via a proxy with Xchange for Web
and iOS.
www.primestream.com
stand: 7.d21
dtv Audio processor
Linear Acoustic AERO.100
Supports AEROMAX loudness control,
UPMAX II upmixing/downmixing,
Dolby Digital (AC-3) and Dolby E de-
coding, Dolby Digital (AC-3) encoding,
ITU (AI) limiter, video delay and Linear
Acoustic Intelligent Dynamics (ID) hy-
brid metadata processing; processes 10
channels (5.1+2+2) via AES and HD/
SD-SDI I/O; control and monitoring
via comprehensive TCP/IP remote, and
access to loudness logging data from
ITU-R BS.1770-3 meters via http serv-
er, all in a 1RU package; non-coding
version available.
www.linearacoustic.com
stand: 8.d30
Audio Monitor
Wohler AMP1-MADIe
In-rack portable MADI monitor unit
with Ethernet control and configuration,
including compatibility with the Evertz
MAGNUM facility control system; ideal
for sports production and other live
broadcasts; can be connected in series
with a 56- or 64-channel MADI stream
to provide audible monitoring and meter-
ing of any eight selected MADI channels
at once.
www.wohler.com
stand: 10.B10
fiBer-optic kvM
eXtenders
Matrox Graphics Avio F125
Separate dual HD video, USB keyboard
and mouse, stereo analog audio, and
USB 2.0 devices from a production or
post-production workstation; transmit-
ter/receiver pair extends two single-link
DVI (2 x 1920 x 1200) or one dual-link
DVI (2560 x 1600 or 4096 x 2160) video,
and multiple high-speed USB 2.0-compli-
ant devices from the host computer by up
to 400m over multimode cable 4km over
single-mode cable; transmits all signals
with zero compression and zero latency
over one duplex LC-LC fiber-optic cable.
www.matrox.com
stand: B.729
integrAted
pLAyout pLAtforM
Miranda iTX
New enhancements include version 1.1
of iTX Render Service for Adobe Afer
Effects CS6 sofware; automates and man-
ages fully rendered Afer Effects graphics,
making them ready for immediate playout
from either the iTX platform or Miranda
Vertigo Suite of graphics automation and
asset management tools.
www.miranda.com
stand: 8.d41
eng-styLe cAMcorder
Panasonic PX5000G
Gives user a choice of recording —
AVC-LongG50 (10-bit, 4:2:2) and
AVC-LongG25 (4:2:2, 10-bit), as well
as AVC--Intra100/50, with optional re-
cording in DVCPRO HD, DVCPRO50,
DVCPRO and DV — in the same body;
three 2/3in, 2.2M 3-MOS sensors facili-
tate 720p and 1080p/i recording.
business.panasonic.eu
stands: 9.c45, 9.d40
Note: Stand numbers are provide by IBC
and are current as of press time. Every
effort has been made by Broadcast
Engineering to ensure the accuracy of
these listings.
308bew16-DE.indd 44 8/2/2013 4:01:27 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 45
Field report
New products & reviews
A
f ter worki ng wit h
Panasonic’s AG-HPX600
P2 camcorder, one word
defines the product for
me: expandability. Te base HPX600
is a lightweight (6.2lbs), highly com-
petent camcorder. By means of a
selection of current and future op-
tions, the camcorder’s functionality
can be significantly enhanced.
Te AG-HPX600 is equipped with
three 2/3in MOS sensors and records
in AVC-Intra50/100, DVCPRO HD
(100Mb/s), DVCPRO50, DVCPRO
and DV. Recording is to P2 cards al-
though Panasonic has now released
a “chargeable” firmware upgrade that
supports recording to microP2 cards.
(MicroP2 cards provide the function-
ality of traditional P2 media, but in
an SD-sized card.) A microP2 card
must be inserted into an AJ-P2AD1
microP2 adapter that plugs into a P2
slot. (See Figure 1.)
The camcorder arrived from
Panasonic wit h a Fuji non
XA17x7.6BERM 17X (7.6mm to
130mm) zoom lens that has a 2X ex-
tender. Te HPX600 has chromatic
aberration compensation (CAC) to
maximize lens performance and a
flash band detector with a compen-
sation algorithm that minimizes this
effect. An LCD display on the cam-
era’s side offers accessibility to the
camera’s extensive menu functions.
Te HPX600 offers two P2 card slots
and one SDHC slot.
Other camcorder features include:
optical neutral density filter wheel
(clear, 1/4, 1/16, 1/64); digital zoom
(2X and 4X) function; variable shutter
speed (1/12s to 1/2000s plus Synchro
Scan); focus assist that expands
the center area on the viewfinder;
GENLOCK IN; TC IN/OUT; two USB
2.0 ports; an Ethernet port, an HDMI
port; and an HD-SDI port. When the
AG-YA600G option is added, uncom-
pressed video/audio can be input to
the HD-SDI port and recorded.
By adding the AG-YDX600G
proxy video encoding option and the
AG-SFU604G sofware key, H.264
QuickTime video/audio can be sent
via an Ethernet LAN connection to
a computer. Proxy video can also
be wirelessly sent to a computer,
iPhone or iPad when the AJ-WM30
Wi-Fi option is plugged into a USB
port. Panasonic offers video apps
Panasonic’s AG-HPX600
the camera offers many options
to create custom workflows.
By Steve Mullen
for these devices. (See Figure 2.) Te
AG-YDX600G option also enables SD
proxy video clips to be recorded on
P2 cards along with SD/HD video.
Figure 1. MicroP2 Cards and an AJ-P2AD1 microP2 adapter
Figure 2. IPad app for proxy video and playlist editing
Panasonic’s AG-HPX600
308bew20-DE.indd 45 8/2/2013 2:13:35 PM
46 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Field report
New products & reviews
Proxy video can also be recorded to
an SDHC card.
At the 2013 NAB Show, Panasonic
announced that the HPX600 with
an AG-SFU603G sofware key inte-
grates the camcorder with LiveU’s
LU40i cellular modem. Te LU40i is
mounted on the back of the camera
and is connected using HD-SDI and
USB cables. Te combination enables
real-time H.264 AVC high-profile
1080i, 1080p and 720p video stream-
ing for live sports and newsgathering.
With a 60Hz system clock rate,
the following frame rates can be cap-
tured: 1920 x 1080 at 59.94i, 23.98pN
and 29.97pN, plus 1280 x 720 at
59.94p, 23.98pN and 29.97pN. (Native
— N — 23.98 and 29.97 frame rates
capture frames with no pulldown
added before recording.) By adding
the AG-SFU602G sofware-key, an
HPX can record at frame rates from
1fps to 30fps (1080p) and 1fps to 60fps
(720p). When set at 24, 24.0fps is
recorded. Te key also adds the ability
to output 23.98PsF video via the HD-
SDI port for uncompressed recording.
When using AVC-Intra100, 1920
x 1080 or 1280 x 720, 10-bit 4:2:2
data are recorded. Panasonic has an-
nounced that in 2013, a chargeable
hardware upgrade will enable the
camcorder to record using the AVC
Ultra codec. Table 1 shows the differ-
ent quality levels within AVC Ultra.
Panasonic has announced that not all
AVC Ultra formats will be supported
by the AG-HPX600. However,
I expect Class 200 will be
available because both P2
and microP2 cards support
200Mb/s recording.
Your first editing task is to select a
method to ingest P2 media into your
computer. Panasonic offers multiple
options. Te low-cost AJ-PCD2 is a
single-slot P2 memory card drive.
Two USB 2.0 cables — one for data
transfer the other for power — con-
nect it to a PC/Mac computer or
laptop. Panasonic also offers two five-
card readers, the AJ-PCD20P (USB
2.0 and FireWire) and the AJ-PCD35
Class 4:4:4 Class 200 AVC-LongG AVC-Proxy
Bit rate
200Mb/s
to
400Mb/s
200Mb/s
@
1080/59.94i
As low as
25Mb/s
800kb/s
to
3.5Mb/s
Frame size
720p
1080p
2K
4K
720p
1080p
1080i
720p
1080p
1080i
720p
1080p
Bit depth
10- to 12-bit
pixel depth
at 4:4:4
10-bit pixel
depth at
4:2:2
10-bit pixel
depth at
4:2:2
8-bit pixel
depth at 4:2:0
Codec Intra-only Intra-only Long GOP Long GOP
Table 1. AVC Ultra formats
Figure 3. Yellow indicates files stored on a connected device.
Figure 4. Consolidate/Transcode…
command
308bew20-DE.indd 46 8/2/2013 2:13:57 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 47
Field report
New products & reviews
(PCI Express). The new two-slot
AJ-MPD1 drive reads microP2 cards
using a USB connection.
If you don’t have card reader, as
I don’t, the camera enables you to
transfer P2 media directly to a USB
2.0 hard drive connected to the
camcorder. Tis method has sever-
al advantages. First, the hard drive
becomes a low-cost backup device.
Second, when the drive has been for-
matted as FAT32, it can be mounted
on either a PC or Mac from which
you can edit. Lastly, if you have a
P2-format sofware encoder such as
AVC-Intra Codec or ImEx Suite (OS
X only) from Hamburg Pro Media,
you can export a production as an
MXF file to a hard drive, connect the
drive to an HPX600, and then copy
the file to a P2 card.
Avid’s Media Composer has func-
tions that conveniently handle P2
editing. Inserting a card into a read-
er connected to a computer running
Media Composer can automatical-
ly create a bin and populate it with
clips. Yellow marked clips indicate
files stored on the connected device.
(See Figure 3.)
As long as a reader is connected,
you can edit clips into a sequence.
When a sequence is complete, se-
lect it and issue Clip > Consolidate/
Transcode…. (See Figure 4.) Next,
choose Consolidate, select the target
hard drive, and click the Consolidate
button. Only those clips in the se-
quence will be copied from the P2
card to the target drive.
If you have previously copied P2
media to a harddisk, issue the File >
Link to AMA Volume… command.
Choose the device, select a folder
with P2 contents, and click Choose.
Te result will be a bin of clips.
(See Figure 3.)
Depending on the power of your
computer, playback performance
may be less than ideal. You can im-
prove performance by transcoding
a P2 media to a DNxHD file. To do
so, select clips in a bin, and then issue
Clip > Consolidate/Transcode….
(See Figure 4.)
Next, select the target drive, select
the type of DNxHD desired and click
the Transcode button. Te transcod-
ed file names will be appended with
a “new” tag.
Final Cut Pro X offers similar
capabilities. After mounting
a P2 media device, its con-
tents are rapidly cataloged
in the background. Once
cataloged, you can begin edit-
ing P2 media. However, you have
two other options, as shown by
Figures 5 and 6.
By checking Create proxy media,
P2 media will be converted to ProRes
Proxy in the background. (See Figure
5.) You’ll now have smooth playback
while editing. During export, likely
to ProRes HQ, the original P2 content
will be used as the source.
By checking Create optimized
media, P2 media will be converted to
ProRes 422 in the background. (See
Figure 6.) You’ll now have smooth
playback while editing. During ex-
port, likely to ProRes HQ, ProRes files
are employed as the source.
BE
Steve Mullen is the owner of DVC. He
can be reached via his website at http://
home.mindspring.com/~d-v-c.
Figure 5. Create proxy media
Figure 6. Create optimized media
Send questions and comments to:
editor@broadcastengineering.com ?
308bew20-DE.indd 47 8/2/2013 2:14:13 PM
48 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
TECHNOLOGY IN TRANSITION
NEW PRODUCTS & REVIEWS
T
he British rock group Queen
had a top-10 hit in 1989 with
“I Want it All.” e song
included and was based
around the catchphrase from singer/
guitarist Brian May’s second wife, “I
want it all, and I want it now!”
Of course, that is what broadcast
storage managers hear every day. It
isn’t enough to have tape archives;
news editors want instant access to
every inch of footage ever shot, mar-
keting wants to know how a show is
trending on Twitter as it airs, and cus-
tomers demand access to music and
videos that fit their personal mood at
that moment.
From a data storage aspect, this
means that nothing is ever old or
offl ine, but must be able to be ready
at the push of a button. Welcome to
the world of Big Data.
What is Big Data?
Big Data is a fuzzy term: It doesn’t
apply to any specific amount or type
of data. But, as companies have
created petabytes and exabytes of un-
structured and semistructured data,
all this data needs to be corralled,
brought under control, understood
and analyzed. As a rule of thumb, if
there is too much data to be effi ciently
loaded into a relational database, it is
Big Data, and specialized tools are
required to turn the raw digital data
into intelligence that can be used for
decision making.
Although much of the emphasis is
on the analytics, that is not the only
aspect. For most industries, the stor-
age and management of the data is
also critical; for broadcasters, distri-
bution also plays a huge role, given the
rise of on-demand programming.

