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ROSSETTI AND HIS CIRCLE .

Other Books by Max Beerbohm THE WORKS OF MAX BEERBOHM MORE YET AGAIN AND EVEN NOW A CHRISTMAS GARLAND THE HAPPY HYPOCRITE ZULEIKA DOBSON SEVEN MEN CARICATURES OP TWENTY-FIVE GENTLEMEN THE POET'S CORNER THE SECOND CHILDHOOD OP JOHN BULL A BOOK OF CARICATURES FIFTY CARICATURES A SURVEY .

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G. PRECOCIOUSLY MANIFESTING.D. . ROSSETTI. AMONG THE EXILED PATRIOTS WHO FREQUENTED HIS FATHER'S HOUSE IN POLITICS Charlotte Street. that queer indifference to WHICH marked HIM IN HIS PRIME AND HIS DECLINE.

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WILLIAM HEINEMANN J J > > > J 1 3 J ^ i J 3 J i i J i J J ^ J > J JJ J J o » J « • 3 J J J >*J> J 3 J J J .ROSSETTI AND HIS CIRCLE BY MAX BEERBOHM LONDOJ^J.

C tic let ( t C C I *^ . Clay & Sons. ( (. LCI 1 C 'c.First printed in 192S by R. Bungay. Ltd.. Suffolk.

and the even greater Robinson who is to loom so tremendously. I do hope this book men of the moment. have been proclaiming by pencil and the only fault I have found them is that (numerous though they always are) they are not numerous enough to satisfy my interest in mankind. is the beauties of Nature. In this case. Throughout I my in great interest in such men . cut to Utopia. etc. I hope. Years ago there was a book entitled The Poet's Corner in which some of my adventures into the Past were recorded by me.^•y NOTE Anxious to avoid will all not be taken as a slight to the past quarter of a century occasion of offence. the shortest I don't agree that the proper study of mankind Man is the study that has been most congenial that the current specimens of him have always whetted my appetite for other ones. fined myself to I ought also to beg your pardon for having here conone little bit of the Past. Hence the apologetic (but not. V CO I- u z 33 V'l . I must But even you. But in that volume there was a slight admixture of the (then) Present. They would suffice me if I were properly keen on metaphysics. Perhaps I shown Rossetti before he passed out of baby-clothes into breeches. the latest discoveries in science. It is to the Past that I have ever had recourse from the Present. flushed though you apologise still more profusely. prefatory words. In this latest volume there is nothing of anything that wasn't the Past when I was a child. Lack of imagination debars me from the pleasure of gazing much at the great Jones Man. abject) tone of these ' '. for good or evil. Perhaps you have never heard of Rossetti. over the thirtieth. In 'The Poet's Corner' Here I haven't so much as ranged back as far as Homer. Chippendale. I do but confess that congenial to me — so who is to leave so deep an impress on the late twentieth century.

as Grand Vizir to some Sultan. England had plenty of greater men. Rossetti shone. and died of it nineteen years before it was over. Disraeli. For him the me. does not appear that the men and women who knew him well were many. in a bygone age. But he was not in himself interesthe was a To be interesting. These men. Nor might Rossetti in the Quattrocentro and by the Arno. in the great days of a deep. thick. for the men and women who knew him. And so he still shines for me. — - eighteen-fifties-and-sixties had no romance at confess. smug. Rather a ribald book? Well. But the men atoned for their fewness by a It great deal of genius. I — all. with the ambiguous light of a red torch somewhere in a dense fog. for Swinwere among those whose early work bore his Millais. itself just of the younger men as it did. industrial complacency. a man*^' ing just crystal-clear crank. But in London. drab. And I rather fancy it must be a great advantage for him to have been born outside his proper time and place. for example. it or at any rate impinged on the magic Circle. with a sprinkling of remarkable elder and younger persons who at one time and another entered stamp. rich. was a far finer poet than Byron. full of well-ordered facts. had Even Whistler's Burne-Jones' work bore it always. Rossetti had invented a type of beauty^ otherwise perhaps we should not be regarding these ladies as beautiful. Shelley. and partly because Rossetti was. I refer you to William Rossetti's biography of his brother a — very thorough piece of work. : must be complex and elusive. a time. must have heard of the Victorian Era. Disraeli. Holman Hunt. on se moque de ce qn'on aime. mightn't have seemed so very remarkable after all. you will find in the pages of this book. would not but for him have Morris. they are very romantic partly because alive in them. And besides. and very . there is no lack of antidotes. And certainly the genius expressed burne. I For wasn't Byron.vi NOTE are with the pride of youth. and Rossetti interesting — these seem in to me the three most men that England had the nineteenth century. and the women by a great deal of beauty. Rossetti belonged to that though he was indeed born nine years before it began.

Professor Mackail's book about Morris is a penetrating work of art. Old drawings and paintings. you are in a great hurry. however. Rapallo. and the accounts oi I have eye-witnesses. early photographs. you know. B. And if. Rossetti 'to my gaze was ne'er vouchsafed. there is always the Dictionary of National Biography. if you would care to hear. Nor did I see any one of the others until he had long passed the age at which he knew Rossetti. been my only aids.NOTE vii Holman Hunt's autobiography is a finely solid pleasant in tone.' Nor did I ever set eyes on Coventry Patmore or Ford Madox Brown or John Ruskin or Robert Browning. 1922. M. of the most curious kind imaginable. albeit earnest. before parting. had another and surer aid. I must warn you. Nor could a husband and his friends be portrayed more vividly and prettily than Burne-Jones and his friends were portrayed by his widow. have not. . And some day I will tell you all about it. not to regard as perfectly authentic any of the portraits that I here present to you. and (between the lines) delightful production.

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Rossdti in Childhooa. Topsy. Rossctti^s Courtship. 13. Robert Broivning introduces a Great Lady. ana Mr. IVilliam Bell Scott wondering. George Meredith's Hortation. Watts. 20. g. Cornforth. Mr. The Touch of a Vanishea Hana. 11. Caine. Gosse. Ned Jones and 7. Swinburne and Mr. 3. IVoolner at Farringford. British Stock and Alien InspiratioH. Leighton suggests Candidature.CONTENTS Frontispiece. Mr. Mr. 8. $. IX . 21. A Momentary Vision tliat once befell Young Millais A Remark by Benjamin Jozvctt. 1. John Rusk in meets Miss Blue China. Morley brings Mr. ig. Cheyne IValk. 23. 18. 14. 6. 2. The Small Hours in Gabriel the 'Sixties at 16. 4. George Augustus Sala with Rossetti. Rossetti' s Name is heard in America. 10. 12. 17. Mr. and Christina. Cove7itry Patmore at Spring Cottage. lb. Ford Madox Brown patronised by Hoiman Hunt. 75. Mill. Shields.

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First County *< " but " John Millais First County Member Second County Member J ^ \ . Holman Hunt j j^.British Stock and Alien Inspiration. no doubt HoLMAN Hunt J Second County Member \ pull of wonderfuHdeas.^^ ^^ ^^ trusted for one moment. John Millais J ..Very clever. Member \ .

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1850— 1860. .RossETTi's Courtship. Chatham Place.

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.A Momentary Vision that once befell Young Millais.

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to do with the Grail when they found it.The sole remark likely to have been made by Benjamin Jowett about the mural paintings at the Oxford Union. Rossetti? . " And what were they " ?vJr. going.

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iS6o. .Spring Cottage. but as a sublime symbol of domesticity. Hampstead. Coventry Patmore very vehemently preaches to the Rossettis that a tea-pot is not worshipful for its form and colour.

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settled on the settle IN Red Lion Square.TopsY AND Ned Jones. .

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Ruskin." . very pleased to meet Mr. I'm sure. Oh.An Miss Cornforth " : Introduction.

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.Blue China.

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when do you begin modelling his halo?" — .WOOLNER AT FaRRINGFORD. 1857. Mr. Mrs. . Woolner. I'm one of the most un-meddlesome of women but when (I'm only asking). Tennyson: "You know.

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.10 Ford Madox Brown being patronised by HoLMAN Hunt.

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Cheyne Walk. .II The Small Hours in the 'Sixties at i6. ^Algernon reading " Anactoria" to Gabriel — AND William.

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" . bird "What is and a water-shoot and the use. Christuia.12 rossetti. "Well. if you insist on getting " C. Gabriel. yourself up like a pew-opener? I don't know — I'm sure j'ou yourself always dress very quietly. R. D. tries hard to prevail on his younger sister to accept at any rate one of these and have a dress made of it from designs to be furnished by himself. R. G. of having a heart like a singing all the rest of it. having just had a fresh consignment of "stunning" fabrics from that new shop in Regent Street.

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.ROSSETTI INSISTENTLY EXHORTED BY GeORGE MeREDITH TO COME FORTH INTO THE GLORIOUS SUN AND WIND FOR A WALK TO HeNDON AND BEYOND.

i i'i wiwDpjgm mnjjji^ i — J\ / ^ -«'»!%tSS!«W i *!.T. '^'«gg-~"'''^W?"*"'^' *'«WW>W g»!{S^iWft«»(iBm«>^<^^ ' )S i-yjg^y^ . " 9Hk ' 3^ ' VJ-r '.

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14 Mr. William Bell Scott wondering what it FELLOWS SEEM TO SEE IN GaBRIEL. is those .

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Mr. Browning brings a lady of rank and fashion
TO SEE Mr. Rossetti.

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Rossetti. and glad we are to pocket the cash and foregather at the Arundel.i6 ROSSETTI IN HIS WORLDLIER DAYS {ciRCA 1866 1868) LEAVING THE Arundel Club with George Augustus Sala. we take the world as we find it." . Sala other. I give Mr. Levy what he wants. "You and I. and you give Mr. : — Mr. to the core. Rae and Mr. we like and we understand each Bohemians. Leyland what they want. both of us.

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»7 Riverside Scene. his great new friend Gosse to . Algernon Swinbirnk taking SEE Gabriel Rossetti.

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and from all of Women. Mill that in his lifelonsf to catch and keep the ear of the nation he has been hampered by a certain deficiency in well.. and he takes my word for it.' that I have seen and heard of your work. Mill has in the press at this moment a new work. Morley of Blackburn. entitled The Subjection From my slight acquaintance with you. introduces Mr. He will read them to you. as a defect) might possibly be remedied by you. "occurred to Mr. John Stuart Mill. in colour. in warmth. that a series of illustrative paintings by you would" etc. their subjection. Mr.i8 Mr. etc. and I have no doubt that you are incensed at Mr. Mill has brought his proof-sheets with him. in I have told him that this deficiency (I do not regard it rich charm. on an afternoon in the Spring of '6g. endeavour — ' . I gather that women greatly interest you." he says. " It has recently. I believe.

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'The world is too much with us'! But alas. To improve the taste of the Sovereign. yet I am not disemboldened to say to you now.»9 A Man from Mr. — — the pantinjf of the hart in me for the water-brooks. I feel that I have. Rossetti. of the Judicial Bench. as yours is. in all of us there is a duality of nature. Come now let me put your ' ! — — ! — name down in our Candidates' Book. of those who direct the Army and Navy and Reserve Forces." . in virtue of what is left to me of youth and ardour. of our merchant princes in Threadneedle Street and ot our squires in the Shires. and through all these to bring light and first-born Spiritual improvement to those toiling millions on whom ultimately the glory of Great Bi-itain rests all this is in me an ambition not to be stifled and an aspiration not to be foregone. have I murmured within me that phrase of Wordsworth's. You smile. from the mire of the market- "Think not Ah no I envy you your ivory tower. Rossetti. from the dust of the arena. jelix nimium. in the words of the Apostle Paul. dear Mr. for one moment. separated from my easel. the taste of her ever-genial and of his sweet and gracious consort. You. am but a place. my dear Mr. How often at some Council Meeting of the R. I. in conjunction with my coUeag-ues. passion. ! — And the civistic passion yes. Rossetti restrains the instinct of the artist in me towards solitude. of the Lords and Temporal of the faithful Commons. that I am insensible to the charm of a life recluded. Frederic Leighton : Hymettus. as I have often wished to say to you. are poet as well as painter. But I. have some little influence at Burlington House. conjoined with the paltry gift of tact. a duty to the nation. and curbs citizen.A. Come over and — ' Our President I grant you in confidence is not of all help us men the most enlightened. Mr.

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a word with you been talking matters over. and we are agreed that to-night and henceforth a'ou must not and shall not read any more of your They are too what shall I say? literary efforts to our friend.20 Quis CusTODiET Ipsum Custodem? Theodore Watts " Mr. Shields and I have Caine. too luridly arresting." : ! — — . and are the allies of insomnia.

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.21 Mr. AND Miss nervously perpetuating the TOUCH OF A vanished HAND.

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Time 1881. Oscar Wilde.22 The name of Dante Gabriel Rossetti : : is heard for the first time in the united states of america. . Lecturer Mr.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY Los Angeles This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. IrSCHARGt URf .

l°^^^ LIBRARY FACILITY AA 000 301974 .MC lh79 B?9r jrj SSi: Hl'illll'lini^^limnmH?.

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