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Lets Talk About Teaching

All sessions in Harry Hickman Building Track A Track B Track C First-year Course Instructors Technology Student Learning

Conversations, workshops and networking for all faculty, instructors and lecturers at UVic
FRIDAY, August 30, 2013
8:00 am 8:30 am 8:30 am 9:00 am

On-site Registration - Harry Hickman Foyer Coffee and pastries provided Welcome to event, Room 105 Teresa Dawson, Director, Learning and Teaching Centre Opening Remarks and Introduction Catherine Mateer, AVP Academic Planning, University of Victoria

9:00 am - 10:15 pm

CHOOSE ONE SESSION PER TIME BLOCK

SESSION A1 #1804 Room 110 How Can We Increase Student Success and Retention in Large First-year Classes Register Facilitators: Lisa Surridge, Humanities; Samantha MacFarlane, English; and Joe Parsons, Learning and Teaching Centre

SESSION B1 #1805 Room 116 How Student FAST Can Assist You Register

SESSION C1 Room 120 Indigenous Knowledge: Epistemology & Pedagogy as Education Scholarship Register Facilitator: Jacquie Green, Social Work

SESSION C2 Room 128 Apples, Oranges, and Pineapples: Rethinking Evaluation as Critical to How Students Learn Register Facilitator: Gillian Calder, Law

Facilitator: Clifton Dildy, Student System Support Services

10:15 pm 10:30 pm

Coffee and networking (provided) SESSION A2 Room 110 Teaching Effectively Across Diversities Register SESSION B2 Room 116 The Uses and Misuses of PowerPoint in Teaching Register SESSION C3 Room 120 Transformative Learning: Making Meaning and Changing Lives Register SESSION C4 Room 128 Course Readings and Other Natural Disasters: How to Encourage Students to Read for Class Register Facilitator: Tim Iles, Pacific and Asian Studies

10:30 pm 12:00 pm

Facilitator: Jin-Sun Yoon, Child and Youth Care


12:00 pm 12:45 pm

Facilitator: Marty Wall, Learning and Teaching Centre

Facilitator: Helga Thorson, Germanic and Slavic Studies

Lunch Break with the President, Professor Jamie Cassels (provided)

12:45 pm - 2:00 pm

SESSION A3 #1812 Room 110 Creating a Culture of Learning: Faculty Involvement in FirstYear Residence Communities at UVic Register Facilitators: Robin Copestake, Coordinator, Residence Education, and Kathryn MacLeod, Director, Residence Services

SESSION B3 #1813 Room 116 Things You Didnt Know You Could Do in Moodle Register

SESSION C5 #1814 Room 120 Strategies for Meeting Challenges in Teaching Englishas-an-additionallanguage Students Register Facilitator: Li-Shih Huang, Linguistics

SESSION C6 #1815 Room 128 Throwing Away Your Notes Register

Facilitator: Sue Harper, Learning Systems

Facilitator: Warren Magnuson, Political Science

2:00 pm - 3:15 pm

SESSION A4 Room 110 Mentoring Undergraduates Register

SESSION B4 Room 116 Social Media Tweeting, Blogging, and You Tube in the Classroom Register

SESSION C7 Room 120 Personal Health, Wellness and Potential Student Transformation through Lifestyle Change and Experiential Community Group Legacy Projects Register Facilitator: Lara Lauzon, Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education SESSION C9, #1822 Room 120 What is the Future of Teaching and Learning in the University? Register

SESSION C8 Room 128 Do We Need to Redefine the Role of the Laboratory Experience in the Undergraduate Program? Register

Facilitator: Gary McGillivray, Mathematics & Statistics


3 : 1 5 4 : 3 0 p m

Facilitator: Janni Aragon, Political Science

Facilitator: Dave Berry, Chemistry

SESSION A5, #1820 Room 110 Learning and Teaching Centre (LTC) Graduate and Undergraduate Support Programs Register

SESSION B5, #1821 Room 116 The Flipped Classroom in Higher Education Register

SESSION C10, #1823 Room 128 Transitioning from Problem-Based Learning (PBL) to Case-Based Learning (CBL) in Medicine: Curriculum Renewal and Lessons Learned Register Facilitator: Jane Gair, Island Medical Program

Facilitator: Cynthia Korpan, TA Training Program Manager, Laurie Waye, Writing Centre Manager, and Adam Yaghi, International Commons Academic Program Coordinatorr

Facilitators: Jamie Kemp, History in Art, Jason Siefken, Mathematics & Statistics

