INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER

S TATIA N EWS
V OLUME 1,
ISSUE

8 J UNE 1, 2009 The May 25 Motion , page 2 No vegetable oil on Statia’s dump, page 2 The proposed names, page 3 New Tax Laws for the Bes islands. Page 4 Nadya van Putten campaigning on Statia, page 5 Corrie van Duren page 6 Leatherback turtles, page 7 In depth, appointing a Governor, page 8

E DITORIAL

Today, Myrtle Suares (behind the yellow  iglo cooler) of the Auxilary home, cele‐ brated her birthday. She took all the old  people along  with her to have lunch  outside, under the grape tree near the  airport. Children and grandchildren of  came to visit during their lunchbreak.  She had music on: Elvis Presley and  other singers from way back in time.  Congratulations, Mrs. Suares!    Meanwhile, Statia is sunny, the July  trees are starting to bloom , the hills are  a luscious green and the people on this  island still live to respectable old age.     If it weren’t for the diabetes!        

In this newsletter, you can read a lot  about  the new Governor.     Things are not certain about the appoint‐ ment of a new Governor.     Maybe a third person will be added to  the list of candidates.    We will keep you informed.    Enjoy the newsletter,  Annemieke Kusters 

Kidney failure, page 9, 10 Pineapple, page 10 Tackle Diabetes Now, page 11 Music; Dennis Amajan, page 12 Announcements, page 13

P AGE 2 L OCAL N EWS

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

M R . J ULIAN W OODLEY A BOUT ‘’T HE M AY 25 M OTION ’’
Our Lieutenant Governor, Mr. Hyden Gittens, will not  have a second term. Mr. Clyde van Putten (PLP), who  is in the opposition in the Island Council and Mr.  Reginald Zaandam, Island Councilmember of the gov‐ erning party DP, filed a motion in the councilmeeting  Monday , May 25th.  In that motion they requested  for Mr. Hyden Gittens  not to have a second term and  they also put forward a list with two proposed names  for the next Governor.   With 3 votes against 2, the motion was carried.   Statianews had a short conversation with Mr.Julian  Woodley, who supported the motion.   He stated he supported the motion, because he  agrees it’s better not to have a second term for Mr.  Gittens. If he would have handed in a motion, it  would have been a motion about this second term  only. In his opinion, a list of proposed candidates  should have been step two.  The procedure is that a list of candidates goes to  the Antillean Council of Ministers and then to the  Dutch Council of Ministers. The chairman of that  Council of Ministers (Ministerraad) is the Prime  Minister, Mr. Jan Peter Balkenende.  Mr. Woodley points out that candidate number one  on the list, Mr. Frederick Gibbs. (profile, see page 3)  was born in 1951 and according to the Antillean  law, that is too old. Maybe a problem can arise, but  his candidacy is possible, because in the Antillean  law a one year Governorship can be given to a per‐ son that exceeds the age limit.   Mr. Woodley said that he was still studying the Wol‐ bes, to find out if after the transition, there will be a  different policy concerning age.  

N O V EGETABLE O IL O N S TATIA ’ S D UMP
Mr. Joshua Spanner collects waste vegetable oil  from all of the restaurants on Statia.  He converts  it into biodiesel. The vehicles that use it have 90%  less emission then regular petroleum diesel.   