Big Data tools
Managing Big Data requires the
development of a new set of tools to
organize and search the data. ere
are now hundreds of such tools, with
more on the way. Many of these are
open source, or are commercial
implementations of open-source so-
ware. Among the most broadly used
Big Data tools are:
• Hadoop (hadoop.apache.org/).
is is an open source Java-based
programming framework for dis-
tributed computing of large data sets.
It can scale from one server to thou-
sands, and redistributes the work in
the event of one or more nodes failing.
It works with Windows, Linux, BSD
and OSX.
• Hive (hive.apache.org). is is a
data warehouse system that “facili-
tates easy data summarization, ad-hoc
Data storage tools
Broadcasters can use these to store Big Data efficiently.
BY DREW ROBB
queries and the analysis of large da-
tasets stored in Hadoop-compatible
file systems.” It is designed for batch
queries/processing or large data sets
and uses HiveQL, a language similar
to SQL.
• MapReduce. Google developed
MapReduce to address the issue of
how to manage the parallel process-
ing workloads required to process
massive amounts of data. The
MapReduce framework consists of
two parts: Map, which distributes the
load out to the compute nodes, and
Reduce, which collects and merges
the results from those nodes into
a single result. Google researchers
Jeffrey Dean and Sanjay Ghemawat
published an introduction to the
From a data storage aspect, nothing
is ever old or offline, but must be able
to be ready at the push of a button.
Welcome to the world of Big Data.
Although Big Data analytics is one of IT’s hottest topics these days, broadcast
has been in the Big Data business for decades.
308bew27-DE.indd 48 8/2/2013 2:15:17 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com 49
TECHNOLOGY IN TRANSITION
NEW PRODUCTS & REVIEWS
MapReduce framework at the Sixth
Symposium on Operating Systems
Development and Implementation
(OSDI) in 2004, the year Google used
it to replace its earlier indexing algo-
rithms. e paper and presentation
slides can be downloaded at research.
google.com/archive/mapreduce.html.
• NoSQL databases. ese are used
to manage and analyze massive sets
of unstructured data. NoSQL doesn’t
mean “no SQL,” but “Not Only SQL.”
Structured query language (SQL)
can still be used as appropriate.
NoSQL databases include Apache
Cassandra (cassandra.apache.org),
originally developed by Facebook;
Amazon SimpleDB (aws.amazon.com/
simpl edb/); and MongoDB
(www.mongodb.org/).
Implementing
Big Data storage
Although Big Data analytics is
one of IT’s hottest topics these days,
broadcast has been in the Big Data
business for decades, having to man-
age media storage containing files
that may be hundreds of GB or even
several TB each. Big Data storage,
then, takes on a different aspect than
when an organization is just using Big
Data for analysis. Some of the factors
to consider include:
• Data deduplication/compres-
sion. A prominent feature of many
storage systems is their ability to
reduce the amount of disk space
needed through use of deduplication
or compression technologies. ese
technologies, however, won’t have
much impact on broadcasters’ storage
needs. Audio and video files already
contain some type of compression as
part of their encoding; any further
compression would lose quality. In
addition, there aren’t as likely to be
as many copies of a single video file
that could be replaced with a point-
er as there are with e-mails or Word
documents. When there are multiple
video file copies, they are likely to be
needed for backup or for streaming.
• Tiered architecture. Given the
breadth of data types that make up
Big Data, and the different uses it is
put to, a tiered storage architecture is
essential. SSDs or NAND Flash mem-
ory cards can be used for analytics,
storage system metadata, indexes and
editing; higher-capacity, lower-cost
SAS; and SATA drives for other pri-
mary and secondary storage.
Although some types of businesses
are dumping tape, it can still play a
key role for broadcast for setting up
active archives. Video files are mas-
sive, and it can be prohibitively
expensive to keep the entire archive
on disks. A May 2013 TCO analysis
from e Clipper Group, Inc. (www.
clipper.com/research/TCG2013009.pdf)
found that archiving on disk is 26
times as expensive as tape over a
nine-year period. A tape library is
slower than disk access, but each
LT0-6 tape holds 2.5TB of uncom-
pressed data, and a single Spectra
Logic T950 tape library scales up to
10,200 slots, enough to hold more
than 25PB of uncompressed data
(62TB compressed). is allows fast,
though not instantaneous, access to
archives, which is good enough for
archival footage.
To speed access to the videos stored
in a tape library, or even lower-tiered
disks, the metadata and the head of
the video can be stored on the SSD
drives, so access can begin immedi-
ately while the rest of the video loads
from the tape.
• Rapid setup of multiple copies.
Broadcast storage systems need the
capacity to rapidly add and remove
content from the storage being used
for streaming video, scaling the num-
ber of copies to meet demand. As Joe
Inzerillo, SVP and content technol-
ogy/CTO for Major League Baseball’s
Advanced Media Group describes it,
“No one cares about a 0-to-3 baseball
game, until in the 7th inning, when
people realize the pitcher is throw-
ing a perfect game. en everyone
cares, and your online hits go through
the roof.”
• Common file system. Some ed-
iting or digital asset management
systems use a proprietary storage for-
mat, which locks the company into a
particular vendor and limits its ability
to adopt a common storage frame-
work for all company data. By using
industry-standard methods such as
NFS, CIFS and HTTP, the files can be
accessed by both old and new systems,
giving greater flexibility.
File system architecture has prov-
en that it works for streaming online
and on-air programming, allowing
for multiple mounts for a single set of
data, and it can increase throughput
and capacity as needed.
BE
Drew Robb is a freelance writer covering
engineering and technology. He is author
of the book “Server Management of
Windows System,” published by CRC
Press.
The following are available on the
Broadcast Engineering Website:
• Cloud MAM systems
• The changing role of content
delivery networks
• Live server technology
Send questions and comments to:
editor@broadcastengineering.com ?
Although some
types of businesses
are dumping
tape, it can still
play a key role
for broadcast
for setting up
active archives.
308bew27-DE.indd 49 8/2/2013 2:15:44 PM
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Page M8 -------------------------------------------------Halls 6 & 7
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Page M11 ------------------------------------------------Halls 11 & 13
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Audio and radio displays
Content production
Studio systems
Telecine and film
Media asset management
Playout automation & server applications
Post production and new media
System integration and consultancy
Transmitters
VFX
Workflow solutions
Broadcast solutions
Cable and satellite
Home systems and broadband
iTV
iPTV
Mobile systems
Service and broadcasters
Transmitters and set top boxes
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 3 8/2/2013 10:22:54 AM
M4 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Hall 1
WC
ee
WC WC
F81
F71
F75
F67
F68
F76
F70
F80
F86
F56
F58
F59
F57 F55
F41
F45
F49 F47
F40
F50
F21
F29
F32 F31
F34
F36
E02
F11
D01
D11
Grass Valley
D41
D40
D30
D39
D35
Samsung
D31
ARRIS
D69
D61
Ericsson
D59
Eutelsat SA
D51
D81
D73
D71
F96 F94 F90 D92 C97 C95 C93 C91 C90 B91 A99 A91
C81
NAGRA
C71
Intelsat
C65
C61
Appear TV
C33
C39
C41
C49
Screen
Subtitling
Systems
C51
C55
C27
Humax
C29
C31
C30
C28
B51
SES
B61
arqiva
B71
Nevion
B79
B31
B38
B40
B41
B24
B28
B20
Harmonic
B29
B30
B09
B10
B16
KAONMEDIA
B22
B19
Pace
A81
Philips Remote Control
A74
A78
A80
A71
Cisco
A59
A50
A52 A54
A49
A51
A58
A62
A69
Vislink
A30
A32
A29
A33
A40
A44
A46
A41
A39
A05 A03 A01
A11
A10
A18
A21
A23
A27
A29
A95
C29 A20
B01 B02 B03 B04 B05 B06 B07
Hall 1
Hall 6
13
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
EXHIBIT HOURS
FRIDAY (13 SEPTEMBER) 10:30 - 18:00
SATURDAY - MONDAY 09:30 - 18:00
TUESDAY 09:30 - 16:00
ISSUE ADVERTISER MAP ADVERTISER
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 4 8/1/2013 4:37:20 PM
For decades Sennheiser has been a reliable and
innovative partner in broadcasting, theatre and
high-profile live audio. Because of this, we know
that world-class sound engineers demand the
highest standards. With this firmly in mind, we
took all of our extensive experience and used it
to create our first digital multichannel wireless
system: DIGITAL 9000, which is in a class of its own,
providing uncompressed digital audio transmission,
free from intermodulation, and delivering stunning
sound and dynamics with a cable-like purity.
DIGITAL 9000 offers control functions that make
system set-up simple and fail-safe. The highly
intuitive interface provides a complete overview
of system performance, offering peace of mind
in challenging live situations. DIGITAL 9000 is the
best-in-class digital wireless system available and
represents a future-proof investment.
DIGITAL 9000 – The Wireless Masterpiece.
www.sennheiser.com
World-class goes digital
THE WIRELESS
MASTERPIECE.
VISIT US AT IBC
HALL 8, STAND D 50
308BEWMAP5.indd 1 8/1/2013 6:16:47 PM
M6 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
H
a
l
l

