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SUKKOT can help #STOP PRAWER
An action and reflection toolkit
    We  are  delighted  to  be  offering  this  action  &  reflection  toolkit  in  honor  of  the   Jewish  holiday  of  sukkot  and  in  opposition  to  the  Prawer  Plan.       The  holiday  of  sukkot  is  marked  by  constructing  and  then  living  in  a  sukkah  -­‐-­‐  a   temporary  dwelling,  like  the  ones  the  Israelites  lived  in  when  wandering  through   the  desert.  Sukkot  remind  us  of  the  importance  of  stability  and  home.  They  are   open,  designed  to  encourage  welcoming  in  guests,  both  strangers  and  familiars.  As   we  gather  in  Sukkot  aware  of  the  reality  of  vulnerability  and  the  possibility  of   openness  we  will  strategize  how  to  stop  the  mass  displacement  and  forced  transfer   of  Palestinian  Bedouin  in  the  Negev.     In  response  to  requests  from  our  allies  and  friends  organizing  in  the  Negev/Naqab   who  have  asked  us  to  do  education  and  also  action,  we  are  excited  to  offer  this   toolkit  to  help  you  and  your  JVP  chapter  and  larger  community  take  action  around   the  Prawer  Plan.  We  are  including  resources  both  for  private  gatherings  and  for   public  actions,  depending  on  what  you  have  planned  you  can  use  whatever  makes   sense!     Please  find  inside  this  toolkit  the  following  for  your  own  or  your  community’s   sukkah:   1.  Materials  for  reading/discussion     2.  A  ritual  for  shaking  the  lulav  &  the  etrog   3.  Decorations  for  your  sukkah   4.  Suggested  additional  reading  –  for  yourself  or  to  provide  in  your  sukkah     You  will  also  find  these  materials  in  the  event  you  plan  to  hold  a  public  action   during  Sukkot:   1.    Street  theater  skit     2.  Flyer  for  distribution     Please  do  let  us  know  how  you  are  using  these  resources  by  emailing   alissa@jvp.org  and  by  posting  photos  at  stopprawer.tumblr.com     Thank  you  to  JVP  members  Jade  Brooks,  Mark  Gunnery  and  Rabbi  Lynn  Gottleib  for   their  work  creating  these  resources.     Onward,   Alissa  &  Stefanie     PS.  This  toolkit  would  not  have  been  possible  without  the  work  and  great  resources   provided  by  Adalah  –  The  Legal  Center  for  Arab  Minority  Rights  in  Israel   (http://adalah.org/eng/),  they  provided  most  of  the  facts  here  and  also  the  lovely   myth/facts  images  we  suggest  for  the  Sukkah.  Check  them  out  for  more  great  info.  

 