P AGE 3 L OCAL N EWS

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

P ROPOSED N AME F REDERIC G IBBS
Mr. Gibbs (Dhr. Mr. Drs. Frederick Gibbs) was born  on  Statia  in  1951,  he  went  to  the  Governor  the  Graaff school for his primary education. And he did  his  mulo  and  havo  on  Curacao.  He  then  went  to  Holland,  to  join  the  Marechaussee.  After  his  initial  training,  and  experience  on  the  field,  he  did  the  “onderofficiers  opleiding”  in  1978—1979  and  the  “officiers opleiding” in 1979—1981. As an  officer, he was member or the staff of the  “Districtscommandant  Koninklijke  Mare‐ chaussee” in Maastricht In 1981, He man‐ aged 200 man marechaussee personel.   During  his  career  in  the  Marechausee  he  studied  law  at  the  University  of  Maas‐ tricht.   In  1985,  he  became  Captain:  “Kapitein  K o n i n k l i j k e   M a r e c h a u s s e e ”   a s  “Veiligheidsofficier”  with  the  “Nato  Eenheid  Joint  Operations  Centre  (J.O.C.)”  in  Cannerberg,  Maas‐ tricht (1985‐1989). In 1989, he was appointed with  the Military Judicial Service on the Staff of the first  army corps.   In November 1989 he changed his career and went to  Aruba  to  work  as  a  lawyer,  which  he  does  up  to  to‐ day.  His  specialties  are  “strafrecht,  arbeidsrecht,  ambtenarenrecht en administratief recht.”   From  2004—2006,  he  studied    public  administration  at the University of Utrecht.  He  has  been  active  as  president  of  the  board of “Casa pa Hubentud” on Aruba. In  2003,  this  shelter  for  children  the  age  of  12  –  18  who  can’t  live  at  home,  (“gezinsvervangend  tehuis”)  was  situated  in  an  old  monastery  and  had  a  strict  re‐ gime.     He is married, his wife grew up in Curacao,  her parents both come from Statia. She is  an English teacher. They have two sons.     Frederick  Gibbs  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  church.  He will be visiting Statia by the end of July.  

P ROPOSED N AME M ONIQUE B ROWN
Monique  Brown‐James  was  born  in  1970  in  Leiden  in  the  Netherlands.  Mrs.  Brown  spend  her  child‐ hood in Curacao, got her VWO diploma in 1988 and  went to University to study Antillean Law. The judi‐ cial faculty of the University of the Netherlands An‐ tilles in Curacao had and still has a good reputation,  according to Monique  Brown.  In  her days,  the  stu‐ dents  had  to  study  Antillean  Law  and  the  old  and  new Dutch Law.   Since 1998, she lives on Statia. At first, she worked  as a lawyer at Duncan & Brandons’ law firm.  Since 1999, she works as a “juridisch medewerker”  for  the  island territory  of St.  Eustatius.  Since  2003,  she is also acting judge.     In  her  extracurricular  activities,  she  is  in  the  “Stuurgroep  Herstructurering  Gezondheidszorg”,  since  2003,  she  is  a  member  of  the  “Werkgroep  Constitutionele Zaken” since 2001, she is member of  the  “Visserijcommissie”  of  the  Dutch  Antilles  since  1999  and  she  is  member  of  the  PTA  of  the  Golden  Rock Catholic elementary school.   Monique  Brown  is  married,  her husband, who was born  on Statia and did his educa‐ tion  in  Curacao  where  they  met,  works  as  an  an  engi‐ neer  in  Statia  Terminals.  They  have  two  children,  born in 2000 and in 2004.       Monique  Brown  is  with  the  evangelical  “Big  Stone  Fellowship”,  where  she  is  a  leader  at  the  Sunday  school.  

 

P AGE 4 D ISCUSSION

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

N EW T AX L AWS
By Koos Sneek

FOR THE

BES I SLANDS
over tax and transfer tax. In the BES structure it is the intention that profit tax and turnover tax will disappear. The new list of taxes will then be as follows: Wage tax; Income tax; Immovable property tax (vastgoed belasting); Revenue tax; General spending tax or ABB (algemene bestedingsbelasting); Transfer tax. The line of thoughts behind this proposed new tax structure is: The system needs to be simpler both for the government collecting the taxes and for the tax payer, resulting in a lower administrative burden for both. For this purpose there will be a shift from indirect taxes to direct taxes. Wage tax needs to be an end tax as much as possible, which means less deductibles and additions to the income. In principal the total tax revenue should remain the same as in the old system. Because of the fact that profit tax will disappear, the incentive of granting a tax holiday for qualified investments will also disappear. A tax holiday, as we know it, is in fact a facility granting a 2% profit tax. This will no longer be necessary. What will remain is the so called economic zone as for instance is in effect for Statia Terminals. In general the proposed new tax regime looks like an improvement and could turn out to be beneficial to the inhabitants and businesses on the BES islands. This does not mean that one should have to take a closer look at the proposals. I have studied them and have made an attempt to interpret them as well as to highlight the good and the not so good sides of the laws. In the following editions of Statia News I will give my view on the individual taxes such as income & wage tax, immovable property tax, and the ABB.

