OregOn Observer

The
Thursday, September 5, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 9 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
Wednesday, October 9, 2013
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Knutson busy, happy, since taking reins of Oregon chamber
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Judy Knutson stepped into her
role as the executive director of
the Oregon Area Chamber of
Commerce in June, shortly before
the organization launched Sum-
mer Fest.
For most, it would have been
a daunting way to begin a new
position. But not for Knutson.
She embr aced
the challenge and
the annual com-
munity celebration
– which happens to
be the chamber’s
biggest annual fun-
draiser – went off
without a hitch.
Kn u t s o n h a s
maintained her vigor and can-do
attitude in the months since then.
And she’s been busy.
“It’s going absolutely wonder-
fully,” she told the Observer on
Tuesday. “I’m excited to be able
to be out in the community. I real-
ly enjoy that.”
Knutson’s already begun plan-
ning for next year’s Summer
Fest, along with preparing for the
chamber’s 50th anniversary next
year.
She’s also working on the
chamber’s annual banquet, slated
for January 2014, and a couple
of events closer on the calendar.
On Tuesday, Sept. 10, the cham-
ber holds its annual golf outing,
and the organization has planned
a Women’s Expo for Oct. 15 in
Oregon.
Knutson has smaller engage-
ments that pop up around the
community, as well. On Thurs-
day, she planned to attend a
groundbreaking for construction
of Headquarters Bar and Grill.
And she recently took in another
groundbreaking, for Mueller Den-
tistry, in anticipation of Chad
Mueller’s new office building on
the west side.
Village officials have been
working closely with Knutson and
the chamber on a couple of proj-
ects: the design off the Jefferson
Knutson
Turn to Pantry/Page 16
Back to school
Village, DOT
discuss plans
for new Hwy. 14
Work to create
four lanes,
relocate road to
take place by 2020
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Somet i me bet ween
2016 and 2020, the Wis-
consin Department of
Transportation plans to
relocate U.S. Hwy. 14
from the Village of Ore-
gon to State Hwy. 92 at
Brooklyn. When that hap-
pens, the highway will
become a four-lane road.
The long-term goal is to
make Hwy. 14 four lanes
to Janesville.
The new right of way
for the highway is a
66-foot parcel west of cur-
rent Hwy. 14 and east of
Hwy. MM, about half way
between the two roads,
explained Town of Rut-
land chair Dale Beske.
He and DOT project
engineer Mike Rampets-
reiter met with the Oregon
Village Board Aug. 19 to
discuss upcoming chang-
es. While the project is
still in the relatively early
planning stage, Beske
and Rampetsreiter wanted
to keep village officials
informed of the project.
Beske said planners are
trying to determine how to
terminate old Hwy. 14 at
Hwy. 138 east of the vil-
lage. When the new road
is built, existing Hwy. 14
will become a Town of
Rutland road.
“We’ve looked at sever-
al ways to connect old 14
to 138,” Beske said.
One idea is to terminate
the road at the intersec-
tion of Hill Road. Traf-
fic would then be routed
north on Hill Road to
Hwy. 138.
“It isn’t designed for
today’s traffic because it
doesn’t have shoulders
and is narrow and hilly,”
Beske said, “but we’re
considering it.”
Rampetsreiter said the
DOT is discussing build-
ing a roundabout at Hwy.
138 just east of the former
Meuller Implement build-
ing. It’s also planning to
create a Park and Ride in
that location, which would
allow a right-turn in, right-
turn out only option, he
said.
The new Hwy. 14 will
reconnect with old 14
near Rutland Road, east
of Brooklyn.
Beske sai d Rut l and
will have to update its
comprehensive plan to
accept old Hwy. 14, and
t he t own woul d need
Village of Oregon and
Dane County approval to
amend its plan.
Vi l l age of Or egon
president Steve Staton
brought up the DOT’s
plan of building a road
salt shed near the inter-
section of Hwys. 14 and
138. He said the vil -
lage has opposed the
idea because it is not the
image the village wants
for an important gateway
to the community.
Oregon Food
Pantry
Local
produce
expands
offerings
BarBara Feeney
Special to the Observer
The Oregon-Brooklyn
Food Pantry has oper-
ated for many years with
the support of several
churches in the area, and
many community volun-
teers, offering a variety
of food and consumer sta-
ples to local households
experiencing financial
stress. The operation has
become a reliable service
and has met many needs
during its years of opera-
tion.
Duri ng t he growi ng
season, local gardeners
have brought in small
amounts of their surplus
produce but there has
never been enough to
make sure all food pantry
clients would leave with
a variety of fresh veg-
etables. Local gardener
Liz Kepplinger thought
something could be done
about that.
If you go
What: Open mic on
local food and housing
insecurity
Where: Firefly
Coffeehouse
When: 6 – 8 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 5
Turn to Knutson/Page 16
Pg 9
Volleyball sweeps Milton
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Tuesday was the first day of school, and Rome Intermediate School was buzzing with excitement. Above,
from left: Megan Schliem, Bailey Bastian, Brinlee Hall, Dhea Kjellstrom, Kyara Prince and Alexis Pollack
look at photos from past school classes as they wait to enter the lunchroom.
See more on Page 7
2
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Loving
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The Brooklyn Fire and EMS
Labor Days Festival stretched
over a span of three days,
starting on Friday, Aug. 30.
In addition to the Pancake
Breakfast on Sunday morn-
ing, there were kickball
games, tractor pulls, games
and activities for kids and
various musical bands play-
ing every night for attendees
to enjoy.
Below, Makenzie Milestone
enjoys the pancake breakfast.
Photo by Kimberly Wethal
A big
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September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Open House for Deanna Fischer
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Oregon woman convicted of fifth count of operating while intoxicated
victoria vlisides
Unifed Newspaper Group
A 40-year-old Oregon
woman was sentenced to
48 months in the Wisconsin
Prison System last Wednes-
day after being convicted
of her of a fifth operating
while intoxicated charge, a
felony.
N o e l l e
M. Ha r t ,
500 bl oc k
o f No r t h
Perry Park-
way, pleaded
guilty at the
t ri al at t he
Dane County
Court House
i n front of
Circuit Court judge Nicho-
las McNamara.
Co n d i t i o n s o f t h e
supervision include Hart’s
l i cense bei ng r evoked
for 36 months, an igni-
tion interlock device being
installed on any vehicle
she owns or operates for 36
months, an AODA assess-
ment and follow through,
active participation in alco-
hol and drug treatment, no
alcohol or drugs without a
prescription, random urine
and blood samples, no drug
paraphernalia and no con-
tact with her alleged boy-
friend who introduced her
to heroin without written
permission of an agent.
Court fees and fines came
to $1,449.
Hart , who' s previ ous
OWIs were in 2000, twice
in '01, and '07, was arrest-
ed by Madison police in
October after she drove off
the road on South Whitney
Way and hit a tree with her
vehicle that also had a pas-
senger who fled the scene.
Authorities arrested Hart
for operating while under
t he i nfl uence-5t h OWI,
possessi on of schedul e
II narcotic, possession of
drug paraphernalia, operat-
ing after suspension- 3rd
offense, failure to have con-
trol of vehicle, and operat-
ing a motor vehicle without
insurance.
Har t was pr evi ousl y
charged with three counts
of f el ony chi l d abuse,
which the district attor-
ney's office amended to be
one count of misdemeanor
child neglect. Hart pleaded
no contest to this charge in
June 2013.
At the trial, Hart's attor-
ney, Rober t Hur l ey of
Hurley Law Office, LLC,
argued she see minimum
jail time for the offense -- 6
months -- so she could still
see her 4-year-old son.
Hurley cited her progress
in substance abuse coun-
seling, stress and anger
management programs and
holding a maintenance job.
Hart told McNamara she
wanted to change.
"I don' t want to go to
prison," Hart said between
sobbing. "I've worked too
hard for what I've got, and
I don' t want to lose my
child."
Assistant district attorney
Joseph Mimier said Hart is
a danger to society and to
her child because of sub-
stance abuse.
"We're not saying Nicole
Hart abused the child," he
said. "What we' re really
saying is she just wasn' t
paying close enough atten-
tion."
McNamara said he saw
progress – but it wasn' t
enough.
" Th e r e ' s n o t mu c h
patience for a fifth OWI
conviction," he said.
Hart
Village of Oregon
Village board
approves hiring
new municipal
accountant
Position used to
exist in village Hall
but was eliminated
several years ago
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Vi l l age Boar d
last week approved hir-
ing Susan Poole as the
village’s new municipal
accountant.
The position used to
exist in Village Hall but
had been eliminated sev-
eral years ago.
Finance director Lisa
Novinska recently reor-
gani zed her st aff and
brought the municipal
accountant position back.
Poole will also work with
billing for the water util-
ity.
“Lisa felt that she want-
ed to have a little more
account i ng experi ence
back in the front office,”
explained village admin-
istrator Mike Gracz. “So
she decided to combine
the positions – the accoun-
tant position and the util-
ity billing clerk are now
the municipal accountant
position.”
Gracz sai d when he
advertised job opening,
“we said you had to have
at least a two-year degree
in accounting. That really
cut down the number of
applicants.”
He told the board that
only 10 or 11 people had
applied for the job.
Poole had two inter-
v i e ws b e f o r e b e i ng
offered the job, which has
a starting salary of $18.50
per hour.
Poole is married to vil-
lage Trustee Eric Poole,
who did not participate in
the discussion or vote at
last week’s meeting.
Susan Poole has worked
for 20 years as an accoun-
tant for a plumbing busi-
ness.
“I’m moving out of the
construction field,” she
said. “I need a change,
and this position interest-
ed me”
She said there will be
a learning curve with the
new position but “I ought
to be able to pick that up
without a problem.” She
will begin work Tuesday,
Sept. 3.
The Pooles have lived
in the village for 25 years
and have an adult daugh-
ter who lives in Verona.
Couple leads Golden Retriever benefit
setH Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
A Town of Oregon cou-
ple with a penchant for
pooches is hoping area resi-
dents support a fundraiser
next week to help dogs in
distress.
Amie and Bryan Trupke
are helping organize the third
annual “Dog Day After-
noon,” a fundraiser for a
non-profit dog rescue group,
Wisconsin Adopt A Golden
Retriever (WAAGR).
The Sept. 14 fundraiser at
Liliana’s restaurant in Fitch-
burg includes games for kids,
obstacle courses for dogs and
appetizers or a four-course
dinner option. And yes, dogs
are welcome, too.
Amie Trupke is president
of WAAGR, a volunteer-run
group that takes in Golden
Retrievers and Golden mixes
that are abandoned or surren-
dered by their owners.
An attorney by day in
Madison, Trupke joined the
organization in January 2010
and took over as president in
May 2011.
Tr upke sai d she got
involved with the group
simply because she loves
Goldens, including the two
7-year-old dogs she and Bry-
an keep in their home in the
Raven Oaks neighborhood.
The couple has fostered oth-
er Goldens, most recently
Sadie, a young Golden they
have cared for since April.
Sadie was found, along
with her brother and sister,
under the porch of an aban-
doned home in Kentucky.
After being seized by animal
control workers there, Sadie
was placed in a foster home
in Kentucky, but she was so
fearful of humans that the
placement didn’t work out,
Trupke said.
“She was terrified of
everything,” she said.
So Trupke offered to house
the pet and it was transported
to Wisconsin by a WAAGR
volunteer.
After months of training
and hard work, Sadie is now
“very affectionate with me”
but still wary of strangers,
Trupke said.
“It’s a work in progress,”
she said.
That story isn’t unusual
among the core group of
roughly 50 volunteers who
chip in to provide temporary
shelter to an ever-rotating
group of Goldens that at any
given time numbers about
25. The goal is to eventually
pair the dogs with permanent
owners.
WAAGR has no paid staff
but rings up expensive veter-
inary bills by caring for sick
or injured pets, Trupke said.
All proceeds from the Sept.
14 fundraiser will support
those efforts.
The event at Liliana’s
includes live music, a story-
teller, face painting and other
games. Bryan Trupke is bar
manager at the restaurant,
which will cap off the event
with a four-course meal with
wine pairings from 5:30-7:30
p.m.
A silent auction will give
visitors a chance to bid on
gift certificates to restaurants
in Oregon, Verona and Mad-
ison, American Girl mer-
chandise, dog daycare and
training lessons, artwork and
more.
WAAGR’ s ma i l i n g
address is in Brookfield but
its operations are spread
throughout the state, Amie
Trupke said. This is the
group’s largest annual fun-
draiser.
If you go
What: “Dog Day
Afternoon,” a fundraiser for
Wisconsin Adopt A Golden
Retriever
When: Sept. 14.
Appetizers and kids menu
from 2-4:45 p.m., 4-course
meal and silent auction
from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Where: Liliana’s
Restaurant, 2951 Triverton
Pike Dr., Fitchburg
How much: afternoon
menu is $15 for adults,
$10 for kids; evening din-
ner is $40 per person
More info: www.waagr.
org
Submitted photo
Attendees seen at last year’s “Dog Day Afternoon,” which is being held for the third straight year at
Liliana’s in Fitchburg.
4
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Opinion
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A
s consumers, we are very
interested in how our
food is grown and what
goes into it.
A balanced diet based on
proper caloric intake, along with
exercise and a healthy lifestyle,
is the key to minimizing the
risk of obesity and premature
disease that is
so prevalent in
today’s society.
But finding
the answers
to our ques-
tions isn’t an
easy task. With
strong opinions
and conflict-
ing informa-
tion shared
every day on TV, online and in
our own conversations, it’s no
wonder we get lost in all of the
arguments. How do we know if
foods are safe and nutritious?
Some say this food discus-
sion has even become a new
religion. We’ve started judging
our neighbors’ moral character
based on what they buy in the
grocery store.
It’s a needlessly polarizing
topic. It seems to me that in
recent years, it has gone from
being science-based and logical
to very emotional and somewhat
illogical.
Amid the arguments, the ulti-
mate goal is still simple: All
of us want our food to be safe,
nutritious and accessible to
everyone, including future gen-
erations.
Sifting through the opinions
and bringing back the logic is
actually simple, too. Just as the
medical field relies on thorough
research to discover new treat-
ments that are both safe and
effective, the same thought pro-
cess needs to apply to our food
discussion.
We need reliable sources
that repeatedly demonstrate the
safety and nutritional value of
the foods we eat.
Let’s use the topic of raw
milk as an example. As con-
sumers, we appreciate having
numerous choices of products
in the dairy case. However,
consuming raw milk and other
non-pasteurized dairy products
presents a public health safety
issue.
According to the Center for
Disease Control (CDC), the rate
of food poisoning outbreaks
caused by raw milk and unpas-
teurized dairy products is 150
times greater than outbreaks
linked to pasteurized products.
These outbreaks may be on the
rise given the emotional popu-
larity of raw milk products.
Even though our modern
dairy farms are much cleaner
and better-managed than years
ago, all animals naturally harbor
bacteria and present a risk if this
food is not processed correctly.
Pasteurization is a great exam-
ple of a thoroughly researched
technology that has removed
a potential health risk without
compromising dairy products’
nutritional value.
It was interesting to listen to
radio call-in shows one day con-
cerning this topic.
One caller, for example,
firmly stated that he had con-
sumed raw milk all of his life
and he can count on one hand
how many times he has been
sick. That’s great for him, but it
leaves out a lot of information.
He might be fortunate to
have minimal family history of
disease. We don’t know if he
gets enough exercise and sleep
or whether his diet is well-
balanced. Does he practice good
hygiene? We cannot say that
one single choice has led to his
outstanding health as many fac-
tors are most likely at play.
To prove that raw milk was
indeed the source of his great
health, we would need to see
similar results from thousands
of people with all different
backgrounds, lifestyles and
genetics. However, peer-
reviewed research does not
show a health benefit and actu-
ally shows a much higher risk
for illness associated with raw
milk.
Let’s use another example
– genetically modified foods
(GMOs) – and this one has an
even wider ironic twist. It’s
interesting to see the strong
movement for the legalization
of raw milk sales when research
repeatedly shows significant
health risks from this food. At
the same time, we see a strong
movement to ban food produced
with GMO technology even
though piles of research show
that it improves crop health (and
subsequent yields) and reduces
chemical and mechanical inputs.
Prior to the approval of GMO
crops 20 years ago, thousands of
research trials and years of uni-
versity research were invested
to verify GMO crops show no
differences in food safety than
conventional crops.
Here in the Oregon area, we
can drown out a lot of the noise
and personal information about
complicated and can be confus-
ing topics such as GMO and
raw milk by turning to some
nearby resources. I encourage
you to seek out University of
Wisconsin experts when look-
ing for credible information on
your food choices and food pro-
duction practices. After all, the
university has some of the best
researchers in the world.
As we look to the future, we
need to sustainably bridge the
gap between population growth
and food supply. We need to
find the ways we can safely pro-
duce wholesome and nutritious
foods for billions of different
people and lifestyles. We will
need to continue to do more
with less and find the balance
between adapting new technolo-
gies and reducing any potential
risks that may exist.
University research will play
a crucial role in our future in
order to scientifically verify
new technologies and ensure
they are safe, socially respon-
sible and economically viable.
Rod Martin is a Town of
Brooklyn resident with 24 years
of experience in consulting with
Midwest dairy operations.
Let’s put some logic
on the dinner table
Martin
Community Voices
Corrections
The last few words of Seth Jovaag’s story “‘Just cause’ debate slogs
ahead” were cutoff in last week’s Oregon Observer. The last sentence
should have read, “The surplus from the past two years will allow the
district to replace old equipment, invest in training and investigate
more options to introduce locally-grown food to school menus, Wei-
land said.” The Observer regrets this error.
See something wrong?
The Oregon Observer does not sweep errors under the rug. If you
see something you know or even think is in error, please contact editor
Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or at ungeditor@wcinet.com so we can get it
right.
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Pretty in pink
No, the pink flamingos haven’t migrated north for the fall, it’s just an excuse to
have some fun to celebrate a recent 40th birthday at this house on Burr Oak Lane.
In Business
The Oregon Observer runs a business section on the fourth week
of each month, highlighting local business topics and news bits. To
submit an item for this page, e-mail editor Jim Ferolie at ungeditor@
wcinet.com. To inquire about advertising on this page, e-mail oregon
sales@wcinet.com. Or call 845-9559.
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
Sponsored by: CUNA Mutual Group, SVA, First Business, Gordon
Flesch Company, Inc., Oak Bank, The Little Gym and Wegner CPAs
Participating Restaurants: The Great Dane, Liliana’s, Yahara Bay
Distillery, Pancake Cafe, Tuscany Grill, Buffalo Wild Wings, Thai Noodle,
Benvenuto’s Italian Grill, Jordandal Cookhouse and Wildtree
u
n
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7
2
5
3
Thank you
Country View
Veterinary Service
for purchasing my pig from
the Dane County Fair!
Carson Hammersley
Thank you Oregon and Brooklyn for
making the Oregon/Brooklyn Lions Stuff
The Bus a success. We collected over
$2,700 in school supplies and monies for
the Oregon/Brooklyn School District.
OREGON-BROOKLYN-LIONS.ORG
U
N
3
0
7
7
0
7
Get Connected: Join us for our
FALL KICKOFF!
Sunday, September 8
Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Open House: 10:30 a.m.
Community Picnic: 11:30 a.m.
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
(608) 835-3154
www.stjohnsoregonwi.org
Rev. Paul Markquart & Rev. Emily Tveite
U
N
3
0
0
6
3
1
Freshman Honors
Anders, Samuel
Auer, Elizabeth
Berke, Madeline
Chase, Max
Cloud, Trevor
Crespo, Cristian
Dallman, Tyler
Davis, Steven
Dietrich, Chandra
Dosher, Maxwell
Espich, Morgan
Fanning, Makena
Feest, Nathan
Fellenz, Katherine
Gefke, Natalie
Gomoll, Joshua
Govier, Nathan
Hackner, Jonathan
Hale, Tyler
Hansen, Constance
Hughes, Emma
Hurda, Logan
Koopman, Leah
Kugel, Willow
Lappen, Patrick
Larson, Brendan
LeBrun, Maddie
Lessner, Kailee
Lucas, Michael
Mckeown, Kristi
Michek, Brandon
Milz, ElliAnna
Mrozenski, Lance
Nasserjah, Arianna
Nikolai, Cassidy
Olson, Sarah
Paddock, Breanne
Padfield, Haley
Paltz, Andrew
Parsons, Derrick
Peterson, Annie
Petras, Annie
Piper, Logan
Reimer, Laura
Ricker, Trent
Risser, Matthew
Root, Larissa
Schultz, Rebekkah
Schwartz, Joseph;
Sergent, Mason
Sharkus, Mitchell
Soule, Charles
Stoddard, Chloe
Temte, Jonas
Tepp, Benjamin
Tower, Lauren
Tucker, Jackson