READING AND DISCUSSION QUESTIONS FOR SUKKOT
During  the  holiday  of  Sukkot,  Jews  across  the  world  eat,  meet,  and  sleep  inside  temporary  dwellings   called  sukkot.  The  sukkah's  origin  is  in  the  temporary  dwellings  that  agricultural  workers  lived  in   during  autumn  harvest  seasons  in  the  past.  They  also  symbolize  the  dwellings  that  ancient  Israelites   stayed  in  during  the  40  years  they  spent  travelling  through  the  Sinai  desert  after  the  Exodus  from   Egypt.  These  structures  have  come  to  represent  Jews'  liberation  from  slavery,  and  Sukkot  is  a  time   when  we  honor  that  liberation.  But  Sukkot  is  also  a  time  when  we  reflect  on  the  precariousness  of  our   freedom.  The  ancient  Israelites  were  freed  from  slavery,  but  they  didn't  move  into  palaces.  Instead,   they  lived  in  collapsible  homes  that  were  portable,  vulnerable  and  temporary.     Today,  in  a  desert  not  far  from  the  Sinai,  another  group  of  people  is  standing  up  for  their  liberation.   Earlier  this  year,  the  Israeli  Knesset  approved  the  Prawer-­‐Begin  plan  which  will  lead  to  the  mass   expulsion  of  the  Arab  Bedouin  community  in  the  Naqab,  or  Negev,  desert  in  the  south  of  Israel.  If  the   plan  is  fully  implemented,  Israeli  forces  will  destroy  35  Arab  Bedouin  villages  and  forcibly  dispossess   up  to  70,000  people  who  live  in  them.       The  inhabitants  of  these  villages  not  only  have  centuries-­‐old  links  to  their  land,  they  are  also  citizens  of   the  state  of  Israel.  They  have  demonstrated  their  complete  rejection  of  the  plan,  and  have  been   protesting  against  their  dispossession  for  years.  Throughout  the  world,  solidarity  activists  have   demonstrated  in  support  of  the  Naqab's  Arab  Bedouin  community.  And  yet,  the  Israeli  government  is   prepared  to  move  ahead  with  the  Prawer-­‐Begin  plan.     Many  Arab  Bedouins  share  the  sentiments  of  Abu  al-­‐Kian,  a  70-­‐year-­‐old  resident  of  Atir,  a  village  that   has  already  been  razed  by  Israeli  bulldozers—and  rebuilt  by  its  inhabitants.  He  remains  steadfast  in   his  refusal  to  leave  his  land.  "For  41  years  I  worked  on  this  land,  in  the  fresh  air,  for  the  Ministry  of   Agriculture  and  the  Jewish  National  Fund,  planting  trees  and  putting  out  forest  fires,"  he  said.  "I  have   citizenship,  but  they  still  destroyed  my  house.  Now  I  have  only  the  shirt  on  my  back.  It's  like  they're   saying  to  me,  'Just  leave  and  go  to  hell.'”     This  Sukkot,  let  us  reflect  on  not  just  Jewish  people's  liberation  thousands  of  years  ago,  but  also  on  the   struggle  for  liberation  happening  today  in  the  Naqab.  Please  discuss  the  following  questions  with  your   friends,  family,  and  community.     •What  does  “home”  mean  to  you?   •During  Sukkot  we  create  temporary  dwellings.  What  does  it  mean  for  you  to  be  in  a  “temporary   dwelling?”  How  would  you  feel  if  someone  decided  that  your  home  is  a  “temporary  dwelling”  that   needs  to  be  destroyed?  How  would  you  respond?   •How  does  building  and  being  in  a  Sukkah  help  you  relate  to  people  whose  housing  is  more  precarious   than  yours?   •How  do  you  feel  when  you  read  Abu  al-­‐Kian's  quote?   •Do  you  think  the  Prawer-­‐Begin  plan  is  something  you  want  to  stop?  If  so,  what  are  ways  you  can  work   to  fight  it  within  your  own  community?     Please  visit  stopprawer.tumblr.com  for  more  information      