It seems that representatives of the Dutch government are not in agreement with the fact that the recently prepared third draft tax laws for the BES islands have already been discussed among the population and businesses on the islands before becoming law. As a representative of STEBA I have received the drafts directly from the commissioner of finance with the purpose to discuss them within our membership. In a democratic process one feels that this is the correct way of having a discussion prior to the proposals becoming law, allowing for input by the stakeholders. In the new constitutional structure of the BES islands taxes will be the responsibility of the Dutch government. This means that Holland will become responsible for the levying and collection of all taxes. Only the levying and collection of the local taxes will be the responsibility of the island government. Only local taxes that are mentioned in the Law Financial Relations BES may be levied. These taxes are similar to those that can be levied by Dutch municipalities. They include: Land tax (or property tax); Tourist tax (now room tax); Car rental tax; Road tax; Tax on gambling; Dog tax; Precario tax (this is tax for instance for signage along public road); Harbor tax. Most of these taxes already exist, but on Statia for some of them the tariff is zero (like land tax), while others are simply not collected. In the future it is up to the island government whether they charge these taxes or not. The income collected from these taxes can be spent by the island government as they see fit. It is noteworthy to mention that property tax is the main source of income for municipalities in the Netherlands while in Statia at present this tax is not levied at all.

Taxes that are now officially the responsibility of the Central Government in the new BES structure will become country taxes (“Rijksbelastingen”) and will be levied and collected by the Dutch government. These include wage tax, income tax, profit tax, turn-

P AGE 5 L OCAL N EWS

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

N ADYA

VAN

P UTTEN C AMPAIGNING

ON

S TATIA

Thurday and Friday May 28th and 29th, Nadya van  Putten, Groen Links candidate for the European Par‐ liament, was on Statia.  She spoke on Talkin’ Blues  Thursday night and after that, she went to Super‐ burger. Here, the topic of conversation was Antil‐ lean politics.     It was nice to see how many people on Statia know  her, and knew her father and mother. Her father  helped the students on Aruba that came from Statia  with housing etc. And a lot of Statia’s children  stud‐ ied in Aruba, when Statia did not have the Mulo.     Friday morning she was on the radio and after that,  she went to the  Gwendoline van Puttenschool. She  talked with the Havo 4 class.   She explained about the European Parliament and  what effect it has on the Dutch Caribbean.    

To be elected in that Parliament, you need 18000  votes.   European laws apply for the Caribbean too. The  flight tax and the banana tax are two examples.     The decision making in Europe is not influenced by  local governments. And Europe can do a lot for us,  that the Netherlands as a county might not be able  to do.     If Nadya is elected, she will be part of the  Euro‐ pean Greens. The Green parties in Europe want to  work on a sustainable growth of the economy and  on developing green energy, like wind energy.         

Nadya van Putten talks to 4 havo students at the Gwendoline van Puttenschool. 

P AGE 6 L OCAL N EWS

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

C ORRIE

VAN

D UREN
services were rendered 24 hours, 7 days a  week.      Corrie and her husband developed a plan for a  petting zoo, a shelter and a boarding kennel,  where people could bring their pet when they  went off island.    The plan was that young people  could perform “stage” (aka job  training) for the secondary  school, or as part of the social  compulsory education. They  would be guided by a paid veteri‐ narian assistant and a social  worker. The young boys and girls  could get experience in different  fields and the contact with the  animals would have a positive  influence on their development.     With this plan, there would al‐ ways be professional and paid  veterinary help for the animals  and Corrie would have assisted  with that.  Unfortunately, the Government did not live up  to its promise to financially support the Animal  Welfare Foundation neither did the board  members support the plan.    After many years of hard work, Jan left the  board two years ago. Corrie left the board last  year. This was one of the most painful mo‐ ments in her life, because her heart was and  still is with the animals.  Since she no longer has access to the medica‐ tion and the building, Corrie cannot help sick  animals anymore at her Whitewall house or in  the building of the Animal Welfare Foundation.  She still hopes that someone will see the bene‐ fits of their plan and provide a sustainable pro‐ gram.     

