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Japanese candle sticks

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Bullish pattern

Bullish Three Outside Up


The bullish three outside up (tsutsumi age) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish three outside up candlestick consists of a downward candlestick (i.e. a red candlestick), followed by a larger upward candlestick (i.e. a green candlestick) that contains the first candlestick (i.e. a bullish engulfing), followed by another upward candlestick (i.e. another green candlestick). Use In Trading The bullish three outside up pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish three outside up pattern is a bullish pattern, and can be used as an indication of the end of a downward trend. The bullish three outside up pattern is a somewhat complicated candlestick pattern, but once the important elements of the pattern are understood (e.g. the second candlestick containing the first candlestick), the pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and the pattern can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Bullish Three Inside Up


The bullish three inside up (harami age) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish three inside up candlestick consists of a downward candlestick (i.e. a red candlestick), followed by a smaller upward candlestick (i.e. a green candlestick), that is contained within the first candlestick (i.e. a bullish harami), followed by a larger upward candlestick (i.e. another green candlestick), that closes above the open of the first candlestick. Use In Trading The bullish three inside up pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish three inside up pattern is a bullish pattern, and can be used as an indication of the end of a downward trend. The bullish three inside up pattern is a somewhat complicated candlestick pattern, but once the important elements of the pattern are understood (e.g. the third candlestick closing above the open of the first candlestick), the pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and the pattern can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Bullish Tri Stars


The bullish tri stars (santen boshi) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish tri stars candlestick consists of a doji candlestick (i.e. a candlestick that opens and closes at the same price), followed by another doji candlestick, followed by another doji candlestick (i.e. three consecutive doji candlesticks). The second doji candlestick must be below both the first and third candlesticks (i.e. a gap down, followed by a gap up).

Use In Trading The bullish tri stars pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish tri stars pattern is a bullish pattern, and can be used as an indication of the end of a downward trend. The bullish tri stars pattern is a rare candlestick pattern, but the pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and when it does occur, it can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Japanese candle sticks

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Bullish pattern

Bullish Three White Soldiers


The bullish three white soldiers (aka sanpei) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish three white soldiers candlestick consists of three upward candlesticks (e.g. green candlesticks) in a row, with each candlestick opening below the close, and above the open, of the previous candlestick (i.e. a gap down), and closing above the close of the previous candlestick.

Use In Trading The bullish three white soldiers pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish three white soldiers pattern is a bullish pattern, and can be used as an indication of the end of a downward trend. The bullish three white soldiers pattern is very easy to identify on a price chart.

Bullish Kicking
The bullish kicking (keri ashi) candlestick pattern is one of the double candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of two individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish kicking candlestick consists of a downward candlestick (specifically a bearish marubozu), followed by an upward candlestick (possibly a bullish marubozu) that opens and closes above the high of the previous candlestick (i.e. a gap up).

Use In Trading
The bullish kicking pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is a somewhat rare pattern. The bullish kicking pattern is an extremely bullish pattern, but it is not necessarily suitable for use as a trade entry or a trade exit pattern (i.e. an exit from a short trade, and/or an entry into a long trade).

Long Belt Hold


The long belt hold candlestick pattern is one of the single candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of only one candlestick), and it is a bullish pattern. The long belt hold candlestick opens with a gap down, and at its low, and closes near its high, showing that the time frame consisted of generally bullish trading.

Use In Trading The long belt hold pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant during a downwards trend. The long belt hold can indicate the end of a downwards trend and the beginning of a new upwards trend, and can therefore be used as both a trade exit and a trade entry. The long belt hold is also included in some of the two or three candlestick patterns, in which case it has the same bullish relevance, and provides the same indication of upcoming price movement.

Japanese candle sticks

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Bullish pattern

Bullish Upside Tasuki Gap


The bullish upside tasuki gap (uwa banare tasuki) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish upside tasuki gap candlestick consists of an upward candlestick (i.e. a green candlestick), followed by another upward candlestick (i.e. another green candlestick) that opens above the close of the first candlestick (i.e. a gap up), followed by a downward candlestick (i.e. a red candlestick) that opens below the close of the second candlestick (i.e. a gap down). Note that the gap up between the first and second candlesticks is not closed by either the second or third candlesticks.

Use In Trading The bullish upside tasuki gap pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant upward trend. The bullish upside tasuki gap pattern is a bullish pattern, and with a confirmation (e.g. bullish trading in a subsequent candlestick), the upside tasuki gap pattern can be used as an indication of the continuation of an upward trend. The bullish upside tasuki gap pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and as long as the important elements of the pattern are provided (e.g. the gap up that is not closed), the pattern can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Bullish Upside Gap Three Methods


The bullish upside gap three methods (uwa banare sanpoo hatsu oshi) candlestick pattern (view full size chart) is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish upside gap three methods candlestick pattern consists of an upward candlestick (i.e. a green candlestick), followed by another upward candlestick (i.e. another green candlestick) that opens above the close of the first candlestick (i.e. a gap up), followed by a downward candlestick (i.e. a red candlestick) that opens below the close of the second candlestick (i.e. a gap down), and has a low below the close of the first candlestick (i.e. closes the gap between the first and second candlesticks).

Use In Trading The bullish upside gap three methods pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant upward trend. The bullish upside gap three methods pattern is a bullish pattern, and with a confirmation (e.g. bullish trading in a subsequent candlestick), the upside gap three methods pattern can be used as an indication of the continuation of an upward trend. The bullish upside gap three methods pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and as long as the important elements of the pattern are provided (e.g. the gap up that is closed by the third candlestick), the pattern can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Bullish Unique Three River Bottom


The bullish unique three river bottom (sankawa soko zukae) candlestick pattern (view full size chart) is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish unique three river bottom candlestick consists of a downward candlestick (i.e. a red candlestick), followed by another downward candlestick that opens and closes above the close of the first candlestick (i.e. a gap up), and has a low below the low of the first candlestick, followed by an upward candlestick (i.e. a green candlestick) that opens and closes below the close of the second candlestick (i.e. a gap down), and has a low above the low of the second candlestick. Use In Trading The bullish unique three river bottom pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish unique three river bottom pattern is a bullish pattern, and can be used as an indication of the end of a downward trend. The bullish unique three river bottom pattern is one of the more complicated candlestick patterns, and the pattern can be somewhat difficult to identify on a price chart, but when it does occur, it can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Japanese candle sticks

[Type text]

Bullish pattern

Bullish Stick Sandwich


(end of downward trend?)
The bullish stick sandwich (gyakusashi niten zoko) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish stick sandwich candlestick consists of a downward candlestick (i.e. a red candlestick), followed by an upward candlestick (i.e. a green candlestick) that opens above the close of the first candlestick (i.e. a gap up), followed by another downward candlestick (i.e. another red candlestick) that closes at the same price as the first candlestick. Use In Trading The bullish stick sandwich pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish stick sandwich pattern is a bullish pattern, and with a confirmation (e.g. bullish trading in a subsequent candlestick), the stick sandwich pattern can be used as an indication of the end of a downward trend. The bullish stick sandwich pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and as long as the important elements of the pattern are provided (e.g. the third candlestick closing at the same price as the first candlestick), the pattern can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Bullish Side By Side White Lines


The bullish side by side white lines (narabi aka) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish side by side white lines candlestick consists of an upward candlestick (i.e. a green candlestick), followed by another upward candlestick (i.e. another green candlestick) that opens above the close of the first candlestick (i.e. a gap up), followed by another upward candlestick (i.e. another green candlestick) that opens below the close of the second candlestick (i.e. a gap down). Note that the gap up between the first and second candlesticks is not closed by either the second or third candlesticks.

Use In Trading The bullish side by side white lines pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant upward trend. The bullish side by side white lines pattern is a bullish pattern, and can be used as an indication of the continuation of an upward trend. The bullish side by side white lines pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and as long as the important elements of the pattern are provided (e.g. the gap up that is not closed), the pattern can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Bullish Three Stars in the South


The bullish three stars in the south (kyoku no santen boshi) candlestick pattern is one of the triple candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of three individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish three stars in the south candlestick consists of three downward candlesticks (i.e. red candlesticks), with each candlestick opening above the close of the previous candlestick (i.e. a gap up), and having a smaller range than the previous candlestick. Use In Trading The bullish three stars in the south pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish three stars in the south pattern is a bullish pattern (even though it consists of three downward candlesticks), and can be used as an indication of the end of a downward trend. The bullish three stars in the south pattern is relatively easy to identify on a price chart, and the pattern can provide a useful indication of upcoming price movement.

Japanese candle sticks

[Type text]

Bullish pattern

Bullish Harami Cross


The bullish harami cross (harami yose sen) candlestick pattern is one of the double candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of two individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish harami cross candlestick consists of a downward candlestick (e.g. a red candlestick), followed by a doji candlestick (e.g. neither a green nor red candlestick) that opens above the close of, and is contained within, the previous candlestick.

Use In Trading Like the bullish harami pattern, the bullish harami cross pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. However, the bullish harami cross does not necessarily indicate the end of a downward trend, and therefore can not really be used as a trade entry or a trade exit pattern. The bullish harami cross indicates that the recent trading has been slightly bullish (due to the doji's gap up), but that neither bullish nor bearish trading has dominated.

Long Marubozu
The long marubozu candlestick pattern is one of the single candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of only one candlestick), and it is a bullish pattern. The long marubozu candlestick opens at (or near) its low, and closes at (or near) its high, showing that the time frame consisted of generally bullish trading.

Use In Trading The long marubozu pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), so by itself it only indicates that the time frame was extremely bullish. Therefore, the long marubozu is not often used as an trade entry pattern, but it is sometimes used as a trade exit pattern (depending upon the trade in question). The long marubozu is also included in some of the two or three candlestick patterns, in which case it has more relevance, and can provide an indication of upcoming price movement.

Bullish Matching Low


The bullish matching low (niten zoko / kenuki) candlestick pattern is one of the double candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of two individual candlesticks), and it is a bullish pattern. The bullish matching low candlestick consists of a downward candlestick (e.g. a red candlestick) that closes at its low, followed by another downward candlestick that opens below the open of the previous candlestick, and closes at the close of the previous candlestick (i.e. the two candlesticks have matching closes and lows). Use In Trading The bullish matching low pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The bullish matching low is a bullish pattern, but as it consists of two downward candlesticks, confirmation from a subsequent candlestick (e.g. bullish trading) is needed in order for the bullish matching low pattern to be used as a trade entry or a trade exit pattern.

Japanese candle sticks

[Type text]

Bullish pattern

Inverted Hammer
(end of downward tend?)

The inverted hammer (tohba boshi) candlestick pattern is one of the double candlestick patterns (i.e. it consists of two individual candlesticks), and it is a generally bullish pattern. The inverted hammer candlestick pattern consists of a downward candlestick (e.g. a red candlestick), followed by either an upward or a downward candlestick (e.g. either a green or red candlestick) that opens below the close of the previous candlestick, trades within the previous candlestick, and then closes below the close of the previous candlestick (i.e. the open and close are outside the previous candlestick, but the high is within the previous candlestick). Note that the second candlestick can be either an upward or downward candlestick, so it is the interaction of the two candlesticks that is relevant. Use In Trading The inverted hammer candlestick pattern can occur in a number of different contexts (e.g. at the beginning of a trend, during a trend, at the end of a trend, etc.), but it is most relevant when it occurs during a significant downward trend. The inverted hammer is an indication of the end of a downward trend, and therefore can be used as both a trade entry and a trade exit pattern, but preferably with a confirmation of bullish trading the following day (i.e. the third day).

Japanese candle sticks

[Type text]

Bullish pattern