1
S
e
e

p
a
g
e

M
4
Halls 2
&
3 Halls 4
&
5
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
EXHIBIT HOURS
FRIDAY (13 SEPTEMBER) 10:30 - 18:00
SATURDAY - MONDAY 09:30 - 18:00
TUESDAY 09:30 - 16:00
WC
Walkway to Halls
8-12
Hall 2
Hall 3
ORG
c
A74
A78
A80
A50
A52 A54
A58
A62
A30
A32
A40
A44
A46
A10
A18
A03 A04
B01 B02 B03
B17
A23 A26
A18
A16
A12
A19
South
Korea
A27
A38
A33
A63
LiveU
A61
A31 A40
A44
A48
A50
A52
A54
A58
A60
A68
LiveU
A17
A15
A16
A14
A10
A21
A27
A29
A31
A41
A36
A34
A32
A30
A24
A22
A20
A40
A48
A58
A49
A51
B50
B31
B39
France
B41 B40
B49
B51
B59
B29
B28
B10
B16
B11
B19
B20
B21
B30
B40
B61
B55
B51
B67
B56
B62
B18
B29
B35
B39
B20
Israel
The Israel Export & International
Cooperation Institute
B26
B43
B25
China
B21
B15 B14
B13 B11
C21
C30
C31 C35
C44
C46
C41
C56
C
5
9
M
e
d
i
a
G
e
n
i
X
C67
C61
C60
C17
C15
C11
C18
C10
C29
C27
C25
C23
C21
C32
C30
C39
C37
C35
C33
C31
C48
C49
C45
C41
C58
C50
C51
C55
C57
C59
C17 B16
C15
C20
A46
WC WC
IBC
Games
Zone
F81
The
Brasserie
C
WC
A11
A07
A09
A05
A01
A51
A49
A41
China
A31
A17
A75
A71
A70
A61
Great Britain
A55
A95 A91
A81
A77
B91
B71
B70
B72
B75
B77 B74
B79 B78
South Korea
B82 B81
B89 B84
B46 Canada
B45
B47
B48
B50
B54
B51
B53
B61
B63
B60
Guntermann
& Drunck
B66
B19
NPTV
B20
B22
B30
B32
B33
B37
Sisvel Technology
B40
C01 B02 B01
B09
B03
Sweden
B04
B11
B15
B10
B18
C15
C16 China
C11
C09
C07
C06 C02
C35
C33
C31
C28
C27
C23
C21
C19
C56
C50
C46
C42
C49
C45
C43
C41
C74
C60
C69
C67
C65
C61
C59
C55
C88
C98
C89
C87
C85
C83
C81
C77
C78
C73
C71
F71
F75
F67
F59
F57 F55
F41
F45
F49 F47
F21
F29
F32 F31
F11
C10
C08
C12 C13 C14
C25
Hall 5
Hall 4
13
ISSUE ADVERTISER MAP ADVERTISER
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 6 8/1/2013 4:37:45 PM
www.liveu.tv
Should have used LiveU
Because there’s only one live moment.
To fnd out how top-tier broadcast and online media in over 80 countries
rely on LiveU's portable uplink solutions for daily news coverage, please
contact us for a demo. From backpacks to smartphones, LiveU offers a
complete range of devices for live video transmission.
See us at IBC2013 (stand 3.A63 + 3.A68)
308BEWMAP7.indd 1 8/2/2013 1:46:01 PM
M8 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Hall 6
&
7
ADVERTISER
* See Screen Subtitling Systems at Stand 1.C49 page M4
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
E
n
t
r
a
n
c
e

(
b
a
d
g
e

h
o
l
d
e
r
s

o
n
l
y
)
L
L
WC
WC G
c
C28 A29
A01
A10
Vizrt
A09 A08 A06 A05 A04 A03 A02
A45 A43 A41
A31 A30
A20
Quantel
A15
B40
B21
B26
B29
B27
Orad Hi-Tec
Systems
B33
B35
B30
B01
B11
B13
C01
C27
C12
C21
C17
C10
C28
C30
D30
D21
D25
D31
D39
D05 D03 D01
E10 D11 D14
D07
E25
Rohde &
Schwarz
E21
E30
F31
F49 F45 F41
F33
F11
AJA Video
Systems
F04 F05 F06 F07 G02
G15 G16
G12
G11
OCTOPUS
G09 G07 G05 G03
G17
G37
G35
G33
G30
G27
Adobe
Systems
G20
Harris Broadcast
G23
G41 G43 G45 G47 H40
H20
Blackmagic Design
H37 H35
H39
H32 H30
H47
H10
H03 H01 H05 H09
H15
H17
J01
J16
J14
J15
Great Britain
J07 J05 J03
J49 J47 J43 J42 J40
J39 J38
J31
J30
J20
Avid
K40
K25
K27
K31
K30
K01
K11
K21
B22
C29 A20
A15
A22
A21
A18
A10
A11
C19 C18
C11 C10
C22
A03 A04 A05 A06 A09
B01 B02 B03 B04 B05 B06 B07
F01
Hall 6
Hall 7
TRUSTED
Who are you going to trust with your OTT & 4K Subtitling?
OTT, web and 4K broadcast is about providing an all-round heightened viewer experience and
that should include accessibility services. Our OTT & web subtitling solutions ensure a consistent
presentation and improved visual quality of your subtitles & captions on all web video players with
minimal player development. And as a dependable supplier of quality HD subtitle transmission
systems to some of the world’s largest broadcasters, you can be confident of the same reliability
in our 4K solution.
Who are you going to trust?
For more information
Call +44 1473 831700 E-mail sales@screensystems.tv Visit www.screensystems.tv
Visit SCREEN at
stand 1.C49
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 8 8/1/2013 4:38:03 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com M9
Hall 8
EXHIBIT HOURS
FRIDAY (13 SEPTEMBER) 10:30 - 18:00
SATURDAY - MONDAY 09:30 - 18:00
TUESDAY 09:30 - 16:00
13
P
L
WC
B99
B97
F51
Halls 1-7
F
u
t
u
r
e

Z
o
n
e
I
B
C

P
a
r
t
n
e
r
s
h
i
p
V
i
l
l
a
g
e
Press
Area
Press Registration
& Entrance
RAI STATION
J
a
d
e

L
o
u
n
g
e
(
g
r
o
u
n
d

f
l
o
o
r
)
IBC TV News
Press
Area
Press
Area
c
A01 B01 A04 A03 B02
B15
B11
B22
B16
A21
A19
Brazil
A10
A14
A12
A11
A31
A36
A35
A30
A28
A26
A24
A22
A20 A23
A25
A40
A44
A48
A50
A54
A51
A84
A80
A76
A74
A70
A64
A59
A58
A86
A90
A92
A94
A96
B37
B36
France
B31
B34
B27
B30
B21
B40
Evertz
B59
B51
B41
B38
Great Britain
B70
SNELL
B77
B80
Fraunhofer Digital
Cinema Alliance
B73
B71
B61
B58
B50
B90
EVS
B96 B95 B94 B92
B93
B91
B89
B81
B98
C01
C28
C22
C20
C11
C16
C05 C03
C41
C40
C35
C31
C29
C
3
0
P
l
a
y
B
o
x
T
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
C25
C60
C61
C58
C55
C49
C51
C48
C81
C80
C77
C73
C76
C65
C71
Lawo
C74
C70
C85
C91
C92
C90
C93 C94 C95 C96 C97 C98
D90
D78
D79
D83
D89
D82
France
D92
RTW
D91
D93
D61
D60
D71
D73
D75
D76
D77
D80
D74
D30
D41
Miranda
Technologies
D50
Sennheiser Electronic
D56
D21
D23
D31
D28
D35
D05 D03
D10 D16
E02
E23
E19 E24
E20
E17
E15
E11
E05 E03
E41
E39
E37
E36
E
3
5

P
h
a
b
r
i
x
E29
E31
E30
E25
E60
E49
E45
E78
E81
E75
E76
E74
E73
E72
E71
E69
E61
E96
E97
E95
E98
E94
E90
E93
E91
E89
E85
E83
F57
F54
F52
F50
A09
A98
C39
P2
P11
P12
P10
P9
P8
P7
P6
P5
P4
P1
P3
G36
G34
G30
G38
G44
G49
G45
G41
G39
G35
G29
F41
F49 F440
F48
Hall 8
Genelec
DK-Technologies
ISSUE ADVERTISER MAP ADVERTISER
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 9 8/1/2013 4:38:27 PM
M10 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
* See Videssence at Stand 11.B12 page M11
Halls 9
&
10
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
13
to Congress Centre, Auditorium & Emerald Room
ee
Passage to Halls
12 & 1-7 1st Floor
WC
WC
P
L
WC WC
L
Hall 10
Forum
Forum Lounge
(Ground floor)
Ruby Lounge
(1st floor)
E102
E103
Speaker
Briefing
Room
E104
E108
Conference
IBC
Workflow Solutions
A40
Holland
Restaurant
c
E105
E106
E107

c
A29
A28
A24
A21
A12 A10 A09
A49
A41
A44
A42
A40
A38
A30
A31
Riedel
Communications
B41
TSL
B39
B31
B10
B21
B20
D10
D45
JVC Professional Europe
D46
D41
D15
D31
Belgium
D26
D25
D30
D29
D20
C49
C51 D57 D59
F39
F41
F43
F51
E59 E51 E50
F20
F24
F26
F21
F22
F23
F29
F35 F30
B44
B48
A11
A09
A07
A05
A03
A01
A33
A31
A59 A57
B14
Great Britain
B24
B20
B19
B28
B27
B31
B51 B49 B43 B41
C40
GoPro
C40
C25
C19
C23 C22
C35
C33
C45
Panasonic Marketing Europe
C49 C47
C01 C02
C17
C10
Ross Video
B12 B08 B06 B04 B02
B10
China
A01
A0
D15
D40
D25
D30
D18
D14
D12
D10
Hall 9
Cobalt Digital
www.videssence.tv
Color you can
count on!
Satisfy the strict color rendering
requirements of film with this amazing
Fresnel. The powerful new Vidnel 100
boasts a 98 CRI!
You’ll want to see this one!
Come see its European
debut at IBC: Stand #11.B12
LED
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 10 8/1/2013 4:38:52 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com M11
Hall 13
Hall 11
EXHIBIT HOURS
FRIDAY (13 SEPTEMBER) 10:30 - 18:00
SATURDAY - MONDAY 09:30 - 18:00
TUESDAY 09:30 - 16:00
Passage to Halls
12 & 1-7 1st Floor
WC
WC
P
ORG
Exhibitor Registration
& Entrance
IBC
Production
Insight
Holland
Restaurant
Hotel
Shuttle
Bus
Airport
Shuttle
Bus
RAI STATION
TRAMS

c
A38
A34
A30
A31
A21 A28
A20
A14 A10
A61
A62
A51
China
A60
A56
A54
A40
A50
A41
A39
A75 A73
A71
A69
A65
A67
A66 A63
B57
B50
Nikon Europe
B53
B55
B61
B12 B10
C11
C21
C40 B45
C31
C36
C30
C20
Fujifilm Europe
C80 C82
C63
C64
C61
C57
C55
C51
C50
D63
D47
D50 D49
D53
D55
D57
D67 D65
D10
D21
D20
D30
D35
D39
D43 D42
D36
E10
E33
E32
E31
E30
E28
E20
E16
E50
Canon Europe
E42 E43
E41
France
E40
E39
E35
E37
E34
E53 E55 E57 E59 D69 E61 F87
F58
F60
F65 F63
F67
F69
F73
F71
F89
F31
F34
F32
F41
F45
F40
F50 F53
F57
F56
F11
F21
ARRI
F20
G11
G45
G41
G37
G35
G29
G27
G25
G21
G42
G36
G30
G75
G73
G71
G69
G65
G63
G61
G59
G87
G85 G83
G81
G79
G77 G66
G68
G64
G54
G50
A43
Teradek
C45
D56
C59
C65 E58
D58
Hall 11
The IBC Big Screen
and IBC Awards
Auditorium
WC
WC
G102
(1st floor)
G103
(1st floor)
G101
(1st floor)
L
Topaz Lounge
(1st Floor)
Auditorium Entrance
IBC Business Lounge
Onyx Lounge
(Ground floor)
Emerald Room
(1st floor)
Hall 13 Meeting Suites
The IBC Pub
Grand Cafe
(Ground floor)
Europa Restaurant
(1st floor)