Many people on Statia know Corrie van Duren as  the person you bring your pet to when it is sick  or injured. Currently, no veterinarian lives on  the island.  Often Corrie is known as “the vet.”   She is not a trained vet. Instead, she is Regis‐ tered Nurse who happens to be a compassion‐ ate animal lover    Corrie arrived on Statia in  2000. For several months  she observed a unique pat‐ tern. Many puppies and  kittens were born against  the wish of their owners.   Kitten and puppy owners  did not know how to go  about birth prevention.  Corrie and her husband,  Jan, set up the St. Eusta‐ tius Animal Welfare Foun‐ dation. The goal: to bring  more awareness about  caring for dogs and cats.    Their efforts resulted in a  building constructed be‐ hind the Agriculture Building in Concordia.  In‐ side is  an operating room, office space, shelter  space, a porch which could serve as a waiting  room for pet owners or as an educational space.    Corrie and Jan organized “spay and neuter clin‐ ics” with volunteer veterinarians from abroad ,  who brought a lot of medication for the clinics  with them.  During the 8 years they were active,  much less unwanted pets were born.  Jan was  busy recruiting overseas volunteer vets.  Corrie  dedicated much time and effort into caring for  the animals. She saved many animals from  death and brought them in to be sterilized. Of‐ ten times the work was tedious, difficult and  emotionally strenuous because of severe inju‐ ries, illness or poisoning of the animals. Owners  and school children were educated on how to  take better care of their cats and puppies. Free 

P AGE 7 N ATURE

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

L EATHERBACK T URTLES

AT

Z EELANDIA

May 19th: five baby leatherback turtles were given  their freedom. They came from a nest of 64. Five of  the 64 eggs were left in the nest. Stenapa, Statia’s  National Park,  took them to hatch out and they all  did.  A Leatherback turtle digs a hole of about  60 cm,  lays her eggs, 60—80 , and goes back in the sea.  The  eggs that come out, will have to make their way out  of the nest and into the sea.  

B EACH C LEAN

UP

Friday morning , May 29th,   All through the year, Stenapa  cleans up Zeelandia Beach  every month. During the turtle  season they have nightly pa‐ trols and when there is too  much rubbish, they clean it up  more often. If you want to see  a turtle that comes to lay her  eggs, please contact Stenapa.      

P AGE 8 I N D EPTH

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

S OME R ULES

AND OF A GOVERNOR

R EGULATIONS

ABOUT THE APPOINTMENT

In the present, Antillean situation, a list with pro‐ posed names for the next Lt. Governor comes from  the island council, from there, the Antillean Council  of Ministers and then the Dutch “Ministerraad” must  approve with the number one and two on that list.  That number one, if approved, will be the next Lt.  Governor and the second one on the list, will be the  acting Governor.  With the Queens’ signature, the  candidacy is a fact.     In the new situation, with closer ties to the Dutch, it  is stated in the Wolbes, that the Dutch Minister of  Internal Affairs (Binnenlandse Zaken) will appoint a  new Lieutenant Governor. Before this recommenda‐ tion, the island council can develop a profile for a  new Governor. The “Rijksvertegenwoordiger”, a new  position after the transition, like what Mr. Kamp is  now, will select candidates. The Island Council can  install a “vertrouwenscommissie” that can investi‐ gate the candidates the “Rijksvertegenwoordiger”  comes up with. This report, that is confidential, will  be presented to the “Rijksvertegenwoordiger”.     After this, the “Rijksvertegenwoordiger” makes a  motivated recommendation for one candidate. The  final decision is being made by the Crown.     The law for the nomination of a Lt. Governor is al‐ most the same as for a “burgemeester” in a munici‐ pality in the Netherlands. Some things differ because  of the size of our communities.     As said, In the Antillean situation the number two on  the list of candidates will be acting as “acting Gover‐ nor”. In the new situation, the executive council will  appoint an island council member to act as “acting  Governor”. In the Netherlands the general rule is that  the “gemeenteraadslid”,  with the longest service in  the council acts as acting “burgermeester”.   In practice, there are made exceptions to that rule.     When a Lt. Governor cannot preside the council‐ meetings for a longer period, due to illness or other  circumstances, the “Rijksvertegenwoordiger” will be  acting Governor. This is the same as in the Nether‐ lands, where a “Commissaris van de Koningin” can  take over the presidium of a “Burgemeester”.     