A RITUAL FOR SHAKING LULAV & ETROG
1. Traditionally,  the  lulav  shaken  at  Sukkot  is  created  based  on  this  quote  from  the  Torah  (Leviticus   23:43)  "On  the  first  day  you  shall  take  the  product  of  hadar  trees,  branches  of  palm  trees,  boughs  of   leafy  trees,  and  willows  of  the  brook,  and  you  shall  rejoice  before  Adonai  your  God  seven  days."  "Fruit   of  goodly  trees"  refers  to  the  etrog  (citron).  "Branches  of  palm  trees"  refers  to  the  lulav.  "Boughs  of     trees"  refers  to  the  myrtle  (hadasim   leafy   ).  "Willows  of  the  brook"  refers  to  the  aravot  or  hoshanot.  For   this  ritual  as  part  of  the  JVP  Sukkot  day  of  action,  we  encourage  you  to  create  your  own  lulav  using   plants  that  grow  in  the  place  where  you  live.  Try  to  find  a  branch,  flower,  or  grass  from  three  different   plants.  Look  for  a  piece  of  citrus  fruit  (traditionally,  an  etrog  or  citron,  but  could  be  a  lemon,  lime,   orange,  or  pomelo,  based  on  where  you  live  and  what  is  in  season  or  affordable).  Draw  the  branches   and  grasses  together  and  bind  them  with  string  or  yarn  to  form  your  own  lulav  for  this  ritual.   2. Stand  facing  east-­‐-­‐towards  the  Negev  desert  where  the  Prawer  Plan  aims  to  displace  20,000  Bedouins   from  their  land.  "All  this  is  not  new,"  said  Hakmeh  Abu  Mdeighem,  a  Bedouin  who  faces  displacement.   "Everything  has  been  destruction  and  more  destruction,  humiliating  human  beings,  displacing  people.   They  are  not  doing  this  only  in  Al-­‐Araqib.  They  want  to  expel  all  the  Bedouins  out  of  Israel."  Lift  the   lulav  that  you  have  created  in  your  right  hand  and  the  citrus  fruit  with  your  left.   3. Bring  your  two  hands  together  so  that  the  citrus  is  touching  the  lulav.  The  bud  of  the  citrus  (the  part   where  it  attaches  to  the  tree)  should  be  facing  down.   If  you  wish  to  say  or  chant  it,  the  traditional  blessing  for  shaking  the  lulav  is:   Barukh  atah  Adonai  Eloheinu  m elekh  ha'olam  asher  kid'shanu  b'mitzvotav  v'tzivanu  al  netilat   lulav.  ("Blessed  are  You,  Lord  our  God,  Ruler  of  the  Universe,  who  has  sanctified  us  with  His   commandments  and  has  commanded  us  concerning  the  waving  of  the  lulav.")   On  the  first  day  of  waving  add:   Barukh  atah  Adonai  Eloheinu  melekh  ha'olam  shehehiyanu  v'kiyemanu  v'higiyanu  lazman  hazeh.   ("Blessed  are  You,  Lord  our  God,  Ruler  of  the  Universe,  who  has  granted  us  life,  sustenance,  and   permitted  us  to  reach  this  season.")   Read  aloud  this  quote  from  a  Bedouin  man  named  Ghadara  Jahalin  before  shaking  the  lulav:  "You  can   see  now  we  are  trapped  between  the  settlements,  their  power  cables  and  the  road,"  Ghadara  Jahalin   says.  "We  used  to  have  wells,  now  we  can't  reach  them.  W e  can't  plant  anything  so  there  is  no  pasture   for  the  goats  and  sheep."   4. Hold  the  lulav  out  to  the  east  (in  front  of  you)  and  shake  it  three  times.  Each  time  the  motion  of  shaking   should  be  a  drawing  in  to  you-­‐-­‐reach  and  draw  in,  reach  out  and  draw  in,  reach  out  and  draw  in.  As  you   shake,  draw  in  the  stories  and  demands  of  the  Bedouin  community.  As  you  reach  out-­‐-­‐feel  the  outrage   at  Israel’s  actions  and  the  hypocrisy  of  displacing  a  people  from  their  land  by  a  people  who  have  been   displaced  and  w hose  ancestors  wandered  in  the  desert  without  land.   5. Repeat  the  same  motion  three  times  to  your  right  (south),  behind  over  your  shoulder  (west),  to  your   left  (north),  raising  it  the  lulav  and  citron  above  you,  lowering  it  down  below  you.  Each  time  you  change   direction  commit  to  taking  action  in  opposition  to  the  Prawer  Plan.  As  you  shake  to  the  south  commit  to   posting  a  picture  on  the  Stop  the  Prawer  Plan  website,  as  you  shake  north  commit  to  writing  a  letter  to   the  editor  of  the  town  or  city  where  you  live,  as  you  raise  up  the  lulav  commit  to  talking  to  your  family   or  friends  to  inform  them  about  the  Prawer  Plan  and  the  Bedouin  opposition  to  it,  as  you  lower  the   lulav  to  shake  it  below  you,  commit  to  speaking  to  a  group-­‐-­‐at  your  school,  place  of  worship,  or   workplace-­‐-­‐to  inform  them  about  what's  happening.   6. Turn  the  citrus  right  side  up  to  indicate  that  you  have  shaken  the  lulav  in  all  four  directions.  Speak  out   loud  the  words  of  Bedouin  protestor,  Eman  Hanna:  “We  have  a  legal  right  to  be  here.  We  are  citizens  of   this  country  and  have  a  permit  to  have  the  protest,  and  look,  we’re  being  treated  like  the  enemy.  What   sort  of  democracy  is  this?”   7. Pass  the  lulav  and  citrus  to  a  friend  in  your  group  to  give  them  the  chance  to  shake  the  lulav  and   commit     to  taking  action.  

 

SUKKAH DECORATIONS
Print  these  quotes,  pictures,  and  myths/facts;  cut  them  into  strips;  and  scatter  

them  around  your  sukkah  as  a  way  of  inviting  in  the  voices  and  faces  of   Palestinian  Bedouin  individuals  during  this  time  of  reflection.    

 

“It     is  not  every  day  that  a  government  decides  to  relocate  almost  half   a     percent  of  it’s  population  in  a  programme  of  forced  urbanization.   This   is  precisely  what  Prawer  wants  to  do.”      
       

-­‐-­‐  Rawia  Aburabia  

“We  have  a  legal  right  to  be  here.  We  are  citizens  of  this  country  and   have  a  permit  to  have  the  protest,  and  look,  we’re  being  treated  like   the  enemy.  What  sort  of  democracy  is  this?”  
  -­‐-­‐Eman  Hanna         “They   push  us  into  cities,  to  concentrate  us.  They  want  a  lot  of     Bedouin   on  a  very  small  amount  of  land,  and  a  few  Jews  on  a  big       amount   of  land.”           -­‐-­‐Awad  Abu  Freih        

“Nobody  can  stop  them.  This  is  their  project  and  they  will  implement   it  no  matter  what.  They  will  push  us  to  somewhere  where  we  won’t   be  able  to  survive.    

-­‐-­‐Ghadara  Jahalin    

      “All   this  is  not  new.  Everything  has  been  destruction  and  more     destruction,   humiliating  human  beings,  displacing  people.  They  are     not   doing  this  only  in  Al-­‐Araqib.  They  want  to  expel  all  the  Bedouins     out   of  Israel.”           -­‐-­‐Hakmeh  Abu  Mdeighem        

                                                 

Bedouin  children  play  in  the  unrecognized  village  of  Assir  in  the  Negev/Naqab.    The  village  was  established   by  the  Israeli  military  in  the  1950s  and  is  now  under  threat  of  eviction  by  the  Prawer  Plan.  

"Why  can't  Bedouin  live  with  camels,  when  Jewish  people  can?"  Mr  Abu  Freih  asks.  "It's   our  profession  to  milk  camels.  But  now  I  drink  camel  milk  from  Jews."  

 

 

 

                                                                                       

The  school  in  Khan  al-­‐Ahmar  where  Eid  Jhalin  sends  his  two  children  is  under   demolition  orders.      

Israeli  troops  stand  guard,  preventing  residents  from  interfering  in  the  demolition  of  Bedouin  village  Al  Araqib    

                                                                                             

Youth  protesting  the  Praer  Plan  near  the  Bedouin  town  of  Rahat  

 

                                                                                             

 

                                                                                             

                                                                                             

STREET THEATER TO #STOP PRAWER
Overview:  This  skit  should  take  about  5-­‐7  minutes  and  can  be  repeated  during  your  action.  The  words  come   from  Bedouin  poetry  and  commentary  about  the  Prawer  Plan.       Theme:  forced  exile     Image:  A  group  of  people  wearing  white  masks  and  they  put  up  a  tent  or  sukkah.  Label  the  Sukkah  “AL   ARAQIB”  or  the  name  of  another  village  under  threat  of  demolition.     They  say:  "We  are  bedouin.  We  have  lived   on  this  land  for  generations.     We  like  to  say:   "When  you  sleep  in  your  room,  your  thoughts  are  as  high  as  the  ceiling,  when  you  sleep  outside,  your  thoughts  are   as  high  as  the  stars."   "The  bedouin  root  of  knowledge  is  not  in  books   but  in  reading  the  language  of  the  earth  and  sky.   Like  the  North  Star,  we  are  steadfast  in  our  love   for  the  Naqab.  We  belong  to  this  land."     Then  another  group  of  people  come  in  carrying  a  sing  that  says  PRAWER  RESETTLEMENT  PLAN        They  are   wearing  half-­‐face  m ask...   They  circle  the  tent  people.   They  say:  "We  want  the  land"       We  have  a  plan.     Resettlement.  Re-­‐education.  Re-­‐moval.   The  Prawer  Plan!       As  they  continue  to  recite,  "resettlement,  reeducation,  removal"   the  Israelis  use  their  signs  like  weapons  and  push  the  bedouins  together  and  off  to  the  side   perhaps  shoving  them  into  a  refrigerator  cardboard  box,  and/or  use  long  thin  cloth  or  rope  to  tie  them   together    so  they  can't  m ove.    When  they  try  to  move  as  a  group,  the  people  with  the  Prawer  Plan  signs     push  them  back  to  the  side.     The  Prawer  Plan  group  strolls  about  smiling  and  m uttering:  resettlement  is  good,  reeducation  is  good,  Jewish  only   land  is  good.    The  Israeli  half  masked  people  are  still  carrying  "Prawer  Plan"  signs.  to  keep  the  white  m asked   bedouin  in  place.         The  Bedouin  say:  (They  also  have  a  sign  with  these  words)   We  see  this  plan  as  a  declaration  of  war  on  the  Bedouin  community  of  the  unrecognized  villages,     even  though  w e  w elcome  any  village  recognition  of  our  39  unrecognized  settlements!   This  plan  was  never  discussed  with  us  or  our  representatives.   We  do  not  support  this  plan.     The  bedouin  (white  masks)  lift  their  hands,  cover  their  faces,  lift  their  hands:   "We  are  like  a  gray  haired  w oman   who  dies  consumed  by  grief  in  a  strange  country,   driven  out  by  those  she  welcomed  to  her  land.  They  reject  her,  humiliate  her,  deprive  her.   Our  soul  cries  out  because  we  are  ordered  to  depart.   We  are  being  forced  toward  a  destination  that  will  destroy  everything.   Unless  you  stop  the  Prawer  Plan.       Then  hand  o   ut  leaflets.      

#STOP PRAWER
Join us in stopping legislation—the Prawer-Begin Bill—that will forcibly expel up to 70,000 Bedouin citizens of Israel from their ancestral land, homes and communities.

0

Do the math. Prawer = Injustice.
- The number of Bedouin who were consulted in the planning

process for the Prawer Plan, which would effect nearly all Bedouin in the Naqab/Negev.

1 7 100

- The Prawer-Begin Bill has passed the 1st reading in the

Knesset, meaning the bill is halfway to being law. - Arab Bedouin have been inhabitants of the Nagab/Negev desert

since the 7th Century. - If Israel applied the same laws to Bedouin citizens and

Jewish citizens of the Nagab/Negev, they would recognize and provide infrastructure for 100% of the 35 Bedouin villages they are trying to destroy with Prawer.

70,000 join us.

- The number of Bedouin citizens of Israel that

could be expelled from their ancestral land, homes, and communities if the Prawer Plan is passed.

#stopprawer.
www.jvp.org/stopprawer
 

FURTHER READING ON PRAWER
From  Adalah:  The  Legal  Center  for  Arab  Minority  Rights  in  Israel:   Report:  The  Arab  Bedouin  and  the  Prawer  Plan,  2012     Factsheet:  Myths  and  Misconceptions  about  the  Arab  Bedouin  in   the  Naqab     Article:  Four  Reasons  to  Reject  the  Prawer  Plan,  by  Dr.  Thabet   Abu  Rass  and  Professor  Oren  Yiftachel     Legal  letter:  Adalah  and  ACRI  Objection  to  the  Prawer  Plan     Summary:  The  Alternative  Master  Plan  for  Bedouin  Villages  in  the   Negev  

From  the  Palestinian  Boycott  National  Committee    http://www.bdsmovement.net/2013/palestinian-­‐bds-­‐national-­‐ committee-­‐calls-­‐freezing-­‐knesset-­‐membership-­‐inter-­‐parliamentary-­‐ union-­‐light-­‐racist-­‐laws-­‐11148   From  JVP's  Director  of  Campaigns,  Rabbi  Alissa  Wise   http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rabbi-­‐alissa-­‐wise/prawer-­‐ plan_b_3438201.html   From  +972   http://972mag.com/tag/prawer-­‐plan/   From  The  Independent   http://blogs.independent.co.uk/2013/06/28/a-­‐snapshot-­‐of-­‐the-­‐lives-­‐ of-­‐the-­‐bedouin-­‐tribe-­‐of-­‐%E2%80%9Cal-­‐araqib%E2%80%9D/