MS1
MS44
MS43
MS42
MS41
MS24
MS35
MS5
MS4
MS34 MS23
MS22
MS3
MS2
MS45
MS46
MS47
MS48
MS36
MS7
MS25
MS21 MS32 MS39
Lounge
13
ISSUE ADVERTISER MAP ADVERTISER
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 11 8/1/2013 4:39:13 PM
M12 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Halls 12, 14
&
Outdoor Exhibits
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
EXHIBIT HOURS
FRIDAY (13 SEPTEMBER) 10:30 - 18:00
SATURDAY - MONDAY 09:30 - 18:00
TUESDAY 09:30 - 16:00
13
IBC Connected World
Gold Pass Lounge
(4th Floor)
Sony Professional Europe
Sony Professional Europe
IBC Connected
A10
SONY
Outdoor Exhibits
(Elicium)
New Visitor/Exhibitor Registration
(Elicium Passage/Basement)
Entrance &
Visitor Registration
RAI Business Centre
& Prayer Room
(Basement)
ee ee
ee ee ee ee
ee ee
ee
e
e
Entrance to Hall
Visitor
Registration
Taxi Departure
A10
Thomson Video
Networks
A32 A30
A20
B30
C20 B20
C12 C10
B10
B32
MR0 MR1 MR7 MR6 MR5 MR4 MR3 MR2 MR8
100
112
111
108 104
109 105
110
106
107 103
102
101
124
122 119
117
116
114
113
MR14
MR15
MR13 MR11
MR18
MR16
MR17
118
126
127
121 120
125
107
109
111
110
112
113
101
102
Broadcast Solutions
104
103
106
Sat-Comm Broadcast
128
115
118
116
117
115
Hall 12
Hall 14
World
ISSUE ADVERTISER MAP ADVERTISER
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 12 8/1/2013 4:39:37 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com M13
Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
Information current as of 23 July 2013
10 Moons
Technology Development ....... 1.F13
16x9 ...........................................11.D21
25-Seven Systems.......................8.D30
27m Group ...................................1.A44
2connect-IT..................................2.A30
2WCOM Systems ........................ 8.E78
42NET Radio Automatization ......8.A84
4HM...........................................10.A30
4Mod Technology ...................... 14.583
51Degrees.mobi ..........................4.C88
A & C .........................................11.A71
AADYN Tech ..............................11.G73
Aaton Digital ............................. 11.F31
AB on Air ....................................3.B20j
Abakus.......................................11.G29
ABE Elettronica ...........................8.D23
ABOX42 ..................................... 14.361
ACB..............................................8.G45
ACB 1-3-9 Media Lab ..................8.G45
Accedo....................................... 14.112
ACCESS ..................................... 14.101
Accusys .......................................6.C10
Ace Marketing.................3.B25/5.A41/
5.C16/6.A29/
9.B10/11.A51
Acebil ..........................................9.A01
Acetel ..........................................3.C44
Acorde .........................................5.C49
Actia Sodielec ................. 8.E24/OE104
Active Circle ..............................2.B39h
ActiveVideo .................................3.B13
Actus Digital................................7.B11
Acz Group ....................................6.B22
ADB Lighting Technologies .......11.A34
Adder Technology ........................7.B33
Adobe Systems ...........................7.G27
Adtec Digital ...............................1.D01
Advanced Broadcast
Components ...........................8.B95
Advanced Digital Broadcast........5.B48
Advantech ...................................9.C22
Advantech Wireless ....................1.A74
AEQ..............................................8.C55
AF Marcotec ..............................11.D35
Agama Technologies ...................4.A71
AheadTek .....................................8.A09
AIC/Xtore.....................................9.A07
Airfilms ...................................... 11.F41
Airgain ............................. 4.A55/MS44
AirTies Wireless
Networks .......................5.B33/MS2
AJA Video Systems ................. 7.F11
Akamai Technologies ..................6.A15
AlanDick Broadcast .....................8.B99
Albiral Display Solutions /
Pixtron Broadcast .................10.A42
Albis Technologies .................... 14.560
Albrecht Elektronik ....................10.A40
ALC NetworX............................... 8.F57
Alcatel-Lucent .......................... MS42a
Aldena Telecomunicazioni ........8.C49a
ALi ...............................................4.C71
Allegro DVT .................................1.A46
Alma Technologies ......................5.C35
Alpermann+Velte ......................10.B48
Alpha Networks ..........................3.A26
Alphatron Broadcast
Electronics ............................11.C36
Altech Multimedia ...........5.C45/MS43
Altera Europe ............................10.A10
Alticast ........................................ 1.F36
Amagi Media Labs ......................3.B17
AmberFin .....................................7.H39
Ambient Recording....................8.C73a
AMD ............................................7.H35
AMIMON ...................................11.G79
Amino Communications ............ 14.120
Amos-Spacecom .........................1.C65
Ampegon .....................................8.D35
Amplidata ....................................6.A22
AnaCom .......................................1.C97
Anevia .........................................4.B66
ANNOVA Systems .......................3.A33
ANT Group...................................8.C76
Antik Technology ....................... 14.242
Antrica .........................................3.C17
ANYWARE VIDEO .....................8.D82c
Apace Systems............................7.K27
APANTAC ....................................7.K21
Appear TV....................................1.C61
Applicaster .....................3.A27/3.B20u
AQS .............................................2.A22
ARA Seavey.................................1.A11
ArabSat .......................................1.B38
Arbor Media ................................7.G15
Arcadyan Technology .................3.C30
Archiware ....................................7.G03
ARET ...........................................OE103
Argosy .......................................10.C51
Arion Technology .........................4.A75
Ariston BTS .................................8.C05
arqiva...........................................1.B61
ARRI Cine Technik ........ 11.F21/11.G30
ARRIS ..........................................1.D31
Artec Technologies ......................7.C28
Artel Video Systems....................2.A20
arvato Systems............................3.B26
ASC Signal ..................................1.C51
ASG Software Solutions .............7.B10
Asia Broadcast
Satellite .......................5.C11/MS23
Askey Computer ..........................3.A38
Aspera .........................................7.K30
Aspiro ........................................ 14.272
Associated Press/AP ENPS .........7.D30
Astec IT Solutions ..................... 4.A61f
Aston Group ..............................2.B39e
ASTRA .........................................1.B51
Astrium Services .........................2.C23
3G-SDI Audio Under Control
3G-SDI Audio – Loudness Simplified.
Analog, AES3, AES3id, 3G-SDI? What do you need? RTW‘s professional audio
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308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 13 8/1/2013 4:39:52 PM
M14 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Astro Strobel
Kommunikationssysteme .......3.C31
Astrodesign ...............................11.D21
ATEME .........................................1.D71
ATG Broadcast ...........................8.B51a
Atomos ........................................9.D25
ATTO Technology ......................... 7.F41
ATX Networks ........................... 14.580
Audible Magic ........................... 14.442
Audio ...........................................8.C97
Audio Wireless............................8.A76
Audio-Technica ............................8.D78
Audisi ..........................................8.C94
Aurora Lite Bank........................11.C63
Autocue Group .......................... 11.F45
Autodesk .....................................7.D25
Avanti Communications ..............1.A50
Avateq ........................................5.B40i
Aveco ...........................................3.B67
AVerMedia Technologies ..........3.B25b
Avid ............................................. 7.J20
AVIION Media ........................... 14.551
AVIT .............................................2.C45
Avitech International ................. 10.F26
Aviwest .......................................3.C41
AVL Technologies ........................5.A49
AVP Europa ................................ 10.E50
AVT Audio Video Technologies ... 8.E91
AWEX-Wallonia Foreign Trade and
Investment Agency ..............10.D31
AWOX ..........................................2.A24
Axel Technology ..........................8.B81
Axia Audio ...................................8.D30
Axle .............................................7.D07
Axon .............................10.A21/10.B21
Ayecka Communication
Systems .................................. 1.F67
B&H Photo .................................10.A01
Band Pro Munich .......................11.D21
Barco Silex ..............................10.D31b
Barnfind Technologies .................2.A14
Barrowa .......................................1.B31
Bazhou HongXingJieTu .............11.D55
BBC Academy ..............................5.B02
BBC R&D .....................................8.G44
BCE - Broadcasting
Center Europe ......................14.B30
Beamr ........................................ 3.B20z
Beenius...................................... 14.121
Beijing B.E.D-Tech
Manufacture ..........................8.D05
Beijing Feiyashi
Technology Development ...11.A51a
Beijing Fxlion
Electronic Technology ..........11.A14
Beijing Hualin Stone-tech .........9.B10e
Beijing KXWELL Technology ...11.A51b
Beijing Novel-Super
Digital TV Technology ............4.B51
Beijing Realmagic Technology ....2.C17
Beijing United Victory ............... 9.B10c
BEiKS BiK Machulski.................11.D63
Beillen Battery-JIADE
Energy Technology ...............11.G68
Belco............................................8.C60
Belgium Satellite Services ..........1.A03
Berghof Automationstechnik ......9.B12
Berlin Partner ..............................8.A25
BES ............................................ 10.F41
BFE Studio und
Medien Systeme ....................3.B62
BFN ..............................................8.C94
bic4 ............................................ 14.118
BiLi............................................... 8.F49
BitTubes ......................................8A25a
Black Box Network Services ....... 8.E20
Blackcam Systems .................... 11.F41
Blackmagic Design ................ 7.H20
BLANKOM Antennentechnik....... 1.F45
BLT ...............................................8.A64
Blue Lucy Media.......................... 7.J40
Bluebell Opticom ....................... 10.F24
Bluebird TV ................................3.B20t
Bluefish444.................................. 7.J07
Blueshape..................................11.A10
Bluetop Technology ...................6.A29c
Boland Communications ...........11.D35
BON Electronics ........................11.A61
Booxmedia...................................3.A12
Boris FX / Media 100 ..................7.G43
Boxx TV......................................10.C49
BPL Broadcast ........................... 14.140
Bradley Engineering .................. 11.F41
Brainstorm Multimedia ...............2.B59
Brazil Pavilion ..............................8.A19
Brexel ..........................................7.B01
Bridge Technologies ....................1.A30
Brightcove ...................................5.B20
Brightday Engineering ..............4.A61hi
Broadcast Bionics........................8.D73
Broadcast Electronics..................8.C91
Broadcast Manufactur ................8.D21
Broadcast Microwave
Services Europe .....................1.A10
Broadcast Partners ......................8.C93
Broadcast Pix...............................7.B21
Broadcast RF /
The Wireless Works............. 11.F67
Broadcast Solutions ........8.A94/OE102
Broadcast Sports .........................5.A09
Broadcast Traffic Systems ...........2.C18
Broadcom Corporation ................2.C35
Broadcom Ltd. .............................8.C95
Broadpeak ...................................4.B72
Brother, Brother & Sons ............11.D67
Bryant Unlimited .......................10.D15
BTESA..........................................8.B02
BTS Broadcast Technology
Solutions & RTP Museum .....OE115
Bulcrypt .......................................4.B79
Burli Software .............................8.A01
BW Broadcast ............................. 8.E74
C&C Technic Taiwan ...................3.A52
Cache-A Corporation ...................7.A04
Caldigit ........................................7.H09
Calrec Audio ................................8.C58
Calzavara ...................................8.C49b
Cambridge Imaging Systems ......7.G16
Camerasolo ...............................11.C11
Camerobot Systems ....................8.A31
CamMate Systems .................... 11.F41
Canara Lighting Industries ........ 11.F71
CANARE ....................................11.A50
CandIT Media UK ........................7.C17
Canford ........................................9.C01
Canon Europe .........................11.E50
Carl Zeiss................................... 11.F58
Cartoni ....................................... 11.E30
castLabs .................................... 14.533
CASTWIN ....................................2.A15
Cataneo .......................................3.B35
Cavena Image Products...............2.C32
CB Electronics ............................. 7.F06
CCI Paris Ile-de-France ....2.A36/2.B39/
8.B36/8.D82/
11.E41/MS42
C-COM SATELLITE SYSTEMS .....4.C55
Cedar Audio.................................8.C98
CEITON technologies ..................3.A60
Celeno .......................................3.B20b
Chengdu Dexin
Digital Technology ................3.B25e
Chimera .....................................11.G87
China Const ...............................11.C65
Christie ........................................9.C17
Christy Media Solutions..............6.C29
Chromatec Video Products ..........3.B55
Chrosziel ....................................11.A67
ChyronHego .................................7.D11
Cine 60 ......................................10.D57
Cinedeck .................................... 10.F39
Cinegy...............................7.A30/7.A41
Cineped .....................................11.D21
Cineroid .....................................11.G27
Cires21 ...................................... 14.360
Cisco ............................................1.A71
Civolution ....................................2.A41
ClassX..........................................5.C02
Clear-Com ..................................10.D29
Clearleap ................................... 14.270
Cloud Media .............................. 14.552
Cloudsigma................................ 14.183
Cmotion ....................................11.G42
CMV Hoven .................................8.A04
Coax Connectors ......................... 8.E02
Cobalt Digital......................... 10.B44
Cobham ....................................... 1.F41
Cogent Technologies .................6.C28a
Comigo ........................... 3.B20o/3.B29
Cominweb ..................................2.B39i
Commotion ..................................8.C91
Communications Specialties.......8.A80
Compunicate Technologies ........ 1.F29
Computenext ............................. 14.180
Comrex ........................................3.B15
Comtech EF Data ......................... 1.F80
COM-TECH Italia .........................8.C20
Comtech Telecommunications .... 1.F80
Conax............................... 1.D69/MS41
Concurrent Computer ..................2.B31
Connected Home Academy ....... 14.481
ContentWise ............................. 14.451
Convergent Design ......................7.D01
Cooke Optics .............................11.D10
Coolux........................................ 11.F53
Coship Electronics .......................1.A32
Cosmolight ................................11.C30
Counterpoint Systems .................9.B19
CP Cases....................................10.A44
CPI International..........................1.B41
Craltech Electronica ....................9.C02
Craze Digital .............................3.B20m
Creative Network Design ............ 7.F06
CRENOVA MULTIMEDIA ...........4.B78b
CRUCIALTEC ..............................4.B78e
Cryptoguard .................................3.C67
Crypton ........................................7.A05
Crystal Vision ..............................2.B11
CSG Media ................................ 14.433
CteDb......................................... 8.C49c
Cube-Tec International ................5.C41
Cubiware .....................................4.C60
Custom Consoles.........................3.A54
CV Support ................................11.C45
D´accord Broadcasting
Solutions ................................8.A35
DAGICO ...................................10.D31c
DAGS ......................................... 4.B78c
Dalet Digital Media Systems ......8.B77
Dan Dugan Sound Design ...........9.D12
Danmon Systems Group............ 8.B51c
DARIM .......................................3.A19e
DataDirect Networks .......6.A09/7.C30
Dataton........................................ 8.E96
Datavideo Technologies Europe ..7.D39
DAVID Systems ...........................3.A31
Dawson ......................................OE113
Dayang Technology
Development ..........................7.B35
DB Elettronica
Telecomunicazioni ..................8.C74
DCC LABS .................................. 14.164
De Sisti ......................................11.B45
De Vlaamse Radio en
Televisieomroeporganisatie ... 8.F48
DEBRIE TECHNOLOGIES............2.A36a
Decimator Design........................7.B40
Dedo Weigert Film ....................11.G36
Dega Broadcast Systems ............7.G07
Dejero ........................................11.C21
DekTec .........................................2.B40
Delec Audio und Videotechnik ..10.D30
Delta Meccanica ......................... 8.E36
DELTACAST ...............................10.D10
Deltron Italia ............................... 8.E15
DENZ .........................................11.C82
Deutsche Thomson...................... 8.F48
DEV Systemtechnik ..................... 1.F34
Deva Broadcast ...........................8.D79
devolo ........................................ 14.471
DEXEL Lighting ..........................11.A20
DGQoS ......................................8.C22e
DHD .............................................8.A50
DiGiDiA........................................8.A92
Digigram ......................................8.C51
Digimetrics ..................................7.A43
Digisoft.TV................................. 14.480
Digispot System .......................... 8.E83
DigiTAG .......................................1.D81
Digital Rapids ................... 7.F33/7.G41
Digital TV Group ..........................4.C88
Digital TV Labs ............................2.A29
Digital Vision ............................... 7.E30
Digitalsmiths ............................. 14.440
DIGITALZONE ............................4.B78d
Dimetis ........................................4.A81
DirectOut ..................................... 8.E85
Discretix Technologies ..............3.B20g
Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand
Information current as of 23 July 2013
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
Issue AdvertIser MAp AdvertIser
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 14 8/1/2013 4:40:21 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com M15
Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand
Disk Archive ...............................8.B38f
DK-Technologies .....................8.E60
DLNA ......................................... 14.430
Dolby ...........................................2.A31
Dot Hill ........................................ 7.J01
Doteck Digital Technologies .......2.C49
DOTSCREEN ..............................2.B39d
Double D Electronics ................. 1.F58a
Doughty Engineering .................11.A60
DPA Microphones .......................8.D76
Draka ........................................11.C31
DSPECIALISTS ............................. 8.E69
DTS ..............................................2.B50
Dual Stream ................................ 1.F55
Dune HD .................................... 14.102
DVB..............................................1.D81
DVBControl ..................................3.B43
DVEO ...........................................2.A34
DVLAB .........................................5.C06
DVMR-OpenHeadend ................ 14.172
DVS.............................................. 7.E25
Dynacore Technology ................11.D56
Dynamic Drive Pool .....................7.H15
Dynaudio Professional ................8.D56
Earda Electronics.........................4.C67
Easel TV.......................................4.C88
easyDCP ......................................8.B80
Easyrig .......................................11.B10
EchoStar ...................................... 1.F76
Eddystone Broadcast.................8.B38b
Edgeware ..................................14.C10
Editshare .....................................7.B26
Egatel ..........................................8.B21
EGIS .............................................3.A50
Egripment ..................................11.A21
EiTV ...........................................8.A19a
Elber ..........................................8.C22a
Electronic Service......................5.C16b
Electronic Theatre Controls.......11.A66
Electrosys ....................................8.C40
Elemental Technologies ..............4.B75
Elements.tv | Syslink ...................3.A23
Elenos .......................................... 8.E76
Elettronika ...................................8.A30
Elite Antennas ...........................5.B15b
Elliptic Technologies .................5.B46e
ELTI ..............................................8.C25
EMC Isilon ...................................7.H10
EMCORE ......................................2.A48
Emerson.......................................9.B27
Emotion Systems....................... 6.C28c
EMS Technical Personnel ............1.B09
EMSYTECH ..............................8.D82dd
Emulex .........................................7.C17
ENCO Systems ............................ 8.E11
Encompass Digital Media ...........4.B61
Enensys .......................................2.A17
Ensemble Designs .......................8.B91
Entone ....................................... 14.541
Entropic Communications ...........2.C27
Envivio .........................................1.D73
eoSTOR........................................7.C17
EPAK ............................................3.B11
Equinix .........................................3.B21
ERECA..........................................9.C47
Ericsson .......................................1.D61
Escape Technology ......................7.A02
Es’hailSat ....................................4.B74
Espial ...........................................5.B10
Etere ............................................8.B89
Etilux........................................10.D31e
ETL Systems ................................1.A33
ETRI .......................8.G30/8.G34/8.G36
ETSI .............................................2.C29
EURO LIGHT System.................. 11.F56
European Broadcasting Union... 10.F20
Eurotek ........................................8.A59
Eutelsat .......................................1.D59
Evertz ...........................................8.B40
Evoxe ...........................................2.C59
EVS ...................................8.A96/8.B90
Excito Electronics ......................5.B03a
Exir Broadcasting ........................8.D28
Exozet Berlin..............................8.A25b
Exterity ...................................... 14.105
Extreme Reality .......................3.B20aa
Extron Electronics........................2.A49
Eyeheight.....................................8.B97
eyevis ..........................................9.B24
F&V Europe................................11.G50
F.A.Bernhardt ...............................2.A21
Facilis Technology .......................7.D05
Factum Electronics ....................8.D90d
Fairlight .......................................7.H17
Falcon Eyes..................................8.C12
Farmers Wife...............................9.C25
Fiberfox......................................11.G59
FileCatalyst..................................7.H40
Fill-Lite.......................................11.D21
Filmbox ...................................... 14.550
Filmgear.....................................11.B53
Filmlight....................................... 7.F31
Fischer Connectors .................... 11.E31
Fischer Panda Generators ...........4.C65
Flanders Scientific ................ 10.F39
Floatcam ......................................9.B51
FLUENDO .....................................5.B30
Flying-Cam............................... 10.D31f
FocalPoint Server ...................... 7.J15c
Fondazione Bruno Kessler ........... 8.F48
Fonix ............................................9.A33
FOR-A ..........................................2.A51
Forbidden Technologies ............ 7.J15d
FORTIS .........................................4.B82
Fortium Technologies ................ 14.352
Fracarro .....................................8.C49d
Fraunhofer Digital
Cinema Alliance .....................8.B80
Fraunhofer-Heinrich
Hertz Institut .......................... 8.F48
Front Porch Digital.......................7.D14
Fujian Newland Communication
Science Technology ................1.C91
Fujifilm Europe...........................11.C20
Funke Digital TV ..........................3.C60
Furukawa ...................................11.G25
Galileo Digital ............................. 7.F01
Gazprom Space Systems.............4.C56
GB Labs ..................................... 7.J15b
Gearhouse Broadcast ................10.B39
Gefei Tech. ..................................8.A20
Gefen ...........................................7.B30
Genelec .................................... 8.D61
General Dynamics
SATCOM Technologies ...........1.A41
Genius Digital............................ 14.250
Geolink Satellite
Services / CETel ...................2.B39b
Gepco International /
General Cable ......................11.G61
Geritel Giomar ............................. 8.E25
Ghielmetti....................................8.C77
GIGABYTE Technology .............. 14.383
Gigasat-Giga Com ....................... 1.F70
Gigatronix .................................. 11.F87
Gilat Satellite Networks .............5.C27
GkWare .......................................2.C51
Glensound Electronics................. 8.E72
Glidecam Industries ..................11.D35
Global Distribution ......................7.G16
Globecast ....................................1.A29
goHDR / WMG,
University of Warwick............8.G49
Gold Best .....................................5.C25
GoMax Electronics ......................4.C87
GoPro ...........................................9.C40
Gorgy Timing .............................8.B36e
GOSPELL Digital Technology .......3.A61
Gracenote .................................. 14.119
Grass Valley ..................... 1.D11/1.E02
Gravity-Rock Solid
Recommendations .................5.C31
GreenGo Communication ..........11.D67
GreenPeak Technologies .............1.C90
GRUS ..........................................OE116
Guangzhou Shiyuan Electronics ..5.C23
Gulfsat Communications .............4.B54
Guntermann & Drunck ........... 4.B60
Guramex ....................................10.B20
Haivision Network Video .......... 14.482
Hamlet .........................................9.D10
Hangzhou Xingfa
Transmission Equipment ........1.C93
HARDATA ....................................8.C16
Harmonic .....................................1.B20
Harris ...........................................7.G20
HBB-NEXT ................................... 8.F40
Headroom Broadcast...................2.C57
Hellas Sat Consortium ................1.B28
HEXAGLOBE ..............................2.A36e
HGST ........................................... 7.J14
HHB Communications .................8.D56
Hi Tech Systems ..........................8.A36
Hibox Systems........................... 14.470
Highlands Technologies
Solutions ..............................10.A12
HilKOM Digital ............................ 1.F45
Hiltron..........................................4.B89
Hisilicon Technologies ................2.C30
Hispasat ......................................1.A40
Hitachi Data Systems.................. 7.E10
Hitachi Kokusai
Electric Europe .....................11.D42
Hitachi Kokusai Linear
Equipamentos Eletrônicos ...8.A19b
HMS ............................................8.A35
Homecast ....................................1.A27
Hongkong Meike
Digital Technology ................9.B10d
HS-ART Digital Service ...............5.C41
HTTV ............................................5.B18
Huawei Device .......................... 14.100
Huawei Technologies ................14.A32
Huaxin Antenna...........................1.C95
Hubee ........................................ 14.240
Hughes Europe ............................ 1.F76
Humax .........................................1.C27
Hybrid TV .....................................9.C33
HYPERION VIDEO ........................8.A74
IABM ...........8.F50/8.F51a/8.F52/8.F54
Ianiro ......................................... 11.E32
IB/E Optics.................................11.D21
IBAS.............................................8.C49
IBC Partnership Village ............... 8.F51
IBC Production Insight ...............11.B61
IBC TV News ................... 8.F55/OE101
IBC Workflow Solutions ..............9.A40
IBM ............................................. MS35
IBT Interfaces ..............................9.A03
Iceberg.........................................5.C08
Ideal Antenas ............................8.A19c
IdeasUnlimited.TV .......................8.A54
Idioma........................................ 3.B20k
IDS Products ................................9.A31
IDX Technology ..........................11.C21
IEEE Broadcast
Technology Society .............. 8.F51b
IET ............................................. 8.F51c
IGP ................................. 1.F58d/OE109
Ihlas News Agency .....................5.C01
IHSE .............................................7.C10
Ikegami Electronics Europe .......11.A31
IkiBit ............................................9.A05
Image Engineering .................... 11.E16
Image Matters.........................10.D31d
Imagine Communications..........3.B20a
Imagine Products.........................9.D14
Imagineer Systems...................... 7.J49
I-MOVIX .....................................11.C55
INA ..............................................6.A20
Indiecam ....................................11.A65
IneoQuest ................................... MS24
Inetsat .........................................5.C12
Infomir ....................................... 14.126
Inmarsat ......................................2.B19
Innowave Technologies .. 5.C14/14.170
Institut für Rundfunktechnik...... 10.F51
Intek Digital .................................5.B22
Intel ........................................... 14.106
INTELLIQUE ..............................2.B39iii
Intelsat ........................................1.C71
Interface Masters
Technologies ..........................7.C17
International Datacasting ...........1.C29
Interra Systems ...........................7.K31
intoPIX .....................................10.D31g
Intuitive Aerial...........................5.B03d
Inview ........................................ 14.353
IO Industries ..............................11.A75
IPgallery......................................3.B20i
IPV ...............................................8.B59
Irdeto ...........................................1.D51
ISOVISION ................................. 8.B36c
iStreamPlanet.................14.283/MS22
Itelsis ........................................... 8.E19
ITS Electronics...........................5.B40J
IWEDIA ........................................5.B01
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
Information current as of 23 July 2013
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 15 8/1/2013 4:40:42 PM
M16 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
i-Yuno Media Group ....................9.C35
J.L. Fisher ..................................11.C40
Jampro Antennas ........................8.B96
JK Audio ...................................... 8.E71
JLCooper Electronics................... 7.J43
JMR Electronics .......................... 7.F05
JOANNEUM RESEARCH
Forschungsgesellschaft ......... 8.F48
JoeCo .......................................... 8.E97
Jünger Audio .............................10.A49
Jutel ............................................ 8.E89
JVC Professional
Europe ......................10.D45/OE111
K5600 Lighting .......................... 11.E28
Kabelkom..................................... 8.E05
Kalix Residential College
for Adult Education ...............OE107
Kaltura ....................................... 3.B20c
Kantar Media Audiences ............ 1.F75
KAONMEDIA ...............................1.B16
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven ... 8.F48
KATHREIN TechnoTrend ..............1.A58
KATHREIN-Werke ........................8.C29
KenCast .......................................2.C25
Kietacam ...................................11.A63
Kino Flo / Cirro lite .................... 11.E33
Kintronic Laboratories ................. 8.E17
KIT Digital....................................1.C30
KOBES .........................................9.C35
Konka Group ................................5.C09
Korea Digital Convergence
Association .... 3.A19/3.A19c/4.B78
Kratos Integral Systems Europe..1.A01
Kroma Telecom ..........................10.A24
Kupo Grip...................................11.G69
Kvant-Efir ..................................... 8.E75
KWS-Electronic ...........................3.C31
Labatus ........................................1.A44
Lacie ............................................7.G17
Lanparte ....................................11.C80
Laon Technology ........................ 10.F22
Lasergraphics .............................. 7.F01
LATTO ........................................ 3.A19r
Lawo...........................................8.C71
LEA ............................................ 14.260
LEADER INSTRUMENTS ...........11.A38
Lectrosonics ..............................8.C73b
Ledgo .........................................11.A62
LEICA .........................................11.D21
LEMO Connectors......................11.D39
Level 3 Communications .............4.C50
LEVELS3D ..................................2.B39ii
Leyard ..........................................9.B28
LG Electronics..............................2.A27
LIBEC ......................................... 11.E33
Liberty Global ..............................1.D39
Lightcraft Technology ..................7.A01
Lightstar Electronic ................... 11.E53
Limecraft .....................................9.B02
Linear Acoustic............................8.D30
LiveU ................. 3.A63/3.A68/3.B20v
Livewire Digital ...........................3.A18
LMP Lux Media Plan ................. 10.F21
Loft London Solutions .................8.B16
LogicKeyboard ............................. 7.F49
LS telcom..................................... 8.E39
LSB Broadcast Technologies .......8.B31
LSI Projects................................ 11.E35
LTO Program ................................9.B20
LUCI-Technica Del Arte ...............7.A15
Lumantek .....................................3.B51
Lund Halsey .................................2.B10
Lupo Light ..................................11.B57
Lupo Lux ....................................11.G54
Lynx Technik ................................8.C70
Magma ........................................ 7.F06
MainConcept ...............................5.A31
make.tv ........................................3.B40
Mandozzi .....................................8.A48
Mariner...................................... 14.530
Mark Roberts Motion Control ...11.G35
Marquis Broadcast ......................2.A58
Marquise Technologies ...............7.H03
Marshall Electronics .................11.D20
Mart.............................................8.B15
Marvell Semiconductor ...............5.C33
Masstech Group ..........................6.A10
Masterclock...............................10.A09
Masterplay Digimedia.................8.A10
MAT Film + TV Camera
Technology ........................... 11.F32
MathEmbedded Consulting.......4.A61b
Matrox Electronic Systems .........7.B29
Matthews Studio Equipment ....11.G71
Mautilus ....................................14.A30
Maxon Computer.........................6.C19
Mayah Communications .............8.B92
MBT ...........................................8.D82a
mDialog .....................................5.B40g
MEDIA 360 ..............................2.A36bb
MEDIA BROADCAST ...................1.B79
Media Excel............................... 14.150
Media IT Profy .............................9.A11
Media Labs Powered
by Ittiam Systems ................ 14.263
Media Links .................................1.C31
Media Logic.................................7.H17
Media Utilities ............................8.A50
media.net berlinbrandenburg.... 8.A25f
Media-Alliance............................8.B71
MediaGeniX ..............................3.C59
Mediaguru Consultants.............10.D20
Medialab Barcelona .................... 1.F55
MediaPower ................................ 7.J42
Mediaproxy ................................. 7.J07
Mediaroom ...........MS21/MS32/MS39
Medienboard
Berlin-Brandenburg ..............8.A25e
Megahertz Broadcast Systems . 11.F20
MEMNON ARCHIVING
SERVICES ...............................8.C85
Merging Technologies ................. 8.E96
MeteoGraphics............................2.C48
Metrological .............................. 14.128
METUS TECHNOLOGY ................9.A09
MICRODOLLY HOLLYWOOD ......11.A40
Microlab ....................................4.A61e
Micron by Audio Engineering...... 8.E98
Microsoft ...................................... MS1
Microtech Gefell .........................8.D80
Microtron.....................................8.A04
Mier Comunicaciones ................. 8.E30
Miller Camera Support..............11.D30
Mindspeed Technologies ..........8.B38e
Minerva Networks .................... 14.553
miniCASTER/TV1.............1.A80/OE110
Minnetonka Audio Software....... 7.F07
MIRAD Microwave......................5.C19
Mirada .........................................5.A07
Miranda Technologies .................8.D41
MiraVid...................................... 14.350
Mistserver.org/DDVTECH .......... 14.452
MISTV..........................................2.A16
MITEQ..........................................1.A18
MITSUMI ELECTRIC ..................11.G85
MJ Shanghai Trading ..................8.D05
Mobile Viewpoint...................... 14.113
MobiTV ...................................... 14.160
Mode-AL....................................10.A38
MOG-Technologies ......................7.H32
Mogami .......................................8.D56
Mole-Richardson Company ....... 11.F57
Monarch Innovative
Technologies ..........................8.B01
Mosart .........................................5.C28
Motama ..................................... 14.582
Motion Plus MEDIA................... 14.127
MOVCAM ..................................11.D21
Movicom....................................11.G63
MovieTech ................................. 11.E39
MSA Focus International ............3.B56
Mstar Semiconductor..................4.C59
MTF Services.............................11.G77
M-Three Satcom .......................8.C22d
mufin..........................................8.A25c
MULTICAM SYSTEMS ............ 11.E41a
MultiDyne................................10.D46b
Murraypro Electronics ............... 10.F23
MWA Nova ................................. 7.E30
Myat ............................................8.A58
Myricom ......................................7.C17
nablet ..........................................9.A05
nac Image Technology ...............11.G75
NAGRA ........................................1.C81
Nagra Audio ................................ 8.E96
Nanguang Photographic
Equipment ............................ 11.E10
Narda Test Solutions ...................8.A04
Nativ ..........................................4.A61d
Nautel..........................................8.C61
Nautilus Studio ...........................7.G05
ND SatCom..................................5.A05
NEC..............................................8.B37
Neotion........................................4.B53
NET INSIGHT ...............................1.B40
Net Mobile ................................ 14.462
Netgear ..................................... 14.110
Netgem........................................5.B45
NETIA .........................................8.B36f
Netrange ................................... 14.108
Netris...........................................5.C21
NetUP ........................................ 14.282
Neutrik.........................................8.C90
never.no .......................................7.A09
Nevion .........................................1.B71
New Insight ...............................2.A36b
New Japan Radio........................5.C13
NewFace TV .............................. 5.B40c
NewsBoss ...................................8.C91
Newtec ........................................1.A49
NewTek .......................................7.K11
NexGenWave ............................3.A19a
Nexidia ........................................3.A46
NEXTO .......................................11.G37
NHK .............................................8.G38
Nikon Europe .............................11.B50
Nila LED Lighting....................... 11.F56
Ningbo Eimage
Studio Equipment .................11.C51
NKK Switches .............................8.A70
NOA Audio Solutions ..................8.D91
Noah Broadcast Solutions ........11.G64
Nordija....................................... 14.540
North Telecom .............................4.B71
Norwia.........................................9.C19
Novella SatComs....................... 1.F58b
NovelSat............................ 3.A48/MS3
Novotronik ...................................1.A54
NPTV............................................5.B19
NTP Technology .........................8.B51b
NTSI............................................2.B39f
NTT Group ...................................2.C50
Nucomm/RF Central ....................1.D40
NUGEN Audio.............................. 7.F07
Numedia ......................................3.B55
NVIDIA......................................... 7.J39
NXP Software............................ 14.450
NyeTec .........................................2.C31
OASYS .........................................8.B16
Object Matrix ............................6.C28b
OCT Technology ...........................2.C37
OCTOPUS Newsroom............. 7.G11
OKNO-TV .....................................9.C30
Omnia Audio................................8.D30
Omnitek .......................................6.A18
On Screen Publishing ................5.B15a
ONE CONNXT ..............................1.A99
One For All...................................1.C41
Onetastic ................................... 8.C22c
Online Voices ............................ 5.B03c
Ontario, Canada ............... 5.B40/5.B46
OOYALA ..................................... 14.116
Open Broadcast Systems ..........4.A61g
Open IPTV Forum ....................... 14.184
Opentech .....................................5.C42
Opera Software ......................... 14.111
Opic Telecom .............................8.A19d
Optical Cable Corporation ......... 10.F29
Opticomm-Emcore .......................2.A48
Optoway Technology ...................8.A22
Orad Hi-Tec Systems ...................7.B27
Orban Europe...............................8.D93
OSEE ..........................................10.D59
Overline Systems ........................ 8.E94
Ovide Maudet............................11.D21
P.A.D. Media & Services ...........11.C57
P+S Technik ............................... 11.E59
Pace .............................................1.B19
Packet Ship Technologies .........4.A61c
Pals Electronics ...........................4.A51
Panaccess Systems .....................5.C10
Panasonic Marketing
Europe .........................9.C45/9.D40
Panodic Electric ...........................3.A40
Panther ...................................... 11.E20
Paradigm Communications .........4.C81
Paralinx......................................11.D21
PBI ...............................................3.C15
Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
Information current as of 23 July 2013
Issue AdvertIser MAp AdvertIser
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 16 8/1/2013 4:41:01 PM
August 2013 | broadcastengineeringworld.com M17
Peak Communications .................1.C33
Pebble Beach Systems ................8.B58
Peer TV .......................................3.B20l
Penta Studiotechnik ..................10.A41
Perceptiva Labs ...........................3.A16
Percon........................................ 10.E51
Perfect Memory.........................8.D82d
Phabrix ......................................8.E35
Philips Entertainment ................11.G81
Philips Remote Control................1.A81
Philips uWand ........................... 14.103
Phoenix7 ......................................3.C21
Phonak Communications ............. 8.E95
Photon Beard .............................11.D43
Pilat Media ..................................2.B30
PINGUIN Ing.Büro........................ 8.F41
Pixel Power..................................7.A31
Pixellot....................................... 3.B20y
Pixelmetrix...................................1.B29
Plaber-HPRC Cases .....................9.B43
PlayBox Technology ...............8.C30
Playcast Media Systems .............5.B11
Playence Spain ............................ 8.F48
Playlist Software Solutions.......8.A19e
PLAZAMEDIA TV &
Film Produktion ....................11.C50
Plisch ........................................... 8.E31
Plura Broadcast ...........................8.B73
Pluxbox ...................................... 10.F35
Polecam .....................................10.C49
Pond5...........................................9.B41
Porta Brace ................................ 11.F69
Portaprompt.................................8.A90
Preston Cinema Systems ..........11.D21
Preview GM System....................8.B61
Prime Focus Technologies ...........7.G37
Primestream ................................7.D21
PRISMAHUB ................................8.A01
Prismcube .................................... 1.F94
ProConsultant Informatique ........2.B21
Production Minds ........................9.D18
Prodys ..........................................1.B30
Professional Sound .....................8.C96
PROFITT .......................................7.A06
Progira Radio Communication.....8.B98
Projectbuilders ...........................OE118
Promax Electronica......................8.B22
Promise Technology ....................6.C11
Pronology.....................................9.A59
ProSup ....................................... 11.E58
ProTelevision Technologies .........8.C48
Provys ..........................................2.B49
PRO-X ........................................ 11.E42
PSI Audio ..................................... 8.E96
Pulse Power and Measurement ..1.A11
PureBlend Software ..................9.B14a
Qbit .............................................. 8.E49
Qt by Digia................................. 14.362
Quadrille .................................... 2.B39c
Quadrus Technology ....................7.K25
Qualcomm ................................. 14.152
Qualitteq......................................3.B14
Quantel ........................................7.A20
Quantum 5X Systems .................5.B40f
Quantum ......................................7.G30
Quattro ........................................ 8.E37
Qube Cinema ............................... 7.F45
Quicklink Video
Distribution Services ..............3.B39
QuickPlay Media ....................... 14.381
Quintech Electronics ...................4.B81
QUOTIUM TECHNOLOGIES .......2.A36d
Qvest Media ................................3.B40
Rabbit Labs..................................3.A44
RADIALL .................................. 11.E41c
Radica Broadcast Systems........8.B38g
Radio Frequency Systems ...........8.B34
Radioscape ................................8.D90a
RAI ............................................... 8.F48
RAIDIX ......................................... 7.J05
RaLex Solutions...........................8.D75
RAMI .........................................8.B36a
Rascular Technology .................8.B38a
RaySat Antenna Systems............5.C27
RealNetworks............................ 14.107
RED Digital Cinema .....................7.H37
Remote Solution........................3.A19d
Rescue Tape-Harbor Products ... 11.F65
Research Concepts.....................1.F58c
RF-Design .................................... 1.F57
RGB Networks .............................4.B70
Riedel Communications ...... 10.A31
RIZ-Transmitters ..........................8.A03
RJS Electronics .........................6.C28d
RME/AUDIO ................................8.A11
RO.VE.R
Instruments & Broadcast .....8.C49e
Rockwell Collins .......................... 1.F50
Rodenstock Photo Optics .......... 11.F73
Rohde & Schwarz ........................ 7.E25
Roland Systems Group ................ 7.J38
Root6 Technology ........................ 7.E21
Roscolab ....................................11.G21
Rosenberger OSI ....................... 11.F50
Ross Video............. 9.B08/9.C10/9.C23
Rotolight ....................................11.D69
Rovi Europe .................................5.A31
Royal Television Society ........... 8.F51d
RRsat Global
Communications Network .....1.A23
RS2I ...........................................2.A36c
RT Software ................................2.B16
RTI Group.....................................6.A21
RT-RK Computer
Based Systems .......................5.A01
RTS ............................................10.D25
RTW ........................................... 8.D92
Ruige China ............................... 11.E43
Russian Satellite
Communications ....................4.B84
Ruwido ........................................ 1.F68
RVR Elettronica ...........................8.C28
Rycote..........................................8.A86
RYMSA ........................................8.C65
S&T (Strategy & Technology) ......1.B22
STP ..............................................8.C85
S3 Group......................................3.B18
S3 Satcom ...................................1.B91
Saffron Digital ........................... 14.154
Sagemcom...................................1.D41
SAIL LABS Technology ................ 8.E03
SALZBRENNER
STAGETEC MEDIAGROUP ......8.C80
Sam Woo Electronics ................ 11.F11
Samim Rayaneh ..........................9.B04
Samsung......................................1.D35
SAMYANG EUROPE ..................11.D57
Sanken Microphone ....................8.C01
Sans Digital ................................. 7.F04
SAPEC.......................................... 1.F21
Sat-Comm Broadcast ...... 1.F90/OE106
Satlink Communications .............5.A17
Satmission.......................1.A91/OE107
SatService ................................... 1.F47
Savas ......................................... 14.181
Scenario 2 .................................5.B40a
Scene...........................................8.G41
ScheduALL...................................1.D30
Schill.......................................... 11.E40
Schneider Kreuznach.................11.A28
Schoeps Mikrofone ..................... 8.E90
Schulze-Brakel
Schaumstoffverarbeitungs .....8.D77
SCISYS Deutschland ...................8.A23
Scottish Development
International .........................9.B14d
Screen Service ............................8.C41
Screen Subtitling Systems.....1.C49
SCTE .......................................... 8.F51e
SeaChange ................................14.B20
SeaWell Networks .................... 14.182
SED Systems ...............................1.A52
SEINT...........................................6.B07
Sematron .....................................1.A78
Semtech .................................... 10.F30
Sencore ....................................... 1.F56
Senna ........................................ 11.E57
Sennheiser Electronic ........... 8.D50
Servicevision .............................11.A41
SES ..............................................1.B51
SGI .............................................7.K01a
SGL ............................................ 7.J15a
SGO .............................................6.A11
SGT / Vivesta ..............................2.A40
Shaanxi Tianyi Antenna ............ 5.C16c
Shape ........................................11.B55
Shenzhen C&D Electronics.......... 1.F96
SHENZHEN AEE TECHNOLOGY .9.B10f
Shenzhen Anycon
Electronics Tech. .................. 3.B25c
SHENZHEN COOLECH
TECHNOLOGY ......................5.A41d
ShenZhen Geniatech .................5.A41a
Shenzhen Gongjin Electronics...5.A41b
Shenzhen Hualistone
Technology ...........................3.B25d
Shenzhen Konvision
Technology ........................... 10.F43
Shenzhen MTC ............................3.C61
Shenzhen New Glee
Technology .............................2.C39
Shenzhen New
Solution Electronics .............5.A41c
Shenzhen Newmi Digital ............ 1.F32
ShenZhen Remote
Tech-Developing ...................5.A41e
Shenzhen Ruiren Electronics.....5.C16a
Shenzhen Skyworth
Digital Techonlogy ..................4.A77
Shively Labs ................................ 8.E81
Shotoku Broadcast Systems ..... 11.F40
SHOTOVER Camera Systems ....11.A69
SI Media ......................................8.B93
Sichuan Changhong Network
Technologies ........................6.A29a
Sichuan Jiuzhou Electric Group ..3.C56
Sichuan Video Electronic ..........3.B25a
Sielco...........................................8.A12
Siemens Convergence
Creators ................................14.A30
Sigma Designs ............................4.C83
Signiant ..................................... 14.125
Signum Bildtechnik .....................7.D31
Simex Import & Export .............. 11.F89
SintecMedia ................................2.B41
SIRA.............................................8.C31
SIS LIVE .......................................1.C55
Sisvel Technology ........................5.B37
SIX .............................................11.D21
SKB CASES................................11.D65
Skyline Communications .............1.A21
SKYPIX.........................................9.C35
Skyware Global ...........................4.A95
Slik.............................................11.A30
Slomo.TV .....................................8.B11
SmarDTV .....................................1.C81
SmartLabs ................................. 14.340
SMiT ............................................ 1.F86
SMK EUROPE ..............................4.C78
SMPTE ........................................ 8.F51f
SNELL ..........................................8.B70
Soft at Home ...............................5.B30
SOFT VALLEE ...............................2.C21
Softlab-NSK ................................7.A08
SoftNI ..........................................1.A39
Softron Media Services ..............7.G12
Sohonet .....................................4.A61d
Solectrix .................................... 11.E61
Solid Camera ...........................10.D46a
Solid State Logic .........................8.D83
SOLIDANIM: TECHNOLOGIE
SOLIDTRACK ........................8.B36d
Sommer Cable .............................9.B31
Sondor Willy Hungerbuehler.......7.H01
Sonifex ........................................ 8.E61
Sonnet Technologies ...................7.G02
sono Studiotechnik......................8.C81
Sony...........................................12.A10
Sotal IPTV ..................................14.B32
Sound Audio Processing .............8.C94
Sound Devices.............................8.D74
Soundminer ...............................5.B40b
SP Telefilm ................................. 8.A19f
SPB TV ....................................... 14.109
Spectra Logic...............................7.G35