You can find more information at:   http://www.arcocarib.com/assets/files/ knowledge_center/legal/constitutional_structure/ memorie‐van‐toelichting‐wolbes.pdf    The chapter on “Gezaghebber” ends with a para‐ graph that explains the necessity of a strong leader  who has to be above all parties.                                               Nice detail: Like a “burgemeester” in the Nether‐ lands, a “Governor” on a Bes island, will get some  decoration. In the Netherlands, a “burgemeester”  wears a “ambtketen”, something like this will be  designed for our future “Gezaghebbers”.     

P AGE 9 H EALTH

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

K IDNEY F AILURE
Thursday May 21. The Statia Health Awareness Foun‐ dation started a series of health seminars with a sym‐ posium in the Lions’ Den about kidney failure, or re‐ nal failure.   An important function of the kidneys is that they  filter the blood. To test kidneys if they do filter the  blood properly, Mr. Gardiner explains about the  blood and urine test. In the urine, no traces of pro‐ tein, crystals and sugar must be found. If there are  traces, that means, these valuable elements are not  in your blood, so the filter does not work properly.     Kidneys have other functions as well. They regulate  fluid, make a hormone that makes blood cells,  modifies vitamine D for bone growth regulate the  “acid ‐ base – status”.     Mr. Gardiner explains that there are two kinds of  renal or kidney disease; acute and chronic.     The acute version is self limiting, it recovers with  treatment. It can be caused by a hypertensive crisis,  from infection, from toxics (in certain medications)  and by obstructive reasons; kidney stones of pros‐ tate disease.     The chronic version is incurable. It has a slower on‐ set and deteriorates over time. 51% of the cases of  chronic kidney failure are caused by diabetes.     Both version hardly have any early symptoms.     Mr. Gardiners’ advice is to go to the doctor once a  year to do a complete check up that includes the  testing of your urine and blood.    One symptom in a later stage of the disease is swol‐ len feet. Mr. Gardiners’ advice: “If your feet are  swollen, go see a doctor.”    From Mr. Gardiners point of view, diabetes is a  more life threatening disease than cancer.     He explains about the medications for kidney fail‐ ure. All they can do is prolong your life. If you live  long enough with diabetes, after 20 years, you end  up with kidney failure. He explains about dialyses.  “Every island on the Caribbean should have a di‐ alyses machine.” When your kidneys fail to filter  the blood, you need to be on a dialyses machine for  several  hours every 48 hours. It’s better to be on  the machine every night, because kidneys normally  do their filtering job 24 hours a day.  

  Medical students were present to measure people’s   blood pressure and blood sugar.     Mr. Ishmael Berkel of the Health Awareness Founda‐ tion explained the purpose of health seminars. He  said that a lot of his brothers and sisters died of can‐ cer. Together with his daughter and sister, he once  went to a symposium about breast cancer. The per‐ sonal testimonies and the question that were asked  at that symposium helped them in coping with this  illness.     After Mr. Ishmael Berkel, Mr. Randolph Marsden,  who suffers renal failure, told the audience the per‐ sonal story of the development and treatment of his  illness. “It’s a rough road, but you have to keep your  faith and stick to your diet.” was his conclusion.    Then Mr. Walter H. Gardiner, MD, had his lecture. He  thanked Mr. Marsden for his testimony, adding that  it takes a lot of courage to talk about such a personal  matter.     Mr. Gardiner is medical director of the Kidney Centre  in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. He was educated in the  United States and has worked there in different ca‐ pacities; as a assistant professor in nephrology  (kidney specialist) and as head of different dialyses  clinics.  

