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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 15
BOEHNER ABOARD
WORLD PAGE 7
STAY FRESH FOR
ROSH HASHANA
FOOD PAGES 17-19
OBAMA GAINS GROUND IN DRIVE FOR CONGRESSIONAL BACKING
OF MILITARY STRIKE AGAINST SYRIA
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The private nonprofit agency
that stands up for cities when the
state raids their coffers has reached
a compromise with state Sen.
Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, on “gut
and amend” legislation he recent-
ly took up that would have limited
ballot advocacy
by local gov-
ernment organ-
izations.
The League of
C a l i f o r n i a
Cities pushed
for several
amendments to
Hill’s Senate
Bill 594 and were able get them
approved in an Assembly
Appropriations Committee Friday
before the long holiday weekend.
Hill claimed the league and other
nonprofits have commingled pub-
lic and private funds for campaign
purposes through a loophole in
the law leading up to Friday’s
vote.
Nonprofits have financed politi-
cal activities through anonymous
campaign accounts originally
sourced from public agencies,
Hill’s office contended.
The league, however, disagreed
and got the definition of “public
funds” narrowed and also was
able to remove schools from the
list of public agencies the legis-
lation would impact.
The amendments “codified our
traditional practice,” the league’s
Executive Director Chris
McKenzie told the Daily Journal
yesterday. The league had opposed
the bill but is expected to back it
this week when the Assembly
Hill, cities reach accord on campaign finance
Senate Bill 594 amended to redefine public funds, use of money for campaign activity
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With the three-year anniversary
of the San Bruno fire and explo-
sion on the horizon, the city held
a press conference yesterday to
update the public on rebuilding the
Crestmoor neighborhood.
So far, of the 38 homes
destroyed by the explosion, 16
have completed construction and
are occupied, according to the
city. Five homes are actively
under construction with active
building permits, while one home
is preparing plans for a building
permit submittal. Sixteen parcels
remain vacant.
Mayor Jim Ruane also spoke
about demanding stricter pipeline
Three years later
College Board
lawsuitover AP
scores denied
Parents still considering
future action on scores
Rebuild of damaged Crestmoor neighborhood in San Bruno continues
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A temporary restraining order
meant to return Advanced Placement
Test scores from the College Board
to Mills High School students was
denied last Friday.
Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, the
firm representing the San Mateo
Union High School District, filed a
lawsuit against College Board and
Educational Testing Service, their
test security provider that adminis-
ters the AP Exams, on Aug. 5. The
suit, originally filed in San Mateo
County Superior Court, stated there
is no evidence of misconduct by
the students and no evidence that
the testing irregularities materially
affected the test scores. The main
objective of the suit was to get the
641 scores returned to the students.
Still, the U.S. District Court con-
cluded Friday that the plaintiffs
failed to demonstrate a likelihood
of success on the merits or that
they would suffer irreparable harm
in the absence of the temporary
restraining order.
“Defendants, and the College
Board especially, have a strong
interest in maintaining the validity
of the test scores that are reported,”
wrote U.S. District Judge Saundra
Brown Armstrong. “Forcing defen-
dants to validate AP exam scores
resulting from improperly adminis-
tered tests would place them in the
untenable position of having to act
contrary to their obligations in the
AP Bulletin, and also would result
in colleges and universities being
less likely to rely on the integrity
of such scores.”
The official statement from
Armstrong goes on to say “the risk
that test scores were subject to
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Mayor Jim Ruane spoke yesterday about demanding stricter pipeline safety regulations and reforms at the
California Public Utilities Commission.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Mateo City Council
opted last night to stay in-house to
fill the interim city manager’s job
by giving it to Larry Patterson, the
city’s public works director and 13-
year employee.
Patterson will take over the job
from Susan Loftus, who retires from
the city after
serving it for 25
years, the last
five as city man-
ager. Loftus
retires Nov. 1
and Patterson
will start his
new job Oct. 15.
Patterson will
work alongside
Loftus for two weeks to help facili-
tate a smooth transition as he pre-
pares for his new role.
“He’s a dynamic leader and per-
sonable individual. He has a vision
on how to take the city through the
interim and maybe beyond. I can
think of no one better for the job,”
said Mayor David Lim last night.
The council approved the
appointment on a 4-0 vote with
Councilman Brandt Grotte being
absent from last night’s council
meeting.
Councilwoman Maureen Freschet
said she was pleased someone
“internal” would lead the city
through the transition.
The appointment is for at least
six months and his annual salary
would be about $222,000.
Council stays in-house for interim city manager
Larry
Patterson
Jerry Hill
See MILLS, Page 20 See PATTERSON, Page 16
See FIRE, Page 20
See BILL, Page 20
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Comedian Damon
Wayans is 53.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1888
George Eastman received a patent for
his roll-film box camera, and regis-
tered his trademark: “Kodak.”
“I am one of the people
who love the why of things.”
— Catherine the Great, Russian czarina (1729-1796)
Actress Khandi
Alexander is 56.
Singer Beyonce
Knowles is 32.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks photo shows Cole Landers, left, Dustin Bockman, center, and Ryan
Bockman (brother of Dustin) pictured with their record setting alligator weighing 727 pounds,and measuring 13 feet taken
in Vicksburg, Miss.
Wednesday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the upper 60s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming west 10 to 20 mph in
the afternoon.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight.
Local Weather Forecast
An item in the Class Notes section of the Sept. 3, 2013
edition of the Daily Journal had incorrect information. The
Burlingame School District will host a Centennial
Celebration on Sunday, Sept. 22 from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. at
McKinley Elementary School, 701 Paloma Ave.
Correction
I n 1781, Los Angeles was founded by Spanish settlers
under the leadership of Governor Felipe de Neve.
I n 1886, a group of Apache Indians led by Geronimo (also
known as Goyathlay, “One Who Yawns”) surrendered to Gen.
Nelson Miles at Skeleton Canyon in Arizona.
I n 1893, English author Beatrix Potter first told the story
of Peter Rabbit in the form of a “picture letter” to Noel
Moore, the son of Potter’s former governess.
I n 1917, the American Expeditionary Forces in France suf-
fered their first fatalities during World War I when a German
plane attacked a British-run base hospital.
I n 1948, Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands abdicated
after nearly six decades of rule for health reasons.
I n 1951, President Harry S. Truman addressed the nation
from the Japanese peace treaty conference in San Francisco
in the first live, coast-to-coast television broadcast.
I n 1957, Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus used Arkansas
National Guardsmen to prevent nine black students from
entering all-white Central High School in Little Rock. Ford
Motor Co. began selling its ill-fated Edsel.
I n 1962, The Beatles, with new drummer Ringo Starr,
recorded “Love Me Do” at EMI Studios in London. (The more
familiar version with substitute drummer Andy White and
Starr on tambourine was recorded a week later. )
I n 1963, a Swissair Caravelle III carrying 80 people
crashed shortly after takeoff from Zurich, killing all on
board.
I n 1971, an Alaska Airlines jet crashed near Juneau, killing
all 111 people on board.
I n 1972, U.S. swimmer Mark Spitz won a seventh gold
medal at the Munich Olympics, in the 400-meter medley
relay. “The New Price Is Right,” hosted by Bob Barker, pre-
miered on CBS.
Mattresses used to be set upon ropes
woven through the bed frame. Ropes
needed to be tightened to keep the mat-
tress from sagging. Hence the origin of
the phrase “sleep tight.”
***
To keep asparagus fresh and revive it
from being wilted and limp, cut half of
an inch off of the base and stand upright
in an inch of warm water.
***
Despite similar spellings the following
pairs of words do not rhyme: bull, dull;
find, wind; gas, was; tough, plough.
***
Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) was
nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize five
times between 1937 and 1948, but he
never won it.
***
The motto of the U.S. Coast Guard is
“semper paratus,” Latin for “always
ready.”
***
Novelist Louis L’Amour (1908-1988),
famous for his westerns, had more than
10,000 books in a private library in his
West Los Angeles home.
***
There was a lawyer on an episode of the
“The Flintstones” (1960-1966) that
claimed he never lost a case. His name
was Perry Masonry.
***
Before Mr. T(born 1952) had an acting
career, he was working as a bar bouncer
in Chicago and going by his given
name Laurence Tureaud.
***
A person who collects matchbooks is
called a phillumenist.
***
The New York Stock Exchange symbol
for Anheuser-Busch Inbev is BUD. The
company makes Budweiser beer.
***
Abbott and Costello’s baseball routine
was named the best comedy sketch of
the 20th century by Time Magazine.
Can you name the players on first, sec-
ond and third base? See answer at end.
***
The 10 events in the Decathlon are: 100
meters, long jump, shot put, high jump,
400 meters, 110-meter hurdles, discus
throw, pole vault, javelin throw and
1,500 meters.
***
The third most expensive zip code in the
United States is 11962. It is the zip code
for Sagaponack, N.Y., (the Hamptions),
where the median home price is
$3,595,000. The two most expensive
zip codes, based on figures from 2011,
are 07620 in Alpine, N.J. and 94027, in
Atherton.
***
Something that has a sound decibel (dB)
level of 85 or higher can damage a per-
son’s hearing. Apower saw is 110 dB. A
jet plane is 125 dB. In contrast, a soft
whisper has a decibel level of 30.
Rustling leaves are about 1 dB.
***
Singers Whitney Houston (1963-2012)
and Dionne Warwick (born 1940) are
cousins.
***
Aping-pong ball will not flush down a
toilet.
***
The first people to be filmed kissing
were May Irwin (1862-1938) and John
C. Rice (1858-1915). They were actors
in “The Kiss” (1896), one of the very
first films ever made. The film is 44 sec-
onds long.
***
Crayola introduced Magic Scent crayons
in 1994. The crayons were scented like
food. After public concerns that children
would ingest food-scented crayons, the
crayons were changed to smell like non-
food items. Some of the scents are euca-
lyptus, smoke, shampoo and dirt.
***
Answer: Who’s on first, What’s on sec-
ond, I Don’t Know is on third. Why
plays left field, Because plays Center
Field, the pitcher is Tomorrow and the
catcher is Today. In the routine, Bud
Abbott (1895-1974) is Dexter
Broadhurt, the manager of the St. Louis
Wolves. Lou Costello (1906-1959) is a
ballpark peanut vendor confused by the
player’s names.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
VENOM STALL ETHNIC UNJUST
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The guest’s rude comments about the lodg-
ing establishment were — “INN-SULTS”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KALNB
TEABA
ROCCSH
CIKELP
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in first place; Whirl Win, No. 6, in second
place; and Gold Rush, No. 1, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:45.95.
8 7 0
4 13 14 28 41 28
Mega number
Sept. 3 Mega Millions
2 7 25 40 56 20
Powerball
Aug. 31 Powerball
9 14 21 34 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 8 4 3
Daily Four
8 6 5
Daily three evening
4 18 24 33 47 1
Mega number
Aug. 31 Super Lotto Plus
Actress Mitzi Gaynor is 82. Actor Kenneth Kimmins is 72.
Singer Merald “Bubba” Knight (Gladys Knight & The Pips) is
71. World Golf Hall of Famer Raymond Floyd is 71. Actress
Jennifer Salt is 69. World Golf Hall of Famer Tom Watson is
64. Rhythm-and-blues musician Ronald LaPread is 63. Actress
Judith Ivey is 62. Rock musician Martin Chambers (The
Pretenders) is 62. Rock musician Kim Thayil is 53. Actor
Richard Speight Jr. is 44. Actor Noah Taylor is 44. Actress
Ione Skye is 43. Rhythm-and-blues singer Richard Wingo
(Jagged Edge) is 38. Actor Wes Bentley is 35. Actor Max
Greenfield is 34.
3
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SAN MATEO
Drug possessi on. A driver was arrested
for possession of suspected methampheta-
mine and hypodermic needles at the inter-
section of Avenue Alhambra and Capistrano
Road before 10:20 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25.
Vandal i sm. The rear window of a vehicle
was broken on the 400 block of Sonora
Avenue before 10 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 25.
Burglary . A window was smashed and
$550 worth of items were stolen from a
vehicle on the 800 block of Sonora Avenue
before 9:45 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 25.
Sus pi c i ous c i rc ums t anc e s . A man
was slumped over his wheelchair in the
alley at the intersection of 28th Avenue
and El Camino Real before 7:23 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 23.
Burglary . A vehicle’s window was
smashed and various items were taken on B
Street before 6:11 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23.
Burglary. A window on the rear door of a
business was smashed and $1,000 was
taken on the first block of Stone Pine Road
before 4:40 a.m. Friday, Aug. 23.
Burglary. Two units at an apartment com-
plex were broken into on the 2200 block of
S. Delaware Street before 3:09 p.m. Friday,
Aug. 23.
SAN CARLOS
Under t he i nfluence. Aman was arrested
and booked for driving under the influence
at the intersection of Standford Lane and
Eaton Avenue before 12:04 a.m. Tuesday,
July 30.
Warrant. A man was arrested and booked
for having two outstanding warrants on the
1100 block of Laurel Street before 2:28
p.m. Monday, July 29.
Drunk in public. Aman was detained for
being intoxicated in public on the 1100
block of Laurel Street before 12:19 a.m.
Monday, July 29.
Police reports
Don’t play in traffic
Several juveniles and a child in diapers
were running onto Elm Street in
Redwood City before 10:50 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 29.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Beverly Beasley Johnson, the county’s
human services agency director the last
seven years, is stepping down at the end of
the year.
Johnson has been quietly alerting depart-
ment heads of her pending retirement but
has not yet made a formal public announce-
ment, said county spokesman Marshall
Wilson.
San Mateo County is currently recruiting
a replacement, according to a job bulletin
on its human resources website that also
notes final interviews will be in early
November.
The position is advertised to pay
$158,953.60 to $198,702.40 annually.
Johnson joined HSA in November 2006,
bringing with her 30 years of experience
including time in Kern County as its human
services director. In San Mateo County,
Johnson took over from interim director
Glenn Brooks who served about a year after
the retirement of the last permanent office
holder Maureen Boland.
Johnson earned a bach-
elor’s degree in psychol-
ogy from Michigan’s
Oakland University and a
law degree from
Michigan State
University’s Detroit
College of Law. She
worked as a social worker
before managing adult
services and economic
self-sufficiency pro-
grams for the state of Michigan. She served
as chief deputy director of the Michigan
Department of Civil Rights from 1999 to
2002 before joining the Kern County
Department of Human Services.
HSAprovides much of the county’s safety
net through programs including those that
help individuals and families with econom-
ic self-sufficiency, foster care and adop-
tions, nutrition and food stamps, career
training and housing.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
HSA head stepping down
Beverly
Johnson
4
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Man jailed for sending child porn to dispatcher
A26-year-old Dublin man was sentenced to a year in jail
and sex offender treatment for sending pornographic images
of children to a Colma police dispatcher.
Jason Neil Judkins must surrender Nov.
2 to serve the year term followed by five
years of supervised probation, a mini-
mum year-long sex offender management
treatment program and a prohibition on
associating with minors. He must also
register as a sex offender for life.
Judkins pleaded no contest in June to
two felony counts of possessing child
pornography which is half of the origi-
nal counts charged. The other two were dropped as part of
the negotiated settlement.
Prosecutors said Judkins had a sexual texting relationship
with the dispatcher and in September texted about his inter-
est in young girls. In September 2012, Judkins reportedly
sent the dispatcher four images leading her to notify her
supervisors and launch an investigation.
Judkins is free from custody on a $100,000 bail bond.
Three armed men rob pair in parked car
Two men in a parked car were robbed at gunpoint in South
San Francisco on Sunday night, a police spokesman said.
The victims had just entered their vehicle in a parking lot
at Aspen and Linden avenues at 10:30 p.m. when three men
with black semi-automatic handguns approached the car,
South San Francisco police Sgt. Bruce McPhillips said.
The men spoke Spanish and ordered the victims to hand
over their property, McPhillips said.
No one was injured, and the suspects fled on foot.
The three suspects were described as Hispanic males and
each wore a black hoodie, a black ski mask and black pants,
according to police.
One suspect stood about 6 feet tall, had a thin build and
weighed about 180 pounds. The second was also around 6
feet tall, with a stocky build, and weighed around 250
pounds.
The third man was around 5 feet 10 inches tall with an
average build.
Anyone with information about the robbery is asked to
call South San Francisco police at 877-8900.
Local briefs
Evelyn Monsor
Evelyn Monsor, late of Millbrae and San Mateo County
resident for 62 years, died in Burlingame Aug. 30, 2013.
Wife of Joe Monsor, married for 66 years.
Mother of Dan (Maria) Monsor of San Lorenzo, grand-
mother of Stephanie Monsor of San Lorenzo, sister of
Christine Shadrick of Burlingame and Florence Nilsson of
San Mateo. Daughter of the late Sam and Judith Sayad.
Anative of Turlock, age 86 years.
Friends and family may visit from 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Friday,
Sept. 6 at the Chapel of the Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive
at El Camino Real in Millbrae.
A 2 p.m. graveside service will follow at the Turlock
Memorial Park, 575 N. Soderquist Road in Turlock.
Obituary
Jason Judkins
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Faced with a list of projects and a
finite amount of resources, the San
Carlos City Council and members of its
Economic Development Advisory
Commission will put their heads
together today to update the city’s eco-
nomic plan.
Since the state dissolved all redevel-
opment agencies, the city’s economic
activities require general funds which
can drive up revenue for the city but also
leave projects pitted against each other
for financial backing.
With that in mind, EDAC Chair
Cameron Johnson said it is crucial the
council, staff and other city officials are
aligned about core priorities. Since
2007, the city has had two formal eco-
nomic development plans listing long-
term commitments include a July 2012
“reset” of priorities in response to lim-
ited staff and money.
“We’ve had an economic plan for a
number of years and no shortage of good
ideas. We just haven’t had the resources
to fund them,” Johnson said.
Even so, the city did hit some of its
long-term benchmarks including the
completion of an environmental impact
report for Wheeler Plaza, visits to five
of the largest businesses in the city to
learn what employers want and adoption
of a strategic property acquisition
reserve policy.
Johnson hopes the joint study ses-
sion Wednesday night results in picking
the top handful of priorities to continue
such as Wheeler Plaza and business
attraction and retention.
While San Carlos has made economic
achievements, the city is still chal-
lenged by a lack of opportunity for new
development space in the built-out com-
munity, wrote Mark Sawicki, economic
development and housing manager, in a
report for the meeting. Sawicki and
Community Development Director Al
Savay also noted that San Carlos must
encourage properties to redevelop into
higher and better uses with bigger eco-
nomic returns.
The meetings with businesses,
according to Savay and Sawicki,
revealed employers have trouble attract-
ing and retaining skilled workers
because of a lack of affordable housing
and transit options and flooding issues
for many eastside businesses.
As part of its discussion tonight,
EDAC and councilmembers will look at
activities the city should continue to
pursue — encouraging a hotel, transfer-
ring Wheeler Plaza, considering the
Transit Village proposal, creating a new
housing element and identifying busi-
ness opportunities. Members will also
be asked to brainstorm other ideas like a
public/private shuttle service, forma-
tion of a business improvement district
and incentives. The caveat for this cate-
gory is that staff resources might not
allow for looking at the initiatives,
according to the staff report.
The joint City Council/Economic
Development Advisory Commission
meeting is 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4 in
the San Carlos Library Conference
Room, Second Floor, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos.
City officials focus on economy
5
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
REUTERS
Motorists drive on the new eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.
By Sudhin Thanwala
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — New bridge, same
traffic.
The gleaming white and newly built $6.4
billion eastern span of the San Francisco-
Oakland Bay Bridge handled its first morn-
ing commute Tuesday with few problems
other than the traffic snarls that were com-
mon around the old span.
California Highway Patrol Officer Sam
Morgan said traffic heading into San
Francisco on the bridge around noon was a
little heavier than usual, possibly because
of excitement about the new bridge.
“Some are making it a recreational
event,” Morgan said.
Officers have not encountered any
instances of people pulling over on the
road to take pictures of the span, Morgan
said.
But Officer Daniel Hill told San Jose-
based KNTV-TV that some drivers were
warned or cited for taking photos and cell-
phone video while driving. He did not have
exact numbers.
One person also received a warning for
driving and taking pictures on the closed
section of the old bridge, Morgan said.
“While everybody is excited about the
new bridge, please remember it is still a
roadway designed to get you from Point At o
Point B,” Morgan warned.
Man who went missing at
Coyote Point dies after being found
An at-risk man who went missing from
the Coyote Point area of San Mateo on
Monday was found in South San Francisco
early Tuesday morning but died at a hospital
a short time later, police said.
Runfa Wang, 50, had last been seen in the
Coyote Point area early Monday morning.
Police said Wang’s speech resembled that of
a small child, but that a medical condition
left him unlikely to speak at all, police said.
Wang was discovered in South San
Francisco shortly after midnight Tuesday
morning and was taken to a hospital because
of his medical condition, police said. He
died at a hospital shortly afterward. Police
said his death is not considered suspicious.
Federal court upholds
oyster farm closure
A federal appeals court on Tuesday
upheld a decision by former Interior
Secretary Ken Salazar not to renew the
lease of a popular oyster farm operating in
the Point Reyes National Seashore in
Northern California.
In a 2-1 decision, a three-judge panel of
the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled
that Salazar had the authority to allow
Drakes Bay Oyster Co.’s lease to expire.
While the farm was slated to close for
good in February, it continued operating
after the court issued a preliminary injunc-
tion while the case was pending.
New Bay Bridge handles first rush hour
Local briefs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
AMoss Beach man who sawed at the neck
of his female roommate with a serrated knife
because she reported him for drunk driving
was immediately sentenced yesterday to 15
years in prison for attempted murder and
assault.
David Jon Vanalstine, 59, was to begin a
jury trial Tuesday morning but instead
changed his mind and pleaded no contest to
the two felonies. He was immediately sen-
tenced but also returns to court Oct. 16 for a
restitution hearing.
Sheriff’s deputies arrested Vanalstine at
his Pillar Ridge Estates residence Dec. 2,
2010 after responding to a call by the then-
56-year-old victim. The woman and
Vanalstine had been romantically involved
in high school but were then living togeth-
er as roommates.
She told dispatchers she had been stabbed
by Vanalstine, who was still inside the
home, after returning home from work in
Montara. Vanalstine allegedly held the
woman down on the couch by her hair and
began sawing at her neck with a serrated
knife from her carotid
artery to her ear, accord-
ing to the District
Attorney’s Office.
He allegedly only
stopped when the
woman’s friend arrived
and she was able to grab a
phone and run outside to
call 911. Vanalstine’s
blood alcohol level three
hours after the attack
tested .59 percent.
The attack came days after Vanalstine was
sentenced to 45 days in jail for an earlier
2010 misdemeanor drunk driving convic-
tion with priors. Police believe the victim
turned Vanalstine in on the charge. Ajudge
stayed the sentence until the end of January
2011, leaving Vanalstine free from custody
and still living with the victim.
In December 2012, Vanalstine’s attorney
questioned Vanalstine’s competency but a
judge ruled he was able to aid in his own
defense. Competency is a person’s ability
to stand trial while sanity is the mental state
at the time of an alleged crime.
Neck slasher gets 15 years prison
David
Vanalstine
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Daly City woman accused of pepper-
spraying a grocery store employee who ques-
tioned her leaving with a cart of unpurchased
beer and liquor wants to withdraw her no con-
test plea to robbery.
Jessica Danielle Louise Jackson, 21, set-
tled the case in April in return for up to a year
in jail. She was due to be sentenced yesterday
but instead indicated a desire to withdraw her
plea, said Assistant District Attorney Al
Serrato.
The motion will be heard Oct. 4.
Jackson was arrested for the April 7, 2012
incident at Safeway inside Westlake Center
after police linked security camera footage
and her license plate to her
parent’s home where she
lives.
Prosecutors say that
afternoon Jackson loaded
up a basket with a 30-pack
of beer and several bottles
of hard alcohol that still
had the security caps
intact. As an employee
alerted by the presence of
the caps followed her out of the store and
asked for a receipt, Jackson allegedly pulled
out a canister of pepper spray and shot it at
the worker before fleeing in a car.
Jackson is free from custody on $50,000
bail.
Booze theft defendant wants to withdraw plea
Jessica Jackson
6
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The owner of a San Bruno-based travel
company will pay more than $25,000 to set-
tle claims that despite having a Better
Business Bureau rating of “F” he misled
Internet customers by claiming to be in good
standing and failed to give consumers infor-
mation about cancellation and payment poli-
cies.
Andre Rusanoff, owner and chief execu-
tive officer of At Cost Flights Corp. which
does business as WayToFly.com, agreed to
settle the case without admitting wrongdo-
ing by paying $13,000 in civil penalties and
$12,412.16 in restitution for 15 specific cus-
tomers.
The stipulated judgment was signed last
week and filed Tuesday in San Mateo
County Superior Court.
Rusanoff was authorized as a travel busi-
ness but “he and the people working for him
got kind of sloppy,” said prosecutor Chuck
Finney of the District Attorney’s Office
Consumer and Environmental Protection
Unit.
For instance, the site www.WayToFly.com
claims to be a licensed and BBB-accredited
travel agency but the business had not
belonged to the bureau since Aug. 12, 2011
and had an “F” rating.
Rusanoff claimed it was an oversight,
Finney said.
“Of course, that doesn’t help,” he said.
The complaint also claimed Rusanoff and
the company made untrue or misleading
statements to travel customers and didn’t
comply with all provisions of the California
Seller of Travel Law business code.
The company, according to the civil com-
plaint, failed to share information about the
total amount to be paid by the consumer
passenger, provide clear statements about
cancellation policies and disclosures about
the company having a trust account or bond.
By violating the travel laws, the company
engaged in unfair competition, the suit
claimed.
Rusanoff could not be reached for com-
ment.
WayToFly.com advertises itself as selling
deeply discounted business class fares
unavailable elsewhere. At Cost Flights Corp.
makes a similar claim about international
travel. According to a Better Business
Bureau alert, the company appears to no
longer be in business and has 37 complaints
on file including 14 about advertising and
17 about problems with its products and
service.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Travel company accused of violating business codes
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Brisbane man charged with keeping a
large stash of dynamite in his home after offi-
cers responded to a domestic disturbance call
faces up to two years in prison after pleading
no contest to illegally possessing explosives,
marijuana for sale and an assault weapon.
William Myle Harrell, 47, took the deal on
the three counts rather than stand trial on sev-
eral more charges, including child endanger-
ment, stemming from the initial incident and
his alleged maintenance of a marijuana grow
house on the coast.
Harrell returns to court Sept. 25 for sen-
tencing.
Harrell was arrested Oct. 1, 2012 after
police went to his Cliff Swallow Court resi-
dence on reports of a domestic disturbance
with his live-in girlfriend. Authorities found
no cause to arrest Harrell for the disturbance
and he was set to leave in a taxi for his par-
ents’ Montara home until the girlfriend asked
officers to follow her back inside. She told
them Harrell kept a closet locked but she had
a key made and grew concerned for the safe-
ty of her children, ages 11 and 20, once she
discovered the contents.
Inside, police reported finding 145 pounds
of commercial-grade explosives in the form
of dynamite sticks, a gallon-size bag of mar-
ijuana and $37,000 in cash.
Experts estimated the explosives were
enough to destroy the neighborhood, accord-
ing to the District Attorney’s Office.
Authorities have not said why they think
Harrell had the stash but believe he has ties to
extremist groups.
Harrell is free on $500,000 bail.
Man takes deal for grow house, explosives
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — California communities
are spending $428 million dollars a year to keep
plastic and other trash off the streets and keep it
from polluting waterways and beaches, an envi-
ronmental group said in a new report. For many,
“soda bottles, food wrappers and cigarette butts
are just forgotten bits of muck that hit the street
and wash away, forgotten. That waste doesn’t
just disappear though, and it is very expensive to
clean up,” the Natural Resources Defense
Council said in an “issue brief” about the litter
problem.
The study, released on Aug. 28, was based on
information supplied by 95 communities around
the state on how much they spent on street
sweeping; litter pickup; waterway and beach
cleanup; storm drain cleaning and maintenance;
installation of devices to trap trash that flows
down storm drains with runoff, and public edu-
cation programs about litter’s impact on water-
ways.
The communities ranged in size from around
700 residents to nearly 4 million and at various
distances from rivers, streams, lakes and water-
ways. Together, they spent an estimated $428
million on litter management and debris reduc-
tion, or around $10.71 per resident, the study
Study: State spends $428M
on waterway trash-fighting
NATION/WORLD 7
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
September 6, 7 & 8, 2013
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By David Espo
and Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama gained ground Tuesday in his
drive for congressional backing of a
military strike against Syria, winning
critical support from House Speaker
John Boehner while key Senate
Democrats and Republicans agreed to
back a no-combat-troops-on-the-
ground action in retaliation for a chem-
ical weapons attack.
Officials said the emerging Senate
measure would receive a vote
Wednesday in the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee. Approval is
likely.
“You’re probably going to win”
Congress’ backing, Sen. Rand Paul of
Kentucky, a conservative and likely
opponent of the measure, conceded in a
late-afternoon exchange with Secretary
of State John Kerry.
The leader of House Republicans,
Boehner emerged from a meeting at the
White House and said the United States
has “enemies around the world that
need to understand that we’re not going
to tolerate this type of behavior. We
also have allies around the world and
allies in the region who also need to
know that America will be there and
stand up when it’s necessary. ”
Boehner spoke as lawmakers in both
parties called for changes to the presi-
dent’s requested legislation, insisting
it be rewritten to restrict the type and
duration of any military action.
Boehner’s aboard: Obama gains Syria-strike support
REUTERS
Speaker of the House John Boehner,left,listens to Barack Obama during a meeting
with bipartisan Congressional leaders in the Cabinet Room at the White House.
By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — As the Obama administration tries to prod
Congress into backing armed action against Syria, the
regime in Damascus is hiding military hardware and
shifting troops out of bases into civilian areas.
Politically, President Bashar Assad has gone on the
offensive, warning in a rare interview with Western
media that any military action against Syria could spark
a regional war.
If the U.S. undertakes missile strikes, Assad’s reac-
tion could have a major effect on the trajectory of
Syria’s civil war. Neighboring countries could get
dragged into a wider conflict, or it could be back to busi-
ness as usual for a crisis that has claimed the lives of
more than 100,000 people over 2 1/2 years.
The main Western-backed opposition group says that
during the buildup last week to what seemed like an
imminent U.S. attack, the army moved troops as well as
rocket launchers, artillery and other heavy weapons
into residential neighborhoods in cities nationwide.
Three Damascus residents, speaking on condition of
anonymity for fear of reprisals, confirmed such move-
ments.
One man said two members of the elite Republican
Guards broke into an empty house he owns and showed
him an official document stating they were authorized to
do so because Syria is at war. Awoman in another area
said soldiers moved into a school next to her house.
A U.S. official confirmed there are indications that
the Syrian regime is taking steps to move some of its
military equipment and bolster protection for defense
facilities.
Syria is said to be hiding
weapons, moving troops
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio correc-
tions officials say Ariel Castro who
held three women captive in his home
for nearly a decade has committed sui-
cide at a state prison facility.
Spokeswoman JoEllen Smith says
53-year-old Castro was found hanging
in his cell around 9:20 p.m. Tuesday at
the Correctional
Reception Center in
Orient. Prison med-
ical staff performed
CPR before Castro
was transported to a
hospital, where he
was pronounced
dead.
The three women
disappeared separately between 2002
and 2004, when they were 14, 16 and
20 years old. They escaped May 6,
when one of the women broke part of a
door and yelled to neighbors for help.
Castro was arrested that evening.
Castro was sentenced Aug. 1 to life
in prison plus 1,000 years on his
guilty plea to 937 counts including
kidnapping and rape.
Man who held three women captive commits suicide
Ariel Castro
LOCAL 8
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE
GOVERNMENT
• The state
Assembl y voted to
pass the extension
of the “Gre e n
Sti cker” program
while the state
Senat e voted to extend the “Whi te
Sticker” program, allowing the latest
generation of low-emission vehicles to
access the High Occupancy Vehi cl e
highway lanes.
Senat e Bi l l 286, authored by state
Sen. Lel and Yee, D- San
Francisco/San Mateo, who created the
Green Sticker program three years ago to
encourage Californians to switch to more
environmentally conscious vehicles. SB
286 extends the Green Sticker program an
additional three years, which would allow
plug-in hybrid cars to access the HOV
lanes until 2019, according to Yee’s
office.
Assemblyman Richard Bloom’s ,
D-Santa Monica, AB 266, originally
authored by then-assemblyman Bo b
Blumenfield before leaving for the Los
Angeles City Council, would similarly
extend the “White Sticker” program that
allows access for fully electric and natural
gas vehicles, according to Yee’s office.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Increasing communication
while contending with changes to
the state’s funding formula and
new Common Core standards are
among the top issues for the seven
candidates for three open seats on
the Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District Board
of Trustees.
With incumbents Brian
Matthews and Andy Stulbarg opt-
ing not to run for re-election, the
only incumbent in the race is
Charles Velschow, who was
appointed in 2011 to replace
Michael Parker. The other candi-
dates are Suvarna Bhopale,
Rakesh Hegde, Amy Koo, Herb
Neuman, Naomi Nishimoto and
Kelly Redmon.
An in-office forum was held to
help the Daily Journal determine
endorsements. To allow each can-
didate a forum to express their
opinions on the issues discussed,
candidates were given the same
questions and asked to answer each
in 50 words or less. Answers are
arranged alphabetically by the
candidate’s last name.
Do you support the exten-
si on of the di stri ct’s parc e l
taxes on the November bal-
l ot ?
Suvarna Bhopal e: Yes.
Renewal of existing parcels, with-
out raising taxes, will prevent cuts
in funding, lessen our dependence
on state aid and retain local con-
trol over budgetary decisions.
Defeating the measure now and
revisiting the issue later, as some
suggest, will result in funding
uncertainty at a time when we need
stability.
Rakesh Hegde: Absolutely. I
support Measure R renewal of the
funding for local schools without
increasing taxes. It is essential for
high-quality education and smaller
class sizes, that we do not lose
existing funding. Our school dis-
trict has seen enormous growth in
enrollments but our revenues have
been fairly flat.
Amy Koo: Yes. It makes sense
to pass the parcel tax measure now
to create funding source stability,
since long-term budgets look out
three years. This funding stability
would enable change by allowing
the board to focus on issues like
creating capacity for increasing
enrollment and improving com-
munication with stakeholders.
Herb Neuman: I support fully
funding our public schools. The
district is seeing revenue increas-
es and measures G and U do not
expire until mid-2015 and 2016.
There will be new trustees this
year and prematurely extending
the parcel taxes now will impair
their ability to analyze and opti-
mize revenue sources.
Naomi Ni shi mot o: Wi t h
growing enrollment, the district’s
passion for excellence and high
expectations from the community,
I support the extension of the par-
cel tax.
Kelly Redmon: Absolutely. I
think a secondary focus in this
campaign and election season will
be to also support and help pass
the parcel-tax extension. With a
growing district and schools
already at capacity, we need to
ensure we maintain a current
stream of guaranteed funding,
while looking for other ways to
bring in revenue.
Charl es Vel s chow:
Definitely, its $2 million annually
the district cannot afford to lose,
we are currently spending down
our reserves to maintain services
and by all accounts we run a very
lean operation with more than 85
percent of our budget allocated for
classroom instruction.
How do you feel the dis-
trict has balanced the needs
of bot h t he Bel mont and
Redwood Shores community?
Suvarna Bhopale: BRSSD is
best served with representation
from Belmont and Redwood
Shores on the board, though
trustees must make decisions with
the best interests of the whole dis-
trict in mind. An impartial, trans-
parent process with appropriate
community input will result in
balanced decisions and create
Belmont-Redwood Shores candidates respond to district issues
Age: 41
Education:
Engineering
degree in
computer science
Experience: CEO
for Rezopia Inc.;
School Force board
Family: Married,
two children
Residence: Redwood Shores since
Rakesh Hegde
Age: 40
Education: B.S.
from MIT and an
MBA and MS from
Stanford University
Experience:
Manager of trade
operations at
Gilead Sciences in
Foster City
Family: Married, two sons
Residence: One year in Belmont, last
nine years in Redwood Shores
Amy Koo
Age: 44
Education:
Landscape
architecture
degree from Cal
Poly San Luis
Obispo
Experience:
Registered
landscape
architect, Art in Action volunteer,
Central Elementary School design
review committee
Family: Married, a son and a daughter
Residence: Belmont for six years
Naomi
Nishimoto
Age: 40
Education:
Bachelor’s degree
from Knox College,
a master’s degree
from Southern
Illinois University,
an MBA from Regis
University and
doctor of nedicine
from Southern Illinois University
Experience: Physician, entrepreneur
and former Fortune 500 senior
executive
Family: Married, a son
Residence: Redwood Shores since
Herb Neuman
Age: 36
Education: Mills
High School,
Cañada College,
teaching credential
from San Francisco
State University,
master’s in
instructional
technologies and a
supplemental single subject credential
in computer technologies
Experience: English teacher at
Carlmont High School
Family: Married, two daughters
Residence: Belmont for 13 years
Kelly Redmon
Age: 45
Education:
Cipriani
Elementary and
Ralston Junior
High (now ‘Middle
School’), Serra High
School (class of
’86), political
science degree
from UC Davis, teaching credential
from San Francisco State University
Experience: Social studies teacher for
the Business Technology Academy
Family: Married, three children
Residence: Belmont for 35 years
Charles
Velschow
Age: 42
Education: J.D.
from Georgetown
Law, B.A. in political
science from the
University of
Maryland
Experience:
Attorney,
Sandpiper Site
Council, as its PTA Advocacy Chair;
president, neighborhood homeowners’
association
Family: Married, two children
Residence: Redwood Shores since
Suvarna
Bhopale
See BRSSD, Page 16
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Syrian chemical attack
Editor,
Who would Dr. King bomb?
Remember the refrain, “Assad must
go?” The Syrian conflict had barely
started, yet Secretary Clinton and
President Obama repeated that state-
ment many times. Of course we would
like to see him go but replaced by
whom and what? Now, chemical
weapons appear to have been used.
Our track record as a nation through
many different administrations has
been anything but consistent.
Knowing what eas in store, we sup-
plied Saddam with the very chemicals
needed for his weapons program but
later called him a war criminal.
“Saddam must go” was the refrain a
few years later.
As horrible as the chemical attack
was, we must bare witness to realities
and not create more chaos by pretend-
ing to be the world’s disciplinarian.
We have backed some dictators with
arms and cash as well as excuses and
vetos in the United Nations yet
demanded that others “must go.” War
criminals must be held accountable,
but careful accounting is needed. The
best examples were the Nuremberg
proceedings after World War II. Oh,
and we need to hold to the very same
rules, by the way.
Mike Caggiano
San Mateo
Letter to the editor
T
he Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District
has a unique feature in that it
serves students in one city, Belmont,
and a portion of another city,
Redwood Shores, which is part of
Redwood City. Separating the two
areas is Highway 101, and though
there are differences between the two
communities the school district is a
powerful common characteristic. In
years past, there has been a divide
between the two communities but
much has been done in recent years to
bridge that gap. Communication has
been lacking at times and all seven
candidates for three open seats on the
Board of Trustees point to the need for
improvement in that critical compo-
nent.
Each candidate brings an important
point of view and each would serve
the district well on the board.
However, the three who deserve your
vote are Rakesh Hegde, Amy Koo and
Charles Velschow.
Velschow was appointed in 2011 to
replace Michael Parker, when Parker
stepped down. At the time of his
appointment, his experience as an
educator was touted as bringing a
much-needed point of view to the
board. He has three children in the
district and was co-chair of a previous
parcel tax campaign. With two incum-
bents opting out of re-election,
retaining some amount of experience
on the board is important. Besides,
Velschow was on the board that named
a new superintendent, Michael
Milliken, who just started in July. It
is appropriate to allow Velschow to
work with the new district head he had
a hand in hiring. Velschow also pro-
vides an enthusiastic energy, com-
mon-sense know-how and unique per-
spective as both a teacher in another
district and a parent in the district.
Koo is best known for her advocacy
in trying to create a new language
immersion program within the dis-
trict. Though her effort ultimately fell
short, it is evidence of her willing-
ness to try new things and reflect a
growing need in the district. She also
shows a firm grasp of the district’s
finances, need for renewed communi-
cation channels, issues with capacity
and need to determine the best path
for new Common Core curriculum
readiness. We look forward to seeing
her work within the district to meet
its needs and identify future needs.
Hegde has been an involved parent
for a while through fundraising and
the parcel tax renewal campaign. He
brings a no-nonsense approach to
any discussion and focuses on the
need to provide the best educational
opportunities for all students. His
experience in the district provides a
certain amount of base knowledge
that can only serve all the schools
well. He also understands the chang-
ing nature of both school finance and
curriculum and will likely hit the
ground running while keeping a con-
stant ear on the community to ensure
that every board decision has every-
one in mind.
Voters in both Belmont and
Redwood Shore have other great can-
didates from which to choose, and we
hope the others continue to be
involved to ensure the district always
moves forward in the most responsive
and responsible way. But Hegde, Koo
and Velschow are the right choices for
the three vacant seats on the Board of
Trustees.
Hegde, Koo, Velschow for Belmont-Redwood Shores
Two developments on the anti-veterans front
Odds and ends
“I
magination is more important than knowledge.” —
Albert Einstein.
I clean off my desk and organize my files once a year
whether they need it or not. In the process I often come
across little slips of paper containing interesting quotes and
comments that I have read in some article or book or maybe
even heard on television. I jot them down in hope of having
them handy to use in a future column. But most I never use
because I forget they are there or where I put them.
This time I found quite a few
— most of them too good to
throw out — so, adding some
that were scribbled in the mar-
gins or my notebooks and
tossing in some that I’ve used
in columns way back in the
’80s, I offer you this collec-
tion of thought provoking tid-
bits to stir up your imagina-
tion. Some of the authors are
listed, and with others, well,
the author will remain a mys-
tery.
“For the secret of man’s
being is not only to live, but
to have something to live for.” — Dostoevski.
“He who thinks he knows, doesn’t know. He who thinks
he doesn’t know, knows.” — Joseph Campbell.
“Nations are identified by not only their highest point of
civilized achievement, but also by their weakest.”
“It is not how much we have, but how much we enjoy, that
makes happiness.” — Charles Spurgeon.
“The really great people are the ones who know how to
make the little people feel great.” — Ashleigh Brilliant.
“You give little when you give of your possessions. It is
when you give of yourself that you truly give.” — Kahil
Gibran.
“The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of
your thoughts.” — Marcus Aurelius Antoninus.
“The man who cannot create wants to destroy.” — Erich
Fromm.
“Everything is changing. People are taking their comedi-
ans seriously and their politicians as a joke.” — Will
Rogers.
“Ours is an age which is proud of machines that think and
suspicious of men who try to.” — H.M. Jones.
“To be blessed is to experience joy, to know freedom, to
have an inner peace that is sustaining in any and every situ-
ation.” — Muriel James.
“The most important thing a father can do for his children
is to love their mother.” — Theodore M. Hesburgh.
“There is no human problem which could not be solved if
people would simply do as I advised.” — Gore Vidal.
“Honest criticism is hard to take, particularly from a rela-
tive, a friend, an acquaintance or a stranger.” — Franklin P.
Jones.
“This country will not be a good place for any of us to
live in unless we make it a good place for all of us to live
in.”— Theodore Roosevelt.
“I saw the angel in the marble and just chiseled until I set
him free.” — Michelangelo.
“To understand and to be understood makes our happiness
on earth.” — German Proverb.
“Parenthood remains the greatest single preserve of the
amateur.” — Alvin Toffler.
“All power is a trust and we are accountable for its exer-
cise.” — Disraeli.
“Man must listen to his own drummer, or be marched right
out of himself.” — Leo Buscaglia.
“Nobody can make you feel inferior without your con-
sent.” — Eleanor Roosevelt.
“Denied a sense of structure and cohesiveness in life —
the kind of stability provided by a clearly defined system of
meanings — we are overwhelmed by anxiety, insecurity and
self-doubt.”
“America refuses to face the painful truth about itself.”
“Just as we must let go of dead philosophies, illusions and
old science to confront reality, so a country must keep chal-
lenging its traditions if it is to be transformed — if it wants
renewal.” — Marilyn Ferguson.
“The believer is happy; the doubter is wise.” — Hungarian
proverb.
“Those who aren’t looking for happiness are the most
likely to find it, because those who are searching forget that
the surest way to be happy is to seek happiness for others.”
— Martin Luther King Jr.
“The only good is knowledge and the only evil is igno-
rance.” — Socrates.
“To keep your marriage brimming/ With love in the lov-
ing cup/ Whenever you’re wrong, admit it/ Whenever you’re
right, shut up.” — Ogden Nash.
“To laugh often and much; to win the respect of people
and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of
honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to
appreciate beauty; to leave the world a bit better whether by
a healthy child, a job well done or a redeemed social condi-
tion; to know even one life has breathed easier because you
lived: this is to have succeeded.” — Fosdick.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
U-T San Diego
T
he Department of Veterans
Affairs deserves its rotten rep-
utation. For years, stories
have documented how it can take ago-
nizingly long for wounded veterans
returning to civilian life to have their
claims processed by the VA. Reviews
of nearly two-thirds of the current
pending 780,000 claims are at least
125 days behind.
But guess who thinks the VAi s
doing an amazing job? The people
running the department.
Anew report says that in 2011, VA
executives approved giving about 70
percent of claims processors $5.5
million in bonuses for their allegedly
“excellent” work — for a year in
which the claims backlog soared 155
percent.
Incredibly, the bonuses were based
on job-performance standards that
encouraged processors to put aside
more difficult claims and focus on the
easiest ones. No wonder some claims
take years to process.
Unfortunately, there’s still more
news on the anti-veterans front. The
American Legion and its 2.4 million
members are now being forced by the
Internal Revenue Service to comply
with onerous bureaucratic require-
ments for the first time since the vet-
erans-support group was formed by a
1919 act of Congress. The IRS says
the Legion must maintain much more
comprehensive records on its mem-
bers’ military service.
Why? Is there any evidence the
Legion has abused its tax-exempt sta-
tus?
The IRS is mum. The White House
shouldn’t be.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,833.96 +23.65 10-Yr Bond 2.848 +0.099
Nasdaq 3,612.61 +22.74 Oil (per barrel) 108.47
S&P 500 1,639.77 +6.80 Gold 1,411.90
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Verizon Communications Inc., down $1.37 to $46.01
The telecom giant spends $130 billion for the remaining 45 percent of
its joint-venture with British cell phone carrier Vodafone.
LeapFrog Enterprises Inc., down 71 cents to $8.91
The stock is downgraded by BMO Capital Markets, which says the
education technology company’s newest pad has bugs.
Key Energy Services Inc., up 40 cents to $7.07
The onshore drilling company’s stock is upgraded by Barclays Capital.
CBS Corp., up $2.40 to $53.50
The broadcaster is perceived as the overall winner after a monthlong
standoff with Time Warner Cable.
Nasdaq
Microsoft Corp., down $1.52 to $31.88
The software company is buying Nokia smartphones and patents to
vault into the lucrative mobile computing market and gear up for a fight
with Apple.
Cytokinetics Inc., down $2.82 to $7.65
The biopharmaceutical company’s heart failure drug did not meet the
main goal in a clinical trial.
BlackBerry Ltd., up 9 cents to $10.21
The stock rallies on hopes that the Microsoft-Nokia deal boosts chances
that the smartphone maker will be acquired as it continues evaluating
“strategic alternatives.”
BioScrip Inc., down 78 cents to $11.42
Patricia Bogusz,a finance executive at the medical and pharmacy services
company, sold 39,687 shares at $11.94 per share.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market
rose modestly Tuesday as renewed wor-
ries about a U.S.-led attack on Syria
dampened an early rally.
Stocks surged in the opening min-
utes of trading as traders felt that a U.S.
attack on Syria wasn’t imminent after
President Barack Obama announced
over the weekend that he would seek
congressional approval for a strike.
But the early rally faded after the top
Republican in Congress said he would
support President Obama’s call for the
U.S. to take action. Speaking in the
late morning, House of
Representatives Speaker John
Boehner said the use of chemical
weapons must be responded to.
“Key Republicans seem to agree
with Obama on Syria,” said JJ
Kinahan, chief derivatives strategist
for TD Ameritrade. “It puts us in a diffi-
cult situation as to what might happen
from here.”
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed up 23.65 points, or 0.2 per-
cent, to 14,833.96. The index had
climbed as much as 123 points in early
trading.
The Dow was also held back by
Microsoft and Verizon, which both
slumped after announcing deals.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
gained 6.80 points, or 0.4 percent, to
1, 639. 77. The Nasdaq composite
climbed 22.74 points, or 0.6 percent,
to 3,612.
The stock market also got an early
boost from a report showing that U.S.
manufacturing expanded last month at
the fastest pace since June 2011. The
report was better than economist had
expected, according to estimates com-
piled by data provider FactSet.
In corporate news, CBS surged
$2.40, or 2.7 percent, to $53.50 after
the broadcaster and Time Warner Cable
reached an agreement that ended a
blackout of CBS and CBS-owned chan-
nels such as Showtime.
Other corporate news was disap-
pointing. Microsoft fell $1.52, or 4.6
percent, to $31.88 after the software
company said it would acquire Nokia’s
smartphone business and a portfolio
of patents and services. Microsoft is
trying to capture a slice of the lucrative
mobile computing market that is dom-
inated by Apple and Google, and
investors are concerned that Microsoft
won’t succeed.
Verizon fell $1.37, or 2.9 percent, to
$46.01 after the company agreed to
pay $130 billion for Vodafone’s stake
in Verizon Wireless.
After a tough August, stocks may
struggle to rally in September because
of a string of events that could shake
investors, said Randy Frederick, man-
aging director of active trading and
derivatives at the Schwab Center for
Financial Research.
The S&P 500 logged its worst per-
formance since May 2012 last month
as investors fretted about when the
Federal Reserve will cut its economic
stimulus. The Fed’s next meeting,
which starts Sept. 17, is when many
on Wall Street think the central bank
will begin winding down its massive
bond-buying program.
Lawmakers in Washington may also
throw investors a curve ball.
To keep the government running,
Congress needs to pass a short-term
spending bill before the fiscal year
starts Oct. 1. Then there’s the govern-
ment’s $16.7 trillion borrowing limit.
Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew warned
that, unless it’s raised soon, the gov-
ernment would lose the ability to pay
all of its bills by the middle of
October.
Political wrangling in Washington
shook financial markets in August
2011, when lawmakers fought over
raising the debt ceiling. That led the
rating agency Standard & Poor’s to
strip the U.S. of its triple-A credit rat-
ing.
“All these catalysts out there ... are
still there,” said Frederick. “There’s
just not enough upside catalysts, and
there’s plenty of downside catalysts.”
Stocks end slightly higher after rally fades
By Michael Liedtke
and Matti Huuhtanen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Microsoft’s
acquisition of Nokia’s troubled smart-
phone business represents a daring
$7.2 billion attempt by the software
giant and a once-influential cellphone
maker to catch up with the mobile
computing revolution that threatens
to leave them in the technological
dust.
The deal announced late Monday
offers both companies a chance to
make up for lost time with a strategy
to meld their software and hardware
into a cohesive package, like rival
Apple has done. But there are plenty
of reasons to question whether the
copycat approach will pay off.
Unlike Apple, Microsoft Corp.
makes most of its money from soft-
ware for personal computers — a still-
profitable franchise that has gradually
been crumbling as smartphones and
tablets supplant laptop and desktop
machines. By some estimates, more
than two-thirds of the computing
devices being sold now are either
smartphones or tablets, and there are
few signs that trend will change during
the next decade.
To complicate Microsoft’s transi-
tion, the Redmond, Wash., company
is being led by a lame duck. Microsoft
CEO Steve Ballmer, who negotiated
the Nokia deal, recently announced
plans to retire within the next year in
a tacit admission that the company
needs a different leader to blaze new
trails.
In Nokia acquisition, Microsoft tries to catch up
Gimme a break: New
Android system named ‘KitKat’
NEWYORK — Gimme a break, Google. Break me off a
piece of that Kit Kat bar.
The tech giant, which is known for nick-naming its
Android mobile operating systems for smartphones and
tablets after desserts, has for the first time chosen a brand-
name candy for its 4.4 version that’s expected to launch this
fall: Kit Kat.
That’s right, the new version shares a name with the
chocolate candy bar with the well-known “Gimme a Break”
jingle. Kit Kat packaging will show Android’s green robot
mascot breaking a Kit Kat bar.
Financial terms weren’t disclosed for the sweet deal
between Google and Hershey Co., which makes Kit Kat. But
the deal shows that naming a stadium or sponsoring a TV
show can be seen as old school. The latest marketing craze
may be to slap a brand name on a tech product.
Apple event invitation hints at new phone colors
NEWYORK — Apple has sent a colorful invitation for an
event next week amid speculation that it may debut new col-
ors for the latest iPhone.
The invitation, emailed Tuesday, has a picture of the
Apple logo surrounded by multi-colored polka dots and the
sentence: “This should brighten everyone’s day. ”
The iPhone 5, which went on sale in September of 2012,
comes only in black or white.
Business briefs
<< Last place belongs to the Giants, page 13
• Local college roundup, page 12
Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013
HONORING THE PAST: 49ERS’ WILLIAMS PLAYS FOR FORMER COLLEGE TEAMMATE >> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Despite being defending
Central Coast Section
Division IV champs,
the Sacred Heart
Prep football team
can’t rest on its lau-
rels if it hopes to be
in the mix for a
Peninsula Athletic
League Bay
Division title and a repeat as
CCS champs.
Not that the Gators would
take anything for granted, but
considering they lost a lot of
talent from that 2012 champi-
onship squad, SHP still has
plenty of pieces returning as
well as a number of players
that figure to continue the
Gators’ tradition of being one
of the best teams in the PAL.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sequoia football coach Rob Poulos has finally
achieved one of the goals he had when he first took over
the Cherokees program: to field two, separate offensive
and defensive units comprised of one-way players.
Unlike a lot of teams that have many of their best
players playing on both sides of the ball, Poulos has
the depth and talent to keep a two-platoon system in
place.
“Last year, we were a one-and-a-half platoon (team),”
Poulos said, meaning most of his top players played
full time on one side of the ball and part time on the
See GATORS, Page 14
See SEQUOIA, Page 13
Penalties
for Oracle
are severe
By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Defending champi-
on Oracle Team USA has been docked two
points in the America’s Cup match against
Emirates Team Zealand and a key sailor was
expelled in the harshest penalties levied in
the 162-year history of sailing’s marquee
regatta.
The penalties were announced Tuesday by
an international jury that has spent four
weeks investigating illegal modifications
of prototype boats used in warm-up regattas
last year and earlier this year.
Oracle Team USA, owned by software bil-
lionaire Larry Ellison of Oracle Corp.,
essentially starts the match at minus-2,
meaning it must win 11 races to retain the
oldest trophy in international sports. Team
New Zealand must still win nine races to
claim the silver trophy.
The match begins with two races Saturday
and two on Sunday on San Francisco Bay.
Dirk de Ridder, who trims the wing sail on
the high-performance, 72-foot catamaran,
is barred from sailing in the regatta, and two
shore crew members also have been
expelled. Grinder Matt Mitchell has been
barred from the first four races. Kyle
Langford, a wing trimmer on the B crew, was
given a warning, and another sailor, identi-
fied only as Sailor X, had his case dismissed.
Top members of the syndicate, including
Oaks get off
to rough start
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Mark Grieb era at Menlo College was-
n’t necessarily expected to start in
grandiose fashion.
Heading into this first game as the head
coach for the Oaks, the schedule gods hand-
ed the former Arena Football League super-
star a date with Washington’s Carroll
College, the No .12 team in the National
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics.
And in return, the Saints handed Grieb and
the Oaks a 51-7 shelling.
Carroll found the end zone in four of its
seven first-half drives (including three of its
first four) to take a 28-0 lead into the half.
The scoring kept coming in the second half
with four more touchdowns and a botched
punt attempt that resulted in a safety.
On the flip side, Oaks struggled to produce
on the offensive side of the ball and tallied a
total of five three-and-outs and three
turnovers — two interceptions and a lost
fumble.
The lone bright spot for the Oaks offense
came in the third quarter when sophomore
running back Brandon Bell — last season’s
leading rusher — found an opening and ran
up the sideline for a 67-yard touchdown.
With the 44-point loss and a preseason
schedule stacked with tough opponents
(see: Westley College, Midwestern State,
See SAILING, Page 15
See MENLO, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Women’s soccer
Menlo College opened its 2013 schedule
in disappointing fashion, dropping a 2-1
decision to Hope International University
in double overtime.
Hope University’s Lizzy Rivas knocked
in a rebound off Oaks goalkeeper Whitney
Galindo with 30 seconds to play to clinch
the victory.
Menlo played well in the first half, press-
ing the attack, but could not click in the
offensive third of the field. Danielle
McCarthy was taken down from behind in
the penalty box and Jocelyn Aguilar con-
verted the penalty kick for a 1-0 Menlo lead
in the second half, but Hope equalized in the
71st minute when Cindy Cisneros headed
home a cross from Brandi Neilan.
Menlo earned a trio of corner kicks in the
first 10-minute overtime period, but could
not convert to extend the game into the sec-
ond overtime period.
Skyline College got a pair of goals from
Ileana Moncada as they played Shasta to a
2-2 draw last week.
Iris Clavel and Jennyfer Prudencio each
assisted on Moncada’s goals, while goal-
tender Staci Garcia kept her team in the
game by making 10 saves.
Men’s soccer
Skyline traveled to the East Bay to begin
the 2013 season with a road game at Contra
Costa College last week, winning 2-1.
Andres Portillo and Zach Weisenburger
each found the back of the net for the
Trojans, with Juan Venegas picking up an
assist.
The Cañada men’s soccer team opened the
2013 season Saturday with a 1-1 tie with
Cosumnes River, before falling to local
power Foothill Tuesday.
Angel Mejia scored off a Mark Lopez
assist in the opener with Cosumnes River,
while goalkeeper Victor Meraz made five
saves for the Colts.
Foothill, however, proved to be too much
in a 3-0 shutout.
Women’s volleyball
Menlo College, the defending Cal Pac
champion, traveled to Oregon to play in the
Southern Oregon tournament last week, where
it went 2-1 to begin the 2013 campaign.
The Lady Oaks opened with a hard-fought,
four-set win over Northwest University,
before falling to host Southern Oregon.
Menlo closed out the tournament with
another grueling win, this one a five-set
victory over Lewis-Clark State College.
Menlo’s Courtney Calicdan, defending
Cal Pac Player of the Year, finished with 21
kills and 13 digs in a 23-25, 25-21, 25-14,
25-13 victory over Northwest. Nicole Yap
chipped in with 11 kills and 18 digs, while
setter Haley Webb dished out 44 assists.
Menlo struggled in a 25-17, 25-14, 25-23
loss to national power Southern Oregon,
but rallied to beat Lewis-Clark. Menlo
dropped the first two sets to LCSC, 26-24
and 25-18, but came back to win the final
three sets — 25-21, 30-28, 15-12.
Local college roundup
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTACLARA— As Kyle Williams suits
up for his first game in more than nine
months, he will pull his No. 10 San
Francisco 49ers jersey over a new No. 81
tattoo on his inner left forearm honoring a
former teammate.
Williams added the fresh ink during the
offseason as a tribute to an Arizona State
teammate, Tyrice Thompson, who died Feb.
2 from injuries suffered when he was stabbed
Jan. 27 while working at a popular
Scottsdale, Ariz., nightclub. Williams will
play in Thompson’s honor this year — the
fourth-year pro’s return from a torn anterior
cruciate ligament in his left knee that
required surgery and ended his 2012 season
in late November.
“He was family to everybody,” Williams
said. “He’s a guy I played with at ASU, and kind
of like a big brother to me. When he was here
(alive) he was always looking over me and
there for me, always sharing wisdom.”
Now that he is healthy at last, the 25-year-
old Williams has a chance to be San Francisco’s
No. 2 wide receiver opposite Anquan Boldin.
Williams also will handle some kick return
duties for the NFC champions.
Williams, Colin
Kaepernick and Co. open
the season Sunday at
home against Green Bay
in a rematch of the NFC
divisional playoffs last
January at Candlestick
Park won 45-31 by the
49ers.
“Kyle Williams, we feel
like we know what Kyle
can do and we’ve been a little bit cautious
there,” coach Jim Harbaugh said of pushing
him too hard early.
Hanging up in Williams’ locker is a regu-
lar reminder of his dear friend — the program
from the late 27-year-old’s service — Tyrice
Allen Thompson. April 2, 1985, to Feb. 2,
2013.
The former tight end and wide receiver died
a day before Williams and the 49ers lost the
Super Bowl to Baltimore in New Orleans.
Thompson was stabbed five times in the
back, hip and arm after an early morning
altercation at Martini Ranch near
Scottsdale’s hip Old Town neighborhood,
and only a few miles from Williams’ high
school.
Ian MacDonald of Tempe is accused in
Thompson’s killing and faces a charge of
second-degree murder.
Williams last saw Thompson in the
Phoenix area during San Francisco’s bye
week after the 49ers played at Arizona on
Oct. 29. The two played together for the Sun
Devils for two years.
“When I saw him he kind of pulled me
aside and we talked for about 20 minutes,”
Williams said. “It was kind of crazy because
I told another one of my friends, those two
had always been like older brothers to me
and watched out for me, I told him, ‘It’s crazy
because whenever I talk to Tyrice he talks to
me like it’s the last time he’s going to see
me.’ And then that happened. I’ve always
looked at him as somebody who’s looked
over me. He’s always trying to prepare me
and always trying to get me ready for what’s
coming. So, I know he’s still got me, he’s
still looking over me.”
For Williams, this season is one he has
been waiting months to begin. He had to sit
out the Super Bowl along with fellow injured
receiver Mario Manningham — one of the
toughest moments in their careers despite
their immense pride in San Francisco being
back there for the first time in 18 years.
Just when Williams was on a nice roll last
season, he got hurt in a Nov. 25 win at New
Orleans. A sixth-round draft pick in 2010,
Williams had 13 catches for 212 yards and a
touchdown in the first 11 games of 2012.
Harbaugh and offensive coordinator Greg
Roman expect a big year from Williams,
who has shown significant improvements in
the offense and with his strength after such a
serious injury.
“Kyle is a dynamic player,” Roman said.
“He’s got great short area change of direc-
tion. I think he can work a defender to get
open and we can give him some different
options on routes. And Kyle’s going to be a
big part of what we do. He’s an ascending
football player, got a great attitude and he’s
meant a lot to this team and will in the
future, more importantly.
“He’s definitely playing stronger, and we
would expect it. I think his whole game’s
improved, his understanding of the game,
all the little nuances that go into the posi-
tion. And he’s a competitive guy that I think
is coming into his own.”
Thompson, Williams insists, will be with
him each moment the 49ers wideout spends
on the field, for practice or game day. And
when he runs out of the tunnel on Sunday for
Week 1.
“Absolutely,” Williams said. “Every time
you lose somebody, you want to honor them
in any way you can, especially him. I played
with him and he was our leader when I was
there.”
49ers’ Williams plays for college teammate
Kyle Williams
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • Sep. 4 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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other. “We have very few kids who started on
both sides of the ball. It’s hard with [our] no-
huddle system”
Why the obsession with have fresh play-
ers? Given his team’s up-tempo offense,
Poulos doesn’t want his offensive players
burning their energy on defense unless
absolutely necessary. Poulos’ no-huddle sys-
tem puts the pressure on opposing defenses to
keep up with the Cherokees’ go-go style.
“We can adjust on the fly,” Poulos said.
“We’re trying to find ways to be faster and
keep the defense on their heels. You definitely
can see the kids who have been in the system,
who are moving faster and getting faster.”
While a lot of spread offenses rely on the
pass, the Cherokees — at their heart — want
to run power football. They definitely have
the power with running back Matt Jenkins, an
ultra-rare four-year varsity player.
“I think he’s going to be a load at running
back,” Poulos said. “Teams are going to have
to have an answer for him. I think it’s going
to trigger a domino effect.”
Jenkins is also one of a handful of players
Poulos has tabbed to play both ways this sea-
son.
Jenkins’ work will hopefully take the pres-
sure off the quarterback, who also serves as a
de facto halfback in the Cherokees’system, in
addition to making the right reads in the pass-
ing game.
Poulos said there was still competition for
the starting spot between Cameron
Greenough and Saave Brown. Greenough, a
senior, appeared in eight games for the
Cherokees last season, accumulating 362
yards of total offense — 173 yards passing,
189 yards rushing.
“Cam’s been there before. He got some seri-
ous reps with varsity (last year),” Poulos said.
“He’s got a strong arm and he has an explo-
sive step this year didn’t have last year.”
Brown, a junior, guided the junior varsity
team to a 5-5 record. The only thing he lacks
is varsity experience.
“[Brown] has size (6-1, 250 pounds) and he
throws a solid ball,” Poulos said. “He can run
our stuff.”
Just by the nature of the offense, the
Cherokee receiving corps will get a lot of
looks and this year the task of catching pass-
es falls on a returning senior wideout Bobby
Sehl, who caught 20 passes for 231 yards last
season, and a couple of newcomers: senior
Liam Clifford and junior Brady Stubblefield.
The offensive line is anchored by Ed Tatola.
Defensively, the Cherokees should be every
bit as fast and explosive as their offense. The
anchor to the unit is junior safety Tommy
Lopiparo, who was in on 57 tackles last sea-
son as a sophomore, with a sack, three inter-
ceptions and a fumble recovery.
“I think he’s going to dominate from his
position. He’s going to be able to react and
come downhill with a purpose,” Poulos said.
“He’s one of the guys who impressed us last
year.”
Dylan Anderson is another key defender
returning at defensive back, giving the
Cherokees a potent 1-2 punch in the defensive
secondary. Eduardo Alvarado will hold down
the linebacking unit.
Defense comes along faster than the
offense. … Offense is always a work in
progress,” Poulos said. “I like what I’m see-
ing on the defensive side of the ball. They’re
flying around. They’re starting to get a feel for
their assignments.”
Coach: Rob Poulos
2012 record: 3-2 PAL Ocean, 9-3 overall
Key returners: Ed Tatola (jr., OL); Tommy Lopi-
paro (jr., DB); Ben Sehl (sr., WR); Matt Jenkins (sr.,
RB); Eduardo Alvarado (sr., LB); Dylan Anderson
(sr., DB).
Key newcomers: Saavae Brown (so., QB/RB);
Brady Stubblefield (jr.,WR); Liam Clifford (sr.,WR).
2013 schedule (home games in CAPS): 9/6 @
Fremont-Sunnyvale, 7 p.m.; 9/13 vs. MONTA
VISTA, 7 p.m.; 9/20 vs.WOODSIDE, 7 p.m.; 9/27 @
Cedar City-Utah, 7 p.m.; 10/11 @ Terra
Nova, 7 p.m.; 10/18 vs. MENLO
SCHOOL, 7 p.m.; 10/25 vs. MENLO-
ATHERTON, 7 p.m.; 11/1 @ Sacred
Heart Prep,2:45 p.m.;11/8 vs.SOUTH
CITY,7 p.m.;11/15 @ Carlmont,7 p.m.
Continued from page 11
SEQUOIA
Denorfia’s hit lifts
Padres to 3-2 win over Giants
SAN DIEGO — Chris Denorfia hit a go-
ahead RBI single in the seventh inning to
lift the San Diego Padres to a 3-2 victory
over the San Francisco Giants on Tuesday
night.
Nick Hundley drew a leadoff walk in the
seventh from rookie reliever Jake Dunning,
who was called up earlier in the day from
Triple-A Fresno. Ronnie Cedeno followed
with a single to send Hundley to third and
bring on reliever Javier Lopez.
Denorfia lined a 1-2 pitch to left for the
single that broke a 2-all tie.
Dunning (0-2), who made his major
league debut in June, took the loss. Tim
Stauffer (3-1) got the win with 1 2-3 innings
of shutout ball.
Huston Street pitched the ninth for his
26th save in 27 chances.
Defending World Series champion San
Francisco (61-77) dropped into last place in
the NL West, one game behind San Diego.
San Francisco catcher Buster Posey was
pinch hit for in the seventh after he
appeared to hurt his right hand on a wild
pitch thrown by Madison Bumgarner in the
sixth inning.
Rangers beat A’s 5-1
for sole possession of 1st
OAKLAND — Martin Perez allowed one
run in seven innings to win his sixth
straight start and Mitch Moreland homered
to move the Texas Rangers back into sole
possession of first place in the ALWest with
a 4-1 victory over the Oakland Athletics on
Tuesday night.
After falling into a tie for first with the A’s
when they lost the series opener, the
Rangers bounced back behind another
strong performance from Perez (9-3) and are
assured of leaving Oakland for the final time
in the regular season with at least a share of
the division lead.
Bartolo Colon (14-6) allowed three
unearned runs in the fifth inning following
his own error and missed an opportunity to
become first pitcher to reach 20 career wins
against Texas. Colon is winless in five
starts since July 26 with a DL stint in the
middle of that stretch.
The highlight of the game for Oakland
came in the sixth inning when third base-
man Josh Donaldson raced across the vast
foul territory at the Coliseum and leaped
over the tarp to make a backhand catch to
rob David Murphy.
Baseball roundup
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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“I think of us as being competitive (this
year). I think we have a chance to win every
game, but I don’t think we’re going to be
dominant,” said SHP coach Pete Lavorato.
“Defense, I think, will be a little behind
where we were last year. We lost a lot of sen-
iors. But I think our athleticism is just as
good. We might have a bit of a slow start
but, as the year goes on, hopefully we get
better and better. ”
One of the biggest positions the Gators
need to fill is at starting quarterback.
Lavorato said two players are vying for the
spot: junior Cole Marsh, last year’s backup,
and sophomore Mason Randle, who started
for the frosh-soph team in 2012.
“They’re pretty even. They can both get
the job done. They’ll both play,” Lavorato
said. “Mason is a sophomore, so that is the
only reservation, but he is a leader and a
very heady player. There’s something about
him. He can play.
“Cole, he’s flat-out good.”
The quarterback position in SHP’s
offense, while critical, is not the focal
point of the Gators attack. That would fall
on the shoulders of the Gators’ running
game and they should be solid in the back-
field this year with the return of Andrew
Segre and Chris Lee. Joining them will be
junior Griffin Kraemer.
“He’s a dynamic flyback,” Lavorato said
of Kraemer. “He could be a game changer for
us.”
Leading the way up front is Patrick
Finnigan, first-team, all-league selection
last year, along with Alex Castro.
The Gators may have lost a lot to gradua-
tion on the defensive side of the ball, but
have its anchor returning in defensive back
Noah Kawasaki, first-team, all-league selec-
tion last season. Ben Burr-Kirven, who saw
plenty of time on the offensive side of the
ball last season, will be the leader of the
linebacking corps, while Paul Westcott will
lead the defensive line.
Lavorato said his biggest concern is
depth as the Gators’ roster is only about 30-
players deep. Buoying Lavorato, however,
is the fact he is confident in the ability of
nearly every one of those nearly three-
dozen players.
“The area I have concern is our overall
depth. We just don’t have a lot of players,”
Lavorato said. “But when you look at our
team, there isn’t one kid who can’t play.
We’re fortunate that way. Our development
teams, we started a freshman team four years
ago, that really helped. We run the same
stuff on three teams (freshman, junior varsi-
ty and varsity). By the time they get to be
juniors, they know how to play. ”
Continued from page 11
GATORS
Coach: Pete Lavorato
2012 record:4-1 PAL Bay,13-1 overall,CCS DIV cham-
pion
Key returners: Andrew Segre (sr.,RB); Pat Finnigan
(sr., OL); Alex Castro (sr., OL); Ricky Grau (sr., UTL);
Chris Lee (sr., RB); Ben Burr-Kirven (sr., LB); Noah
Kawasaki (sr., DB); Paul Westcott (sr., DL).
Key newcomers: Mark Hardy (sr.,OL/LB); J.R.Hardy
(jr., LB); Griffin Kraemer (jr., RB); Mitch Martella (jr.,
WR); Will Reilly (sr., WR); Cole Marsh (jr., QB); Mason
Randle (so., QB); Andrew Daschbach (so.,TE).
2013 schedule (home games in CAPS): 9/6 @ Bran-
ham, 4:15 p.m.; 9/14 vs. MOUNTAIN VIEW, 1 p.m.;
9/20 @ Salinas, 7 p.m.; 9/27 @ King’s Acad-
emy, 7 p.m.; 10/4 @ Woodside, 7 p.m.;
10/18 @ Menlo-Atherton,7 p.m.; 10/25
vs. SOUTH CITY, 3 p.m.; 11/1 vs. SE-
QUOIA,2:45 p.m.;11/8 vs.TERRA NOVA,
2:45 p.m.;11/15 vs.Menlo School at Se-
quoia, 7 p.m.
Four ex-NFL players file
new suit on concussions
NEWORLEANS — Four former NFLplayers
have sued the league and its helmet maker,
claiming they hid information about the dan-
gers of brain injury. They want medical care for
past, current and future NFLplayers.
The ex-players — Jimmy Williams, Rich
Mauti, Jimmy Keyes and Nolan Franz — filed
the federal lawsuit in New Orleans on Sunday.
Last week, the NFLtentatively agreed to pay
$765 million to past players with health prob-
lems that can be caused by concussions, but
some said the amount should have been more.
James Dugan II, the attorney for the former
players bringing the new suit, did not immedi-
ately return a call and email seeking comment.
Neither the league nor helmet maker Riddell,
Inc. would comment Tuesday about the new
suit, which claims they failed to protect play-
ers from brain injuries. Riddell isn’t part of the
proposed settlement.
The players say they have suffered one or
more traumatic brain injuries. They want the
NFLand Riddell to set up and pay for a medical
monitoring and treatment program for all for-
mer, current and future NFLplayers.
Valley City State University), it’s safe to
say Menlo will take its lumps in the year’s
initial stages. But if anything, they’ll be
battle-tested by the time the conference
schedule kicks off.
Despite the harsh loss, the fact that Bell
found the end zone is a good thing. Bell had
a breakout freshman campaign and will be
expected to carry a big load for Grieb’s new
west coast offense. Bell ran for 561 yards on
65 carries for an 8.4 yards per carry average.
He also scored four touchdowns.
Joining him in the backfield is Michael
Alexander, who accounted for 11 of the
Oaks’ 38 touchdowns last season. Alexander
racked up 350 yards on the ground and 399
yards receiving.
Also looking to build off a solid 2012-13
campaign is junior running back Jake Fohn,
who appeared in all 10 games as a sopho-
more and scored a pair of touchdowns.
Returning to the backfield following a knee
injury last season is senior Thomas
Reynolds. In 2011-12, he was the Menlo
workhorse with a team-high 56 touches for
320 yards and three touchdowns.
The importance of the Menlo backfield
cannot be overstated as 2013-14 season
marks the beginning of the non-Matt
Pelesasa quarterback era.
Erik Peterson was the leader in the QB
clubhouse following camp. In 2012-13,
Peterson saw action in six games connect-
ing on 12 of 23 attempts for 139 yards and
a pair of touchdowns. Grieb is on the record
saying there are up to five different quarter-
backs competing for time with Peterson
inching ahead because of his experience
with the head coach’s offensive system.
The offense fueled the Oaks last season to
a 4-1 start — with scoring outputs of 41, 55
and 59 points in three of those games. But
they lost a lot of their magic down the
stretch, which led to five straight losses.
The same can be said about a defense that
needs to regain its form.
Gone is leading tackler Devon Jonsson,
but in his place is senior linebacker James
Yoder, who led the returning group with 49
total tackles, including six for loss. Right
behind Yoder is fellow senior Camyar
Meshkaty. The Beverly Hills native was a
stalwart on the Oaks defensive line with 42
tackles (eight for loss) and a team-best 4.5
sacks last season. Also huge for the Oaks
will be Angel Jimenez and Michele Canali,
who return nearly 40 tackles from a defen-
sive line that needs to be a major strength of
this Menlo team.
Unfortunately for the Oaks, the defense
didn’t quite show up last weekend.
With the loss, Menlo falls to 0-1 while
Carroll improves to 1-0. The Oaks return to
action Sept. 7 when they travel to Grand
Junction, Colo. for a meeting with Mesa
State College. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.
Continued from page 11
MENLO
Sports brief
NFL
ARIZONACARDINALS —Signed LB Kenny De-
mens,DTAnthonyMcCloudandWRSamMcGuffie
to the practice squad.
ATLANTAFALCONS —Signed OT Jeremy True-
blood.Waived OT Terren Jones. Reached an injury
settlement with G Phillipkeith Manley.
BUFFALOBILLS—Signed K Dan Carpenter.
CLEVELANDBROWNS —Agreed to terms with
K Billy Cundiff.Placed OL Jason Pinkston on injured
reserve/designated.
DALLAS COWBOYS —Acquired DE Caesar Ray-
fordfromIndianapolisfor anundiscloseddraft pick.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS —Signed TE Dominique
Jones from the practice squad. Signed TE Justice
Cunningham to the practice squad.
KANSASCITYCHIEFS—Placed S Sanders Com-
mings on injured reserve. Signed S Bradley
McDougald. Signed G Rishawn Johnson to the
practice squad.
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed G Danny Watkins to
a one-year contract.Waived C Josh Samuda.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS—SignedTEMatthew
Mulligan. Signed OT Jordan Devey and OT R.J. Dill
to the practice squad.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS —Signed WR Robert
Meachem to a one-year contract. Placed LB
Jonathan Vilma on injured reserve.
SANFRANCISCO49ERS—Signed TE Derek Car-
rier to the practice squad.
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • Sep. 4 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
650-354-1100
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 85 53 .616 —
Washington 70 68 .507 15
Philadelphia 63 76 .453 22 1/2
New York 62 75 .453 22 1/2
Miami 52 85 .380 32 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 81 57 .587 —
St. Louis 79 59 .572 2
Cincinnati 78 61 .561 3 1/2
Milwaukee 59 79 .428 22
Chicago 58 80 .420 23
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 83 55 .601 —
Arizona 69 68 .504 13 1/2
Colorado 65 75 .464 19
San Diego 62 76 .449 21
San Francisco 61 77 .442 22
Tuesday’sGames
Washington 9, Philadelphia 6
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Mets 1
Cincinnati 1, St. Louis 0
Miami 6, Chicago Cubs 2
Pittsburgh 4, Milwaukee 3
L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 4
Toronto 10, Arizona 4
San Diego 3, San Francisco 2
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 83 57 .593 —
Tampa Bay 76 61 .555 5 1/2
New York 74 64 .536 8
Baltimore 73 64 .533 8 1/2
Toronto 64 75 .460 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 81 58 .583 —
Cleveland 73 65 .529 7 1/2
Kansas City 72 66 .522 8 1/2
Minnesota 61 76 .445 19
Chicago 56 81 .409 24
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 80 58 .580 —
Oakland 79 59 .572 1
Los Angeles 64 73 .467 15 1/2
Seattle 62 76 .449 18
Houston 45 93 .326 35
Tuesday’sGames
Cleveland 4, Baltimore 3
N.Y.Yankees 6, Chicago White Sox 4
Boston 2, Detroit 1
Minnesota 9, Houston 6, 12 innings
Kansas City 4, Seattle 3
Toronto 10, Arizona 4
Tampa Bay 7, L.A. Angels 1
Texas 5, Oakland 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 3 1 0 .750 93 103
N.Y. Jets 3 1 0 .750 105 80
Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 84 101
Miami 2 3 0 .400 104 89
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 3 1 0 .750 98 67
Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 77 89
Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 90 89
Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 60 111
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 106 63
Cleveland 3 1 0 .750 75 68
Baltimore 2 2 0 .500 119 97
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 56 93
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 2 2 0 .500 71 104
Kansas City 2 2 0 .500 82 60
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 101
San Diego 1 3 0 .250 68 102
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 4 0 0 1.000 106 53
Philadelphia 2 2 0 .500 87 91
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 78 93
N.Y. Giants 1 3 0 .250 71 85
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 3 1 0 .750 97 80
Carolina 3 1 0 .750 92 68
Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 66 115
Atlanta 0 4 0 .000 65 108
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 3 1 0 .750 107 63
Chicago 2 2 0 .500 100 96
Green Bay 1 3 0 .250 37 71
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 67 104
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 0 0 1.000 110 36
San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 96 43
Arizona 3 1 0 .750 68 55
St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 76 94
NFL PRESEASON GLANCE
Thursday’sGame
Baltimoreat Denver, 5:30p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Atlantaat NewOrleans, 10a.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago, 10a.m.
NewEnglandat Buffalo, 10a.m.
Tennesseeat Pittsburgh, 10a.m.
TampaBay at N.Y. Jets, 10a.m.
Kansas City at Jacksonville, 10a.m.
Seattleat Carolina, 10a.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 10a.m.
Minnesotaat Detroit, 10a.m.
Oaklandat Indianapolis, 1p.m.
GreenBay at SanFrancisco, 1:25p.m.
Arizonaat St. Louis, 1:25p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 5:30p.m.
Monday’sGames
Philadelphiaat Washington, 4:10p.m.
Houstonat SanDiego, 7:20p.m.
TRANSACTIONS
vs. Astros
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/7 9/6
vs. Rangers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/4
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/5
vs. Arizona
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/6
@Padres
3:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/4
vs. Arizona
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/5
vs.Philly
8p.m.
ESPN2
9/8
vs.Vancouver
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/14
vs.Montreal
7p.m.
9/17
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
@Salt Lake
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/21
@ChivasUSA
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/9
NFL WEEK 1 SCHEDULE
CEO Russell Coutts, skipper Jimmy
Spithill and tactician John
Kostecki, were not implicated in the
scandal, which involved 45-foot
catamarans that were prototypes for
the 72-footers being sailed in the
America’s Cup regatta.
Coutts, a New Zealander who has
won the America’s Cup four times,
told The Associated Press it was an
“outrageous decision” by the jury.
“It sets an unbelievable precedent
ongoing,” Coutts said. “You could
think of lots of analogies. Think of
Olympic athletes on a team break-
ing the rules and a whole team get-
ting penalized. It’s completely out-
rageous.”
Coutts said de Ridder “has been a
fantastic team member and a fantas-
tic sailor for many, many years. I
think all the decisions are incredi-
bly harsh. I don’t think the evidence
supported the jury’s decision.”
Langford will replace de Ridder
trimming the 131-foot wing sail,
which looks and performs like an
airplane wing, helping to power the
boat to speeds in excess of 50 mph.
“He’s 22 years old but I’m sure
he’s going to do a fine job,” Coutts
said. “We have four days to get him
ready.”
According to the jury report,
Langford became aware last year
that weight had been added to two
boats, but that he did not consider
whether it might be a breach of the
rules.
The jury said Langford’s testimo-
ny was “honest” and that the panel
didn’t doubt his integrity.
“However, not knowing the rules
relating to a ‘one-design’ manufac-
turer’s class’ is not the conduct
required of a professional sailor,”
the jury said.
Coutts said having to win 11 races
to keep the Cup “obviously is
going to make it more difficult. The
fact that we have to rearrange crew at
last moment makes it more difficult.
But we’re going to be focused from
now on in the remaining four days
to get ready for this and get ready for
Saturday.”
Continued from page 11
SAILING
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — From an ace on the
first point to a stinging return on the
last, Serena Williams was close to
perfect in the U.S. Open quarterfi-
nals.
The score said it all: 6-0, 6-0.
Yes, Williams is looking better
and better with each match at the
year’s last Grand Slam tournament.
With two more wins — no matter the
exact scores — she’ll earn a fifth title
at Flushing Meadows and 17th major
championship overall.
The No. 1-ranked and No. 1-seeded
Williams shut out 18th-seeded Carla
Suarez Navarro of Spain, winning 53
of 71 points and dominating pretty
much every statistical category
Tuesday night. The first set took all
of 19 minutes. The second was slow-
er, lasting 33 minutes, but no less
lopsided.
In Friday’s semifinals, Williams
will play 2011 French Open champi-
on Li Na of China.
Asked in an on-court interview if
her game is peaking, Williams
replied: “No. Not yet. I hope not. I’m
just trying to do the best that I can.”
Well, that just happens to be rather
good. Through five matches,
Williams has dropped a total of 13
games so far. For comparison’s sake,
know this: Suarez Navarro lost more
games than that in her previous
match alone, 15, while eliminating
No. 8 Angelique Kerber.
That victory, and her seeding,
should have demonstrated that Suarez
Navarro is quite capable of playing
well, too. But not on this evening.
Not against Williams, who is 65-4
with eight titles in 2013. Going back
to the start of Wimbledon last year,
the 31-year-old American is 96-5
with 13 trophies, including from
three of the past five Grand Slam tour-
naments plus the London Olympics.
Serena cruises into
semis at U.S. Open
vs. Packers
1:25p.m.
FOX
9/8
@Seattle
5:30p.m.
NBC
9/15
vs. Colts
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/22
@Rams
5:25p.m.
NFLNetwork
9/26
vs. Texans
5:30p.m.
NBC
10/6
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Colts
10a.m.
CBS
9/8
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/15
@Denver
5:40p.m.
ESPN
9/23
vs.Redskins
1:25p.m.
FOX
9/29
vs. Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/6
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
bye
10/13
vs. Arizona
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/7
vs. Arizona
1:5p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/8
vs. Rockies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/9
vs. Rockies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/10
vs.Astros
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/8
@Twins
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/10
@Twins
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/11
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
16
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
community trust in the decision-makers.
Rakesh Hegde: Both Belmont and
Redwood Shores communities have unique
challenges, but on the whole all the seven
schools in the district provide quality educa-
tion that our kids deserve. The capacity issue
due to high enrollments needs to be solved
to ensure that the kids go to their neighbor-
hood schools.
Amy Koo: The message of seven schools
one district is a unifying theme, but
Belmont and Redwood Shores are two differ-
ent communities and more should be done to
acknowledge the differences and account for
them in district policies, communication
messages and methods and task force selec-
tion criteria.
Herb Neuman: The district seeks to treat
both communities fairly and frequently
achieves that goal. The recent surprise
announcement targeting certain Shores
kindergartners for displacement from a
neighborhood school followed by an equal-
ly surprising reversal serve to undermine our
residents’ trust in the fairness and thought-
fulness of the trustees’ decision-making.
Naomi Ni shi moto: As a school district,
we are one community. However, because the
district has made decisions based on short-
term solutions and then failing to clearly
communicate its decisions, both communi-
ties have felt neglected. Envisioning long-
term goals and improving communication
should be a top priority for any prospective
board member.
Charles Vel schow: Given that huge
mistakes were made years ago (the selling of
district land in the ’80s when enrollment
dropped), fairly well. The district and com-
munity has built two schools, received
matching funds to expand Redwood Shores
Elementary, with room for growth. We need
to communicate better with all community
members.
Kelly Redmon: I think the district has
done a decent job balancing the needs of
both of these communities, but I believe
there’s a lot more work to be done. One way
to help strengthen the bond between these
two communities would be to improve com-
munication and transparency with all com-
munities.
Do you agree with the Common
Core standards?
Suvarna Bhopale: Yes. The Common
Core curriculum is designed to teach students
skills relevant to succeed in higher educa-
tion, career and life. These K-12 learning
standards delve deeper into key concepts in
math and English language arts and require
students to apply acquired knowledge, rather
than master multiple-choice tests.
Rakesh Hegde: I think Common Core
standards, if implemented correctly, ensure
that no matter where the students live, they
are equally skilled and equipped to compete
with their peers globally. It is also impor-
tant that the transition phase is coupled with
well-equipped instructional materials and
adequate training for the staff.
Amy Koo: Yes. I believe Common Core
will enable everyone who has an influence
on a child’s education to be on the same page
regarding expectations no matter where they
live, but allows local jurisdictions and
teachers themselves to create the content
and curriculum that best fits their students’
needs.
Herb Neuman: Since 1997, California
has led the country in adopting statewide
academic content standards for English-lan-
guage arts and mathematics. These standards
have helped our students succeed academical-
l y. I anticipate the Common Core standards,
once fully implemented, will similarly be
leveraged by teachers and families to the
benefit of our children.
Naomi Ni shi moto: I agree with the
concept of the Common Core Standards
because students are required to think and
reason more than before. The new standards
emphasize the need for students to under-
stand and explain their answers.
Charl es Vel s chow: Yes, they are a
marked improvement over the previous state
standards. Common Core requires more crit-
ical thinking, cross curricular analysis and
align with international benchmarks. The
board must support professional develop-
ment to ensure their implementation, they
will be a welcome challenge for our students.
Kelly Redmon: Yes. Finally standards
that make sense, are achievable, increase
rigor, prepare students for college and
careers and allow for teacher creativity.
These are a breath of fresh air compared the
other standards we’ve had to use.
What curriculum changes would you
like to see at the district?
Suvarna Bhopale: We must ensure that
students at all levels, from those who have
special needs to those in the GATE (gifted
and talented) program, receive a high-quali-
ty education. Though the state has eliminat-
ed funding for GATE, teachers must be
encouraged to provide differentiated instruc-
tion to GATE students within the mainstream
classroom.
Rakesh Hegde: While we are in the tran-
sition phase to the Common Core standards
and a new curriculum is being rolled out, I
would like to see a larger emphasis on
engaging the students in the STEM areas,
which will build a solid foundation for quali-
ty education.
Amy Koo: I would like to see more sup-
port for specialized programs such as GATE
or language immersion. Children are pas-
sionate about different things and should be
given an opportunity to excel in the areas
they are passionate about; these programs
can be located at one school to serve the dis-
trict’s students.
Herb Neuman: Our children will compete
in a global economy and the district must
focus on math, science and engineering. The
district talks about “21st Century
Education,” but in 2011, only 4 percent of
the $2 million from measures G and U was
spent on these areas. That is not good
enough.
Naomi Ni shi moto: In general BRSSD
has a great curriculum, in part due to the sup-
port of the PTA, education foundation and
general public. But there’s always room for
improvement and that’s a discussion I would
love to start with the teachers.
Charles Vel schow: Long term: further
implementation and strengthening of STEM
programs, an organized GATE program,
summer enrichment for EL and at-risk stu-
dents and a districtwide standard for second
language development for all students
beginning in elementary school.
Kelly Redmon: With Common Core,
there will be some curriculum changes. But
this is a question that needs the input of the
teachers, the master’s of curriculum. They
should be the ones telling us what’s work-
ing, what isn’t working and what additional
resources they need.
Do you think the Local Contro l
Funding Formula will have a positive
or negative impact on the district?
Suvarna Bhopale: Unclear. LCFF pro-
vides districts with greater control over their
budgets and more money to districts with
high numbers of economically disadvan-
taged, English-learners or foster children.
Because LCFF will replace the basic aid/rev-
enue limit distinction, the budgetary impact
on BRSSD is undetermined — another rea-
son to renew the parcels.
Rakesh Hegde: LCFF will shift control
over spending and budgeting from state to
districts. While this gives more control to
the district, it is designed to give more
money to disadvantaged schools. This may
mean lesser funds for BRSSD. As the
specifics of LCFF are rolled out, the impact
will be clearer.
Amy Koo: The impact can be positive.
As a basic aid district where per pupil fund-
ing is decreasing as enrollment increases,
the district may revisit the decision to
remain basic aid. Involving all stakeholders
in creating an annual accountability plan per
LCFF priorities will improve transparency
in decision making and stakeholder engage-
ment.
Herb Neuman: Simply by replacing the
current funding system, LCF could be a net
positive. LCF increases state spending for
education with potentially more money for
our district in the coming years. Overall
state funding will not fall below 2012 lev-
els. The required Local Accountability Plans
could drive meaningful community involve-
ment.
Naomi Ni shi moto: I think it will have a
positive impact on the district since it gives
the district flexibility and more control on
how to best use the funding for our schools’
needs.
Charles Vel schow: If enrollment con-
tinues to grow, in five years or more we
should benefit from LCFF, as we move out of
basic aid status and revenue limit districts
are funded appropriately. However, one pro-
jection has BRSSD second to last in per
pupil spending countywide under LCFF in
the short term.
Kelly Redmon: Overall, I believe the
LCFF will help lift California up from our
low ranking. It is exciting that our own
community will have the freedom and
responsibility to make decisions about
where our money should be spent. That
being said, the new formula probably will
reduce current funds. No matter what the out-
come, I think it will be important to truly
involve all members of our community;
there must be public transparency.
Continued from page 1
BRSSD
Patterson currently oversees a department of about 130
employees with a budget of about $25 million annually or
more depending on capital projects the city undertakes.
The city has about 500 employees with a total budget of
about $160 million. Patterson’s appointment comes shortly
after the hiring of Rory Walsh as the city’s interim communi-
ty development director and a council decision to hire an audi-
tor to probe the city’s CDD. Walsh replaces Lisa Grote, whose
last day with the city is today.
The CDD has hit some bumps of late, including Grote’s
departure, the resignation of two other key Planning Division
employees and the decision to conduct a management audit.
Both came after the City Council ruled that the controversial
7-Eleven on San Mateo Drive was erroneously permitted to
operate and the city was sued.
Patterson studied civil engineering and has an extensive
public and private sector experience.
Continued from page 1
PATTERSON
FOOD 17
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: September 30, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
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iLoveJacks.com
By Jim Romanoff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rosh Hashana typically is a solidly
autumnal holiday, falling sometimes as late
as October. But this year, the Jewish New
Year comes early — the first week of
September, a time when summer’s bounty is
still fresh for much of the country.
“It’s a gift,” says kosher chef Laura
Frankel, executive chef for Wolfgang Puck
Kosher Catering in Chicago. The holiday
falling at the height of the harvest season
presents an abundance of culinary opportu-
nities for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur
cooking, she explains.
The timing presents cooks with com-
pletely different choices in terms of what
foods — particularly produce — are in the
markets.
Frankel says her cooking theme this year
is clean and simple because the produce will
be fresh and ripe. Rather than the tradition-
al cooked borscht soup made with late sea-
son beets, she’ll be serving salads with
thinly sliced raw beets. For desserts, she’ll
do simple fresh fruit galettes with an olive
oil and egg yolk pastry crust. Whatever
looks best in the markets will help guide her
in developing the menu.
Because the holiday is early, for example,
there will be fewer varieties of apples (a sta-
ple of the holiday) than usual, but more
stone fruits, tomatoes and eggplants, she
says.
The careful choice of Rosh Hashana foods
is significant, because like most Jewish
holidays, which are all in some way tied to
the agricultural calendar, foods are an impor-
tant part of the celebration and are loaded
with symbolism.
The typical Rosh Hashana meal is filled
with sweet foods, such as apples and honey,
to represent the hope for a sweet year to
come. Enjoying newly harvested fruits is
also important, as is offering a round chal-
lah loaf studded with sweet dried fruit, which
some think symbolizes the cyclical nature
of life or perhaps the crown that marks God
as the king of the world.
This high holiday has come to represent
the beginning of the new harvest year. And
that has deep meaning for David and Jamie
Baker, who gave up a high-end lifestyle on
the North Shore of Chicago to start
Primrose Valley Farm in South Central
Wisconsin. The organic farm, which also
has a kosher cooking facility, sells commu-
nity sustained agriculture (CSA) shares to
locals and provides over 5,000 pounds of
produce a year to The Ark in Chicago, which
offers assistance to members of the city’s
Jewish community.
David Baker said that their lives always
have been centered around the kitchen and
the cycles of the holidays; family life and
planting and growing food have always
been a significant part of his family’s spiri-
tual life.
Baker and his wife watched as the coun-
try’s trend toward eating healthier foods
grew into a system of corporate farms and
high-priced natural food markets that
depended on huge amounts of resources. So
what started as an interest in backyard gar-
dening to grow their own food turned into a
mission to “repair the world” through com-
munity sustained agriculture, says Baker.
The Bakers celebrate Rosh Hashana with
several families in their community, includ-
ing a rabbi, by having a “seder” (a celebra-
Rosh Hashana comes early with fresh possibilities
The typical Rosh Hashana meal is filled with sweet foods,such as apples and honey,to represent
the hope for a sweet year to come.
See FRESH, Page 18
18
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD
tory meal more often associated with
Passover) at which a symbolic plate of
foods is at the center of the table. As with
Passover, these foods help tell the story
of the significance of the holiday.
Few Jewish families celebrate Rosh
Hashana with this kind of seder, but for
the Baker’s it helps close the circle on
their agriculturally centered lives. The
seder plate will hold many foods typically
included at Rosh Hashana, such as leeks,
spinach and potatoes, but also will have
some vegetables that were particularly
abundant in this year’s harvest at
Primrose Valley Farm.
The rabbi, says Baker, will say a tradi-
tional prayer over each food, then offer
his thoughts on how the food fits into
their lives running the farm and nourish-
ing members of the community.
Laura Frankel also sees the Jewish high
holy days — which start with Rosh
Hashana and end with Yom Kippur (a day
of atonement) — as a time for reflection,
new beginnings and always an opportuni-
ty for learning something new.
This year, rather than relying on culi-
nary creativity to turn late harvest pro-
duce into a great meal, she’s committed to
letting the foods speak for themselves.
She sees this holiday as an opportunity
for cooks to learn to do less to their foods
rather than rely on complicated recipes.
Her Rosh Hashana lamb or brisket will
be roasted and served with a “butter” made
by cooking down fresh beets and apples.
To break the Yom Kippur fast she might
offer an heirloom tomato gazpacho soup.
Frankel encourages home cooks to take
advantage of whatever fruits, vegetables
and herbs are at the height of freshness in
their area.
This caramelized onion, eggplant and
heirloom tomato tart is made with an
olive oil crust and can be served alongside
meat or poultry for Rosh Hashana, or
served cold or at room temperature as part
of a Yom Kippur fast breaking.
Date and honey zucchini bread has dual
holiday suitability as well. Serve it as a
Rosh Hashana dessert, or perhaps spread
with a little cream cheese as part of a light
Yom Kippur break-fast dairy meal.
CARAMELIZED ONION, EGGPLANT
AND HEIRLOOM TOMATO TART
Start to finish: 2 hours
Servings: 8
For the crust:
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, chilled in
the freezer for 1 hour
4 tablespoons ice water
For the filling:
Olive oil cooking spray
1 3/4 pounds small eggplants, peel and
cut into 1/2-inch-thick rounds
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 cups thinly sliced red onions (about 3
large)
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
4 heirloom tomatoes (multiple colors),
cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
Fresh basil leaves, to garnish
To make the crust, in a large bowl whisk
together flour and salt. Add chilled olive
oil and using clean hands or a fork, mix
until the oil is incorporated and the mix-
ture is the consistency of small peas. Add
the ice water and mix until dough has just
formed. Shaped into a 6-inch disk, wrap
tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for
at least 1 hour.
Meanwhile, prepare the filling.
Position an oven rack in the middle of the
oven. Heat the oven to 375 F. Coat a large
baking sheet with olive oil cooking
spray.
Mist the eggplant rounds with cooking
spray, then season both sides of each
slice with salt and pepper. Arrange the
eggplants slices in a single layer on the
prepared baking sheet. Bake for 30 min-
utes, or until soft and golden brown.
Remove from the oven and set aside.
While the eggplant cooks, in a large
saucepan over medium, heat the olive oil.
Add the onions and saute until softened
and translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in 1
teaspoon salt and the thyme, then reduce
heat to low. Cook, stirring occasionally
so the onions don’t burn, until very soft
and browned, about another 30 minutes.
Stir in the vinegar and remove from heat.
Mist an 11-inch springform tart pan (or
a tart pan with a removable bottom) with
cooking spray.
On a clean, floured surface using a
floured rolling pin, roll the chilled dough
into a 13-inch circle. Transfer the dough
to the tart pan and fold in and press
together the overhanging dough to build
up the edges. If the dough tears or breaks,
simply piece it together and press it into
the pan.
Spread the onion mixture in an even
layer over the bottom of the tart. Add an
even layer of the eggplant. Top with
tomato slices arranged in an overlapping
circular pattern. Spray the top of the tart
with olive oil cooking spray, then season
with salt and pepper.
Bake until the crust is golden and the
tomatoes are slightly browned, about 45
minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a
rack. Remove the outer ring of the pan and
transfer the tart to a serving plate. Slice
into 8 wedges and serve warm, at room
temperature or chilled. Serve garnished
with torn basil leaves.
Nutrition information per serving: 340
calories; 160 calories from fat (47 percent
of total calories); 18 g fat (2.5 g saturat-
ed; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 41 g
carbohydrate; 7 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 6 g pro-
tein; 610 mg sodium.
DATE AND HONEY ZUCCHINI BREAD
Start to finish: 1 1/2 hours
Servings: 10
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more
for dusting the pan
1 1/2 cups white whole-wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking powder?
1 teaspoon baking soda?
1 teaspoon kosher salt?
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg?
3 eggs
1 cup honey
1 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups packed shredded zucchini (not
peeled)
1 cup coarsely chopped medjool dates
Set a rack in the center of the oven. Heat
the oven to 350 F. Mist a Bundt pan with
baking spray.
In medium bowl, whisk together both
flours, the baking powder, baking soda,
salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Set aside.
In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until
well beaten. Stir in the honey, oil and
vanilla, then fold in the zucchini.
Add dry ingredients and chopped dates
to the zucchini mixture. Stir just until the
dry ingredients are just moistened. Do not
over mix.
Pour the batter into the prepared bundt
pan. Bake until a toothpick inserted at the
center of the loaf comes out clean and dry,
50 to 60 minutes. Let cool in the pan for
10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack
to cool completely. Serve warm or at
room temperature.
Nutrition information per serving: 510
calories; 210 calories from fat (41 percent
of total calories); 24 g fat (2 g saturated;
0.5 g trans fats); 55 mg cholesterol; 71 g
carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 40 g sugar; 7 g
protein; 400 mg sodium.
Continued from page 17
FRESH
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
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By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Most people know challah — a
Jewish egg bread — as a braided loaf.
But truth is, it can take on a variety of
shapes. And at Rosh Hashana it often
is formed into a spiral, which is meant
to symbolize the circle and continuity
of the Jewish new year.
To make this delicious celebratory
bread a little easier, we gave our ver-
sion of spiral challah a boost thanks
to a bit of help from baking powder.
And to make it easier to shape — and
faster to bake — we divided the large
loaf into mini rolls shaped in muffin
tins. The result tastes like challah, but
looks like a beautiful popover.
If desired, you can add raisins to the
spirals, then drizzle them with honey
after they come out of the oven for a
great breakfast.
SPEEDY CHALLAH
MUFFIN SPIRALS
Start to finish: 2 1/2 hours (30 min-
utes active)
Servings: 16
2/3 cup warm water
4 whole eggs, room temperature
3 egg yolks, room temperature
1/2 cup vegetable or canola oil
2 tablespoons honey
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons instant yeast
4 1/2 to 5 cups all-purpose flour
For the egg wash:
1 egg
1 tablespoon water
In the bowl of a stand mixer, com-
bine the water, 4 whole eggs, 3 egg
yolks, oil, honey, salt, baking pow-
der, yeast and 4 1/2 cups of flour. Mix
on low speed for 6 to 8 minutes, or
until the dough is smooth and elastic.
The dough should be very soft and
slightly sticky. If it feels too sticky,
add the remaining flour 2 tablespoons
at a time.
Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and
allow to rise in a warm place for 45
minutes.
Dump the dough out onto the counter
and divide into 16 even pieces. Roll
each piece into a 12-inch long snake.
Spray a muffin tin with cooking
spray. Spiral 1 dough snake into each
muffin cup. Cover the muffin tin loose-
ly with plastic wrap and allow to rise
again in a warm place for another 45
minutes, or until puffy.
After the dough has risen for 30 min-
utes, heat the oven to 375 F.
To prepare the egg wash, in a small
bowl beat together the egg and water
until frothy. Brush gently over the spi-
rals, then bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or
until cooked through and golden
brown. Transfer to a rack to cool.
Traditional challah
in fast-bake format
A baked apple that is
healthy, fast, festive
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like many Jewish holidays, Rosh Hashana — the
Jewish new year — is rich with delicious, symbolic
foods. Rounds of challah bread, for example, signify
continuity, while apples and honey represent wishes for
a sweet year to come. Of course, just as important is
spending time with loved ones.
So we created a dish to satisfy both the traditional
food customs and the desire to spend time with family.
Baked stuffed apples have the both the honey and the
apples for the sweetness, yet take little effort to make.
The method is so simple, even the children can help.
Adults can core the apples while the kids make the fill-
ing and stuff them. Let them get their hands dirty by
breaking the walnuts, chopping the dates (if they’re old
enough), and mixing the filling by kneading it togeth-
er in a bowl. The result is a sweet and satisfying dessert
that isn’t laden with butter.
Taking cues from the Mediterranean, we flavored the
filling with orange and mint. It makes for a great con-
trast to the otherwise sweet blend of honey and dates. If
you don’t have (or don’t like) dates, other dried fruit will
work just as well. Try dried chopped apricots or raisins.
The same goes for the walnuts. Substitute another vari-
ety of nut or leave them out altogether.
BAKED HONEY-DATE APPLES
Start to finish: 1 hour (15 minutes active)
Servings: 6
6 baking apples, such as Fuji or Gala
1/2 cup walnuts, toasted and broken
3/4 cup chopped dates
Zest of 1 orange
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint
Heat the oven to 350 F. Mist a 9-by-9-inch baking
pan with cooking spray.
Core the apples using an apple corer or a melon baller,
leaving the apple otherwise whole. Scoop out a little
bit of extra apple at the center to create a cavity inside
about the size of a walnut. Arrange the apples standing
upright in the prepared pan.
In a medium bowl, combine the walnuts, dates, orange
zest, honey and mint. Knead the mixture together with
your hands until it is well combined. Spoon some of the
mixture into the cavity of each the apple, packing it
into the center. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until the
apple is tender when pierced with the tip of a paring
knife.
Nutrition information per serving: 260 calories; 60
calories from fat (23 percent of total calories); 7 g fat
(0.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 54 g
carbohydrate; 8 g fiber; 43 g sugar; 3 g protein; 0 mg
sodium.
If desired, you can add raisins to the spirals, then drizzle them with honey after they come out of the oven for breakfast.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday • Sept. 4 , 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 4
Social Networking Session:
Facebook. 10:30 a.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Learn about this popular
social networking site, including
how to create your own account.
Previous computer basics and word
processing or equivalent suggested.
Free. For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Osteoporosis support group. 11
a.m. to noon. Mills Health Center, 100
S. San Mateo Drive, San Mateo. Free.
Drop-in. For more information call
654-9966.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Free resume and cover letter
workshop. 2 p.m. San Mateo Main
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Presented by PeninsulaWorks and
the San Mateo Public Library. To reg-
ister call 522-7818. For more infor-
mation contact Eric Groth at
egroth@cityofsanmateo.org.
Teen Gaming. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Xbox or Wii gaming for
ages 12 to 19. Free. For more infor-
mation contact conrad@smcl.org.
The Club Fox Blues Jam. 6:30 p.m.
to 11 p.m. The Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. Featuring
Junior Watson and other guests.
Tickets are $5. For more information
go to www.rwcbluesjam.com.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 5
Peninsula Volunteers Inc.,
Information Session for all New
Volunteers. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Lucy Uhl Room, Little House, 800
Middle Ave., Menlo Park. For more
information call 322-0129.
Kings Mountain Art Fair 50th
Anniversary. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Kings
Mountain Community Center, 13889
Skyline Blvd., Woodside. For more
information go to kingsmoun-
tainartfair.org.
Groovy Judy and Pete. 6:30 p.m. to
8 p.m. Off the Grid Market,
Burlingame Caltrain Station (south
parking lot on California and
Carmelita avenues), Burlingame. For
more information go to
www.groovyjudy.com.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights. Plays until
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
Movies on the Square: ‘Short
Circuit.’ 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
780-7311 or go to www.redwoodci-
ty.org/events/movies.html.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 6
Structure Straws: Soda-Straw
Architecture. 10 a.m. to noon.
College of San Mateo Library, 1700
W. Hillsdale Blvd., building nine, San
Mateo. Learn about the basic build-
ing blocks of architecture and help
build a geodesic dome out of soda
straws. Free. For more information
call 574-6232.
Free First Fridays at the San Mateo
County History Museum. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. There will be two programs
planned for children without fees. At
2 p.m., museum docents will lead
tours of the museum for adults. Free.
For more information call 299-0104
or go to www.historysmc.org.
Bustamante Antique Show and
Sale. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fiesta Hall, San
Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Browse
antiques and collectibles ranging
from 17th century tapestries to art
nouveau and jewelry. Admission is
$8, $5 for seniors or students.
Children 12 and under are free.
Parking is $10 per vehicle. Show con-
tinues on Saturday and Sunday. For
more information go to www.busta-
mante-shows.com.
‘Beyond the Walls at Fioli.’ 2 p.m.
Meet at the San Mateo Garden
Center, 605 Parkside Way, San Mateo.
Garden Study Club of the Peninsula.
Tom Davids will lead ‘Beyond the
Walls at Fiolli.’ There will be tea and
cookies after the program. Free. For
more information call 365-6191.
Two New Exhibits Opening at
Pacific Art League. 5:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. Pacific Art League of Palo Alto,
227 Forest Ave., Palo Alto. The Pacific
Art League of Palo Alto (PAL) will
host two new exhibitions, ‘Water
Media on Paper’ and local photogra-
pher Judy Kramer’s solo exhibit.
Refreshments will be served. Free.
For more information email front-
desk@pacificartleague.org.
International Gem and Jewelry
Show. Noon to 6 p.m. Expo Hall, San
Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. View a
large selection of gems and jewelry
and have access to special show
pricing. Children under 8 years old
are not permitted. Admission is $8
for the three day show (continuing
Saturday and Sunday). Advanced
tickets are $6 at
www.ticketderby.com. Parking is $10
per vehicle. For more information go
to www.intergem.com.
Music on the Square: Native
Elements. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation go to
redwoodcity.org/events.
Puzzles for Fun at Reach And
Teach. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Reach And
Teach, 144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo.
Have fun with jigsaw puzzles,
Sudoku, wood puzzles and other
brain-teasers at Reach And Teach.
Free and fun for all ages. For more
information email
craig@reachandteach.com.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
The Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents ‘The Tragedy
of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.’
7:30 p.m. Cameron’s Outback, 1410
Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay.
Tickets are $20, $15 for students and
seniors. For more information email
halfmoonbayshakes@gmail.com or
go to hmbshakespeare.org.
Architecture Lecture Series. 8 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. The lecture series
will feature leading pioneers in
architecture who have had a signifi-
cant impact on design and built
environment. For more information
call 522-7818.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights. Plays until
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 7
‘Rides for Lives’ Car Show to
Benefit Peninsula Humane
Society Animals. 9 a.m. There will be
music, lunch for $5, a raffle and
People’s Choice Awards. Registering
a show vehicle is $20, but the event
is free for spectators. Donations are
encouraged. PHS/SPPCA will bring
adoptable dogs to the event. For
more information email
ttp.nrcc@yahoo.com or call 888-
8313.
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. Central
Recreation Center and Park, 50 E.
Fifth Ave., San Mateo. Walkers enjoy
one-hour walks with physician vol-
unteers and can ask questions about
general health topics along the way.
Free. To sign up visit
www.smcma.org.
International Gem and Jewelry
Show. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Expo Hall,
San Mateo County Event Center,
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo.
View a large selection of gems and
jewelry and have access to special
show pricing. Children under 8 years
old are not permitted. Admission is
$8 for the three day show (Friday
through Sunday). Advanced tickets
are $6 at www.ticketderby.com.
Parking is $10 per vehicle. For more
information go to
www.intergem.com.
Mountain View Art and Wine
Festival. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Castro
Street, between El Camino Real and
Evelyn Avenue, Mountain View. The
festival will include live music, arts
and crafts, festive food and drink, the
Comcast Pigskin Party Lounge with
a large TV, organic and green prod-
ucts showcase, health and wellness
displays, home and garden exhibits,
a NASA Mars Rover Curiosity exhibit,
climbing wall, bungee jump, hula
hoops and carnival rides. Free. For
more information call 968-8378.
Bustamante Antique Show and
Sale. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fiesta Hall, San
Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Browse
antiques and collectibles ranging
from 17th century tapestries to art
nouveau and jewelry. Admission is
$8, $5 for seniors or students.
Children 12 and under are free.
Parking is $10 per vehicle Show con-
tinues on Sunday. For more informa-
tion go to www.bustamante-
shows.com.
Dad and Me at the Library. 2 p.m.
Foster City Library, 1000 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information go to www.fatherhood-
collaborative.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
votes on it. Hill’s office claimed taxpay-
er-financed nonprofit groups have lax
transparency and financial disclosure
rules that leaves the public in the dark.
“The goal of this legislation is and
has been to ensure that taxpayer dollars
are not being used for campaign activity
and to increase transparency of cam-
paign contributions from taxpayer
financed nonprofit organizations,” Hill
wrote the Daily Journal in an email yes-
terday.
The League of California Cities’ mis-
sion is to expand and protect local con-
trol for cities and is supported by fees
from its members.
It has challenged the state in court in
recent years over its dismantling of
redevelopment agencies and has raised
money to support ballot measures that
protect city money.
CITIPAC, the League’s political
action committee established in 2003,
supports the ballot measure and other
advocacy activities of importance to
cities, according to the league.
In 2004, CITIPAC helped raise private
funds needed to support the league’s
effort to pass Proposition 1Aand again
in 2010 with the passage of
Proposition 22. Both propositions
amended the state Constitution to end
state raids on local funds.
The amendments will continue to
allow nonprofits to have political
action committees and to support ballot
measures or candidates with funds from
those committees, although the League
of California Cities does not support
candidates.
Nonprofit organizations such as the
league that receive 20 percent or more of
their annual operating budgets from
public resources and that participate in
campaign activities must file reports
detailing sources of funds for campaign
activities with the Franchise Tax Board,
not the attorney general as originally
proposed in Hill’s union-backed legis-
lation.
The reports must be filed under the fol-
lowing circumstances:
• When expenditures on state meas-
ures/candidates exceed $50,000 in a
quarter or $100,000 in a calendar year;
• When expenditures on local meas-
ures/candidates that exceed $2,500 in a
quarter or $10,000 in a calendar year
quarter.
The Franchise Tax Board may conduct
discretionary audits under the legisla-
tion and mandatory audits occur after an
annual expenditure in excess of
$500,000. Violations are subject to
civil fines of $10,000 per violation.
Cities and counties spent nearly $100
million last year on lobbying, accord-
ing to Hill’s office.
In response to a similar allegation
made by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers
Association against the league and oth-
ers, the Fair Political Practices
Commission ruled in November 2009,
after a one-year investigation, that
there was no evidence that public funds
were used to make political contribu-
tions by the organizations, according
to the league.
The league challenged the bill because
it would have prevented it from speak-
ing out on potential ballot measures
that may harm or even help cities and
prevent it from taking positions on bal-
lot measures introduced by the
Legislature.
“If we don’t stand up for cities, who
can?” the league’s McKenzie said.
Continued from page 1
BILL
safety regulations and reforms at the
California Public Utilities
Commission.
“We had to step up, even as a small
town,” Ruane said at the event. “This
could have been prevented.”
Eight people died as a result of a
Pacific Gas and Electric pipeline explo-
sion and fire, while 66 people were
injured on Sept. 9, 2010 in the
Crestmoor neighborhood. The explo-
sion and resulting shock wave regis-
tered as a magnitude 1.1 earthquake and
forever changed the city.
In late August, it was revealed that
PG&E used flawed documents to improp-
erly declare two Peninsula natural-gas
pipelines safe, according to state regu-
lators. Last fall, when regulators dug up
the connector line in San Carlos,
known as Line 147, to repair a minor
leak, workers discovered that the pipe
was of lesser quality than company
records indicated. There were several
stretches of pipe that had a problematic
type of welded seam.
“When I heard, I thought, here we go
again,” Ruane said. “It’s disgusting. A
lot of this stuff is coming to the surface
now and it’s frustrating because we’re
the ones who lost eight people and are
rebuilding a neighborhood.”
Moving forward, the maximum fine
and penalty against PG&E is $3.8 bil-
lion, which is $2.45 billion after-tax
dollars.
“We cannot bring back the innocent
lives tragically lost at the hands of
PG&E and the CPUC, but we can make
sure the legacy of the tragic disaster in
San Bruno becomes an opportunity to
prevent future negligence by PG&E and
stronger, active oversight by the
CPUC,” Ruane said in a statement. “The
PG&E disaster in San Bruno, and the
failure of state regulators, must serve as
a wake-up call for PG&E, the CPUC and
state elected leaders to put public safety
first over utility profits and cozy rela-
tionships between utilities and those
responsible to regulate them.”
Additionally, of the 17 homes that
were badly damaged, 15 have completed
repairs, one is nearly complete after a
total rebuild and one home has complet-
ed repairs but has not finalized the build-
ing permit. The city hopes reconstruc-
tion of homes in vacant lots owned by
San Bruno and PG&E will begin next
year.
The city is also completing full recon-
struction of the infrastructure in the
entire neighborhood. Replacement of
water, sewer and stormwater infrastruc-
ture in the immediate fire damaged area
was completed last spring. The under-
ground infrastructure replacement is
expected to be completed in spring
2014. All the infrastructure work is
being funded by the Crestmoor
(Glenview) Trust Fund established by
the city and PG&E.
The last piece of reconstruction work
will be replacement of the curb, gutter
and sidewalk throughout the neighbor-
hood. There will also be repaving of the
streets and a new streetlight system.
There will be a remembrance service at
the explosion site on Monday, Sept. 9
from 6 p.m.-7 p.m. at Claremont and
Glenview drives. Light refreshments
and beverages will be served in celebra-
tion of families who have completed
reconstruction and are returning home.
For more information on the rebuild
effort visit rebuildcrestmoor.org.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
invalidation in the event of testing
irregularities was fully disclosed to
MHS students and their parents, the
School District and MHS officials, in
the AP Manual, the AP Bulletin and the
AP Participation Form. For their part,
Defendants investigated the MHS stu-
dent’s allegations of seating irregulari-
ties and confirmed through discussions
with MHS officials that such irregulari-
ties did, in fact, occur.”
The case moved from San Mateo
County Superior Court to federal court
because College Board and ETS feared
bias against New York corporations in a
California court of law.
College Board offered students the
opportunity to retake the APexams this
summer, but some were staunchly
against the retake based on principle.
Jennifer Kao, one of the Mills APstu-
dents who is now attending University
of California at Berkeley, helped lead
the fight to get scores back, said leader-
ship has mostly been passed on to par-
ents. She didn’t retake the six AP tests
that were thrown out this past spring
and she said she is going to be retaking
a lot of classes. “I know for a fact that I
didn’t cheat; they can’t just arbitrarily
treat schools differently,” Kao said,
adding that she and others are looking
into emergency legislation
for an appeals process to get
scores back through the polit-
ical route. “We worked so hard
for those AP tests. What kind
of lesson are they [College
Board] trying to teach us stu-
dents? They’re just trying to
protect their own interests.”
Back on July 17, the dis-
trict reported that ETS invali-
dated tests in 11 AP subjects
taken by 286 students this
past May because of seating
irregularities. The Mills
investigation stemmed from a
complaint issued by a student
on May 13.
Mills High School parent
and former Millbrae council-
man Paul Seto said the parents
haven’t formally discussed
further actions at this point,
and with some of the students
already off at college, the par-
ents really haven’t gotten
together. He said he himself
needs some time to think a
lawsuit, or other further
action, through.
Continued from page 1
MILLS
COMICS/GAMES
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Weekend’s PUZZLe sOLVed
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Angrily
10 Inheritance
12 Kidded around
13 Threat ender (2 wds.)
14 Barn babies
15 Grant territory
16 Less than one
18 Mantra chants
19 Occult fgure
22 Bicker
25 Piece of china
29 Lariat
30 Rani’s garments
32 Lawn pests
33 Fridge maker
34 Checked out
37 Trouser accessories
38 Open shoe
40 Winter mo.
43 Charlotte of “Bananas”
44 Cash advance
48 Passionate
50 Sharply
52 Duration
53 Rock band crew member
54 Dog owner’s purchase
55 Furtive sound
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2 Mellowed
3 Sled pullers
4 Mac rivals
5 Practical question
6 Fjord port
7 Those people
8 Rents
9 NFL gains
10 — cit. (footnote abbr.)
11 Itches
12 Pretty, in Paris
17 Gomez’s hairy cousin
20 Dough raisers
21 Greenish melon
22 Branch
23 Mob scene
24 Nor’easter
26 Delicate blossoms
27 Europe-Asia range
28 Carton of milk
31 Stockholm carrier
35 Mother —
36 Spiral molecule
39 Diary opener
40 Complimentary
41 Writer — Ferber
42 Requests spare change
45 Not evens
46 Found a roost
47 PBS “Science Guy”
48 Once and for —
49 Utmost degree
51 “NYPD Blue” role
diLBerT® CrOssWOrd PUZZLe
fUTUre sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre sWine®
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WednesdaY, sePTeMBer 4, 2013
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Mix business with
pleasure and socialize with people you like. If you
create your own opportunities, you will gain respect.
Your expertise will be in demand.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You should keep
something secret if it will help you avoid opposition.
Taking on too much will work against you. It’s better to
offer less and end up doing more.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You’ve got all the right
moves, and Lady Luck will give you numerous chances to
use them. Take on any challenge you face with confdence,
verve and the determination to come out ahead.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Not everyone will
see things your way. Make changes that will improve
your fnancial situation, but make sure you have the
facts and fgures straight before you proceed.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’ll have the
edge when it comes to practical matters concerning
investments and medical concerns. Your common
sense and practicality will lead to gains and added
respect.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Refect upon and size
up your situation and you will know exactly what you
must do regarding a diffcult situation. Listen to your
doubts concerning certain associates.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) — Interaction will be
the name of the game today. Deal with your partners
or colleagues fairly, and success will smile upon you.
Opportunity will knock, and you must take advantage
of what’s offered.
aries (March 21-April 19) — You would do well
to take part in activities that present a mental or
physical challenge. What you accomplish will make a
lasting impression. Don’t allow anyone to belittle your
successes.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) — Now’s the time to put
your nose to the grindstone. You can make a difference
if you offer solutions and are passionate. Don’t hold
back and don’t run away from confict. Play to win.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) — Not everyone will agree
with you, but you should still follow your heart and
make the moves that you believe will bring you the
best return. You can make a difference.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — You can go far as long
as you craft a detailed agenda and stick to it. Your
skills and experience will come in handy. An interesting
approach to an old idea will pay off.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Do whatever it takes to bring
about positive change in your life. It may be necessary
to alter the scenery if you hope to achieve a fresh
perspective.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
Vice President wanted by venture capital
firm in Menlo Park, CA to manage team
of 2 to 3 associates; oversee portfolio in-
vestments; conduct deal analyses & due
diligence reviews; manage buy-out proc-
esses & strategic business dvlpmt; & in-
vestigate new sectors of technology for
evaluation & potential investment in
s/ware industry. Reqs: Master's deg in
Business Admin. or closely rltd field + 1
yr exp in job off'd or 1 yr exp as financial
analyst; or Bachelor's deg in Business
Admin. or closely rltd field + 5 yrs pro-
gressive work exp, & 1 yr exp in job off'd
or 1 yr exp as a financial analyst, or any
other qualifying combo of edu, training or
exp. Forward resumes to: Battery Ven-
tures Inc., 2884 Sand Hill Rd, Ste 101,
Menlo Park, CA 94025.
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
DRIVER -
Route Driver
Bay Area, Commission based compen-
sation. Wanted independent contractor to
handle Bay Area route, five days per
week. Must have valid California drivers
license. Must have good driving record.
Must be neat and detail oriented and ac-
curate with calculations and record keep-
ing. Responsible for inventory in truck
and at customer.Must be reliable. Must
be able to lift and move 60lb boxes. Re-
sponsible to develop new customers.
Good people skills. Send resume to D&X
Distributing, 285 Old County Rd, San
Carlos CA 94070. Call Bob at 650-207-
4162
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
JOB TITLE: SOFTWARE ENGINEER
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS, IT,
CIS, etc. + 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5).
Exp. w/ Java, Javascript, C++, Python,
Oracle, HTML, XML, Unix, REST, SIP &
PHP reqd.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: HR Dept. 1400 Fashion Island Blvd,
7th Floor San Mateo, CA 94404
LOOKING FOR Cosmetologist with Cal
State Board Lic. Apply in Person at 148
N. B St., San Mateo or call
(650)281-8879
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Kitchen staff and Sushi man wamted.
Apply at 773 Laurel Street, San Carlos.
(650)796-7928
124 Caregivers
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203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522906
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jon Snitow and Melissa Eitzel
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jon Snitow and Melissa Eitzel
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Jonathan Craig Snitow,
aka Jonathan Snitow, Jonathan C. Sni-
tow, Jon Snitow
a.Proposed name: Jonathan Craig Sni-
tow Solera
b.Present name: Melissa Viola Eitzel
aka Melissa V. Eitzel, Melissa Eitzel
b.Proposed name: Melissa Viola Eitzel
Solera
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/21/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/06/2013
(Published, 08/28/13, 09/04/2013,
09/11/2013, 09/18/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257037
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: A-1 Self Storage, 1337 Old
Country Rd., BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: 1) Caster Belmont Storage, LP, CA,
2) Caster Family Enterprises, Inc., CA, 3)
Terrence R. Caster, 4607 Mission Gorge
Place, San Diego, CA 92120 . The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/01/2007.
/s/ Terrence R. Caster /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/0a/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523196
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Huei I. Lin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Huei I. Linl filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Huei I. Lin, aka Stella
Huei I. Lin
Proposed name: Stella Huei I. Lin
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 10,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 08/28/13, 09/04/2013,
09/11/2013, 09/18/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257149
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Dental Care, 1122 Hopkins
Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ramiz R. Petros, DMD, 335 Elan Village
Ln. #209, San Jose CA 95134 The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Ramiz R. Petros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256852
The following person is doing business
as: BWE Bay Mortgage, 1410 B Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Carlos Bone, 215 Victoria Rd., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Carlos Bone /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256924
The following person is doing business
as: Evergreen Towing Service, 697 Va-
nessa Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Alfred Diong, 697 Vanessa Dr., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94402. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 1998.
/s/ Alfred Diong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256932
The following person is doing business
as: Kaydee Services, 1601 Ark Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kathryn L.
Donath, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/01/2013.
/s/ Kathryn L. Donath /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257067
The following person is doing business
as: M3G Computer Repair, 24 Sonora
Ave. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Manuelito L. Aguas, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Manuelito L. Aguas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
23 Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257009
The following person is doing business
as: Musculoskeletal Medical Center,
1850 Sullivan Ave., Ste. 310, DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Christian Bocobo
MD Professional Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/20/2004.
/s/ Christian Bocobo, MD /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257136
The following person is doing business
as: Sheryl de Luna Office Services, 901
Constitution Dr., FOSTER CITY, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Sheryl de Luna, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/2010.
/s/ Sheryl de Luna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257152
The following person is doing business
as: Pixel Perfecto Solutions, 364 Caprino
Way #1, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Elizabeth Marinos, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/02/2013.
/s/ Elizabeth Marinos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257463
The following person is doing business
as: Eastern Health Center, 6801 Mission
St., Ste 208, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jie Liang, 640 Francisco St., Apt., 1114,
San Francisco, CA 94133. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Jie Liang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/13, 08/21/13, 08/29/13, 09/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257134
The following person is doing business
as: MJP-ENZ, 117 24th Ave., Apt. 1,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Marian J.
Peris, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Marian J. Peris /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257154
The following person is doing business
as: Resell It with Anna, 3221 La Mesa
Dr., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Anna
E. LeCuyer, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Anna E. LeCuyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257101
The following person is doing business
as: All Bay Hauling and Demolition, 708
2nd Avenue, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hassan Mortazavi, 21 San-
born Road, Orinda, CA 94563. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Hassan Mortazavi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257239
The following person is doing business
as: Glassvendor.com, 830 Bransten
Road, Suite L, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Tony Campanile, 427 Bark Dr.,
Redwood City, CA 94065. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Tony Campanile /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257214
The following person is doing business
as: Atlas Heating & Ventilating Co., 340
Roebling Road, SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Tuck Aire Heating &
Air Conditioning Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/21/2007.
/s/ Geoffrey Tuck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257100
The following person is doing business
as: Lockheart Press, 407 Briarfield Way,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Andrea
Simmons, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Andrea Simmons /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257195
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Cosmopolitan Cafe, 2)Patio Cafe,
3)Cosmo Cafe @ MWE, 275 Middlefield
Road, #100, Menlo Park, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Cosmopolitan Catering LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/01/2010.
/s/ Joseph Schumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257197
The following person is doing business
as: Cosmopolitan Cafe @ Gopro, 300
Clearview Way, San Mateo, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cosmopolitan Catering LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 11/19/2012.
/s/ Joseph Schumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257353
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Nexus Loans, 2)Galaxy Loans,
3)GMCC, 1350 Bayshore Highway, Suite
740, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Gener-
al Mortgage Capital Corporation, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/28/2013.
/s/ Raymond Chou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256775
The following person is doing business
as: Aqua-Care USA, 1838 El Camino
Real, #207, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Modern Technology Resources, Inc., CA
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Igor Kleyner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257369
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1)Pure Mist, 2)Pure Mist E-Cig-
arettes, 3)Pure Mist E-Juice, 230 South
Spruce Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Dave Gaufo, 485 Cy-
press Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066 and
Maria Cristine Madjus, 402 Campbell
Ave., San Francisco, CA 94134. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Dave Gaufo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257371
The following person is doing business
as: Nutricion Activa, 346 N. Ellsworth
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ru-
malda Rios, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Rumalda Rios /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257119
The following person is doing business
as: Polka Dot Gorilla, 1419 Oak Grove
Ave., #203, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lauren B. Haule, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on August 6,
2013.
/s/ Lauren B. Haule /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257319
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Matchcmo, 930 Edgecliff Way,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Louis
& Jane Lalonde, same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Louis Lalonde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257435
The following person is doing business
as: Miki-Ya, 1180 Vermont Way, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Miyuki Tandy,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/13/2013.
/s / Miyuki Tandy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257452
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pacific Heights Financial, 2) Finan-
cisco 1838 El Camino Real, #180H,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Softeri-
nox, Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s / Valeriy Krysov /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Nida Corpus Patalot
Case Number: 123661
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: NIDA CORPUS PATA-
LOT. A Petition for Probate has been
filed by DANILO C. PATALOT, SR. in the
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo. The Petition for Probate re-
quests that DANILO C. PATALOT, SR.
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: September 30,
2013 at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Timothy J. Gavin, No.2143147
39300 Civic Center Dr., Ste. 310
Fremont, CA 94545
(510)248-4769
Dated: August 26, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on August 28, September 4, 11, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SIGNED MARK MCGWIER BASEBALL
- 70th Home Run, $30., (650)595-3933
SILVER PEACE dollar circulated $30
firm 415 333-8540 Daly City
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash.(650)654-9252
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA TRUCK -great
condition, $25., 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PHOTOSMART Printer, mint condi-
tion, 2 sided, view & print color & black,
multi-functions, includes 2 unopened car-
tridges $45.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
24
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
As a condition of compliance with Education Code Section
60119 and California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section
9531(c), district, charter school and county office of education
local governing boards are required to hold an annual public
hearing and adopt a resolution stating whether each pupil in
the district or charter school has, or will have prior to the end of
that year, sufficient textbooks or instructional materials in each
subject consistent with the content and cycles of the curriculum
framework adopted by the State Board of Education.
Therefore, a public hearing regarding instructional materials
sufficiency for the
13-14 School Year will be held September 11, 2013 at 7:00
p.m. at the Governing Board Meeting of the San Bruno Park
School District. The location of the meeting will be:
Crestmoor Elementary School
2322 Crestmoor Drive
San Bruno, CA 94066
Immediately following the public hearing, the Board will consid-
er the adoption of Resolution No. 13-09-05.
304 Furniture
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., (650)591-2720
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
ELECTRIC MEAT slicer $30., SOLD!
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
306 Housewares
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
KITCHEN POTS - (3) stainless steel
with black handles - 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5
gal. Asking $10 all. Will sell separately,
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET - lid
cover and mat, beige. Asking $10. Call
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINYL SHOWER CURTAINS (3) one is
beige/coral floral; one is aqua/black/
gold floral, and one is royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10 each. Call (650)574-3229 (Foster
City) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" HEDGE TRIMMER - pro mod-
el, sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BLACK AND Decker electric 18" blade
lawn mower, rated at 4 HP,
$45.(650)367-8146
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, SOLD!
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DENIM JACKET - faded but in good
condition, man's XL, $19., 650-595-3933
ELECTRIC BLOWER. Plenty of power.
Clean your leaves. Adjustable tube
length/direction. $20 Cash SOLD!
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
GARDEN CLAW. Excellent for tilling
you soil for planting flowers/vegetables.
$20. SOLD!
LAWN AERATOR. Irrigate your lawn at
the roots. Hose attachment. $15 Cash.
SOLD!
308 Tools
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, 650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., SOLD!
NEW NEWTONE DOOR BELL -factory
pack, complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NEW PRO Torque Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty and case $29, 650-595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
ROSS ROOT feeder. Excellent for
feeding trees/shrubs. $15 Cash.
SOLD!
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition, SOLD!
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, SOLD!
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRAND NEW TARP - 7' X 5' sealed fac-
tory package, Only $9., 650-595-3933
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
model #38640, lead drisel dome, 44 car-
ot plated, $45., (650)315-5902
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60
(650)697-5405
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI MAKER - elec-
tric, heat top & bottom only, $9., 650-
595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $75 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), clay colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), gold colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 SOLD!
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
310 Misc. For Sale
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 SOLD!
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
SUMMER READING, 100 paperbacks
and hard cover, popular authors, Cuss-
ler, Patterson, Brown, Steele, more.
$30.00 all obo (650)578-9208
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10., Call (650)574-3229
(Foster City) between 10 am - 7 pm.
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited edi-
tion with Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-
5902
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
316 Clothes
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - $.25 each, or all for
$100., (650)921-6741
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $30 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
25 Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Saw point
6 Etching fluid
10 Touches
affectionately
14 Prenatal exam,
for short
15 Body part that
smells
16 Jump in a skater’s
short program
17 Legend with an
ax
19 Actress Hayworth
20 Dinner pair?
21 Like cough syrup
22 Indigenous New
Zealander
23 Legend with a
clarinet
26 Alcove
29 Not at all well-
done
30 “Let’s Get __”:
Marvin Gaye hit
31 Udder parts
33 Jamaican genre
36 Legend with a
vine
40 Animal on
Michigan’s state
flag
41 Coffee shop
cupful
42 Fishing tool
43 “Your Majesty”
44 It includes a bit of
France
46 Legend with a bat
51 Betting every last
chip
52 Hat-borne
parasites
53 Toward the
rudder
56 Charlatan, e.g.
57 Legend with a
bathrobe
60 Sour
61 Actor Morales
62 Dutch pianist
Egon who taught
Victor Borge
63 Lime beverages
64 Holiday song
65 Important word
for 17-, 23-, 36-,
46- and 57-
Across
DOWN
1 Packer’s need
2 Arab League
member
3 Burden
4 Up to, briefly
5 Bindle carriers
6 Former U.N. chief
7 How some flirt
8 Life-cabaret link
9 Place to relax
10 Where to see
floats
11 Self-evident truth
12 Flashy tank
swimmer
13 Like many
characters in
Shakespeare’s
dramas
18 Catering hall
dispensers
22 Dashing
inventor?
23 1885 Motorwagen
maker
24 Reduce to small
pieces
25 Inauguration Day
pledge
26 Customary
observance
27 Reference list
abbr.
28 Bulletin board
material
31 Icon on a pole
32 Immature newt
33 Goad
34 “Felicity” star
Russell
35 Like the Flying
Dutchman
37 “In space no one
can hear you
scream” film
38 Not, quaintly
39 On the safer side
43 Bypasses
44 Chickenpox
symptom
45 Expletive
replacements
46 Sicily neighbor
47 Epic that ends
with Hector’s
funeral
48 County on the
River Shannon
49 Pond plants
50 Zero, to Nero
53 Prefix with war or
hero
54 Forest floor
flora
55 High school math
class
57 Feathery layer
58 Club for GIs
59 “... but __ are
chosen”
By Victor Barocas
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/04/13
09/04/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
SPECIALIZED CROSSROADS bike. 20"
frame/18 speed. Needs tires.Great com-
mute bike. $99. Cash SOLD!
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TRAINING BASEBALLS - Soft center
(3) $2. each and Regular Softballs (2)
$3. each, (650)595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
FLEA
MARKET
San Bruno
City Park
(Crystal Springs and
Oak Ave.)
Sunday,
Sept. 8
9am-4pm
Don’t miss
shopping for
great deals from
85 vendors.
Furniture,
sporting goods,
antiques and
more!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD ‘95 LX Coupe -
$1900., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excellent Condition $1,500
SOLD!
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., SOLD!
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning •Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services •
Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650)453-3002
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Carpet, Tile
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
27 Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
WORLD 28
Wednesday • Sept. 4, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
View our channel streaming live online!
You can see PenTV
anywhere in the world
if you have the internet!
Live Feed on Website
at www.pentv.tv
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
County boundaries are no match for the world wide web!
Dennis Rodman
in North Korea to
visit ‘friend’ Kim
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PYONGYANG, North Korea — Former
NBAstar Dennis Rodman landed Tuesday in
North Korea and said he plans to hang out
with authoritarian leader Kim Jong Un, have
a good time and maybe bridge some cultural
gaps — but not be a diplomat.
Rodman was greeted at Pyongyang’s air-
port by Son Kwang Ho, vice-chairman of
North Korea’s Olympic Committee, just
days after Pyongyang rejected a visit by a
U.S. envoy who had hoped to bring home
Kenneth Bae, an American missionary
jailed there. The North abruptly called off
the official visit because it said the U.S. had
ruined the atmosphere for talks by holding a
drill over South Korea with nuclear-capable
B-52 bombers.
Rodman said the purpose of his visit was
to display his friendship for Kim and North
Korea and to “show people around the world
that we as Americans can actually get along
with North Korea.”
Speaking to reporters in Beijing ahead of
his flight to Pyongyang — his second trip
to the North — Rodman declined to say
whether he would seek Bae’s release. Bae’s
health is poor, and he was recently trans-
ferred to a hospital.
“I just want to meet my friend Kim, the
marshal, and start a basketball league over
there or something like that,” said Rodman,
wearing rings through his lower lip and
each nostril. “I have not been promised
anything. I am just going there as a friendly
gesture.”
REUTERS
Dennis Rodman at the Beijing Capital
International Airport on his way to North Korea.
By Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — An Egyptian doctor once close
to Osama bin Laden is bringing together
multiple al-Qaida-inspired militant groups
in Egypt’s Sinai to fight the country’s mili-
tary, as the lawless peninsula emerges as a
new theater for jihad, according to Egyptian
intelligence and security officials.
There have been other signs of a danger-
ous shift in the longtime turmoil in the
peninsula bordering Israel and the Gaza
Strip since the military’s July 3 ouster of
Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, the
officials say. With the shifts, Sinai’s insta-
bility is becoming more regionalized and
threatens to turn into an outright insur-
gency.
Sinai has seen an influx of foreign fighters
over the past two months, including several
hundred Yemenis. Several militant groups
that long operated in the area to establish an
Islamic Caliphate and attack their tradition-
al enemy Israel have joined others in declar-
ing formally that their objective now is to
battle Egypt’s military.
Also, Sinai has become the focus of atten-
tion among major regional jihadi groups. A
leader of al-Qaida’s Iraqi branch, Abu
Mohammed al-Adnani, last weekend called
on Egyptians to fight the military, as did al-
Qaida’s top leader, Ayman al-Zawahri. The
militant considered the most dangerous man
in the Sahara — one-eyed terror leader
Moktar Belmoktar, a former member of al-
Qaida’s North Africa branch — joined forces
with a Mali-based jihadi group last month
and vowed attacks in Egypt.
Topping the most wanted list in Sinai is
Ramzi Mawafi, a doctor who joined al-
Qaida in Afghanistan in the 1990s.
Mawafi, 61, escaped from an Egyptian
prison in 2011 in a massive jailbreak that
also sprung free Morsi and more than a
dozen Muslim Brotherhood members dur-
ing the chaos of the uprising against auto-
crat Hosni Mubarak.
Mawafi is now believed to be in Sinai
coordinating among militant groups and
helping arrange money and weapons, secu-
rity officials told the Associated Press. The
four officials were from military intelli-
gence, the military and the security forces
and spoke on condition of anonymity
because they were not authorized to speak to
the press.
Egypt’s Sinai emerging
as new theater for jihad
By Didi Tang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — The shark’s fin, bird’s nest
and abalone are gone from the offerings at
Beijing’s Xiang E Qing restaurant — a
favorite of Communist Party cadres just
months ago. Diners are now left with less
exotic fare such as shredded beef, pickled
turnip and fried peanuts.
China’s high-end restaurants have gone
into crisis under leader Xi Jinping’s cam-
paign to crack down on the kinds of party
extravagances that have angered ordinary
Chinese, such as dining on the public dime.
To stem big losses and avoid the now-tar-
nished image of VIP banquet halls, these
restaurants have been busy reinventing
themselves.
“We don’t do high-end! We just serve fam-
ily-style food!” a jittery manager at Xiang E
Qing told a visitor who wanted to see the
dramatic, near-overnight transformation of
one of the capital’s most prestigious eater-
ies.
The Xiang E Qing restaurant in downtown
Beijing — part of a national chain that has
been among the hardest hit — no longer has
the expensive liquors, minimum spending
requirements or special fees for the private
banquet rooms where government officials
and business executives once gathered in
seclusion. Its calling cards have been rewrit-
ten to promote a joyful, family atmosphere.
Restaurants serving exquisite delicacies
in banquet rooms long flourished under the
lavish spending habits among all levels of
public officials, who spent about 300 bil-
lion yuan ($50 billion) a year on food and
drinks in recent years, according to state
media. But new party rules since the begin-
ning of this year curb spending on food and
drink, and Xi himself has set the example by
having a work meal of four simple dishes
and one soup.
China’s top restaurants reeling over new austerity
REUTERS
A woman shouts slogans in front of Boulaq Al-Dakrour police station, after an explosion in
Giza,Egypt.

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