Facilitator: Lesley Scott, Visiting Scholar

SEE NEXT PAGE FOR SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
9:00 - 10:15 am SESSION A1 How Can We Increase Student Success and Retention in Large First-Year Courses? Room 110 Facilitators: Lisa Surridge, Humanities, Samantha MacFarlane, English, and Joe Parsons, Learning and Teaching Centre Lisa Surridge, Samantha MacFarlane, and Joe Parsons will summarize research-based strategies that increase student performance on exams and boost student retention to 95%+ levels. This interactive workshop will model successful strategies and will facilitate the application of strategies in your discipline. SESSION B1 How Student FAST Can Assist You Room 116 Facilitator: Clifton Dildy, Student System Support Services Do you need help with grading your classes or importing large class grades from an existing Excel document? Get a demo of the new Instructor Quick Launch to short-cut you to your current Class Lists and to your course grading pages! Get help with commonly asked questions and other features of the FAST Student Reporting system with Nadia Munro. Taught in an informal and easy to understand setting. SESSION C1 Indigenous Knowledge Epistemology & Pedagogy as Education Scholarship Room 120 Facilitator: Jacquie Green, Social Work It is necessary to teach Indigenous education within mainstream institutes in a transformative approach. This means that rather than lecturing, writing and analysis, that students experience Indigenous knowledges through storying, visiting landscapes and participating in the documentation of history through the art of building canoes, learning how to create regalia, formulating their own histories through understanding their own identities, histories and places. The intent for students to learning their own histories and identities is to illustrate that our history within the Canadian state is multifaceted. We all come from diverse backgrounds, experiences and places. This approach alleviates tensions to understanding colonialism and brings the focus of Indigenous knowledge to a collective rather than individual experience. SESSION C2 Apples, Oranges and Pineapples: Rethinking Evaluation as Critical to How Students Learn Room 128 Facilitator: Gillian Calder, Law This workshop will be an opportunity for participants to view, discuss and interrogate the use of alternative evaluation methods in courses typically evaluated by paper or exam. This will be done with particular attention to the idea of understanding art as law. Part of the workshop will involve critical engagement with the criteria developed this past semester by one instructor to evaluate vastly differing projects and papers handed in as final assignments in the same law school course. The goal of this workshop will be for participants to consider the role of evaluation in the learning process with attention to possible pitfalls and the potential for transformative learning outcomes. 10:30 am 12:00 pm SESSION A2 Teaching Effectively Across Diversities Room 110 Facilitator: Jin-Sun Yoon, Child and Youth Care There has never been a time that Canada has been so diverse and it is only just beginning to show in the university classroom at UVic. How prepared are you to ensure your curriculum and teaching style is inclusive and effective? How can you provide a high level of engagement and reduce the potential for inadvertently discriminating against a student? In this highly interactive workshop, we will identify issues and practical strategies that will maximize teaching effectiveness working with a multitude of diversities in the classroom or in an online class. SESSION B2 The Uses and Mis-uses of PowerPoint in Teaching Room 116 Facilitator: Marty Wall, Learning and Teaching Centre PowerPoint can be an effective teaching tool but is instead often a distracting impediment to learning. We will focus on the differences between presenting and teaching in PowerPoint, the PowerPoint teaching strategy of less-is-more, the dos and donts of teaching with PowerPoint, and guidelines for animating PowerPoint slides to enhance teacher-student communication. SESSION C3 Transformative Learning: Making Meaning and Changing Lives Room 120