P AGE 10 H EALTH

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

F OLLOW U P : K IDNEY F AILURE
The only cure for kidney failure is a kidney transplant.   If your lifestyle doesn’t change after the transplant,  the transplanted kidney will fail after a few years.     The audience was very interactive; Mr. Gardiner had  to answer a lot of questions.     Mr. Gardiner took away some preconceived assump‐ tions: “You don’t have to drink a lot of water to keep  your kidneys working well.” “Acid reflux has nothing  to do with kidney failure.”     He said that he did not come to lecture about a  healthy diet and enough exercise, because as a  nephrologist with a long practice, he experiences  that people know how to live healthy but still fail to  do so.     His lecture was more about symptoms, medication  and treatment. And about the numbers; diabetes and  kidney failure are becoming the number one cause of  death all over the world.  

Lenora Cannegieter of the Statia Health Awareness  Foundation, who led the seminar, thanked Mr Gar‐ diner for his in formative lecture  and presented  him a token of appreciation.     If you want to be updated about upcoming health  seminars, you can send an email to Lenora Canne‐ gieter: cveux@yahoo.com  

H EALTHY F RUIT : P INEAPPLE
Pineapple has been used by many people for centu‐ ries as a folk remedy for numerous ailments, parti‐ cularly digestive problems. Modern research has  shown that bromelain, an  enzyme found in both the  stem and the fruit of a pi‐ neapple, may be where  pineapple gets many of its  health benefits. Pineapple  contains substantial  amounts of both vitamin C  and manganese, so eating  pineapple can help streng‐ then bones, relieve cold symptoms, aid digestion,  and stop diarrhea.     A cup of fresh pineapple chunks contains 73% of the  manganese the body needs for the day. Manganese,  a trace mineral, is needed to build bone and con‐ nective tissues. A recent study found that a combi‐ nation of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, and  manganese offered significant improvement of  symptoms for people with mild to moderate osteo‐ arthritis of the knee.     Although many people instantly reach  for a glass of orange juice when they  feel a cold coming on, it might be a  better idea to take a swig of pineapple  juice instead. They both contain heal‐ thy amounts of vitamin C, but the pine‐ apple also contains bromelain, which  helps suppress coughs and loosens  mucus.     Studies have found that bromelain is effective in  treating upper respiratory conditions and acute  sinusitis. You can make a natural cough syrup by  mixing 2 teaspoons of honey into 8 ounces of warm  pineapple juice. Sipping the soothing liquid will ease  the pain of a sore throat and help quiet coughs.   source: http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/4‐2‐2006 ‐92514.asp 

P AGE 11 H EALTH

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

T ACKLE D IABETES N OW ! B Y J OYCE W IJSHAKE
Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome   
Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of 5 risk fac‐ tors which cause enormous health risks;   1.a disturbed glucose‐ and insulin‐ metabolism; too  high blood sugar level; higher than 126 mg/dl.  2. too high cholesterol, too low HDL (good part of the  cholesterol); lower than, too high blood‐fats.  3.high blood pressure (hypertension)  4. over weight and too much fat around the abdomi‐ nal area; more than 88 cm for women and 102 cm for  men.  5.increased inflammation of the blood vessels which  causes  earlier arteriosclerosis (narrowing of and  hardening of the inside of the vessels by poisoning  chemicals of the cigarette smoke and cholesterol)  When 4 of the 5 risk factors are seen, you will be di‐ agnosed with “metabolic Syndrome”.   With the increasing of age those risk factors can  increase too.  Metabolic syndrome is definitively linked to insulin‐ resistance.  The 5 risk factors each are life‐threatening. A com‐ bination will be even more serious. People with  Diabetes type II are in the middle of the danger‐ zone.     Health risks are;   Arteriosclerosis which can cause heart problems  like heart infarct and heart failure, leg problems like  claudicatio intermittens (every time you walk a dis‐ tance you have to stop because of the pain, after a  while the pain goes and you can continuing walking  for a while again). Brain problems like  a stroke,  high blood pressure which can cause kidney failure,  eye problems, some forms of dementia (vascular  dementia, “Alzheimer disease”)    Try to improve your daily activity, watch your eat  pattern (pay attention to the portion , eat always  the same time and don’t skip a meal) and take your  medicine always, regular and on time.    Learn more details about the positive advantages of  this active lifestyle program, call 318‐4304 (physical  therapist) or ask your doctor.     