Freshman High
Honors
Ast, Samuel
Aurit, Jeffrey
Bartelt, Jessica
Bull, Sean
Chr i st of f er son,
Andrew
Cisler, Maria
Cody, Amber
Collins, Riley
Copus, Sydney
Coughlin, Mariana
Cox, Courtney
Craig, Anna
Dewey, Sarah
Doering, Alexis
Gerwig, Kelsey
Girard, Samantha
Grady, Alizabeth
Greisinger, Gracie
Groblewski, Emma
Guenther, Sarah
Hall, Nicole
Hallinan, Luke
Hann, Jared
Heim, David
Hill, Thompson
Howe, Timothy
Irvin-Vitela, Simon
Jacobs, Jessica
Janes, Benjamin
Johnson, Jennifer
K r e b s b a c h ,
Spencer
Kriefski, Alexandra
LeBrun, Nina
Locy, Lauren
Lynch, Emily
Martin, Derek
Maurice, Dominic
McCombs, Caitlin
M c D e r m o t t ,
Alexander
Meidl, Isabel
Meier, Erica
Miess, Beryl
Molot, Max
Nevel, Cole
Newton, Quincey
Norland, Allyson
Odorico, Kristen
Owen, Justin
P e t e r s o n ,
Alexandra
Pierce, Charles
Podnar, Olivia
Purdy, Sierra
Quamme, Sidney
Reid, Lauren
Rockwell, Haley
Samu, Kysa
Sande, Anika
Schulz, Joshua
Shillingstad, David
Slack, Jenna
Sommers, Solanus
Swenson, Lillianna
Swiggum, Cameren
Teasdale, Taylor
Victorson, Annika
Wales, Austin
Wall, Mitchell
Weiland, Benjamin
Wenger, Kathleen
Wiedholz, Kayla
Wright, Christina

Freshman Straight A
Connery, Bailey
Damon, McKenzie
Frank, Veronica
Hanson, Zachary
Hardin, EmmaLeah
Jacobs, Elliot
Keiner, Sydney
Kenley, Jeffrey
Lindloff, Megan
Martin, Taylor
Odden, Kjetil
Robinson, Amanda
Schaeffer, Samuel
Sharkus, Meghan
Spierings, Kate
Stevenson, May
Wirtz, Alexander
Zernick, Emily


Sophomore Honors
Anderson, Jordan
Andriacchi, Joseph
Ayers, Abigail
Barron, Anissa
Beach, Joanna
Boehm, Clayton
Brown, Lauren
Carpenter, Avery
Cina, Jarrett
Colin, Ariel
Condon, Mitchell
Deegan, Brennen
Diaz, Camilina
D o m b r o w s k i ,
Daniel
Eisert, Megan
England, Jasmine
Evert, Tori
Fleming, Paityn
Hake, Tyler
Hynek, Sean
Jacobson, Andrea
Jensen, Zackary
Jenson, Mary
Joswig, Hannah
Klus, Hunter
LaBrosse, Victoria
Lemke, James
Liechty, Stephanie
Machonga, Ryan
Maier, Garrett
Marnauzs, Sven
M c G u i n e ,
Christopher
Miller, Johnathon
Nelson, Izaac
Novotny, Zachary
Peckham, Riley
Petras, Kyle
Rossmeisl, Anna
Schmitt, Abby
Schroeder, Danielle
Smedley, Kendall;
S t e i d e m a n n ,
Nicholas
Talley, DeEtte
Tobias, Markus
Torhorst, Carson
Trolinger, Shianne
Tucker, Alexander
Walowit, Valerie
We d d e r s p o o n ,
Marissa

Sophomore High
Honors
Adler, Nicholas
Anderson, Sarah
Barron, Kyle
Barry, Ryan
Bausch, Kaci
Boley, Jessica
Brandenburg, Nina
Brechlin, Ashley
Burke, Brenna
Busler, Austin
C h r i s t e n s e n ,
Alexandra
C h r i s t e n s e n ,
Joshua
Farris, Mackenzie
Gaus, Quintin
Gerow, Erica
Hermus, John
Horsnell, Samuel
Hughes, Colin
Hyames, Hannah
Jaeggi, Lindsey
Jahn, Kelsey
Kane, Peter
King, Sydney
Kissling, Peter
Klementz, Zachary
Knipfer, Lucas
Kramer, Alizabeth
Krier, Cassandre
Laundrie, Caylan
Lawry, Brendan
L e a k e ,
Benjamin
L u b i n s k i ,
Bailey
M a r t i n ,
Tasha
Massey, Claire
Meeker, Madeleine
Moen, Kyle
Nelson, Andrew
Paltz, William
Pearson, Megan
Pearson, Spencer
Petersen, Brenna
Phillips, Rosilyn
Rice, Caroline
Rosemeyer, Riley
Rowe, Yanique
Ryan, Kaela
Sanford, William
Schel l er - Sui t or ,
Cameron
Schmidt, Teryl
Schulting, Ethan
Sc hwa r t z s t e i n,
Emily
Skiles, James
Stoffel, Miles
Stoffel, Peter
Tervort, Raegan
Torpy, Mackenzie
Uselmann, Alexa
Walker, Ana
Sophomore Straight
A
Chapman, Allison
Griffith, Daniel
Hagen, Shelbey
Hinesh, Brett
Igl, Andrew
Kessenich, Wilhelm
McAnulty, Hannah
Moravec, Elliot
Pfeffer, Claire
Wagner, Kayla
Weidensee, Alida

Junior Honors
Adams, Austin
Adkins, Bailey
Badillo, Gloria
Bales, Jordan
Baron, Jennifer
Behrend, Brady
Boehnen, Katelyn
Brashi, Dustin
Carignan, Kyle
Catlin, Kayla
Cooper, Shane
Douglass, Amanda
Espich, Taylor
Etienne, Samantha
Foor, Carly
Gefke, Emily
Gits, Maddison
Gomez, Daniela
Greene, Allison
Hale, Ryan
I r o n m o n g e r ,
Danielle
Jaeger, Jacob
Jones, Valerie
Jordaan, Therese
Kapusta, Nicholas
Kelly, Meaghan
Knight, Alexander
Korpela, Wesley
Krizan, Makayla
Kutz, Jessica
LaFever, Chloe
Lalor, Erin
Lynch, Ryan
Martin, Mariah
Maurice, Abraham
McKenna, Morgan
Moore, Danielle
Moran, Emily
Morhoff, Hanna
Mosiman, Samuel
Mrozenski, Logan
Nyenhuis, Andrew
Nyman, Taylor
Osborne, Halie
Paltzer, Mitchell
Pease, Brandi
Peterson, Lance
Powers, Jonathan
Purdy, Colton
Reimer, Claire
Reinicke, Will
Rhiner, John
Roesch, Theresa
Rolfsmeyer, Marlee
Sampson, Matthew
Schneider, Jackson
Schultz, Sarah
Smith, Madeline
S t r y c h a r s k e ,
Nicholas
Tollakson, Dakota
Utikal, Adam
Vlasak, Monica
Walsh, Chad
Wysocky, Lauren
Zernick, Jennifer

Junior High Honors
Ainsworth, Jenna
Bacon, KayLynn
Bausch, Carly
Borden, Katie
Brugger, Megan
Byron, Colin
Carpenter, Ruby
C h r i s t e n s e n ,
Hayley
Conduah, Jonathan
Donner, Katie
Farness, Maxwell
Feest, Helen
Fourdraine, Jason
Gochberg, Aaron
Goodwick, Carissa
Guenther, Rachel
Guthmiller, Megan
Hakes, Rachel
Hall, Natalie
Higgins, Elinor
Hughes, Rachel
Irvin-Vitela, Maya
Jacobson, Ashley
Johnson, Troy
Kane, Hannah
Knox, Natalie
Kratz, Audrey
Krumrei, Mallory
Kursel, Cameron
Lam, Chi-Ching
Ligler, Katherine
Lowe, Megan
Marshall, Kristin
McBride, Anne
McCann, Alexandra
McCartney, Anna
McCorkle, Morgan
M c C o r m i c k ,
Caroline
M c W i l l i a m s ,
Nathan
Meier, Abigail
Mellen, Miranda
Miller, Nicholas
Milski, Abigail
Molot, Arielle
Morgan, Madeline
Murphy, Bryce
Nytes, Kayla
Olson, Shannon
Peterson, Michelle
Peterson, Pierce
Proto, Gabrielle
Rau, Daniel
Rehrauer, Bradley
Schnabel, Chaylee
Schnabel, Hailie
Seeger, Geneva
Sommers, Cosette
Steinberg, Lydia
Switzky, Miranda
Szabo, Morgan
Webber, Kyle
Wienholtz, Bradlee
Wilhelm, Jackson
Williams, Ian

Junior Straight A
Boettcher, Nicole
Eithun, Thomas
Frankson, Lara
Jackson, Maurice
Jost, Emily
K l o n s i n s k i ,
Madison
Neidhart, Eliza
Nelson, Kassandra
Onesti, Alec
Pauls, Regan
Schmitt, Megan
Wagner, Mark
Weber, Courtney
Wood, Jamie
Zerbe, Rebekah

Senior Honors
Ambrose, Joseph
Andersen, Weslee
Ashworth, Taylor
Baumann, Jarid
Bessemer, Adam
Beyler, Kelsey
Brauns, Adam
Corcoran, Rebecca
Crossen, Brooke
Daws, Jared
Debroux, Brooke
Deegan, Jennifer
Donner, Nickolas
Ehrke, Mikaela
Forster, Emily
Gombar, Katiya
Greisinger, Greta
Groenier, Charles
Harrison, Scout
Hepner, Nicholas
Jacobsen, Amber
Johnson, Brian
Johnson, Cassie
Johnson, Emily
Kahl, Sarah
Kannal, Allen
Kelbel, Jessica
Ledin, Emma
Lee, Danielle
Likitpanyachote,
Nanfa
Markquart, Hannah
McAnulty, Heather
McClurg, Christiana
McGinnis, Tyler
McReavy, Colin
Morhoff, Haily
Mussehl, Ross
N a s s e r j a h ,
Alexander
Nikolai, Blake
Ochoa, Carlos
Paltzer, Wyatt
Peach, Sidney
Pressprich, Emily
Ragels, Zachary
Reukema, Jessica
Richards, Neenah
Schulting, Andrew
Schulz, Clayton
Sc hwa r t z s t e i n,
Anna
Slusser, Danielle
Tanner, Danielle
Urben, Aimee
Wagner, Ava
Walowit, Lucas
Ward, Hunter
Weber, Cordel
Wendlandt, Sara
Wunsch, Gabrielle
Wyland, Rebecca
Zavoral, Annie

Senior High Honors
Anderson, Dylan
Bandt, Alex
Behling, Jeffrey
Bissen, Nathan
Boumstein, Alexis
Brien, Courtney
Buchanan, Morgan
Christians, Tawnee
Cody, Amanda
Evans, Kayla
Fallon, Timothy
Fischer, Katrina
Gempeler, Heidi
Goldberg, Aaron
Haggerty, Robyn
Hughes, Lauren
Jackson, Kiana
Jacobs, Sarah
Jaeggi, Jeffrey
Jend, Andrew
Johnson, Lisa
Joyce, Claire
Kaeppler, Mikayla
Kutz, Sarah
Lessner, Kyle
Luther, Kirbie
Maurice, Simon
McCann, Tayler
McGuine, Ryan
Morey, Hailey
N o w l a n d ,
Alexander
Owen, Derek
Peckham, Brittany
Petersen, Erica
Petrie, Zachary
Pflaum, Alan
Potenti, Claudio
Prew, Allison
Ricker, Maranda
Rockwell, Danielle
Russell, Lydia
Schwartz, Daniel
Shirk, Caitlin
Shirk, Natalie
Slepica, Madison
Smith, Alexis
Steinberg, Danielle
Temte, Elizabeth
Tushoski, Kaitlin
Vaccaro, Cole
Vogt, Madeline
Wall, Jacob
Wangen, Anna

Senior Straight A
Hallinan, David
Karls, Ethan
Nelson, Alexa
Odorico, Scott
Wood, Michelle
Oregon High School honor roll
Second semester, 2012-13 school year
6
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
LUTHERAN CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
offce@communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 am & 10:15 am Worship service
at Oregon High School PAC
Quest for grades 1-6 during 10:15
service
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Thursday, Sept. 5
• 1 p.m., Country line dancing begins, Oregon Senior
Center
• 6 p.m., Open Mic, Firefly
• 6:30 p.m., Optimist Club, Oregon High School
Library
• 6:30 p.m., Village of Oregon Planning Commission,
Village Hall
Saturday, Sept. 7
• 4:30-7 p.m., Oregon Sportsman’s steak feed, ore-
gonsportsmans.com
Monday, Sept. 9
• 5:30 p.m. Village finance meeting, Oregon Village
Hall • 6:30 p.m., Village of Brooklyn board meeting,
Village Hall
• 7 p.m., Oregon School District Board of Education
meeting, Rome Corners Intermediate School
Tuesday, Sept. 10
• 2 p.m., Oregon Area Chamber of Commerce 9-Hole
Scramble at Foxboro Golf Club
Wednesday, Sept. 11
Patriot Day
• 9-11 a.m., Rubber Stamping Cards with Katie at the
senior center
Thursday, Sept. 12
• 1 p.m., How to grow great garlic, senior center
Friday, Sept. 13
• 10:30 a.m., Barbecue and music, senior center
Monday, Sept. 16
• 6 p.m. Village board meeting, Oregon Village Hall
Community calendar
Thursday, Sept. 5
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Sept. 3)
Friday, Sept. 6
U.S. Army News
Saturday, Sept. 7
Stoughton Syttende Mai
Parade (of May 19)
Sunday, Sept. 8
Worship Service: First
Presbyterian Church
Monday, Sept. 9
“Taste of Theater” Part 1
& 2
Tuesday, Sept. 10
“Taste of Theater” Part 3
& 4
Wednesday, Sept. 11
“Taste of Theater” Part 5
& 6 &7
Thursday, Sept. 12
Progressives “Open Mic”
(of Sept. 5)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, Sept. 9
AM—Diabetic Foot Care
AM—Reflexology
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:00 Planning Committee
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
1-4 WI Home Energy Asst.
4:30 T.O.P.S. Weight Loss
Tuesday, Sept. 10
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:15 Cont. Piano Class
2:15 Beg. Piano Class
Wednesday, Sept. 11
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Cards with Katie
11:00 On-Line Games
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Thursday, Sept. 12
AM—Chair Massage
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 COA
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
1:00 Fall Garlic Planting
1:00 Country Line Dancing
Friday, Sept. 13
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
10:30 SENIOR CENTER
Monday, Sept. 9
Turkey Roast w/Gravy,
Mashed Potatoes/Gravy,
Beets, Fresh Fruit, Multi
Grain Bread, Ice Cream
VO – Egg Salad
Tuesday, Sept. 10
Hearty Vegetable Soup,
Crackers, Tuna Salad/
Lettuce Leaf on Whole
Wheat Bun, Banana, Cookie
VO-Cottage Cheese w/
Garnish
Wednesday, Sept. 11
Tater Tot Casserole,
Carrots, Small Croissant,
Strawberry Short Cake w/
Topping
VO- Soy Casserole
Thursday, Sept. 12
Chicken Tetrazzini
Casserole, Italian Green
Beans, Peach Slices, W.W.
Bread
VO-Swiss Cheese on Rye
SO—Tortellini Salad
Friday, Sept. 13
SPECIAL MEAL
BBQ Ribs on Bone, Baked
Potato w/Sour Cream,
Glazed Baby Carrots, Dinner
Roll, Pie
VO-Veggie Ribbetts
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, Sept. 5
Oregon School Board
Special Meeting (of Aug. 28)
Friday, Sept. 6
7 p.m.--LIVE--OHS Boys
Varsity Football vs Monona
Grove
Saturday, Sept. 7
OHS Boys Varsity Soccer vs
Baraboo (of Sept. 5)
Sunday, Sept. 8
OHS Boys Varsity Football
vs Monona Grove (of Sept. 6)
Monday, Sept. 9
6:30 p.m.--LIVE--Oregon
School Board Meeting
Tuesday, Sept. 10
“Blue Sundays” Band (of
Aug. 31)
Wednesday, Sept. 11
OHS Boys Varsity Soccer vs
Milton (of Sept. 10)
Thursday, Sept. 12
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Sept. 9)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
Sensitive Egos
My brothers and I were recently engaged in a conversation about
our childhood in which we all felt compelled to apologize for our
youthful teasing and taunting of each other. What was interesting
to me was that we all felt that in one way or another the teasing
and striving with each other had made us more prepared to deal
with life. One brother even expressed the worry that “we are so
over-sensitized to emotionally abusive people these days that
we are cultivating a whole generation of young people who are
unable to handle any kind of threats to their fragile egos. When
they are bullied they react in ways that are hugely disproportion-
ate to the situation, i.e. suicides, mass shootings, etc.” Perhaps
the teasing banter and rough and tumble play of childhood is
preparation for life in a world that isn’t always sensitive to the
fragile vagaries of our ego. It would be nice, albeit boring, if we
lived in a world where everyone was always kind and deferential
but until that ideal world arrives, perhaps we should let kids
engage in the rough and tumble world of childhood in a way
that will prepare them for the real world. Resolving conflict is an
important skill that is best learned early in life.
– Christopher Simon for Metro News Service
“A hot-tempered person stirs up conflict, but the one who is
patient calms a quarrel.”
Proverbs 15: 18
Want to get your community event or calendar item in the Observer?
Send an email with the information to:

ungcalendar@wcinet.com
Oregon Brooklyn Optimist
Club meeting change
The Oregon Brooklyn Optimist
club will continue to meet the first
Thursday of every month at 6:30
p.m., but beginning this week, the
group will meet at the Oregon High
School Library.
Sportsman’s steak banquet
and fundraiser
The Oregon Sportsman’s Steak
Feed banquet and fundraiser is set for
4:30-7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, at 1726
Sand Hill Road in Oregon.
The cost is $10 for kids 14 years
old and younger; $15 for adults.
Many raffles prizes will be available,
including a Browning Tactical Series
gun safe (with mystery gear inside), a
$1,000 archery package, $500 resort
package, $500 salon and spa package
and more.
For more information on the event,
visit oregonsportsmans.com or call
835-3314.
Piano classes for adults
Beginner and continuing students
can take classes at the Oregon Area
Senior Center beginning Tuesday,
Sept. 10 from 2:15-3 p.m.
The lessons will run through Nov.
12. The cost is $100 without a book
or $120 with a book.
9-hole scramble at Foxboro
Golf Club
Golfers, get ready to hit the links
once more before the leaves start to
fall.
At 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, (reg-
istration is at 1:30 p.m.) the Oregon
Area Chamber of Commerce is spon-
soring a 9-Hole Scramble at Foxboro
Golf Club.
An After 5 Business Mixer will
immediately follow the golf. The cost
is $45 per person/$165 for a four-
some. To register or sign up, call 835-
3697.
Rubber stamping cards with
Katie
People are invited to the Oregon
Area Senior Center from 9-11 a.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 11 to create six
handmade greeting cards to send to
friends and loved ones.
Instructor Katie Johnson will come
with three different card samples and
you will make two of each design.
Materials and envelopes provided.
Please bring your own adhesive.
Everyone is invited—no experience
necessary.
This event is great for unleashing
your creativity ... people will be able
to learn a new skill each month. To
sign up, call Anne at 835-5801 by
Monday, Sept. 9.
The cost is $10 per person (only
about $1.65 per card).
How to grow great garlic
Check out the Oregon Area Senior
Center from 1-2:30 p.m., Thursday,
Sept. 12 and learn how to grow great
garlic.
The class will cover: seed selection,
soil preparation, planting info (spac-
ing, depth, winter care), best planting
times this fall, and harvesting guide-
lines (summer of 2014).
The instructor is Gary Kuyzinski.
Cost: $5 or 1 Dane County Time
Bank hour. For information, call Gary
at (608) 228-4172.
Contact Anne at the Oregon Area
Senior Center at 835-5801 to sign up
for this class.
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
Ask The Oregon
SENIOR CARE
Q. How can I help my senior eat a nutritious diet?
A. No matter what your age, good nutrition is one of the best ways to stay healthy and
daily food choices can make an important difference. Managing the nutritional needs of
your senior can be a challenge, but here are some practical diet tips that can help. Healthy
eating can increase mental acuteness, help to resist illness and disease, promote higher energy
levels, faster recuperation times and better management of chronic health problems. Eating
a balanced mix of healthy foods can be a key to a positive outlook as well as help prevent
diseases such as heart, stroke, type 2 diabetes, bone loss and some kinds of cancer or anemia.
Be sure to check with a doctor or registered dietitian about foods to include or avoid. Here
are a few suggestions: Whole, enriched, and fortified grains and cereals such as brown rice
and 100% whole wheat bread; Bright-colored vegetables such as carrots and broccoli; Deep-
colored fruit such as berries and melon; Low-fat and non-fat dairy products such as yogurt and low-lactose milk; Dry
beans and nuts, fish, poultry, lean meat and eggs; Liquid vegetable oils and soft spreads low in saturated and trans fat;
Fluid intake and foods with high water content such as lettuce, vegetable juice and soups; Making small changes can
help a senior enjoy meals and assure that he or she gets the nutrients and energy
needed for healthy, active living.
Stephen Rudolph
FACHE, CSA
5396 King James Way, Suite 210, Madison, WI 53719
(608) 442-1898 • www.comfortkeepers.com
VETERINARIAN
Q. What should I do if I find injured or orphaned wildlife?
A. Trying to help injured or orphaned wildlife can be dangerous to both you and the
animal you are trying to help. Many carry diseases that can be transmitted to humans
and pets and frightened animals may bite or scratch trying to protect themselves from
you. If possible, place a cardboard box or laundry basket over the animal to contain them
until you are able to contact a licensed animal control officer or wildlife rehabilitator.
Different species have very specific dietary and medical needs and it is against the law
to rehabilitate wildlife in Wisconsin without a proper license.
1350 S. Fish Hatchery Road
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-0551
Photos by Scott De Laruelle
It was a fun first day for kids and staff alike at Rome Corners Intermediate School on Tuesday. CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Sarah
Boerigter, Gianna Schulz, Anneka Haglund, Sydney Jackson, Carolyn Gehrmann, Grace Michels and Claire Michels enjoy their
lunch; students listen intently during reading time; these two buddies have some fun in the lunchroom.
Back to school (continued)
8
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office – Madison, WI 53783
© 2006 002138 – 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office – Madison, WI 53783
© 2006 002138 – 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
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Scott De LarueLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
When President Thomas
Jefferson appointed Meri-
wether Lewis and William
Clark to explore the newly
purchased Louisiana Ter-
ritory, he probably had no
idea their path would make
such a cool summer trip for
kids more than 200 years
later.
But “Westward Bound”
is more than just a fun way
to follow in the footsteps of
the country’s two leading
explorers. In June, a group
of 20 eighth-grade students
and five chaperones trav-
eled nearly 2,000 miles as
they explored the West and
reflected in the glory of the
lands that Lewis and Clark
– not to mention genera-
tions of Native Americans
– once walked.
While there were plenty
of new things to learn and
see along the way, some
of the greatest discoveries
were of themselves.
T h e p r o g r a m wa s
approved last fall by the
Oregon School Board to
help “at risk” eighth grade
st udent s t ransi t i on i nt o
high school by building
their confidence and lead-
ership skills, and helping
them feel more connected
to their school and com-
munity. The foundations of
the program are building
connections, learning about
the outdoors, experiencing
hands-on learning and find-
ing out more about diverse
cultures.
The course is the brain-
child of Oregon Middle
School teacher Amy Vatne-
Bintliff, who previously led
students on three similar
cross-country summer trips
while teaching in Minne-
sota. The stories from those
trips and how they affected
those students formed the
basis of her 2001 book,
“Re-engaging Disconnected
Youth.”
Vatne-Bintliff said the
transition from eighth to
ninth grade is a time when a
lot of students really strug-
gle, making a program like
“Westward Bound” particu-
larly useful.
“Especially those first
mont hs of hi gh school ,
t he y c a n f e e l r e a l l y
overwhelmed,” she said.
Participants are chosen
for the program based on
t eacher or st aff recom-
mendations. The course
is geared toward students
who have struggled with
truancy, schoolwork, fam-
ily problems or low self-
esteem or who have gotten
into trouble in or out of
school. Eighty percent of
students on the trip failed
one or more classes last
year.
“Westward Bound” was
f unded t hr ough near l y
$9,000 in donations from
t he communi t y, i ncl ud-
ing the Oregon Education
Foundation, the Oregon
Rotary Club and the Madi-
son South Rotary Club, as
the cost per student was
more than $700.
Learning experience
The program began with
two full summer school
cl assroom days, where
st udent s l earned camp-
ing skills, Lakota history,
westward expansion history
and steps to investigate sci-
ence along the journey. The
group then boarded three
vans and headed out on a
week-long camping trip to
Devil’s Tower, Wyo., stop-
ping at historic sites along
the way, including the Akta
Lakot a Museum, Crazy
Horse Monument, Badlands
National Park and Custer
State Park.
Lessons on caring for the
environment, “Leave No
Trace” camping and lead-
ership skills were taught
along the way by three
teachers licensed in lan-
guage arts, history and sci-
ence. Students saw many
animals, interviewed Native
American artists and saw
a fossil workshop at Bad-
lands National Park.
Each evening on the trip
and each class, the group
met in a “Restorative Jus-
tice Talking Circle,” said
Vatne-Bintliff.
“We use a ‘talking piece’
that is passed around the
circle,” she said. “When
someone has the talking
piece, it is their time to
speak. When they don’t,
it is their time to listen. It
serves to connect the group
and form trust along the
journey,” she said. It also
serves as a way to reflect on
the day’s experiences and
the lessons learned.”
Vatne-Bintliff said some
of the best memories of the
journey centered around
students supporting and
encouraging each other as
they tried new things.
“One student participated
in a hike that challenged
his fear of heights, other
students worked through
missing their families, still
anot her shared feel i ngs
during circle,” she said.
“Through all these things,
st udent s used words of
encouragement and praise
wi t hout any prompt i ng
from adults.”
Students also volunteered
at a camp for people with
disabilities called “Meet-
ing the Need” in Otho,
S.D. They listened to Dal-
las Dietrich, founder of
the camp, share his stories
of resiliency, then worked
hard on forest fire preven-
tion and cleaned ditches
along the camp.
“The st udent s di d an
amazi ng j ob, ” Vat ne-
Bintliff said. “They came
together and were work-
ing as a team by the second
day.”
This was the first year
Vatne-Bintliff took kids on
the trip that were as young
as eighth-graders, but she
said the group was great
and the trip was wonderful.
“They did an amazing
job,” she said. “They really
came together as a group.
Our service project helped
with that and our evening
circles solidified it.”
When students returned
from the trip, they met
again as a class and devel-
oped a newsletter and par-
t i ci pat ed i n i nt ervi ews
about t he t r i p and i t s
impact. They will continue
to meet in circle through-
out this year. “Returning
to that circle space will re-
connect the group and will
allow students to explore
the joys and challenges of
the transition,” said Vatne
Bintliff. “The camping trip
serves as a model for how
resilient students are and
the leadership that they
showed during the jour-
ney.”
Students speak
Eighth-graders who par-
ticipated were: Jayme Zan-
der, Emma Lust, Joshua
Klahn, Marcus Robey, Josh
Rudolph, Kassidy Aberle,
Faith Vaughn, Jeremiah
Kadl ec, Brayan Lopez,
Jamts Batbaatar, Lily Lin,
Chris Haggerty, Melanie
Blatterman, Alexus Jensen,
Nic Tierman, Alisha Chat-
field, Tim Soderman, Alex
Peschl and Karla Ortega.
Ninth-grader Rachel Gold-
berg served as a mentor.
Haggerty said the trip
was definitely worth spend-
ing some of his summer
vacation.
“It’s something you’re
not going to forget for a
long time,” he said.
Haggerty had heard from
friends about the trips in
years past, and made it a
point to go along this year.
He said he learned a lot
from the journey – being
away from home and mak-
ing new friends.
“It was about just get-
ting out more and not being
so lazy,” Haggerty said. “I
also appreciate going on the
trip for free, when it was
kind of expensive.”
His favorite place to visit
on the trip was the Black
Hi l l s, and hi s favori t e
moment was when massive,
shaggy bison would walk
right up to vehicles.
“That was pretty cool
to see up close,” Haggerty
said.
For any students who
might be thinking about
joining up for the trip next
summer, Haggerty said it is
well worth it.
“Go on the trip if you
have the opportunity to take
it,” he said. “You might not
be able to see something
like that ever again. You
won’t regret going.”
Zander said she’s wanted
to go on the trip for some
time, and was not disap-
pointed.
“I hadn’t really known
any of the people who went
very well, but now I have
some really good friends,”
she sai d. “Every ni ght
we sat in a circle around
a campfire with a talking
piece, and it was kind of
deep (conversations) and it
was easy to share. I don’t
have a lot of friends, but it
was good because we had
to be together, and by the
end we just wanted to be
together the entire time.”
Adventure time!
OHS Westward bound class more than a fun 2,000 mile trip
Photos submitted
TOP: The Westward Bound group from Oregon Middle School poses by the Crazy Horse Monument in Montana during their trip west in
June. ABOVE LEFT: Eighth-grader Jayme Zander discovers bones on a morning walk. ABOVE RIGHT: Melanie Blatterman, Emma Lust,
Rachel Goldberg, Jeremiah Kadlec, Chris Haggerty, Marcus Robey, Joshua Klahn and Faith Vaughn horsing around at the Circle B Ranch.
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, September 5, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Panthers drop Milton in Badger South Conference debut
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
One of two seniors on the Ore-
gon girls tennis team with varsity
experience this season, Michelle
Peterson knows her coaches and
teammates are counting on her
experience more than ever this
season.
Such was the case Tuesday in
the Panthers’ Badger South Con-
ference debut as the No. 2 singles
player found herself down three
games to Milton’s Emma Davis in
the first set.
Fighting back to 2-5, Peterson
rattled off five-straight wins to
close out the first set and three
more to start the second in a 7-5,
6-2 victory that clinched a 4-3
win over the visiting Red Hawks
in Oregon’s conference debut.
“Coach came out and definitely
tried to get me to cool down my
emotions during that first set,”
Peterson said. “I just needed to
play strong and not let anything
get in my head because it’s such a
mental game.”
Sophomore Leah Koopman
was the first Panther off the court,
rolling 6-2, 6-1 at No. 1 singles.
Junior Kenzie Torphy followed
that up, winning her No. 3 singles
match 6-4, 6-1.
The Panthers went on to drop
the next two matches, falling 7-5,
6-4 at No. 2 doubles, and 6-2, 6-4
at 2 singles.
Deadlocked at 2-all, Oregon
picked up a vital 7-5, 6-2 win at
No. 4 singles from junior Claire
Massey.
The Panthers had a chance to
extend their lead to 5-2 with No.
3 doubles still on the court.
Sophomores Jess Bartelt and
Madeline Bjerke were unable to
match their magic from earlier in
the week, however, falling 6-4,
4-6, 7-6 (7-3).
Still it was quite a change from
a 6-1 loss to a Milton team that
typically battles for one of the top
three spots in the conference.
“Today was a huge win to not
only win, but win the way we
did,” co-head coach Eric Gavin-
ski said. “To fight back after
being down at 2 and 4 singles was
Volleyball
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior outside hitter Regan Pauls (1) celebrates with teammates – junior middle hitter Kena Hinker (15), senior setter Jamie Wood (middle) and senior setter Dani Loomis
– Aug. 29 after a block by Wood in the third game against Milton. The Panthers won 3-0 (25-22, 25-16, 25-16) to improve to 1-0 in the Badger South Conference (2-0
overall).
Panthers earn revenge
on milton after a regional
loss in 2012
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
From the first point the Ore-
gon High School volleyball team
scored l ast Thursday agai nst
Milton, it was evident the match
was going to be big, despite being
the first Badger South Confer-
ence game.
And the energy and momentum
continued throughout as the host
Panthers earned revenge on the
Red Hawks for knocking them
out of regionals in 2012 with a
3-0 sweep (25-22, 25-16, 25-16).
“We were really pumped when
we were get t i ng ready i n t he
locker room,” junior middle hitter
Riley Rosemeyer said. “You can
tell the excitement. We wanted
the revenge. This is conference.
We wanted to be on top, and we
knew this is what we needed to
do.”
Milton (0-1 Badger South, 0-1)
overall) didn’t have much going
for itself until the third game,
when the Red Hawks scored eight
out of nine points to take a 13-11
lead. But a kill by senior outside
hitter Maddy Gits, who led the
Panthers with 21, a few points
later changed all of that.
Oregon (1-0, 2-0) went on to
score 11 of the final 12 points,
including a couple of key blocks
by j uni or mi ddl e hi t t er Kena
Hinker, and took the game 25-16.
Rosemeyer said that blocking
Girls tennis
A sweeping success
Football
Turn to Volleyball/Page 11
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Senior Michelle Peterson slices a return during her No. 2 singles match Tuesday
against Milton’s Emma Davis in a 7-5, 6-3 win. The Panthers won their Badger
South Conference debut 4-3.
Panthers
stumble late
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Oregon scored 26-unan-
swered points Friday at
Mount Horeb/Barneveld, but
were unable to cement the
win late, dropping the Badger
Conference crossover game
46-39.
Panthers head coach Dan
Kissling called it one of the
most exciting high school
games he’d ever been part
of, even though there was no
doubt he’d like to rewrite the
ending.
“Mount Horeb’s offense is
very hard to simulate in prac-
tice,” Kissling said. “It took
us a little while to adjust, but
simply put, we have to elimi-
nate the big plays.”
Oregon rallied from an
18-point deficit, driving 75
yards before halftime to setup
the second of four touch-
down passes from senior
quarterback Jack Krueger to
junior wide receiver Josh Sro-
movsky.
Pushing the ball inside the
Vikings’ 1-yard line, the up-
tempo Oregon offense forced
MH/B to call timeout on
fourth down before Krueger
found Sromovsky open in the
rightside of the end zone.
“That was a huge momen-
tum shifter,” Sromovsky said.
“It gave us a lot of confidence
that we were the better team.”
Krueger went on to connect
with Sromovsky on scoring
passes from 44 and 57 yards
to start the third quarter.
Luke Knipfer forced a
fumble on the ensuing kickoff
before Oregon’s offense final-
ly stalled, going backwards
and punting on fourth-and-15.
Still, the Panthers’ defense
came up with another stop,
while junior Brock Buckner
tacked on an 8-yard touch-
down run to push the team’s
lead out to 39-31.
“We felt that we had con-
trol at that point, but we also
understood that we are a very
good team,” Sromovsky said.
“We couldn’t take a play off.”
Playing from behind for the
Turn to Football/Page 10
Turn to Tennis/Page 11
10
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Residential Trash & Recycling
Customers:
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
Residents normally serviced the week of
Sept. 2nd–Sept. 6th will be serviced one
day later than their normal pickup day.
• City of Fitchburg • City of Middleton
• DSI/Veridian/HOA’s • Town of Dunn
• Town of Pleasant Springs • Town of Verona
• Village of Arena • Village of Belleville
• Village of Brooklyn • Village of Oregon
• Village of Shorewood Hills • Village of Waunakee
ENJOY YOUR LABOR DAY!
NO TRASH PICKUP ON LABOR DAY
It’s all about the details!
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Caring for our Green World since 1978
Tim Andrews Horticulturist - LLC

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Fall planting season is here!
Trees, Shrubs, Perennials and lawns love
cool evenings and the rains of fall.
Photo submitted
Busting some clay
The Oregon Sportsman’s Club is pleased to announce that the team “United Clay Busters of America” were named Class AA Trap
Shooting Champions. The team consists of (from left) Mike Kriefski, John Krull, Shawn Harper, Jeff Szpak and Alex Schmalz. There
were 27 teams competing this year in our 12-week season. The team consisted of both men, women and youth shooters.
Boys soccer
Sievers, Mosiman lead
Panthers past Reedsburg
S e n i o r s
Sam Mosi -
m a n a n d
David Siev-
e r s e a c h
scored t wo
goals Tues-
day in a 6-0
non-confer-
ence win at
Reedsburg.
Si evers scored i n t he
second and ninth minutes,
while Mosiman tallied goals
in the 41st and 55th minutes.
Juniors Nick Steidemann
and Col i n Hughes al so
scored goals. Shaw Storey
added two assists in the first
half, and Steidemann and
Mitch Morhoff each had an
assist in the second half.
Senior Jere Bauer collect-
ed one save, while senior
Bradley Weinholtz added
two.
Oregon hosts Baraboo
at 7 p.m. Thursday, and it
opens the Badger South
Conference season at home
at 7 p.m. Tuesday against
Milton.
Pewaukee Pirate Cup
Oregon finished 0-1-1 in
the Pewaukee Cup last Fri-
day and Saturday.
The Pant her s l ost t o
Menomonee Fal l s 3- 0
Friday and tied Pewaukee
2-2 Saturday.
Agai ns t Menomonee
Falls, junior defender Joe
Burgoyne, senior forward
Nick Gonzales and senior
midfielder Will Vander-
horst all found the back of
the net, while junior goalie
Will Genthe stopped four
Oregon shots.
Junior goalie Dan Dom-
browski finished with five
saves.
The Panthers offense had
a little more success Satur-
day with two goals, includ-
ing a penalty kick by junior
midfielder Nick Steide-
mann in the 75th minute to
tie Pewaukee.
Pewaukee took the lead
in the 57th minute with a
goal by Griffin Jende, and
it tied the game at 1 in the
first half with a penalty
kick by Alex Zabel.
Hughes struck first for
Oregon with a goal in the
13th minute. Senior defend-
er Sam Mosiman had the
assist on the goal.
Dombrowski and senior
goalie Jere Bauer combined
for three saves for the Pan-
thers, while Pewaukee’s
Garrett Shibilski and Matt
Lupo combined for seven.
–Anthony Iozzo
Girls golf
Morgan McCorkle leads
Oregon at Portage invite
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
S e n i o r
M o r g a n
Mc Co r k l e
finished third
overall last
Wednesday
at the Portage
Invitational
at Por t age
Country Club
to help Ore-
gon take fourth with a 362.
McCorkle finished third
with a 75 behind Verona
junior Jessica Reinecke (71)
and Stoughton senior Becky
Klongland (74).
“I am so proud of how the
girls are doing,” head coach
Ben Cowan texted. “I can’t
wait to see how the rest of
the season turns out. Morgan
finally believes in her game
and has DI potential.”
Freshman Taylor McCorkle
followed with an 87, while
sophomore Jenny Johnson
and junior Ashley Brechlin
finished the scoring with a 94
and a 106, respectively.
Verona won the invitational
with a 332, while Stoughton
took second with a 336.
Oregon played in the Mil-
ton Invitational at University
Ridge Golf Course Wednes-
day, but results did not meet
the Observer’s Tuesday dead-
line.
Oregon plays in the Middle-
ton Invitational at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday at Pleasant View
Golf Course.
The Panthers then travels
to Stoughton Country Club to
take on the Vikings in a Bad-
ger South Conference dual at
3:30 p.m. Tuesday. Oregon is
1-1 in the Badger South Con-
ference this season.
Oregon 180,
Fort Atkinson 217
The Panthers traveled to
Koskonong Mounds Coun-
try Club last Thursday for a
Badger South dual against
Fort Atkinson and pulled out a
180-217 win.
Johnson led the Panthers
with a 42, while Taylor
McCorkle followed with a
43. Morgan McCorkle was
third with a 47. Senior Jessica
Nankivil finished the scoring
with a 48.
Photos by Jeremy Jones
Above: Alex Neal reacts during the waning seconds of the Panthers 46-39 loss Friday in Mount Horeb; (below) Sophomore Zach
Steklein (83) tackles Mount Horeb/Barneveld running back Wyatt Thompson for a loss in the first half.
Football: Panthers suffer heartbreaking loss at Mount Horeb
win certainly wasn’t anything
new for MH/B head coach
Travis Rohrer as over the
past six years, the Vikings’
coaching staff has won 40
percent of their games after
trailing.
Oregon on the other hand,
which has won just five
games over the past three
seasons, is still learning how
to close out a game with the
lead.
“We just aren’t used to
that,” Sromovsky said. “It’s
part of getting that experi-
ence ... our minds were rac-
ing faster than we were play-
ing.
“You could tell we weren’t
that comfortable, just because
we have never been in that
position.”
The Vikings answered
back with a 24-yard strike to
Alex Field from Max Mey-
lor, who one possession later,
ran 48 yards to push MH-B
ahead 46-39 with just over a
minute on the clock.
Though MH/B was only a
game from state a year ago,
it’s not the same team.
“We only have two back
on offense three or four
on defense,” Rohrer said.
“We’re young, so it was
huge just to be able to bat-
tle through some adversity
tonight.”
Krueger finished 15-of-
24 for 276 yards in the loss,
while Sromovsky caught
eight passes for 188 yards.
Buckner led the way on the
ground, racking up 114 yards
on 19 carries.
“We can play with any-
body, there’s just not going
to be any easy games in
the Badger Conference,”
Kissling said. “They had a lot
of mistakes, we just couldn’t
capitalize and finish it.”
The Panthers host four-
time defending Badger South
Conference champion Mono-
na Grove at 7 p.m. Friday.
Oregon follows up the Sil-
ver Eagles with Waunakee,
who won three-straight D2
state titles before finishing
runner-up a year ago.
“We’ve shown that we’re
able to move the ball and put
up a lot of points,” Kissling
said. “I think we’ll be OK.”
Continued from page 9
McCorkle
Mosiman
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
Swimmers turn in four top five finishes
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Oregon’s girls swimming
team was visited by former
UW-Madison Big Ten cham-
pion swimmer Ashley Wan-
land last week before open-
ing their season on the road.
Stoughton Relays
The Panthers had four
top five finishes out of the
12 events Tuesday at the
Stoughton Relay meet.
Oregon’s team of Abby
Schmitt, Logan Fahey, Allie
Greene, and Willow Kugel
highlighted the meet, finish-
ing second in the 200 medley
relay with a time of 2 min-
utes, 8.77 seconds.
Megan Schmitt, Gabby
Proto, Amber Cody, and
Quincey Newton added a
fifth-place finish in the 4x100
IM relay with a 5:07.57,
while Logan Fahey, Megan
Schmitt, Makayla Kapalc-
zynski and Greene matched
the finish in the 200 breast-
roke relay (2:30.05).
Oregon’s final top-five fin-
ish came from the team of
Megan Schmitt, Grace Przy-
byl, Miranda O’Rourke and
Proto in the 200 breastroke/
butterfly (2:29.64).
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has been the key so far this
season, and she said it was
what helped keep Milton’s
attack off-balance.
“We have been work-
ing mainly on our blocks
this year, and they have
surprisingly picked up,”
Rosemeyer said. “We saw
it in the last two games,
and i t has been a key
aspect because Milton has
some good strong hitters.
If we can block them, they
can’t stop us.”
Milton made a run in the
first game, as well after
Oregon took a 23-15 lead.
The Red Hawks scored
seven of t he next ei ght
points to pull to within
two. That prompted Ore-
gon head coach Kristen
Kluck to call a timeout and
calm the Panthers down.
Oregon came out of the
t i meout and scored t he
clincher for a 25-22 win to
set the tone for the rest of
the match.
I n t he second game,
Milton once again tried to
hang around, but the Pan-
thers scored five of the
final six points, including
two kills by Gits, to win
25-16.
The Panthers had some
trouble closing games and
matches last season, but
that is not the case so far
in 2013. Kluck said that
was a goal from the start of
practice.
“Looking at last year, we
decided one of our goals
would be to not be a roller
coaster team,” Kluck said.
“So as soon as we feel
ourselves going into one
of those slumps, we just
really focus on our serve
receive and to get a great
pass to the setter so we can
get a good swing in.”
Seni or set t er s Jami e
Wood and Dani Loo-
mi s pi cked up 19 and
15 assists, respectively.
Senior libero Madi Klon-
si nski fi ni shed wi t h 15
digs, while senior outside
hitter Regan Pauls picked
up nine.
Hinker led Oregon with
three blocks, while Rose-
meyer added four aces and
six kills.
The Panthers travel to
Monona Grove at 7 p.m.
Thursday, and return to
MG for an invitational at 9
a.m. Saturday.
Kl uck sai d she want s
the team to continue to
focus on the next task, as
opposed to looking ahead
t o Madi son Edgewood,
which hosts Oregon at 7
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12.
“We are doing a real-
l y good j ob as a t eam,
just making sure we are
encouragi ng each ot her
and having a good time
and just playing in that
moment – not focusing on
down the road when we
play bigger schools,” she
said.
Belleville invite
The Panthers traveled to
the Belleville Invitational
last Saturday where they
finished runner-up.
Oregon lost to McFar-
land (16-25, 25-17, 13-15)
i n t he c ha mpi ons hi p,
but it defeated Cambria-
Fri esl and (25-18, 25-9)
and Fenni more (25-16,
25-7) in pool play.
Stats were unavailable
at the time the Observer’s
Tuesday deadline as Kluck
could not be reached for
comment. Look for them
in next week’s paper.
Photos by Anthony Iozzo
Junior middle hitter Kena Hinker blocks Milton’s attack in game two Aug. 29 against Milton. Hinker
picked up three blocks to lead Oregon.
Volleyball: Oregon takes 2nd at Belleville
Senior outside hitter Maddy Gits goes for a kill in the second game
Aug. 29 against Milton. She finished with 21 to lead Oregon.
Continued from page 9
Cross country
Girls swimming
Boys run to ninth at West Bend
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
The Oregon boys cross
country team had three run-
ners below 18 minutes and
two more right on their heels
Saturday as the Panthers fin-
ished ninth out of 20 teams at
the Jamie Block Invitational
at West Bend West High
School with an average time
of 17 minutes, 57 seconds.
Juniors Ben Vogt (17:40)
and Josh Christensen (17:45)
led the way for Oregon. Last
season’s top runner, sopho-
more Chris Cutter, followed
11 seconds back in 17:56.
Senior Daniel Rau and
junior Ryan Barry just
missed giving the Panthers
five runners under 18 min-
utes, finishing in 18:09 and
18:11, respectively.
Juniors Sam Horsnell and James Skiles
both competed on varsity, but did not score
for the team.
“I was pleased to see the boys working
together throughout the race and running as a
team,” head coach Erik Haakenson said.
The host Spartans won the varsity meet
with a combined time of 1 hour, 24.18 sec-
onds behind senior Alex Miller (15:56).
No one else cracked 16 minutes. Neenah
(1:25.02) edged Green Bay Preble (1:25.03)
by the narrowest of margins to round out the
top three schools.
The Panthers JV team turned in a sixth-
place finish (out of 19 schools).
Oregon’s boys and girls squads travel to
the annual Verona Invitational at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday.
Girls
Senior Valerie Jones paced the girls team
with a time of 17:22. Sophomore Emma
Hughes looked strong, finishing almost seven
minutes faster than her best time a year ago,
29 seconds behind Jones in 17:51.
Underclassmen standouts a year ago on
varsity, fellow sophomores Maddie LeBrun
and Bree Paddock were only separated by
one second in 18:08 and 18:09, respectively.
Freshman Carolyn Vogt impressed in her
first race as well, coming in at 18:10.
Senior Katie Boehnen (18:15) and sopho-
more Kayla Wiedholz (18:27) also competed
on the varsity squad. Boehnen’s time was two
minutes faster than her best last year.
“The seniors have modeled working hard
everyday and that is catching on with the
newcomers/freshman,” head coach Doug
Debroux said.
Oregon, which was without sophomore
Jen Brien, who sustained a foot injury earlier
in the week, finished 17th out of 20 teams.
Brien was a first-team All-Conference athlete
a year ago. How much of the season she may
miss remains up in the air.
A state runner-up a year ago, Neenah aver-
aged a meet-best time of 15:24, led by senior
twins Jessica and Jennifer Parker, to win the
meet. Third place at state last season, Madi-
son West (16:13) finished second.
Vogt
Jones
absolutely huge.”
Oregon 7, Portage 0
The Panthers swept all
seven flights Thursday at
Portage for a 7-0 victory
over the Warriors in a Bad-
ger Conference crossover
match.
Oregon dominated the
Warriors atop the singles
l i neup, droppi ng t hree
games at No. 1 singles en
route to a 6-1, 6-2 victory
by sophomore Leah Koop-
man. Peterson cruised 6-0,
6-0 at No. 2 singles.
Torpy and Massey had
move competitive matches
at No. 3 and 4 singles, but
only slightly, cruising 6-4,
6-1 and 6-3, 6-1, respec-
tively.
Whi l e si ngl es act i on
was all fairly one-sided,
the doubles side provided
three very exciting match-
es for the Panthers.
Juniors Kaci Bausch and
Cassandra Krier had the
easiest go of things, taking
their No. 1 doubles match,
6-4, 6-4.
Freshmen Renee Lawa-
ndowski and Katie Pliner
meanwhile went to the
first of two tiebreakers,
winning 6-1, 7-6 (7-0) at
No. 2 doubles.
Bartelt and Bjerke turned
in the victory of the night,
pulling out a three-set win
at No. 3 doubles 6-4, 4-6,
7-6 (7-3).
Oregon travels to con-
ference rival Stoughton at
4:25 p.m. on Thursday and
back Saturday at 9 a.m. for
the Viking’s annual invi-
tational
Tennis: Oregon wins conference debut
Continued from page 9
12
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Book Festival
Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013
8:00 am - 6:00 pm, at Edgerton High School Campus
Special Guest - Patch Adams
is a physician, social activist, clown and author.
He founded the Gesundheit! Institute in 1971, and is
the subject of the 1988 film Patch Adams
— Also featured —
Maribeth Boelts “Happy Like Soccer” & “Sleeping Bootsie”
Erin Hart “The Book of Kilowen”
and many other authors
For full schedule: www.edgertonbookfestival.com or festivalʼs Facebook pg.
Edgerton’s 8th Annual
Sterling North
Obituaries
Patricia Mary Feller
Patricia Mary Feller, age
85, of Oregon, passed away
peaceful l y, on Sunday,
Aug. 18, 2013, at Meriter
Hospital. She was born on
May 19, 1928, in Madison,
the daughter of Daisy and
John Raftree.
Patricia married G. Wal-
ter Feller on April 6, 1974,
in Madison. She grew up
on the east side of Madison,
graduating from East High
School. Patricia retired
from Methodist Hospital
after working there for 25
years. While working at the
hospital, she met the love
of her life, Walter. Walter
and Patricia shared their
married life on their farm
outside of Oregon. The city
girl loved country living,
having a big garden, rais-
ing animals and walking the
fields. She was a very kind
and compassionate person
and was an inspiration to
many. After Walter’s pass-
ing, she was proud that she
was able to continue to live
in her home, where she
felt safe and free from her
blindness.
Patricia is survived by
her daughters, Susie (Ter-
ry) Campbell and Melissa
(Guy) Judd; sons, Jef-
fery (Bonnie) Olson and
Christopher Olson; sisters,
Marilyn Lindau (Mike Sie-
mion) and Sharon Stoltz;
20 grandchildren; and 17
great-grandchildren.
She was preceded i n
deat h by her husband,
Walter; sons, Michael and
Stephen Olson; daughter,
Eileen Simonson; mother,
Daisy Paltz; brother, Joe
Raftree; brothers-in-law,
Paul Lindau and Bill Stoltz;
and her lifelong friend,
Adeline.
Memorial visitation will
be held at Gunderson Ore-
gon Funeral Home, 1150
Park St., Oregon, from 10
a.m. until noon on Satur-
day, Sept. 7, 2013.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials may be made to the
Wisconsin Council for the
Blind in Patricia’s honor.
wcblind.org. Death is no
more than passing from
one room into another. But
there is a difference for me
you know because in that
other room, I shall be able
to see. Online condolences
may be made at gunderson-
fh.com
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1150 Park St.
835-3515
Jeanette C. Anthony
Jeanette C. Anthony, age
80, of Brooklyn, passed
away on Wednesday, Aug.
28, 2013, at Nazar et h
House in Stoughton. She
was born on Aug. 5, 1933,
in Sauk City, the daughter
of Peter and Emma (Lins)
Haas. Jeanette attended
Sauk Ci t y School s and
moved to Madison in 1951,
where she met her future
husband.
She ma r r i e d Da vi d
“Chuck” Anthony on June
8, 1953, in Sauk City. Jea-
net t e was empl oyed by
Gisholt and moved to the
family farm with David
near Brooklyn. After their
children were born, she
stayed at home raising the
children. Jeanette was also
employed at WISCO and
with the Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Transport at i on
until retiring in 1988. She
was a member of the Holy
Mot her of Consol at i on
Catholic Church. Jeanette
enjoyed sewing, knitting,
and flower gardening. She
mostly loved spending time
with her grandchildren.
J eanet t e i s s ur vi ved
by her son, John (Kathy)
Ant hony of Br ookl yn;
four grandchildren, David
Anthony, Lisa (Tim Amer-
ine) Anthony, Stephen (Sar-
ah) Anthony, and James
Anthony; six great-grand-
children; two step-great-
grandchildren; and numer-
ous ot her rel at i ves and
friends. She was preceded
in death by her parents;
husband; and son, Robert,
in 1996.
A Mass of Christian Buri-
al was held at Holy Mother
of Consolation Catholic
Church, 651 N. Main St.,
Oregon, on Tuesday, Sept.
3, 2013, with Fr. Ken Dool-
ey presiding. Burial will be
at Prairie Mound Cemetery
in Oregon.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials may be made to Holy
Mot her of Consol at i on
Catholic Church. Thank
you to the staff of Sienna
Crest and Nazareth House
for the wonderful care giv-
en to our mother and grand-
mother the last few years.
Online condolences may be
made at gundersonfh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1150 Park St.
835-3515
Barbara Larson
Prestegard
Barbara Larson Preste-
gard, 92, of Oregon, passed
away on Aug. 31, 2013, at
Sienna Meadows Alzheim-
ers Care Center in Oregon.
After a long journey with
Alzheimers it is easy to lose
sight of all that a person
was.
Who is Barbara Preste-
gard?
Her life story began on
September 12, 1920, in
Readstown, Wis., when she
was born to her beloved
parents, Bernie and Annie
Callaway, one of five chil-
dren.
She married Russell Lar-
son and was blessed with
four sons. Losing her hus-
band to cancer at a young
age proved her persever-
ance through difficult times
by earning her teaching
degree to support her fam-
ily. In her own words:
“raising her four boys was
her greatest achievement in
life.”
Passion for education and
learning encompassed a
twenty year teaching career
which began in four differ-
ent one room schools and
ended in Oregon, where
she moved when marrying
Orlan Prestegard. Her final
career was with UW Exten-
sion guiding others on their
career path.
Creativity and multiple
interests radiated through
her musical, sewing, cook-
ing, gardening, and flower
arranging talents.
Al ways an organi zer,
she was i nvol ved wi t h
Boy Scouts, Little League,
Homemakers, school and
church groups.
Satisfying her interest
and curiosity of other cul-
tures, she traveled to every
continent except Antarctica
with her husband Orlan.
She often shared her knowl-
edge through public presen-
tations.
She had compassion for
others and reached out in
time of need through her
church and community.
Barbara is survived by
three sons: Brian (Cheryl)
Larson of Elmwood, Stuart
(Mary) Larson of Burling-
ton, and Paul (Terry) Lar-
son of Stoughton; daughter-
in-law: Nancy Larson of
Baraboo; one sister, Lois
Catrambone; sister-in-law,
Carol Callaway; 11 grand-
children, 32 great grand-
children; and other nieces,
nephews and friends.
She was preceded i n
death by her parents, her
husbands Russell Larson
and Orland Prestegard; her
son Frederick Larson; a
grandson: Bjorn Larson;
a granddaughter: Amy Jo
Larson; one brother: D.
Blayne Callaway; two sis-
ters: Emily Squire and
Normalee Dutch.
We would like to thank
the caregivers of Sienna
Meadows for five years of
care and compassion.
Visitation will be from
9:00 a.m. to the time of
service at 11:00 A.M. on
Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013, at
Peoples United Methodist
Church, 103 Alpine Park-
way, Oregon. Private inter-
ment will be in the Read-
stown Cemetery. Memo-
rials may be given to the
Oregon Public Library.
The Sime Funeral Home
of Readstown is serving the
family. Online condolences
may be sent to simefuneral-
forum.com.
Richard T. Mould
Richard “Dick” Mould,
age 82 years, went to be
with the Lord on Tuesday,
Sept. 3, 2013, at Oregon
Manor Nur si ng Home.
He was born in Buffalo,
N.Y., to Harry W. & Flor-
ence Mould. He graduated
from high school in Ken-
more, N.Y., and TriState
College in Angola, Ind.,
with a degree in Chemical
Engineering. He served in
the U.S. Marine Corps dur-
ing the Korean War. He
worked for Chemetron Cor-
poration for 20 years, Tam-
pa Oxygen for five years,
and later owned his own
business, “Snack Attack.”
Dick was involved in
ministry throughout his
life, primarily in music and
with puppetry. Regard-
less of where he was living,
the people from the Austin
Wesleyan Church in Chi-
cago were family for over
45 years.
He is survived by his
wife of 61 years, Jean; son,
Richard “Rick” (Diane)
Mould of Fort Wayne, Ind.;
daughter, Barbara (Gary)
Giss of Belleville; four
grandchildren: Curt, Callie,
Lisa & Julie; three great-
grandchi l dren; Barret t ,
Jackson & Isabelle; and
two beloved foster children,
Richard (Rhonda) John-
stone of Oakland, Cal., and
Karen (Brad) Kahle of St.
Charles, Ill.
Memorial services will
be held Saturday, Sept. 7,
2013, at 11 a.m. at Hillcrest
Bible Church in Oregon,
with a time of gathering
from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m.
on Saturday at the church.
The fami l y wi shes t o
thank caring staff at Oregon
Manor and Agrace Hospi-
ceCare for their wonderful
care. Online condolences
may be made at gunderson-
fh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1150 Park St.
835-3515
Patricia Feller Barbara Prestegard Jeanette Anthony Richard Mould
Women’s Club to meet Sept. 10
The first monthly meet-
i ng for 2013-14 of t he
Oregon Town and Coun-
try Women’s Club will be
Tuesday, Sept. 10 at the
Stoughton Country Club.
The event begins with a
12:30 p.m. luncheon.
Gail Brown will be shar-
i ng i nf or mat i on about
Spokes from Wisconsin, a
chapter of the non-profit
organization Bicycles for
Humanity, which collects
and ships bicycles to people
in need around the world.
Meet i ngs are open t o
anyone wishing to attend.
A reservation may be made
by calling Ruth Boerth at
609-9384. For more infor-
mation about the club, con-
tact Dawn George at 455-
3925.
The major fundraiser of
the organization will be a
silent auction on Nov. 13.
Proceeds are awarded to
five Oregon High School
seniors, as well as various
organizations in Oregon
and Fitchburg.
Got a story idea?
Hey! Let us know. Email communityreporter@wcinet.
com or call Victoria Vlisides at 845-9559 ext. 249 with
your news and feature tips!
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Oregon history is
provided by the Oregon
Area Historical Society
at 159 W. Lincoln St.
Gerald Neath compiles
information.
The society’s hours are
Tuesdays: 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., the first Saturday of
month: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
(September - May) and
Saturdays in June, July and
August.
100 years ago (1913)
• Oregon hosted its first
tent Chautauqua – an annual
summer educational and rec-
reational assembly. The 3-day
event was sponsored by the
library. Lectures during the
event included: by Truman J.
Spencer; by Gov. J. Y Sanders
of Louisiana; and two agri-
cultural lectures by Franklin
Menges. Saturday was desig-
nated as “Woman’s Day” with
lectures on painters, health
and beauty tips and a session
on bird imitations.
• During the three day event
music was provided by The
College Male Quartet, The Old
Virginia Jubilee Quintet, and
Tolomeo’s Royal Italian Band
and their grand opera singers.
The Italian Band and singers
presented a condensed pro-
duction of Verdi’s opera, Il
Trovatore.
• Kellor and Criddle
announced that they had just
gotten in the new 1914 Buick
(Model B 25). It’s a five pas-
senger auto with 28-30 horse
power, a Delco electric start-
er and is lighted electrically
throughout. The wheels fea-
ture demountable rims along
with an extra rim. The price is
$1,050.00.
• Village Clerk, C. H. Hanan,
reported that the real estate
and personal property in the
Village of Oregon is worth
nearly a million dollars. The
breakdown of some of the per-
sonal property items included:
159 horses $18,170; 163 head
of cattle $7,312; two sheep,
$8.00; 173 wagons and car-
riages, $4195; merchandise,
$75,000; tobacco $1,500;
twenty-three automobiles,
$9,325; bank stock $10,000;
Other machines, $650; build-
ings on leased land, $1,450;
and all other misc. personal
property, $9,070.
• The total for real estate
was $770,960 and for personal
property $138,065 for a total
valuation of $909,025.
50 years ago (1963)
• The installation of natu-
ral gas service by Wisconsin
Power and Light begins.
Taking part in a ground break-
ing ceremony were Village
President, Steve Madsen; and
Village Board Members, Earl
Lawson, Jay Bossingham,
Norman Champion, Fred
Kivlin, and Gary Sheil. Those
representing W.P. & L. were
Urban Johnson, Carl Winden,
and Bill Mossman their con-
tractor, Bob Soehnlen.
• A Grand Opening was held
at the new asphalt track of
the Capital Speedway featur-
ing two nights of stock car
and modified stock car racing.
Winner of the 50-lap feature
race was “Fuzzy” Fassbender,
of Slinger.
• Gene and Marian Nelson,
former operators of the Oregon
Truck Stop and Restaurant,
announced that they had pur-
chased the Golden Rule Resort
in Hayward, Wis.
• The Wisconsin State Fair
was advertising that Lawrence
Welk and his complete TV
show would be performing for
five days of the fair.
• Jay Bossingham and
his wife, Ann, held a Grand
Opening of Jay’s Liquor Store
in down town Oregon next
door to their inn and tavern.
Besides liquor they will be sell-
ing novelties and other gifts
including ladies’ handbags.
They will also have a “cheese
corner”. Dorothy Freitag is
being employed to help serve
customers.
• The Oregon Bowl was
advertising that residents
could warm up for the coming
season by bringing one dozen
bottle caps from Dad’s Root
Beer Bottles for which they
would be given a free lane of
bowling.
• This past summer it was
noted that OHS Coach “Bob”
Kissling had instructed 87
students in the “Behind the
Wheel” driver’s education.
• The Aqua Teens, a local
water ballet club, presented the
program, “Holidays on Melted
Ice” at the Oregon Swimming
Pool. Members of the group
were Joann Topham, Carol
Henry, Pat Martinson, Jean
Below, Kathy Hennessey,
Alice Xander, Francie Noyce,
Jennifer Ace, Kay Seamonson
and Nancy Field. Admission
was twenty cents for adults
and ten cents for children.
25 years ago (l988)
• Rev. Gregory Haugen was
installed as pastor of Faith
Lutheran Church. He came
here from Sutherlin, Oregon,
where he had served Christ
Lutheran Church for the past
six years.
• Third through fifth graders
participating in Mr. Cornwell’s
recorder classes this sum-
mer were Lily Kim, Lisa
Mordecai, Nicole Brown, Claire
Fischer, Davina Smith, Andrea
Stohs, Brian Bride, Allison
Gipp, Melissa Buehler, Kelly
Harelson, Jacob Schreiber,
Rebecca Blakeman, Heather
Fry, Andrea Raymond, Josh
Coughlin, Patricia Meicher,
Jenny Cornwell, Kara Foust
and Ashley Kortle.
• The Chamber of Commerce
announced the winners of their
“Penny Days” prize drawings.
Ole Anderson of Belleville won
first prize; $150.00 of Chamber
Bucks; Craig Schwenn of
Oregon won the second prize:
$100.00 Chamber Bucks and
Gary Jones of Oregon was the
third prize winner of $50.00 of
Chamber Bucks.
• The Oregon Video Store
was offering the follow-
ing new releases: “Good
Morning Vietnam”, “Empire
of the Sun”, “Planes, Trains,
& Automobiles” and “Police
Academy 5”. They also noted
in their advertisement that they
still had some Beta movies left
for sale.
• Six year old Matthew
Howards won a new bicycle
for his entry in naming a dino-
saur contest sponsored by a
local TV station. His winning
entry name was “Dimples”.
• CPA, Marty Verhelst, a
former employee of WISC
Industries, opened an account-
ing business at his home.
• Felix Paz, a teacher from
Lima, Peru, spent the month
on the Lawrence Warner farm
with LaVerne Warner observ-
ing Wisconsin farming and
agricultural programs. During
his visit, OHS agricultural
vocation instructor Fenton
Abrams took him on field trips
to area FFA projects.
• Four Japanese teachers of
English spent two weeks visit-
ing Oregon schools. Also vis-
iting were a dozen Japanese
wrestlers, three of their coach-
es and one manager. The
wresting group spent four
days here as part of a 16 day
trip to the U.S.
10 years ago (2003)
• The winners in the Oregon
Community Fun Run were
nine year old Brent Johnson
in the 1-k event and Tony
Escarcega in the 5k event. The
first woman to cross the finish
line was Sarah Mattison from
Verona.
• Graves Cemetery in the
Town of Rutland was vandal-
ized. Over thirty-nine head-
stones dating back to the
1850’s were overturned. Total
damage was estimated at
$25,000.
• The ParentShare’s
Multiples Connection (a group
of families in the Oregon Area
with twins and triplets ages
0-5) held their second annu-
al summer picnic. Some of
those attending were Grace
and Anna Enfield; Connor,
Quinntin and Claudia Jones;
Josh and Trent Lawry; Sydney
and Emma Shreve; Kailey
and Addie O’Brien, Mina and
Maddie LeBrun; Amy, Lauren
and Jenna Weis; Anna and
Sophia Michalski; Grace and
Elizabeth Andriacchi; Brittany
and Cailyn Griebel, Meghan
and Mitchell Sharkus; Jenna
and Justin Sharkus; Cailyn
and Julia Schmidt; Sage and
Brianna Sauer. The group hold
monthly playdates as well as
having couples’ nights and
mom’s-nights-out.
• Ten year old Shelly Ace,
a member of the Oregon
Headliners 4-H Club, exhibited
the Champion High Grade Ewe
at the Dane County Fair. The
Ewe was later selected as the
Reserve Supreme Ewe of the
Show.
• The musical group, The
Mud Lake Restoration Project,
performed in Waterman
Triangle Park as part of the
Oregon Summer Concert
Series. All four musicians,
Ben Siebers, Brian Blakeman,
Jake Stroop and Evan Pettit,
are from Oregon.
• Oregon’s Eighth Annual
National Night Out draws near-
ly 1,000 people. Gerard Pehler
was the coordinator for the
event. Cris Plata and his band,
Extra Hot, gave a concert of
Americana and folk music in
the bank shelter. The event
ended with the second of the
Harry Potter films shown on
the west wall of the Oregon
Swimming Pool.
• Doug Brehauer,
Scoutmaster for local Boy
Scout Troop 50, led a group
of six scouts and five adults
on a cultural exchange jour-
ney to Nicaragua. They were
hosted there by a Nicaraguan
Boy Scout troop. Members
of Troop 50 who participated
in the exchange were Rolf
Severtson, Andrew Davis,
Nick Brethauer, Ben Feinstein,
Elliot LeBrun and Brian White.
The adults accompanying the
scouts were Stan Lyon, Tim
LeBrun, Jim Stout and Mark
Severtson, along with Doug
Brehauer.
• The Bank of Verona
announces that it will be open-
ing a branch bank in Oregon at
the site of D.J.’s Steakhouse
(present day Bank of Cross
Plains).
Legals
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
CIRCUIT COURT,
DANE COUNTY,
NOTICE AND ORDER FOR
NAME CHANGE HEARING
Case No. 13CV2588
In the matter of the name change of:
Bernadette Ann McWilliams
By (Petitioner) Bernadette Ann Mc-
Williams
NOTICE IS GIVEN:
A petition was fled asking to change
the name of the person listed above:
From: Bernadette Ann McWilliams
To: Samantha Bernadette Ann Mc-
Williams
Birth Certifcate: Bernadette Ann
McWilliams
IT IS ORDERED:
This petition will be heard in the
Circuit Court of Dane County, State of
Wisconsin:
Judge’s Name: C. William Foust
Place: Dane County Courthouse
215 Hamilton Street, Courtroom 7D
Madison, WI 53703
Date: September 17, 2013
Time: 8:45 a.m.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED:
Notice of this hearing shall be given
by publication as a Class 3 notice for
three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date
of the hearing in the Stoughton Courier
Hub a newspaper publication in Dane
County, State of Wisconsin.
BY THE COURT:
Stephen Ehlke
Circuit Court Judge
August 12, 2013
Published: August 22, 29 and
September 5, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
CIRCUIT COURT,
DANE COUNTY, NOTICE TO
CREDITORS (INFORMAL
ADMINISTRATION) IN THE
MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ROSA J. ALLEN
Case No. 13PR589
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for Informal Admin-
istration was fled.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
September 22, 1928 and date of death
July 12, 2013, was domiciled in Dane
County, State of Wisconsin, with a mail-
ing address of 3614 Old Stage Road,
Brooklyn, WI 53521.
3. All interested persons waived no-
tice.
4. The deadline for fling a claim
against the decedent’s estate is Novem-
ber 29, 2013.
5. A claim may be fled at the Dane
County Courthouse, Madison, Wiscon-
sin, Room 1000.
Lisa Chandler
Probate Registrar
August 19, 2013
Michael D. Greiber –
Kammer & Greiber, S.C.
702 DeWitt St., Ste. A
Portage, WI 53901
MDG/aea
(608) 742-3234
Bar Number: 1030938
Published: August 29,
September 5 and 12, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
PARK COMMITTEE AGENDA
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013
6:30 PM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WISCONSIN
1. Call meeting to order.
2. Reading and approval of minutes
from the last meeting.
3. Public Comments and Appear-
ances.
4. Discussion and possible Action
re: Eagle Scout Project.
5. Discussion and possible Action
re: Hillcrest Park Playground Equipment
6. Discussion and possible Action
re: recommendations/decisions from the
Town Board.
7. Review of potential work projects.
8. Set next meeting date.
9. Adjournment.
Note: Requests from persons with
disabilities who need assistance to par-
ticipate in this meeting or hearing should
be made to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200
with 48 hours notice.
Steve Root, Chairperson
Posted: August 27, 2013
Published: September 5, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
PUBLIC NOTICE
VILLAGE OF BROOKLYN
PUBLIC HEARING
SEPTEMBER 9, 2013
6:00 PM
210 COMMERCIAL ST.
Please take notice that on the 9th
day of September, 2013 a public hearing
will be held before the Village of Brook-
lyn Planning/Zoning Commission at the
Village of Brooklyn Village Hall at 210
Commercial St, Brooklyn, WI beginning
at 6:00 p.m.
The Planning/Zoning Commission
will hear all interested persons regard-
ing a CONDITIONAL USE AMENDMENT
REQUEST for 94 W Main Street, Parcel
# 23-109-0050.0000, owned by Brooklyn
Storage, LLP, Oregon, WI. Applicant is
Scott Meier. Property is zoned GENERAL
BUSINESS. Amended Conditional Use
would allow for 2 additional smaller stor-
age units instead of the originally pro-
posed larger storage unit.
Any person unable to attend the
hearing may submit written testimony to
the Clerk’s Offce by 5 pm on September
9, 2013. The Planning/Zoning Commis-
sion shall report their recommendation to
the Village Board for fnal consideration.
A copy of the proposed new site plan is
available in the Village Clerk’s offce for
public viewing M-F, from 7am-5pm.
Note: Requests from persons with
disabilities who need assistance to par-
ticipate in this meeting or hearing should
be made to the Clerk’s offce at 455-4201
with 48 hours notice
Kimberly J. Brewer,
Deputy Clerk-Treas.
Published: September 5, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
Oregon History
August
Dale and Nancy Ninmann
PARKINSON’S
SYMPOSIUM
Saturday, September 28
10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
St. Mary’s Hospital Conference Center
700 S. Park Street
Madison, WI 53715
Call 608-229-7628 or email Parkinson_assn@ssmhc.com
by September 16. Parking ramp at the corner of Park Street
and Erin Street. Valet parking available at main hospital entrance.
WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
People with Parkinson disease
Caregivers of people with Parkinson disease
AGENDA
9:00 - 10:00 a.m. Registration and booths
10:00 - 10:45 a.m. Annual Meeting, APDA - Wisconsin Chapter
11:00 - 12:00 p.m. Keynote Speaker
12:00 - 12:40 p.m. Lunch and 2013 Volunteer of the Year Awards
12:40 - 1:00 p.m. Dessert and Exhibits
1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Breakout Session A
2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Breakout Session B
*Chapter membership is $10 annually.
Sponsored by the American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA) Information
and Referral Center located at St. Mary’s Hospital in Madison, WI, the
Ninmann family, and the Wisconsin Chapter of the APDA.
FREE for APDA
WI Chapter members,
$10 for non-members*
U
3
0
8
4
1
1
N
Oregon native in Les
Miserables performance
Several Oregon natives
took part in Four Seasons
Theatre’s production of Les
Miserables at the Mitby The-
ater last week.
Jace Nichols starred as
Javert, the relentless law man
who pursues parole-breaking
Jean Valjean at all costs in
the show that takes place in
the tumultuous French revo-
lution. Jennifer Yancey, Sami
Elmer and Andrew Leone
were members
of the ensem-
b l e wh i l e
Leyla Sanyer,
t he or ches-
tra director at
Oregon High
School, served
as concer t -
master for the
orchestra.
Nichols
14
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
140 Lost & Found
FOUND WHITE DOVE. Seems friendly.
Near Cty Rd A and Hwy 14.
Call 608-835-0962 Claudia
143 notices
START WITH ROTARY and good things
happen. Locate the nearest club at www.
rotary.org. This message provided by
PaperChain and your local community
paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 PLaces to Go
27TH ANNUAL Pickett Steam Show,
Sept 7 & 8; Veterans 1/2 price adm on
Sunday. Farm & Hot Farm Tractor Pull
Friday night 7:00 pm. Saturday Horse
Pull 11am, 1:30 Tractor Pull, Sunday
afternoon combine Demo Derby. New
this year: Restroom/Shower building.
Features: Hay equipment, all tractors
& engines. Music by Elwood Lee, Rock
Crusher, Radio Flyers. Flea Market, food,
sweet corn, pies & ice cream. HWY 26
Olden Rd. 4 1/2 mi N of Rosendale. 920-
379-5057 (wcan)
35TH ANNUAL AUTO PARTS SWAP
Meet & Car Show! Sept. 27-29.
Jefferson CTY Fairgrounds, Jefferson,
WI. Swap meet & car corral ALL THREE
DAYS! Show Cars Sat/Sun only. Adm
$7. No pets. Fri 10-6, Sat/Sun 6-3. 608-
244-8416
madisonclassics.com (wcan)
SUPERIOR GUN-KNIFE Show Sept. 20
& 21. Friday 3-8pm. Saturday 9-4pm.
Curling Club at Fairgrounds. Admission
$5 good for both days. Information call
Ray 866-583-9083 or 715-292-8415
(wcan)
163 traininG schooLs
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just
10 Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 9/7/2013. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
340 autos
1999 HONDA CIVIC EX, automatic,
133,800 miles, excellent condition, runs
great, aftermarket wheels & good tires,
new exhaust, A/C, cruise, power win-
dows & doors. NO RUST! $4900. 608-
575-5984
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck or Boat
to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-day
vacation. Tax Deductible. Free towing.
All paperwork taken of!
800-856-5491 (wcan)
342 Boats & accessories
RENTALS WAVERUNNERS Pontoons
- Ski Boats - Fishing Boats Outboards -
Canoes - Kayaks. Daily or weekly. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Fun Center,
Shawano 715-526-8740 (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 recreationaL VehicLes
2002 EXCELL Limited Edition! 35 foot
5th wheel, 3 slides, NS and NP, abun-
dant storage, roomy floorplan, newer
tires. $17,000. 815-990-8923
4 MILLION Liquidation! 200 Pontoons &
Fiberglass must go! Buy it, Trade it, Store
it for FREE! Pay later! This sale will not
last! Finance 866-955-2628. american-
marine.com (wcan)
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 traiLers
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 heLP Wanted, GeneraL
CAREGIVERS WANTED: Comfort Keep-
ers is seeking qualified, compassionate
individuals to help assist the elderly in
the Madison area. If you have experience
caring for those in need, give us a call.
CNA/personal care experience preferred.
Driver's License Required. 608-442-1898
EXPERIENCED CONCRETE Finisher
Must have valid drivers license. Com-
petitive wages. Health, dental available,
608-884-6205
MADISON AREA Road Maintenance
Company accepting applications for CDL
drivers and laborers. Full time beginning
now thru October. For more information
call 608-842-1676.
PAOLI CAFE & Grocery looking for
cooks, servers, customer service/sales.
Willing to train, email resume to paolilo-
calfoods@tds.net
SIENNA MEADOWS- OREGON,
has immediate job opportunities
to join our compassionate Care
Specialist Team. We offer competitive
wages designed to attract and retain
quality staff. Various shifts available
both full and part time. Preferred
candidate will have a C.N.A. and all
state mandated courses completed.
Go to www.siennacrest.com to print
an
application today! Turn in your
completed application to :
116 Spring St, Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-0040 E.O.E.

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
PATIO & SKI SALES.
We are now accepting applications for
half-time sales positions in our casual
furniture area in the summer and ski/
sportswear department in the winter. If
you enjoy working with people, have a
flair for color & design and like winter
sports, please visit our store. Positions
are year-round with flexible shifts of 15-
25 hrs/wk on weekdays and weekends.
Chalet is a fun and friendly place to
work. We have great appreciation for
our employees and customers. We
offer a paid training program, generous
base salary with commissions,
incentives and other great benefits.
Apply in person or send resume to:
Chalet Ski & Patio,
5252 Verona Rd, Madison, WI 53711
608-273-8263
SUPER 8 Verona has immediate
openings for our Front Desk Staff. $9-10/
hr. Paid training, paid holidays, paid
vacation. Apply in person 131 Horizon
Dr. Verona, WI
TAXI DRIVERS must be friendly, reliable
and clean driving record. Must be at least
23 years old. 608-873-7233
WANTED:
Part-Time Teacher to Tutor
Students at Various Grade Levels.
Please Call Norland Learning Center
608-497-1299
440 hoteL, Food & BeVeraGe
KOFFEE KUP RESTAURANT LOOK-
ING FOR RESPONSIBLE COOKS,
DISHWASHERS AND WAITSTAFF. 355
E. MAIN, STOUGHTON
449 driVer, shiPPinG
& WarehousinG
COMPANY DRIVERS WANTED
Sign on bonus
Stoughton Trucking is expanding and
now accepting applications. Class A
CDL, Minimum 2 years OTR experience.
Must have a good driving record. Health/
Dental & Vision. If you meet these
requirements please call Tom
At 608-873-2933 or 800-635-2158
X-2933
453 VoLunteer Wanted
MADISON EAST High School is seeking
volunteers to work with advanced French or
Spanish students as tutors and conversa-
tion partners. Tutors should be native or
experienced speakers including fluency in
reading and writing the target language.
Hours are flexible and volunteers can work
as many hours as desired. Fantastic fall ser-
vice projects at the U.W. Arboretum. We've
got dozens of openings for scout troops,
civic groups, faith groups, school groups,
family groups, singing groups, all kinds of
groups to help take care of gardens, for-
ests, prairies and more. All projects involve
physical labor such as pulling weeds, raking
wood chips, cutting down shrubs and other
yard work. United Way 2-1-1 is seeking
new volunteers to become Information and
Referral Specialists. If you are looking for an
opportunity to learn more about community
resources and would like to assist people
in finding ways to get and give help, United
Way 2-1-1 may be the place for you! Our
volunteers staff our telephone lines, answer-
ing questions about resources available in
the service area. Call the Volunteer Center
at 246-4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.
org for more information or to learn about
other volunteer opportunities.
508 chiLd care & nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stough-
ton / Pleasant Springs Licensed Fam-
ily Childcare 22 yrs. exp. Quiet acre lot.
Summer & Fall Openings Available Sum-
mer Field Trips - Kindergarten Readiness
Music Program - Indoor Platform & Slide
Teacher Directed $160 p/week Call: 873-
0711 Location - Experience - Rates All
on our website at: www.browndeerday-
care.com
516 cLeaninG serVices
WANT SOMEONE to clean your house?
Call DOROTHY'S SWEEP CLEAN. We
are Christian ladies that do quality work.
Dependable and have excellent refer-
ences. Call 608-838-0665 or 608-219-
2415. Insured.
532 FencinG
CRIST FENCING FREE ESTIMATES.
Residential, commercial, farm, horse.
608-574-1993 www.cristfencing.com
548 home imProVement
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Fall-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
European-Craftsmanship
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

RECOVER PAINTING offers all car-
pentry, drywall, deck restoration and all
forms of painting. Recover urges you
to join in the fight against cancer, as a
portion of every job is donated to cancer
research. Free estimates, fully insured,
over 20 years of experience. Call 608-
270-0440.
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a sensible
price. Free estimates, Insured, Polite,
Professional.
608-873-9623
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
550 insurance
SAVE MONEY On Auto Incurance from
the major names you trust. No forms. No
hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR
MY QUOTE now!
888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 LandscaPinG, LaWn,
tree & Garden Work
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 ProFessionaL serVices
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Electrical Repair
and Installations.
Call 800-757-0383 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs
Call 800-981-0336 (wcan)
THE PINES Treatment and Recovery
Center: Detox & inpatient rehab. 50%
off treatment programs until Septem-
ber 15th. www.tptrc.com, 855-234-5097
Financing Available (wcan)
568 seWinG & aLterations
THE STITCHER FIXER Sewing Machine
Service and Repair. Monticello 608-214-
5641
586 tV, Vcr &
eLectronics rePair
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
wcan
601 househoLd
1947 NAVARRE Clear Fostoria Etch
#327, 56 pieces, 8 piece setting, actual
value $1891, less 30% $562 = $1324,
sale price $1200. Anniversary, Wedding,
Birthday.
815-232-4405
CHAPEL BELL by Alvin Silver, 44 piece
Estate Flatware. This is not your ordinary
silver. First produced in 1939 Cameo
Silverware chest of Marshall White Chi-
cago. Actual value $3174 less 30% =
$2222. Sale price $2000. Anniversary,
Wedding, Birthday. 815-232-4405
NEW MATTRESS SETS from $89.All
sizes in stock! 9 styles. PlymouthFurni-
tureWI.com 2133 Eastern Ave. Plymouth,
WI Open 7 days a week (wcan)
606 articLes For saLe
BURGUNDY RECLINER/LIFT chair less
than 6 months old 608-884-9372
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.
The Oregon Observer Classifieds. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
648 Food & drink
ENLOY 100% GUARANTEED delivered-
to-the-door Omaha Steaks! Save 74%
plus 4 free burgers - The Family Value
Combo Only $39.99. Order today. 1-888-
676-2750 Use Code: 48643XMT or www.
OmahaSteaks.com/mbff79 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouth-
watering gifts for any occasion. SAVE
20% on qualifying gifts over $29. Fresh
Dipped Berries starting at $19.99. Call
888-479-6008 or Visit www.berries.com/
happy (wcan)
652 GaraGe saLes
OREGON 688 Union Rd. 9/6 8am-4pm,
9/7 8-noon. BARN SALE! Antiques,
Victorian chairs, copper weathervane,
school bell, oak desk, tables, work
bench, garden, collectibles, Raike Bears,
Recliner, electric fireplace, drapes,
lots of miscellaneous. Something for
everyone! S. Perry or Lincoln Rd. to
Union Rd. 2 miles S on corner of
Hwy A & Union Rd.
OREGON 797 MARKET St. Saturday
ONLY! Sept. 7, 7am-7pm. Huge
sale inside and outside. Power tools,
Home staging decor, Lenox & Nascar
Collectibles, Furniture, more.
see craigslist.
OREGON 880 Dunn Ave, Friday-Satur-
day multi-family. 8am-4pm. Too much to
mention! See Craig's List.
OREGON 938 Johnson Ave. Friday-
Saturday. Multi-family, children-teenage
clothes, boys & girls, toys, sporting, bike,
household misc.
STOUGHTON- 2079 Tower Dr (east
side) Saturday/Sunday Sept 7-8. 8am-
2pm. Proceeds to Arthritis Foundation.
Grill, dishwasher, household items, Mens
S-XL clothing, women's S-M and much
more
STOUGHTON 2142 Colladay Pt. Drive.
Thursday-Saturday, 8am-4pm.
Three family sale.
STOUGHTON- 909 Bristol Ct., 9/6 3pm-
7pm, 9/7 8am-? VINTAGE/ANTIQUES
ONLY SALE. Refinished furniture includ-
ing an 8ft oak pew and tiger oak library
table, Detecto beam-type baby scale,
1914's dentist stool, wood toolboxes,
1960's record players, Perfection oil
heater and other misc. pieces
UTICA- BARN Sale 2251 Washington
Rd. Sept 6 & 7 8am-5pm. Old furniture,
chairs, tables, dressers, interior doors,
household items, tools, refrigerator,
buidling materials, many old other items
664 LaWn & Garden
3'-12' EVERGREEN & Shade Trees.
Pick up or Delivery! Planting Available!
DETLOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444
(wcan)
666 medicaL & heaLth suPPLies
ATTENTION SLEEP Apnea sufferers
with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP replace-
ment supplies at little or no cost. Plus
Free home delivery. Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection. 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no
activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd
waterproof alert button for free and more.
Only $29.95 per month. 877-863-6622
(WCAN)
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
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Work from home in your PJs!
Available to Wisconsin and Iowa residents only. Must have
a PC, high-speed Internet, and landline phone.
Walk-In Interviews Welcome
Employment Offce: Mon.-Fri. 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
851 1st Avenue • Monroe, WI
Complete Application at
SCContactCenters.com

1st Shift M-F OR 3rd Shift Weekends
Home Phone Agents
(800)
48-SWISS
Equal Opportunity
Employer M/F/D/V/H
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We’ve recently launched
the option to renew your
newspaper subscription
electronically with our
secure site at:
connectverona.com
Easily
renew your
subscription
online!
• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere
24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time.
Training provided.www.WorkServices7.com (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- MISCELLANEOUS
MovingHelp.com PT/Work, FT/Pay. Now in Wisconsin!
Be Your Own Boss! *Set Your Own Rates *Set Your
Schedule. Apply Now! Go To: MovingHelper.com
Powered by: U-Haul (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
OTR Drivers Needed Above Avg. Mileage Pay. Avg.
2500-3500 Miles/WK 100% No Touch. Full Benefts
W/401K. 12 Months CDL/A Experience 1-888-545-
9351 Ext 13 www.doublejtransport.com (CNOW)
Get more home time on Transport America’s regional
runs. Great miles, equipment + extras. Enjoy Transport
America’s great driver experience! TAdrivers.com or
866-204-0648. (CNOW)
Drivers - Day Cab Drivers Wanted. Competitive Pay.
Frequent Home Time & OTR. Join the deBoer team
now! deBoer Transportation 800-825-8511 Apply
Online: www.drivedeboer.com (CNOW)
Drivers- CDL-A Train and work for us! Professional,
focused CDL training available. Choose Company
Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease
Trainer. (877) 369-7893 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.
com (CNOW)
Gordon Trucking- A better Carrier. A better Career.
CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed Up to $5,000 Sign-
on Bonus! Starting Pay Up to $.44 cpm Full Benefts
Excellent Hometime No East Coast EOE Call 7 days/
wk! GordonTrucking.com 866-565-0569 (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
668 musicaL instruments
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 Pets
Cats and Kittens for adoption. Healthy,
friendly. 608-848-4174 www.Angels-
Wish.org. Verona.
676 PLants & FLoWers
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Prices starting at
just $19.99. Plus take 20% off your order
over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/
ActNow or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
688 sPortinG Goods
& recreationaL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 eLectronics
DIRECTV OVER 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Call now! Triple Sav-
ings. $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade
to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!
Start saving today. 800-320-2429 (wcan)
DISH NETWORK STARTING at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
888-719-6981 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for
12 mo's) Options from ALL major service
providers. Call Aceller today to learn
more! 866-458-1545 (wcan)
696 Wanted to Buy
TOP PRICES
Any kind of scrap metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick-up
Property Clean Out
Honest/Fully Insured/U Call-We Haul
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
THE OREGON OBSERVER CLASSI-
FIEDS, the best place to buy or sell. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
705 rentaLs
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
ON LAKE KEGONSA Home to share
with single person 2nd floor Lakeside
bedroom $485 phone, internet & cable
& all utilities included Boat house, Rec
Building, great garden, Water Falls.
Large Pier. Laundry. No/Smoking
No/Pets. Quiet & great place to live.
Ideal for traveling salesman, pilot or
professional person. 815-238-1000
OREGON SECOND Floor Two-bedroom
apartment with laundry room, garage
and security entrance. All appliances,
water and sewer, lawn and snow remov-
al included. No dogs. Security deposit.
Lease Rent $800. 713 S. Main St. Call
835-5072
STOUGHTON- 2 b/4 unit on dead end st.
One up, remodeled bath, kitchen, dish-
washer, micro-stove-ref. window blinds-
oak-floors storage coin laundry. Heat,
water/sewer included. $715/mo 1 month
deposit. One cat okay. 561-310-5551
VERONA 1/2 duplex, 2 bedroom l full
bath, newer kitchen, W/D included. One
car garage. Large, private wooded back-
yard. $1200/mo. Call Liz at 608-577-
7526
720 aPartments
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
OREGON DOWNTOWN LOCATION
1 Bed, 1 Bath, Appliances, A/C, Laundry,
Storage, $650./month. Heat included.
608-206-7596
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 storaGe sPaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
=
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
OREGON SELF-STORAGE
10x10 through 10x25
month to month lease
Call Karen Everson at
608-835-7031 or
Veronica Matt at 608-291-0316
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10 X 5 - 10 X 30
24/7 Access/Security lit.
Short/long term leases
608-334-1191
801 oFFice sPace For rent
North Industrial Park has office space
for rent .Utilities included. High speed
internet available. Reasonable rent. Call
873-8170
NORTH INDUSTRIAL Park has office
space for rent. Utilities included; high-
speed Internet available. Reasonable
rent. Call 873-8170.
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
820 misc. inVestment
ProPerty For saLe
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 40 wooded
acres. $32,000 OBO. CFR taxes. Terms
available. More land available 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 80 wooded
acres. $70,000 OBO. Montreal River
runs through land. CFR taxes. Terms
available. More land available 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
840 condos &
toWnhouses For saLe
STOUGHTON 3-BEDROOM Townhome.
2.5 bathrooms, garage, full basement,
deck, large yard. All appliances. Cen-
tral air. Abundant storage. Utilities paid
by tenant. References. Pets considered.
Deposit is $1200. 608-772-0234 Avail-
able October 1.
845 houses For saLe
12.5 ACRE FARMETTE! 1500 square
feet ranch built in 1969. 3 BR, 2 bath,
new furnace, water heater and water
softener. 45X72 Morton building, 1/2
cement with 16X28 heated shop with pit
in floor. 10 acres tillable. Beautiful views.
1 mile north of Twin Grove, 1/4 mile west
of Towncenter Rd. $199,000. Call Tim @
608-214-3003
MT. HOREB 3 Bedroom home, land
contract. $12,000 down.
608-335-6008
870 residentiaL Lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895

970 horses
TIM NOLAN ARENA Horse Sale - Breed-
ers, Classic & Colors of the Sun Horse
Sale. September 7, 2013. Tack 9am.
Horses Noon. Consignments start Friday
9/6 from 9am-7pm. NO call in consign-
ments. N11474 State Hwy 110, Marion,
WI (wcan)
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
990 Farm: serVice
& merchandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
Now hiring for a variety of care-
giving shifts & a part-time activity
assistant. Shift and weekend
differentials, paid training and
an array of benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
www.elderspan.com
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
Activity Assistant
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Check out our Industry Leading Benets!
40% Proft Sharing • 401k Program • Cash Bonuses
Incentive Programs • Vacation Pay • Sick & Disability Pay
Medical/Dental/Vision • Life Insurance • Group Cancer &
Accident Policies • Scholarship Program • More!
NOW HIRING!
Oregon & Stoughton Stores
Guest Service Co-Workers
• Full & Part Time • 1st/2nd/3rd Shifts
• $9.90 - $12.60 per hour (based on experience)
Shift Leader
• $11.70 - $15.05 per hour (based on experience)
Assistant Food Service Leader
• $10.60 - $13.70 per hour (based on experience)

Apply online: www.kwiktrip.com
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RESIDENT ASSISTANT
Skaalen Nursing & Rehabilitation Center currently
has a part time opening on the night shift in our
Assisted Living section. The position is 16 hours
per week, including weekends and holidays. The
duties include assisting residents with activities
of daily living, maintaining cleanliness of rooms,
administering medication and more. The successful
candidate must be able to lift up to 50 pounds.
Interested candidates may submit
a resume or application to:
Nancy Martin, Director of Human Resources
Skaalen Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
Ph: 608-873-5651 Ext. 308
NMartin@skaalen.com
400 N. Morris St., Stoughton, WI 53589
Fax: 608-873-0696
Equal Opportunity Employer
Smoke free/Tobacco free campus
** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1,500 SIGN-ON BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreen’s stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
* Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Beneft Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
* 401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
* Paid Holidays & Vacation
* Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have 18 months tractor
trailer exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certifcate from an
accredited driving school and meet all DOT requirements.
Send resume to b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
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Web Designer
Are you a skilled web designer? Does working in an
ever changing, fast-paced environment excite you? Are
you a self-motivated person with creative ideas? If you
answered yes to all three of these questions, you might
be the TH Media’s next Web Designer.
This Web Designer position is located in Dubuque,
IA. Responsibilities include developing, testing, and
auditing of THonline, other TH Media websites, and
our mobile site. In addition, this person should also
be skilled in print design, provide a high level of timely
and accurate customer service, and stay abreast of the
latest trends as it relates to web development.
To be considered for this position, you must have
a two-year college degree in a related feld (or the
equivalent in experience) and one to three years’
experience with Web site creation, design and online
publishing. Additionally, experience with content
management systems is a plus.
For consideration, apply online at
http://www.wcinet.com/careers
TH Media, a division of Woodward Communications,
is an Equal Opportunity Employer
Get
ConneCted
Find updates and
links right away.
Search for us on
Facebook as
“Oregon Observer”
and then LIKE us.
16
September 5, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
787 N Main St., Oregon, WI
(608) 835-3666
Cutting Edge Hair Etc. would like to welcome
Tricia Fisher to our massage staff. Tricia is a
licensed massage therapist and also aesthetician.
Tricia is certified in:
• Cranial Sacral Therapy
• Sports Medicine
• Therapeutic Massage
• Prenatal
• Swedish Massage
• Hot Stone Massage
• Relaxation Massage
• Body Wraps
• Customized Facials w/extractions
Tricia is currently offering an introductory savings
of $55 (regularly $60) for a 1 hour massage and
$35 (regularly $40) for a ½ hour massage.
*Mention this ad and receive an additional $5 off!
BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY!
WEDNESDAY • 8:30 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
THURSDAY • 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.
SATURDAY • 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
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Wednesday, October 9, 2013
9:00 am-Noon - Expo
Noon-2:30 pm - Lunch, Entertainment & Bingo
FREE Admission - Open to the Public
Call 845-9559
for more information
Stoughton Wellness and Athletic Center
2300 US Highway 51-138, Stoughton, WI
5th Annual
Need A Booth?
Call us!
Photo submitted
Oregon’s Liz Kepplinger unloads produce for the Oregon-Brooklyn Food Pantry.
In 2012, Keppl i nger
began making contacts with
large local growing opera-
tions, soliciting donations
of fresh produce for the
monthly food pantry distri-
bution day. The first year
went well so the initiative
continued in 2013 with a
new component – the dis-
tribution of tomato and
pepper seedlings early in
the growing season so that
food pantry clients with
the space to have a plant or
two would have an ongoing
source of fresh produce in
the summer months. Plants
were donated by Kopke's
Gr eenhous e and K&A
Greenhouse.
At the most recent food
pantry distribution day held
on Aug. 29, fresh produce
was available in quantities
large enough so that every
food pantry client left with
a variety of fresh items.
Ac c o r d i n g t o Ke p-
pl i nger , t he ef f or t has
been personally reward-
ing – beyond what she ever
expected.
“So many people have
stepped up to make this
happen – it is wonderful
to see people who them-
selves enjoy fresh produce
and want their neighbors to
have access to it as well,”
she said.
Local gardeners con-
tinue to drop off their gar-
den surplus. Large quanti-
ties of produce have been
donated by Tomato Moun-
tain Farms and Old Stage
Vegetable Garden, both of
Brooklyn. The garden and
hoop house at the Oregon
Mi ddl e School and t he
Oregon Community Garden
have also been sources of
donated produce. Donations
of locally produced bakery
items from Steiny Jo’s Bak-
ery of Brooklyn have been
a welcome addition.
Kepplinger, with the
help of volunteers, picks up
and distributes the produce
and bakery goods on the
food pantry day, so that the
regular Food Pantry volun-
teers can continue to focus
on the job of helping food
pantry clients obtain the
food staples offered at the
pantry. The fresh produce
initiative operates from
May through September.
Accordi ng t o regul ar
food pantry volunteer Dot-
tie Richardson, there were
a record number of cli-
ents and volunteers for the
August distribution day,
demonstrating that the need
for food assistance is still
strong despite the improv-
ing economy.
The issue of food and
housing insecurity in the
Oregon area will be the
topic of an Open Mic at the
Firefly Coffeehouse this
Thursday from 6 – 8 p.m.
Pantry: Record number of volunteers in Aug.
Continued from page 1
10, the chamber holds its
annual golf outing, and the
organization has planned a
Women’s Expo for Oct. 15
in Oregon.
Knut son has smal l er
engagements that pop up
around the community,
as well. On Thursday, she
planned to attend a ground-
breaking for construction of
Headquarters Bar and Grill.
And she recently took in
another groundbreaking, for
Mueller Dentistry, in antici-
pation of Chad Mueller’s
new office building on the
west side.
Village officials have
been working closely with
Knutson and the chamber
on a couple of projects: the
design off the Jefferson
Street parking lot, which will
be refurbished this fall, and
the design and production of
parking maps for visitors to
downtown Oregon.
“We’re ironing out dump-
ster problems and have been
working with the village on
all that,” she said, adding
that chamber members are
invited to a meeting about
changes to the parking lot on
Wednesday, Sept. 11.
Knutson said she and vil-
lage administrator Mike
Gracz have “looked the
map all over and made a lot
of changes to it. We added
some more restaurants and
parking spots, and we’re put-
ting a blue line on the map
to show where there is street
parking, because we want
people to know that is avail-
able too.”
The chamber is helping to
fund the map design and pro-
duction, although the details
of exactly how much and for
what service is undecided,
she said.
Knutson said a big goal
this year is to research the
hotel study and “get that
back in the forefront.”
“I really want a hotel in
Oregon because there’s so
much going on but no place
to stay,” she said.
The chamber has also
teamed up with other local
entities, led by the Oregon
School District, on a project
called the Oregon Area Well-
ness Coalition.
“We’re trying to get
people out to walk and be
in the community and have
a healthy lifestyle,” she
explained.
Earlier this week, in fact,
Knutson and Amy Miller,
Community Education and
Recreation Director for the
school district, presented the
concept to the Oregon Rotary
Club.
During all the activity,
Knutson and the chamber
continue to recruit new mem-
bers. She said the organiza-
tion has enlisted nine new
members since she began in
June.
And she continues to work
closely with village officials
and staff to better the com-
munity.
“I do have to give hats
off to the village,” she said.
“They’ve been great to work
Knutson: Goal this year is to research hotel
study and ‘get that back in the forefront’
Continued from page 1
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Fun and games
Oregon School District Recreation Coordinator Kyle Schicker plays a game of “Guess Who” with
Joseph Zuehlke at the Kiser Park Shelter last week. The games are part of the “Summer Playground”
program put on by the Community Education and Recreation Department of the Oregon School
District.

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