Facilitator: Helga Thorson, Germanic and Slavic Studies This workshop investigates ways to facilitate the development of deep learning by exploring methods that engage learners in the transformation of perspective and immersing students in the process of meaning making. Participants investigate ways of teaching that include opportunities for dialogic learning, community involvement, and critical self-reflection. Activities and discussions will focus on how a university education can provide students with much more than just knowledge acquisition and offer them the opportunities and skills that have the potential of changing lives. SESSION C4 Course Readings and Other Natural Disasters: How to Encourage Students to Read for Class Room 128 Facilitator: Tim Iles, Pacific and Asian Studies We all assign readings in our courses, for obvious reasons--but do you get the feeling that those reasons are obvious to us, as instructors, and not to our students? Do your students show up without having completed the readings, or without even knowing that they should have done so? This hour-long workshop will offer a forum to discuss this problem, allowing you to consider why students don't complete their readings, or why their retention of read material may not be sufficient, and will also offer strategies for encouraging students to read and retain information more effectively and completely. The workshop isn't intended to provide a blueprint or one-size-fitsall approach; rather, this will be an open opportunity to share practices that work. 12:45 - 2:00 pm SESSION A3 Creating a Culture of Learning: Faculty Involvement in First-Year Residence Communities at UVic Room 110 Facilitators: Robin Copestake, Coordinator, Residence Education, and Kathryn MacLeod, Director, Residence Services Living in residence is a touchstone for the first year university experience; at UVic, up to 85% of the students in residence enter university directly out of high school. Residence Services recognizes our responsibility in supporting first year students in their academic and life-long educational goals. Over the past 20 years, Canadian universities have come to understand the value of residence as an environment where students can seek out and experience expanded educational opportunities. Residence Services at UVic is in the early stages of developing a unique and innovative residential curriculum, partnering with faculties and individual instructors to engage students in learning both inside and outside the classroom. In this session, Residence Services will present examples of faculty involvement in residences across Canada; examine relevant research and theory; and outline current and future educational programs at the UVic residences. Join us to discover how we can collaborate on high-impact educational practices, setting up first-year students for academic and educational success. SESSION B3 Things You Didnt Know You Could Do in Moodle Room 116 Facilitator: Sue Harper, Learning Systems How are you using Moodle? Posting resources and announcements? Collecting assignments and giving quizzes? Is that it? You and your students are totally missing out! Come learn how to take advantage of some of the best things you didn't know Moodle could do! The primary goal of this session is to make instructors aware of some great tools Moodle has to offer. The secondary goal is to encourage instructors to share ideas and begin thinking about how they can use Moodle to design activities that engage and empower students at higher levels. Sue Harper (Learning Systems) will help you explore and discuss how to leverage some of Moodle's less commonly used features, and demonstrate integration of Moodle with several interesting external teaching technologies. SESSION C5 Strategies for Meeting Challenges in Teaching English-as-an-additional-language Students Room 120 Facilitator: Li-Shih Huang, Linguistics If you follow the Chronicle of Higher Education or other similar periodicals, you will inevitably run across a multitude of posts related to the recruitment of international students who speak English as an additional language (EAL). Even if you are not a follower of recruitment and enrollment trends, you probably have noticed an increasing number of EAL students in your classes, especially in certain disciplines. This session is designed specifically for instructors who are facing challenges associated with teaching students who speak English as an additional language. In this participatory session, we will focus on enhancing cross-cultural awareness, and generating and refining practical teaching strategies to meet these new or existing challenges. SESSION C6 Throwing Away your Notes Room 128 Facilitator: Warren Magnusson, Political Science

Are you a slave to your own notes when you lecture? Are you using PowerPoint as a crutch? If you free yourself from your notes, slides, and other teaching aids, you may find that you can relate to your students much more effectively than before. This workshop is about the ways and means of unblocking your own voice and rediscovering your natural capacity for exposition and explanation. 2:00 - 3:15 pm SESSION A4 Mentoring Undergraduates Room 110 Facilitator: Gary McGillivray, Mathematics & Statistics Mentoring students is something that touches every aspect of what we do as instructors. The intent of this session is to have a discussion about working with undergraduate students on research projects not related to any course (much of the discussion could be relevant to course-mandated research as well). The topics to be discussed include: (i) How are the students selected? (ii) How is the project selected? (iii) What is the desired outcome and what is the assurance the project is at the right level? (iv) What constitute good practices for working with the student(s) through the life cycle of the project? (v) What determines whether the project was a success? It is intended that the discussion be subject independent, and not focused on projects in math, science or engineering. To accomplish that goal, lots of people will need to contribute ideas. SESSION B4 Social Media Tweeting, Blogging, and You Tube in the Classroom Room 116 Facilitator: Janni Aragon, Political Science This workshop will offer examples of effective use of social media in the classroom. Web 2.0 platforms are useful tools for todays classrooms and students. Graduate students should also understand the networking capabilities that social media provides. SESSION C7 Personal Health, Wellness and Potential Student Transformation Through Lifestyle Change and Experiential Community Group Legacy Projects Room 120 Facilitator: Lara Lauzon, Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education Blending theory, research and experiential learning in a first year academic health and wellness course can encourage students to embrace the concept of self-responsibility for self-care and inspire them to make healthy lifestyle choices that enhance both their academic and personal lives. Examples of lifestyle change projects, small group community legacy projects, wellness days, guest presentations by past students and student reflections will be shared in this session. It is a privilege, as the instructor for this course, to share in the transformation process of the students each semester. This student reflection says it so well: This course has taught me so much about what it truly means to be well. I had no idea how drastic the changes in my life would be within three months. Through my lifestyle change project, I realised that I am closer to finding balance in my life. In fact, I looked at myself in the mirror this morning and told myself that I am a work in progress, and always will be because the self is constantly changing. I was inspired to not only come to every class but to be engaged, want to learn more, do more and be more. I also was reminded that I had the responsibility to remember I didnt just have an effect on my own life, but also others around me and the world Im living in. The small group community legacy project with the Mustard Seed group was a wonderful eye opening, challenging and emotional experience that Im glad I had the chance to participate in. SESSION C8 Do We Need to Redefine the Role of the Laboratory Experience in the Undergraduate Program? Room 128 Facilitator: Dave Berry, Chemistry The current financial situation is imposing significant changes in the way the laboratory programs are offered in the Faculty of Science. This session is aimed at the lab instructors who will implement the revisions. We can share how we hope to minimize the negative consequences and where to begin a reconstructive process leading us into the next decade of undergraduate education in science. 3:15 - 4:30 pm SESSION A5 Learning and Teaching Centre (LTC) Graduate and Undergraduate Support Programs Room 110 Facilitators: Cynthia Korpan, TA Training Program Manager, Laurie Waye, Writing Centre Manager, and Adam Yaghi, International Commons Coordinator, Learning and Teaching Centre

The LTC offers varied programs that support specific learning needs of graduate and undergraduate students. In this session, Cynthia Korpan, TA Training Program Manager, Laurie Waye, Writing Centre Manager, and Adam Yaghi, International Commons Coordinator will provide information and answer questions about the LTC programs offered to UVic students. Through these programs, students . . . have access to one-on-one writing support, receive training in effective teaching and learning practices, are offered professional development opportunities, and join courses and workshops designed to address their academic and professional needs. Please join us to find out how to best inform students about the programs offered at the LTC. SESSION B5 The Flipped Classroom in Higher Education Room 116 Facilitators: Jamie Kemp, History in Art, and Jason Siefken, Mathematics & Statistics The Flipped Classroom is a teaching strategy in which lecture content is delivered to students online as homework so that in-class time can be dedicated to discussion, project work and interactive learning. In this workshop, well talk about some implementation strategies, the technical skills required, some common sticking points and why this model is useful. By the end of the session, you should come away with an idea of whether this method might work for you and a plan for how to start changing your classroom environment.

SESSION C9 What is the Future of Teaching and Learning in the University?

Room 120 Facilitator: Lesley Scott, Visiting Scholar Government, economics, globalisation, technology, business, research and theory; there are powerful forces converging on higher education today and an equally powerful sense of shifting pedagogic plates and potentially seismic change. Is teaching about to radically change?

A Visiting Scholar at the LTC, Lesley Scott, has spent this year widely reviewing writing on the future of higher education and teaching and learning in the University. From mass-media accounts of the MOOC to the sober reflections of a Canadian University president, she has found repeated calls for transformation and predictions of radical and necessary pedagogic change. In this session therefore Lesley will outline the powerful forces for change and introduce some of the more interesting ideas and provocative predictions from her research. Her ultimate objective, however, is to encourage discussion and debate on the future of University teaching practice. Please come along for an opportunity to cogitate, imagine and speculate. What do you see as key forces for change (if any)? What could be their impact and what predictions would you personally make? What is the future of teaching and learning in the University? Will you agree with the writers or will you propose some quite distinct and alternative ideas? Outcomes To outline some of the key developments and influences on contemporary HE pedagogy To outline a range of predictive opinions from key writers/thinkers on future pedagogies To suggest, evaluate and debate influential forces influencing higher education pedagogy today To make predictions on the potential pedagogic impact of the above SESSION C10 Transitioning from Problem-Based Learning (PBL) to Case-Based Learning (CBL) in Medicine: Curriculum Renewal and Lessons Learned Room 128 Facilitator: Jane Gair, Island Medical Program Although PBL is still a popular small group active learning pedagogy in medical schools around the world, UBC is transitioning away from it and towards a model that looks more like Case-Based Learning (CBL). The curriculum renewal process has been several years so far and I will share what we have learned and some of our experiences. Ill share the feedback we have received from some pilot projects that we have undertaken in the classroom with the medical students from both students and faculty. In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about Problem-Based Learning (PBL) and how it has been used in the Island Medical Program. We will also explore Case-Based Learning (CBL) and how it differs from PBL. Many of the pedagogical principles that underlie these two methods of teaching can be applied to any content matter and any discipline. If youre looking for ways to have your students become more interactive and engaged, this workshop will be a good one to come to!