Spectracom ...............................8.D82b
Spideo ....................................... 14.370
Spinner ........................................8.B27
Spotlight ....................................11.D53
SPX Flow Technology ..................8.C60
Square Box Systems .................7.K01b
Staer ...........................................8.C49f
Stardom .......................................7.G09
Starfish Technologies ..................8.B30
Starline Computer .......................7.H05
Step2e Broadcast ........................2.B29
Stereolabs ............................... 11.E41b
Stereotec ................................... 11.F63
Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
Information current as of 23 July 2013
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 17 8/1/2013 4:41:26 PM
M18 broadcastengineeringworld.com | August 2013
Stirlitz Media...............................8.C91
STMicroelectronics ..................... 1.F40
Stoneroos ....................................1.A95
StorageDNA ................................ 7.J47
STORDIS ......................................7.C17
Stream Labs ................................7.G47
Streamit.......................................2.A32
Streamstar................................. 10.E59
STRYME ...................................... 7.J03
Studer by Harman .......................8.D60
Studio Network Solutions ...........7.A03
Studiotech .................................11.C64
Sub10 Systems............................4.C88
Suitcase TV ...................... 2.C10/2.C15
Suman Satellite Technology .....5.C16b
Sumavision Technologies ............1.B10
Sumitomo Electric Industries ......4.C73
Surface Heating Systems............ 1.F59
SVP Broadcast Microwave..........2.C55
Sweden at IBC.............................5.B03
SWE-DISH by Rockwell Collins... 1.F50
Swedish Microwave ................... 1.F71
SWIT Electronics .......................11.A39
Switchcraft ..................................9.C49
SyES ..........................................8.C49g
Synapse TV..................................1.B22
Synaptop ...................................5.B40e
Syrp ...........................................11.A56
Systembase ................................. 8.E93
TAC SYSTEM ............................... 7.F06
Tactel .........................................5.B03b
Tag Video Systems ......................4.C89
TAKTIK .....................................10.D31h
TAMUZ Broadcast Monitors .......2.C57
Tangent Wave .............................7.G33
Tata Communications ..................3.C20
Tata Elxsi ..................................... 1.F31
TC Electronic ...............................8.D56
Tcube ......................................... 2.A36f
TDF ..............................................1.B79
Teamcast .....................................2.B51
TECH4HOME ...............................3.C35
Techbid Auctions .......................10.A08
Technicolor .................MS4/MS5/MS7
Technisat Digital .......................14.C20
Technische Universität
Braunschweig ........................8.G35
Techno Design Engineering .........8.C03
Technocrane ..............................11.D36
Techwave ....................................9.C35
Tecsys Video Networks .............3.B20e
Tedial ...........................................8.B41
Tektronix ....................................10.D41
Telairity ........................................5.B09
Tele Frontier ................................ 1.F59
Teledyne Paradise Datacom ........1.B24
Teleidea .......................................5.B04
Telekom Austria Group ..............14.C12
Telemetrics ................................ 11.E37
Telenor Satellite Broadcasting ....1.A59
Telesat .........................................1.C39
Telespazio ....................................4.A70
Teleste .........................................4.B77
Telestream ...................................7.C12
Television Research Institute ......5.C43
TELIKOU TECHNOLOGIES..........11.A54
Telmaco ....................................... 8.E45
Telos ............................................8.D30
Telsat .........................................8.C22b
TEM .............................................8.A26
Teracue ...................................... 14.461
Teradek ................................... 11.A43
Terrasat Communications ........... 1.F81
TESLA Electrontubes ...................8.A14
Thaicom Public ............................1.A05
Thales Alenia Space ...................4.A70
Thales Angenieux...................... 11.F34
The Foundry Visionmonger..........7.B13
The Israel Export & International
Cooperation Institute .............3.B20
The Pixel Farm .............................6.C18
The Video Point ........................3.B20w
TheLight.....................................11.G83
ThinkAnalytics .............................1.D92
Thomson Broadcast.....................8.C11
Thomson Video Networks .........14.A10
Thum+Mahr .................................8.A50
Thuraya Telecommunications .....2.C23
Tieline .......................................... 8.E73
Tiffen .........................................11.D21
Tiger Technology .........................7.D03
Tilta Technology ......................11.A51d
Timecode Systems ....................9.B14a
TiVo ............................................ 14.531
TMD.............................................2.C58
TMS ........................................... 14.562
Toner Cable Equipment UK .........4.B91
ToolsOnAir
Broadcast Engineering ...........7.G45
Top-Up Industry ...........................8.B94
TOSCA-MP .................................. 8.F48
Toshiba ........................................8.D16
TQTVD Software .......................8.A19g
Tract ............................................. 8.E83
TRANSRADIO
SenderSysteme Berlin ...........8.D35
Transvideo ................................. 11.F31
TRedess .......................................8.A21
Triada-TV .....................................8.D31
Trilogy Communications ............10.A29
Trinnov Audio ..............................8.C35
TriVis Weather Graphix ...............3.A58
True Lens Services ....................11.G65
TSF.be .......................................10.D31i
TSL ........................................... 10.B41
TTA ..............................................2.C41
TTcomm ....................................... 1.F49
TTI ...............................................4.C69
Turkonet-Signal ENG ...................3.B16
TV Skyline..................................11.C51
TV1 ..................................1.A80/OE110
TVC .............................................OE112
TVINCI ............................ 3.B20n/3.C46
TVLogic ......................................10.D26
TVStorm.......................................4.A91
TVU Networks .............................2.B28
TW Electronics (Newbury) ..........4.C77
Ubertweek .................................8.A25d
UK Pavilion ......................4.A61/5.B15/
6.C28/7.J15/
7.K01/8.B38/9.B14
Ultimatte .....................................7.C27
Uniclass Technology ....................4.C61
Unified Streaming ..................... 14.115
Unique Broadband Systems ........8.A40
UnitronGroup ...............................4.C85
Universal Electronics...................1.C41
US Wondlan International ........11.C61
Utah Scientific .............................2.B20
Utelisys...................................... 14.363
UXP Systems .............................5.B40d
Varavon .....................................11.C11
VariZoom ...................................11.D58
VBOX COMMUNICATIONS .......3.B20d
Vcodes .......................................3.B20p
VDB Audio ...................................8.C01
VDL ............................................8.D90b
VDL Deutschland .......................8.D90c
Vector 3 .......................................7.C01
Venera Technologies ...................8.A98
Verimatrix ....................................4.A55
Versatile-Remotes.TV ............... 11.F41
Veset ...........................................5.C15
Vestel ........................................14.A20
Viaccess-Orca..............................1.A51
ViaLite Communications .............1.A11
VidCheck....................................8.B38d
VIDEO-FLOW .............................3.B20h
Videosolutions Group ..................7.A05
Videssence ............................ 11.B12
VidiGo ..........................................7.H30
VidMind .........................3.B20s/14.124
Viewcast.................................... 14.372
Vigintos Elektronika .................... 8.E23
Vimond Media Solutions...........14.B10
Vimsoft ........................................9.A02
Vinson........................................ 14.371
Visio Light..................................11.G45
VISION Cloud............................. 14.380
Vision Research.........................11.D47
Vision247................................... 14.273
Visiware ....................................2.B39g
Vislink ....................................... 1.A69
ViSTA-TV .....................................8.G39
Visual Research........................... 7.J30
Visual Unity ............................... 14.280
Vitec ............................................ 7.J31
VIXS Systems ..............................2.A10
Vizrt .............................................7.A10
Vocas ......................................... 11.E34
Vodience ....................................3.B20q
Voice Technologies....................8.C73a
Volamp ........................................8.A28
Volicon .........................................7.G23
Vortex Communications ............11.G11
VSN .............................................7.C21
VTQ Videotronik .......................... 1.F11
VTS Studiotechnik .......................8.C81
W.B. Walton Enterprises .............1.A62
Walimex Pro ..............................11.A73
WASP3D ...................................... 7.J16
Wave Science Technology ..........8.A44
Wavestream ................................5.C27
Weather Channel
Professional Division .............3.B61
WeatherOne ................................2.C11
Well Buying Industrial ................. 8.E29
WellAV Technologies ..................5.B47
Wellen+Noethen .........................3.B40
Wheatstone.................................8.A24
Winmedia ..................................8.B36b
Wisi Communications .................4.B50
Wisycom......................................8.D89
Witbe...........................................4.C74
WNM........................................10.D31j
Wohler Technologies ................10.B10
Wooden Camera ....................... 11.E55
Work Microwave .........................4.B63
World DMB .................................9.D30
WorldCast Systems .....................8.B50
Wowza Media Systems ..............5.B32
wTVision......................................7.A45
Wyplay ........................................5.A11
XCRYPT......................................4.B78a
XenData.......................................7.H47
Xiamen RGBlink
Science & Technology ............7.K40
Xpertia .........................................2.C33
Xstream ..................................... 14.122
Xtreme Labs ...............................5.B46f
Xytech Systems ...........................6.C22
Yamaha Commercial Audio .........8.D10
Yangaroo ...................................5.B40h
Yegrin Liteworks........................11.G66
Yellowtec.....................................8.A51
Yospace ..................................... 14.104
Yuan High-Tech Development .....9.B06
Yuyao Fotodiox
Photo Equipment ................ 11.A51f
Zacuto........................................ 11.F60
Zappware ....................................1.A81
Zaxcom ......................................8.C73a
Zetrox ......................................4.A61hii
ZHANGZHOU LILLIPUT ELECTRONIC
TECHNOLOGY ....................11.A51e
ZHC Digital Equipment ..............6.A29b
Zhengzhou Generalink
Lighting Equipment ..............9.B10b
Zhengzhou KEMA MOVIE-TV
OPTO-ELECTRONICS ..........11.A51c
Zhengzhou Taiying
Video Equipment ....................9.B49
Zhuhai Gotech Electronic
Technology ........................... 5.A41f
Zhuhai Jili Development .............9.A57
Zigbee Alliance ......................... 14.117
Zixi ............................................. 14.342
Zoo Digital ................................. 8.B38c
ZukunftsAgentur Brandenburg ..8.A25g
Zylight........................................ 11.F56
Issue AdvertIser MAp AdvertIser
Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand Exhibitor name Hall.Stand
For more information about IBC and to
register, go to www.ibc.org/register
IBC2013
AMSTERDAM RAI • 13-17 SEPTEMBER
Information current as of 23 July 2013
308bew17-MAP-DE.indd 18 8/1/2013 4:41:46 PM
Visit TSL Products @ IBC 2013 Stand 10.B41
Contact us for further information:
E: products@tsl.co.uk
T: +44 (0)1628 676 221
www.tslproducts.com
Products
Effortless Audio Monitoring
From Entry-level to Critical multi-channel monitoring, TSL
Products has a solution to give confidence to every Sound
operator position along the broadcast chain whether in
creative or technical engineering.
Seamless Cross-Equipment
Communication
Tallyman sits at the heart of broadcast system coordinating
critical broadcast infrastructure components and providing
operators with a common platform to universally control multiple
pieces of kit from different vendors. Choose from tactile push-
button or virtual touchscreen control panels.
Basic and Intelligent
Power Management Solutions
Any facility that has rack-mounted equipment be it a TV
Station, IT/Data Centre, Hospital or Oil Rig, with TSL Products
Power Manager Family, savings on power consumption and
energy costs could be extensive.
Straight-Forward Surround Sound
Capture & Processing
HD Broadcasters can capture the atmosphere of the action
and the crowd with TSL Products SoundField range. Perfect
for Live Events from World Class and Small Scale Sporting
Competitions to Studio Audience-based and Concert Venue
productions.
308BEWMAP19.indd 1 8/2/2013 10:17:38 AM
308BEWMAP20.indd 1 8/2/2013 11:55:16 AM

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