P AGE 12 M USIC

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

D ENNIS A MAJAN
Mr. Dennis Amajan is a music teacher from the Phil‐ lipines. In 1995, he got his bachelors’ degree with  orchestration as his major, and from 1996 he has  been working on Sint Eustatius. In 1999 he went back  to the Phillipines to finish his Masters’ degree and  after he came back in 2003, he has been working for  the Culture Department.   your musical skills. All the young people from Statia  that play in bands on Statia and abroad, have been  his students.    His approach is playful. “I teach music in a fun way.”  He plays games with the children and lets them  know that music is all around them.     Twice a month, on Mondays he performs as a one  man band in Blue Bead and the Old Gin house. He  brings in different guest performers. Usually,  they’re his students. “Bringing out the young people  to perform helps develop their confidence. A lot of  students are very good in the classroom, and tend  to get very nervous when they have to perform.”  Dennis tries to encourage them and performing live  on stage also helps to encourage the parents to  support their children.     On Wednesdays, Dennis also performs at the Old  Gin house with the Colors Band. This band has pro‐ fessional players from different nationalities. They  play a variety of international music. It helps to  keep the night live going and is an outlet for tour‐ ists.     In the third week of June, there will be the Annual  Music Festival for the schools. It will be held at  Charlie’s Place. The theme will be “Statia’s Young  Beethovens in concert”. All schools will participate  and Dennis will be conducting.   

  Dennis Amajan is an arranger. He plays brass, string,  woodwind, percussion and for the culture depart‐ ment he directs music programs.     His major goal is to teach children to play music. He  teaches all the children at the Golden Rock and Gov.  de Graaffschool.     Mr. Amajan also has music classes at the Department  of Culture, because according to him,  teaching music  in school alone, is not enough. To develop talents,  individual classes are necessary.   According to Dennis Amajan there is definitely a lot  of musical talent on Statia. He provides a formal edu‐ cation, that is a necessary foundation for developing 

Dennis Amajan conducting the Oranje Steelband. Part of  the band are Marcella Gibbs  (head of the Department of  Culture) and Nellie de Visser (wife of the island secretary)  

P AGE 13 A NNOUNCEMENTS

June 1, 2009

S TATIA N EWS

Vacancy:
The Board of the Bethel Methodist School is seeking: 2 (two) fully qualified (preferably Male ) teachers for FBE Cycle two (ages 8 & 9)

Applicants should: - have knowledge of the Antillean Education System - have a flexible personality - be a good team player - be fluent in the Dutch language (verbal & written) Applications and complete CV must be sent to the attention of: Rev. Florence Daley Black Harry Lane, St. Eustatius Neth. Ant. fax # 599 318 2919 email: methchurchstatia@yahoo.com

Z AKENDOEN

IN HET

K ONINKRIJK
There are opportunities on the Dutch Antilles  for  Dutch and Suriname companies. St. Eustatius and  the other islands are developing and need solid  partners, suppliers, subcontractors and investors.  For Dutch companies, facing the economic decline,  investing in the Antilles is a new challenge.  There will be an exposition, a congress, workshops  and a “matchmaking” program. This matchmaking  is very important, because here the contacts are  made.    Mr. Sneek will go to Curacao and he will try to  make valuable contacts for Steba’s members.  When he comes back, he will write a report.  Anyone on Statia that has suggestions for Steba,  or who wants to join Mr. Sneek on this trip, is very  welcome to contact Steba at koossneek@steba.biz 

Steba,( St. Eustatius Business Association) represented  by Mr. Koos Sneek, will participate in “Zaken doen met  het Koninkrijk der Nederlanden”, which will take place  June 10 – 18 in Curacao and Suriname.   This is the eighth time this event takes place. The focus  is on stimulating social and economic development by  attracting investors that want to build on a lasting co‐ operation between the Netherlands, Suriname and the  Dutch Antilles.  

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful