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The State Department's Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002 Report was released yesterday. A .pdf and html
version of the report are available at the following URL: http://www.state.goV/s/ct/rls/pgtrpt/2002/

We will obtain printed copies for the Commission library (the file is too large to attach via email). Pasted below
you will find Secretary Powell's statement, as well as Amb. Gofer Black's remarks at an on-the-record briefing at
the report's release.

Release of the 2002 "Patterns of Global Terrorism" Annual Report

Secretary Colin L. Powell


Washington, DC
April 30, 2003

(10:45 a.m. EOT)

SECRETARY POWELL: Well, good morning, ladies and gentlemen. I am pleased to join Coordinator for
Counterterrorism Ambassador Cofer Black in presenting Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, our annual
publication.

The international campaign against terrorism that President Bush launched and leads continues to be
waged on every continent. With every passing month, that campaign has intensified.

As the President has pledged, "With the help of a broad coalition, we will make certain that terrorists and
their supporters are not safe in any corner or cave of the world."

I am pleased to report that unprecedented progress has been made across the international community.
Nations everywhere now recognize that we are all in this together; none of us can combat terrorism alone.
This global threat demands a global response. Concerted action is essential, and together we are taking
that concerted action.

Countries across the globe have taken concrete antiterrorism steps, the kinds of steps called for in the
pathbreaking United Nations Security Council Resolution 1373. The world's regional organizations have
followed suit with reinforcing measures. United Nations sanctions have been imposed on many terrorist
groups and on individuals, officially making these groups and individuals international pariahs.

And here in the United States, we have designated additional groups and Foreign Terrorist Organizations.
We and other members of the international community are sharing intelligence and law enforcement
information and cooperating more closely than ever before, and we are working with our partners around the
world to help them build their domestic capacities to combat the terrorist threat within and across their
national boundaries.

Our own capacity to combat terrorism has been strengthened by the establishment of the Department of
Homeland Security under the very, very able leadership and direction of Governor Tom Ridge.

As a result of all of these efforts, thousands of terrorists have been captured and detained. For those still at
large, life has definitely become more difficult. It is harder for terrorists to hide and find safe haven. It is
harder for them to organize and sustain operations. Terrorist cells have been broken up, networks disrupted,
and plots foiled.

The financial bloodlines of terrorist organizations have been severed. Since 9/11, more than $134 million of
terrorist assets have been frozen. All around the world, countries have been tightening their border security
and better safeguarding their critical infrastructures, both physical infrastructures and virtual infrastructures.

States that sponsor terrorism are under international pressure and increasingly isolated. Much of this life-
saving work has gone on behind the scenes. Meanwhile, U.S.-led coalition forces destroyed a major terrorist

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A - Introduction Page 1 of 11

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
April 30, 2003

Introduction

In a speech at the Jimmy Doofittte Hight Facility in Columbia, South Caioiina, on 24 October2002, President George
W. Bush promised to prosecute the war on terror with patience, focus, and determination*

terrorism continued to plague the world throughout 2002, from Bali to Grozny to Mombasa. At the same time, the glob
the terrorist threat was waged intensively in all regions with encouraging results.

The year saw the liberation of Afghanistan by Coalition forces, the expulsion of al-Qaida and the oppressive Taliban r<

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C - The Year in Review Page 1 of 2

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
April 30, 2003

The Year in Review

International terrorists conducted 199 attacks in 2002, a significant drop (44%) from the 355 attacks
recorded during 2001. A total of 725 persons were
killed in last year's attacks, far fewer than the 3,295
persons killed the previous year, which included the
thousands of fatalities resulting from the September
11 attacks in New York, Washington, and
Pennsylvania.

A total of 2,013 persons were wounded by terrorists


in 2002, down from the 2,283 persons wounded the
year before.

The number of anti-US attacks was 77, down 65%


from the previous year's total of 219. The main
reason for the decrease was the sharp drop in oil US Embassy staff load ths flag-draped casket ofKristan
Wormstey, daughter of US diplomat, into a van in
pipeline bombings in Colombia (41 last year, Islamabad. Pakistan. 20 March 2002. K'listen and her
compared to 178 in 2001). m other Barbara Gmen were toled in an attack on thg
Pivtestant fnternationaf Church in Islamabad.
Thirty US citizens were killed in terrorist attacks last
year:

• On 15 January, terrorists in Bayt Sahur, West Bank, attacked a vehicle carrying two persons,
killing one and wounding the other. The individual killed, Avi Boaz, held dual US-Israeli
citizenship. The AI-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade claimed responsibility.

• On 23 January, Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal's South Asia bureau chief was
kidnapped in Karachi, Pakistan. On 21 February, it was learned that he had been murdered.

• On 31 January, two hikers on the slopes of the Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines were
attacked by militants. One of the hikers, US citizen Brian Thomas Smith, was killed.

• On 16 February, a suicide bomber detonated a device at a pizzeria in Karnei Shomron in the


West Bank, killing four persons and wounding 27 others. Two US citizens—Keren Shatsky,
and Rachel Donna Thaler—were among the dead. The Popular Front for the Liberation of
Palestine claimed responsibility.

On 14 March, two US citizens—Jaime Raul


and Jorge Alberto Orjuela—were murdered
in Cali, Colombia, by motorcycle-riding
gunmen.

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L - Appendix A: Chronology of Significant Terrorist Incidents, 2002 Page 1 of 15

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
April 30, 2003

Appendix A: Chronology of Significant Terrorist Incidents, 2002

Note: The incidents listed have met the US Government's Incident Review Panel criteria. An
International Terrorist Incident is judged significant if it results in loss of life or serious injury to
persons, abduction or kidnapping of persons, major property damage, and/or is an act or attempted
act that could reasonably be expected to create the conditions noted.

January

12 January
Venezuela
In El Amparo, armed militants kidnapped two persons, an Italian and Venezuelan citizen. On 17
May, a rebel defecting from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) released the two
hostages.

15 January
West Bank
In Bayt Sahur, militants attacked a vehicle carrying two passengers, killing one person, who was a
US-Israeli citizen, and wounding the other. The AI-Aqsa Martyrs Battalion claimed responsibility.

22 January
India
In Kolkata (Calcutta), armed militants attacked the US Consulate, killing five Indian security forces
and injuring 13 others. The Harakat ul-Jihad-l-lslami and the Asif Raza Commandoes claimed
responsibility.

India
In Jammu, Kashmir, a bomb exploded in a crowded retail district, killing one person and injuring
nine others. No one claimed responsibility.

23 January
Pakistan
In Karachi, armed militants kidnapped and killed a US journalist working for the Wall Street Journal
newspaper. No one claimed responsibility.

24 January
Algeria
In Larbaa-Tablat Road, militants set up an illegal roadblock, killing three persons, including one
Syrian. No one claimed responsibility.

31 January
Philippines
Two hikers on the slopes of the Pinatubo volcano were attacked by militants. One of the hikers, a
US citizen, was killed.

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M - Appendix B: Background Information on Designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations Page 1 of 20

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
April 30, 2003

Appendix B: Background Information on Designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations

Contents

Abu Nidal organization (ANO)


Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG)
AI-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade
Armed Islamic Group (GIA
'Asbat al-Ansar
Aum Supreme Truth (Aum) Aum Shinrikyo, Aleph
Basque Fatherland and Liberty (ETA)
Communist Party of Philippines/New People's Army (CPP/NPA)
AI-Gama'a al-lslamiyya (Islamic Group, IG)
HAMAS (Islamic Resistance Movement)
Harakat ul-Mujahidin (HUM)
Hizballah (Party of God)
Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU)
Jaish-e-Mohammed (JEM)
Jemaah Islamiya (Jl)
Al-Jihad (Egyptian Islamic Jihad)
Kahane Chai (Kach)
Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK, KADEK)
Lashkar-e-Tayyiba (LT)
Lashkar I Jhangvi (LJ)
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)
Mujahedin-e Khalq Organization (MEK or MKO)
National Liberation Army (ELN)—Colombia
Palestine Islamic Jihad (PIJ)
Palestine Liberation Front (PLF)
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP)
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command (PFLP-GC)
AI-Qaida
Real IRA (RIRA)
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC)
Revolutionary Nuclei
Revolutionary Organization 17 November (17 November)
Revolutionary People's Liberation Party/Front (DHKP/C)
Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC)
Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path or SL)
United Self-Defense Forces/Group of Colombia (AUC)

The following descriptive list constitutes the 36 terrorist groups that currently (as of 30 January 2003) are
designated by the Secretary of State as Foreign Terrorist Organizations (FTOs), pursuant to section 219 of the
Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended by the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996.
The designations carry legal consequences:

• It is unlawful to provide funds or other material support to a designated FTO.


• Representatives and certain members of a designated FTO can be denied visas or excluded from the
United States.

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N - Appendix C: Background Information on Other Terrorist Groups Page 1 of 20

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
April 30, 2003

Appendix C: Background Information on Other Terrorist Groups

Contents

AI-Badhr Mujahedin
Alex Boncayao Brigade (ABB)
Al-lttihad al-lslami (AIAI)
Allied Democratic Forces (ADF)
Ansar al-lslam (Iraq)
Anti-Imperialist Territorial Nuclei (NTA)
Army for the Liberation of Rwanda (ALIR)
Cambodian Freedom Fighters (CFF)
Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)/ United People's Front
Continuity Irish Republican Army (CIRA)
Eastern Turkistan Islamic Movement (ETIM)
First of October Antifacist Resistance Group (GRAPO)
Harakat ul-Jihad-l-lslami (HUJI)
Harakat ul-Jihad-l-lslami/Bangladesh (HUJI-B)
Hizb-l Islami Gulbuddin
Hizb ul-Mujahedin
Irish Republican Army (IRA)
Islamic Army of Aden (IAA)
Islamic International Peacekeeping Brigade
Jamiat ul-Mujahedin
Japanese Red Army (JRA)
Kumpulan Mujahidin Malaysia (KMM)
Libyan Islamic Fighting Group
Lord's Resistance Army (LRA)
Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF)
Moroccan Islamic Combatant Group (GICM)
New Red Brigades/Communist Combatant Party (BR/ PCC)
People Against Gangsterism and Drugs (PAGAD)
Red Hand Defenders (RHD)
Revolutionary Proletarian Initiative Nuclei (NIPR)
Revolutionary United Front (RUF)
Riyadus-Salikhin Reconnaissance and Sabotage Battalion of Chechen Martyrs
Sipah-l-Sahaba
Special Purpose Islamic Regiment
The Tunisian Combatant Group (TCG)
Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement (MRTA)
Turkish Hizballah
Ulster Defense Association/Ulster Freedom Fighters (UDA/UFF)

AI-Badhr Mujahidin (al-Badr)

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O - Appendix D: U.S. Programs and Policy Page 1 of 6

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counter-terrorism
April 30, 2003

Appendix D: U.S. Programs and Policy

Antiterrorism Assistance Program

Congress authorized the Antiterrorism Assistance (ATA) Program in 1983 as part of a major
initiative against international terrorism. Since that time ATA has provided training for over 31,000
students from 127 countries. The ATA Program provides training and related assistance to law-
enforcement and security services of selected friendly foreign governments. Assistance to the
qualified countries focuses on the following objectives:

Enhancing the antiterrorism skills of friendly countries by providing training and equipment to deter
and counter the threats of terrorism.
Strengthening the bilateral ties of the United States with friendly, foreign governments by offering
concrete assistance in areas of mutual concern.
Increasing respect for human rights by sharing with civilian authorities modern, humane, and
effective antiterrorism techniques.

ATA courses are developed and customized in response to terrorism trends and patterns. The
training can be categorized into four functional areas: Crisis Prevention, Crisis Management, Crisis
Resolution, and Investigation. Countries needing assistance are identified on the basis of the threat,
or actual level of terrorist activity they face.

Antiterrorist assistance and training, which begins with a comprehensive, in-country assessment,
can take many forms, including airport security, crime-scene investigations, chemical and biological
attacks, and courses for first responders. Most of this training is conducted overseas to maximize its
effectiveness, and even more courses are being conducted in country under ATA's new "Fly-Away"
concept.

ATA programs may also take the form of advisory assistance, such as police administration and
management of police departments, how to train police instructors or develop a police academy,
and modern interview and investigative techniques. Equipment or bomb-sniffing dogs may also be
included in the assistance package.

The post-September 11 era has shifted the focus of ATA outreach to the newly identified frontline
nations. These include Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Djibouti, Egypt, Georgia, India,
Indonesia, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyz Republic, Malaysia, Morocco, Oman, Uzbekistan,
and Yemen. The United States delivered 80 courses to these frontline nations in 2002.

ATA has also identified specific areas in which courses will be added or expanded to enhance the
antiterrorism capabilities in frontline and other countries. These include medical response to mass
casualties, advanced police tactical intervention, physical security, border controls, and operations
to deal with weapons of mass destruction such as mail security, customs/immigration inspection,
disaster response, and urban search and rescue.

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Q - Appendix F: Countering Terrorism on the Economic Front Page 1 of 2

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
April 30, 2003

Appendix F: Countering Terrorism on the Economic Front

Since the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the US Government has taken a number of steps
to block terrorist funding.

On 23 September 2001, for example, the President signed Executive Order (EO) 13224. In general
terms, the Order provides a means to disrupt the financial-support network for terrorists and terrorist
organizations. The Order authorizes the US Government to designate and block the assets of
foreign individuals and entities that commit, or pose a significant risk of committing, acts of
terrorism. In addition, because of the pervasiveness and expansiveness of the financial foundations
of foreign terrorists, the Order authorizes the US Government to block the assets of individuals and
entities that provide support, financial or other services, or assistance to, or otherwise associate
with, designated terrorists and terrorist organizations. The Order also covers their subsidiaries, front
organizations, agents, and associates.

The Secretary of State, in consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of the Treasury,
has continued to designate foreign terrorist organizations (FTOs) pursuant to section 219 of the
Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended. Among other consequences of such a designation, it
is unlawful for US persons or any persons subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to provide
funds or material support to a designated FTO. US financial institutions are also required to retain
the funds of designated FTOs.

A few 2002 highlights follow:

On 27 June, the United States designated Babbar Khalsa International responsible for the killing of
22 Americans when it bombed Air India 182.

On 12 August, the United States added two groups and an individual (New People's
Army/Communist Party of the Philippines and Jose Maria Sison) responsible for the death of
Americans in the Philippines. The United States also obtained the cooperation of the European
Union on this designation.

On 23 October, the United States designated Jemaah Islamiya under both the EO and as an FTO.
Jemaah Islamiya is responsible for the Bali bombings as well as plots to bomb US interests
elsewhere in Southeast Asia. On the same date, 50 countries joined the United States at the United
Nations in requesting that the UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1267 Sanctions Committee
add this group to its consolidated list of individuals and entities associated with Usama Bin Ladin,
al-Qaida, or the Taliban.

On 30 January 2003, under the authority of both the EO and FTO, the United States designated
Lashkar i Jhangvi, which was involved in the killing of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. The
UNSCR 1267 Sanctions Committee also included this group on its consolidated list.

Actions taken through January 2003 brought the total number of groups designated under EO

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Q - Appendix F: Countering Terrorism on the Economic Front Page 1 of 2

U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE

Patterns of Global Terrorism -2002


Released by the Office of the Coordinator for Counter-terrorism
April 30, 2003

Appendix F: Countering Terrorism on the Economic Front

Since the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the US Government has taken a number of steps
to block terrorist funding.

On 23 September 2001, for example, the President signed Executive Order (EO) 13224. In general
terms, the Order provides a means to disrupt the financial-support network for terrorists and terrorist
organizations. The Order authorizes the US Government to designate and block the assets of
foreign individuals and entities that commit, or pose a significant risk of committing, acts of
terrorism. In addition, because of the pervasiveness and expansiveness of the financial foundations
of foreign terrorists, the Order authorizes the US Government to block the assets of individuals and
entities that provide support, financial or other services, or assistance to, or otherwise associate
with, designated terrorists and terrorist organizations. The Order also covers their subsidiaries, front
organizations, agents, and associates.

The Secretary of State, in consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of the Treasury,
has continued to designate foreign terrorist organizations (FTOs) pursuant to section 219 of the
Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended. Among other consequences of such a designation, it
is unlawful for US persons or any persons subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to provide
funds or material support to a designated FTO. US financial institutions are also required to retain
the funds of designated FTOs.

A few 2002 highlights follow:

On 27 June, the United States designated Babbar Khalsa International responsible for the killing of
22 Americans when it bombed Air India 182.

On 12 August, the United States added two groups and an individual (New People's
Army/Communist Party of the Philippines and Jose Maria Sison) responsible for the death of
Americans in the Philippines. The United States also obtained the cooperation of the European
Union on this designation.

On 23 October, the United States designated Jemaah Islamiya under both the EO and as an FTO.
Jemaah Islamiya is responsible for the Bali bombings as well as plots to bomb US interests
elsewhere in Southeast Asia. On the same date, 50 countries joined the United States at the United
Nations in requesting that the UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1267 Sanctions Committee
add this group to its consolidated list of individuals and entities associated with Usama Bin Ladin,
al-Qaida, or the Taliban.

On 30 January 2003, under the authority of both the EO and FTO, the United States designated
Lashkar i Jhangvi, which was involved in the killing of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. The
UNSCR 1267 Sanctions Committee also included this group on its consolidated list.

Actions taken through January 2003 brought the total number of groups designated under EO

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