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Thursday,September5,2013 50¢daily Delphos,Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
TellingTheTri-County’sStorySince1869
Jeffcats remain perfect
in volleyball, p7
FFA Van Wert County Fair
results, p4
www.delphosherald.com
Getting to know ...
... the Canal Days Chicken Dinner Chairs
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — While walking
through the streets of Delphos dur-
ing Canal Days, there will be many
sights, sounds and aromas that will
heighten the senses, none more
mouth-watering than the tantalizing
sweet,grilledaromaoftheKiwanis’
BBQchickenwaftingthroughtheair
turningonthetastebuds.
Planning for the Kiwanis Club
Chicken BBQ is no small feat and
bothchairsfortheevent,JimFischer
and Donna Berger, have had plenty
of experience planning and carrying
outtheevent.
Fischersaidthathehasbeenvol-
unteering his time cooking for the
CanalDayseventforthreeyears.
“I arrange supplies for the bar-
becue,” Fischer explained. “Other
members of the club help our Head
Chef,DaveSmith,preparethechick-
en and Donna Berger has been in
chargeofservingthechicken.”
Berger said 12 years ago she
wasontheChamberBoardwiththe
group of guys — now The Core —
and all of them decided that they
would like to see Canal Days return
towhatitwasyearsago.
“That year, I was asked, along
with other members of the board,
to help serve the BBQ chicken,”
Berger explained. “Since then, we
have grown, selling chicken for 2
days.”
Bergersaysplanningandserving
the dinners has become easier and
easiereveryyear.TheKiwanismem-
berstakecareofthefoodandBerger
retainstheworkers.
“It’s a win/win for both par-
ties and the community,” Berger
explained.
The Kiwanis Club Chicken Tent
will be located beside the chamber.
Service starts at 11 a.m. Saturday
until sold out and at noon Sunday
until sold out. No dinners will be
soldduringtheparade.
“A total of 600 chicken dinners
will be prepared for the event,”
Fischersaid.
“We cut down some [dinners] on
Saturday and added another 50 on
Sundaybecausewesoldoutsoearly
after the parade last year,” Berger
said.
Jim Fischer and Donna Berger
Crews ready the balloons for the Hot Air Affair in Van Wert this week-
end. (Times Bulletin photo)
HotAirFestivalcoming
VanWertthisweekend
BY LINDSAY MCCOY
Times Bulletin News Writer
lmccoy@timesbulletin.com
VANWERT—The2013VanWert
HotAirFestivalisquicklyapproaching
andwillkickofftodayattheVanWert
Regional Airport with a media event
and free tethered balloon rides for the
area’s residents with special needs.
The main events will be held Friday,
Saturday and Sunday at the Van Wert
CountyFairgrounds.
Today, Balloon Pilot Tony Sandlin
andhiscrewwilloffertetheredballoon
ridestoanestimated150personswithin
the area with special needs or who are
limited to nursing home living. Rides
are expected to present a once-in-a-
lifetime opportunity to those who have
beenlimitedastohowtheycanexperi-
encetheworldaroundthem.
“Wearereallyproudofthisevent,”
said Event Organizer Jerry Mazur.
“This offers an opportunity for those
whoarechallengedbothmentallyand
physically do not often have. We are
looking forward to about 400 people
fillingtheairportforthisday’sevent.”
Hotdogsandrefreshmentswillalso
be provided to those taking tethered-
balloonrides.Distantballoonrideswill
alsobeavailableforrepresentativesof
variousnewsoutlets.Fourorfivebal-
loonswillbelaunchedfromtheairport
carryinglocalnewsreps.
Today’s events are expected to
beginat4:30p.m.
Ticketswillbesoldatthegateonly
this year and admission ticket prices
include parking. Armbands will be
given to those wishing to come and
gothroughouttheday.Admissionwill
be$10perpersonforeachindividual
day. Early bird admission for $5 will
beheldonSaturdayandSundayfrom
5-10a.m.Childrenages12andunder
arefree.
See AIR, page 10
Clevelandman’ssuicide
bringslittlesympathy
The Associated Press
CLEVELAND — Residents in
the tough Cleveland neighborhood
where three women were secretly
imprisoned for a decade reacted
with scorn and grim satisfaction
WednesdayafterArielCastrohanged
himselfinhiscellbarelyamonthinto
alifesentence.
Eventheprosecutorjoinedin.
“Thismancouldn’ttake,foreven
a month, a small portion of what
he had dished out for more than
a decade,” said Cuyahoga County
ProsecutorTimMcGinty.
Castro, 53, was found hanging
from a bedsheet Tuesday night at
thestateprisoninOrient,corrections
spokeswoman JoEllen Smith said.
Prison medical staff performed CPR
beforeCastrowastakentoahospital,
wherehewaspronounceddead.
The coroner’s office said it was
suicide.
“Hetookthecoward’swayout,”
said Elsie Cintron, who lived up
the street from the former school
busdriver.“We’resadtohearthat
he’s dead, but at the same time,
we’re happy he’s gone, and now
weknowhecan’taskforanappeal
or try for one if he’s acting like
he’scrazy.”
As the shocking news sank in,
prison officials faced questions
about how a high-profile inmate
managed to commit suicide while
in protective custody. Just a month
ago,anOhiodeathrowinmatekilled
himself days before he was to be
executed.
Ohio prisons director Gary Mohr
announced a review of Castro’s sui-
cide and whether he had received
proper medical and mental health
care.Statepolicearealsoinvestigat-
ing.
Theannouncementcameafterthe
American Civil Liberties Union of
Ohiocalledforafullinvestigation.
“As horrifying as Mr. Castro’s
crimesmaybe,thestatehasarespon-
sibilitytoensurehissafetyfromhim-
self and others,” executive director
ChristineLinksaid.
See SUICIDE, page 10
Chamber hosts 1st BAH event of season
The Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce had a Business After
Hours event Wednesday evening. Superior Federal Credit Union
sponsored the event and Jubilee Winery hosted. It was the first
Business After Hours for new Chamber Executive Director Tara
Krendl. Attendees played an ice breaker-game and enjoyed snacks
and wine. Above: Jay Metzner holds his prize from one of the raffle
drawings as he talks to Kurt Kneeper. Metzner also won the 50/50
drawing. (Delphos Herald/Erin Cox)
Mostlysunny
todayandclear
tonight.Highs
inthemid70s
andlowsin
theupper40s.
Seepage2.
See CHICKEN, page 10
Tendertimes
tobenefitfrom
pooltournament
CJ’sSidepocketsinVan
WertwillhostanEight-ball
Tournamentat7p.m.Sept.
20and21withparticipants
andsupportersdonating
suppliesforTendertimes
ChildDevelopment
CenterinDelphos.
AmericanPool
Associationruleswill
applyinthehandi-
cap10,double-elimi-
nationtournament.
Registrationbeginsat
6:30p.m.withCalcutta
at7p.m.sharp.
Thecostis$25
perperson.
Thepoolhallislocated
at123N.Washington
St.,VanWert.
Itemsneededforthe
centerinclude:paper
towels,toiletpaper,baby
wipes,tissues,color
paints,constructionpaper,
copypaper,children’s
booksandmovies,color-
ingbooks,kitchentrash
bags,washablemark-
ers,gluesticksandcraft
item(gogoeyes,pom
poms,carftsticks,etc.).
TODAY
BoysSoccer
AdaatOttoville,5p.m.
ContinentalatFort
Jennings(PCL),5p.m.
Lincolnviewat
Bryan,5p.m.
ElidaatWapakoneta
(WBL),5p.m.
KalidaatLimaTemple
Christian,5p.m.
VanWertatShawnee
(WBL),7p.m.
GirlsSoccer
JeffersonatSt.
John’s,5p.m.
BoysGolf
NewKnoxvilleatSt.
John’s(MAC),4p.m.
ColumbusGroveand
CrestviewatPaulding
(NWC),4p.m.
OttovilleandArchbold
atAyersville(Country
Aces),4:30p.m.
FortJenningsatArlington
(SycamoreSprings),4:30p.m.
SpencervilleandAdaat
Bluffton(NWC),4:30p.m.
ElidaatShawnee
(WBL),4:30p.m.
LeipsicandMillerCity
atKalida(PCL),4:30p.m.
Volleyball
NewKnoxvilleatSt.
John’s(MAC),5:30p.m.
WapakonetaatElida
(WBL),5:30p.m.
ShawneeatVanWert
(WBL),5:30p.m.
JeffersonatOttoville,6p.m.
Kalidaat
Lincolnview,6p.m.
CrestviewatWayne
Trace,6p.m.
GirlsTennis
ShawneeatElida
(WBL),4:30p.m.
VanWertatBath
(WBL),4:30p.m.
2 – The Herald Thursday, September 5, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERALS
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
FROM THE ARCHIVES
The Delphos Herald
wants to correct published
errors in its news, sports
and feature articles. To
inform the newsroom of a
mistake in published in-
formation, call the edito-
rial department at 419-695-
0015. Corrections will be
published on this page.
CORRECTIONS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 144 No. 59
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TODAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the mid 70s. Northeast
winds 5 to 10 mph.
TONIGHT: Clear. Lows in the upper 40s. East winds
around 5 mph through midnight becoming light and variable.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the mid 70s. Southeast
winds around 5 mph.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 50s. South
winds around 5 mph.
SATURDAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the mid 80s.
SATURDAY NIGHT THROUGH MONDAY: Partly
cloudy with a 20 percent chance of showers and thunder-
storms. Lows in the mid 60s. Highs in the lower 80s.
TUESDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the upper 80s. Lows in the upper 60s.
Betty L. Fox
Jan. 24, 1938-
Sept. 3, 2013
Betty L. Fox, 75, of
rural Venedocia went to
be with her Lord at 8:56
a.m. Tuesday in the Baton
Rouge Health Services
Community in Lima,
where she had resided for
six years.
She was born Jan. 24,
1938, in Sophia, W. Va.,
to Chester T. and Helen
Tankersley Jewell, who
preceded her in death.
On July 12, 1994, she
married Richard L. “Dick”
Fox, who survives.
Other survivors include
two sons, Michael “Mike”
(Bessie “Betty”) Keltner
of Lima and Ricky Thomas
of Marysville; two daugh-
ters, Tara Martin of Tiffin
and Jennifer “Becky”
Thomas of Marysville; 13
grandchildren; eight great-
grandchildren; a brother,
Danny (Mary) Jewell of
Culleoka, Tenn.; four sis-
ters, Joyce Hollenbacher,
Carol (Dal e) Mi l l er,
Sandra Young and Judith
Jewell, all of Florida; and
a brother-in-law, Robert
M. Fox of Concord, N.C.
She was preceded
in death by two great-
grandchildren and two
brot hers-i n-l aw, Roger
Hollenbacher and Mike
Young.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Friday in the
Thomas E. Bayliff Funeral
Home in Spencerville,
Pastor Terry West officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in
the Wright Cemetery near
Converse.
Friends may call from
2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. today
and after noon Friday at
the funeral home.
Memorials may be to
donors’ choice.
Corn $6.15
Wheat $6.16
Soybeans $14.61
Information submitted
The following individuals appeared
Wednesday before Judge Charles Steele in Van
Wert County Court of Common Pleas:
Changes of pleas
Lacey Warren, 22, Van Wert, changed her
plea to guilty to breaking and entering, a felony
of the fifth degree. A second charge for posses-
sion of criminal tools was dismissed for her plea.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investiga-
tion and set sentencing for Oct. 16.
Matthew Parr, 20, Van Wert, changed his
plea to guilty to breaking and entering and to
possession of criminal tools, each a felony of the
fifth degree. A third charge for tampering with
evidence was dismissed for his plea.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investiga-
tion and set sentencing for Oct. 16.
Jonathan Wells, 32, Sidney, entered a plea
of guilty to a prosecutor’s bill of Information
charging him with obstruction of official busi-
ness, a misdemeanor of the second degree. His
previous charge of tampering with evidence was
dismissed for his plea.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investiga-
tion and set sentencing for Sept. 25.
Dyllen Redding, 22, Convoy, changed his
plea to guilty to possession of drugs, a felony of
the fifth degree.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investiga-
tion and set sentencing for Oct. 16.
Robert Seibert, 26, Van Wert, changed his
plea to guilty to possession of heroin, a felony
of the fourth degree; and possession of heroin, a
felony of the fifth degree.
He then requested and was granted Treatment
in Lieu of Conviction. Further proceedings were
stayed pending completion of the treatment
program.
Dustyn Taylor, 22, Convoy, entered a plea of
guilty to a reduced charge of criminal trespass,
a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. This was
reduced from breaking and entering, a felony of
the fifth degree.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investiga-
tion and set sentencing for Sept. 25.
Sentencings
Ronald McBride, 43, Bryan, was sentenced
on four counts of unlawful possession of a
dangerous ordinance, each a felony of the fifth
degree.
He was sentenced to five years community
control, an additional 30 days jail, 100 hours
community service, psychological assessment
and treatment, 60 days electronic house arrest,
no contact with victims and not be within 1,000
feet of the victims, not enter Van Wert County
without permission of the probation department,
three years intensive probation and ordered to
pay court costs and partial appointed counsel
fees.
A 12-month prison term on each count was
deferred pending completion of community
control.
Lester Sulfridge Jr., 54, Van Wert, was
sentenced for operating a motor vehicle under
the influence of alcohol, a felony of the fourth
degree.
His sentence was three years community
control, 60 days jail and then up to six months
in WORTH Center, additional 30 days jail,
100 hours community service, substance abuse
assessment and treatment, two years intensive
probation, operator’s license suspended five
years and ordered to pay a mandatory fine of
$1,350, court costs and partial appointed attor-
ney fees.
An 18-month prison term was deferred.
Jason Kremer, 30, Van Wert, was sentenced
for trafficking drugs, a felony of the 5th degree.
His sentence was three years community
control, 90 days electronic house arrest, addi-
tional 30 days jail, 100 hours community ser-
vice, substance abuse assessment and treatment,
two years intensive probation, operator’s license
suspended six months, ordered to pay costs and
partial appointed counsel fees.
A 12-month prison term was deferred.
Eva Leiendecker, 27, Venedocia, was sen-
tenced on three counts of harassment by an
inmate, each a felony of the fifth degree.
She was sentenced to 12 months prison in
each count, concurrent with credit for 51 days
already served.
She was then re-sentenced on another case
involving two counts of assault (felony 4) and one
count of vandalism after she was medically dis-
charged from the WORTH Center on these charges.
On this case, she was sentenced to three years
community control on each count, concurrent,
30 days jail, 100 hours community service,
substance abuse and psychological assessments
and treatments, two years intensive probation,
ordered to pay costs and partial appointed attor-
ney fees.
A 12-month prison term on each counts was
deferred.
Landon Grayless, 31, Fort Wayne, was
sentenced for possession of heroin, a felony of
the fifth degree.
She was given three years community control,
60 days electronic house arrest, additional 30
days jail, 100 hours community service, sub-
stance abuse assessment and treatment, two years
intensive probation, Operator’s License suspend-
ed 6 months and ordered to pay court costs.
A 12-month prison term was deferred.
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born Sept. 3 to
Ashley and James Williams
of Elida.
One Year Ago
Pathfinder Meagan Hempfling took
Grand Champion Boer Market Goat at
the Van Wert County Fair last week.
Hempfling also placed first in Boer
Market Weather Class 3. She is the
daughter of Chuck and Sue Hempfling.
She is a 2012 St. John’s High School
graduate.
25 Years Ago – 1988
Rhonda Barnhart, 14, was busy col-
lecting trophies Monday at the junior fair
poultry show. Sporting her championship
rosette and holding her White Rock ban-
tam rooster, she accepted the large trophy
from Art Haehn Jr. of Delphos, an advi-
sor for the Fancy Feathers 4-H Club, as
the winner of the overall poultry project.
Rhonda also showed the champion game
bird and pen of two.
Scott Allen took medalist honors with
a 78 and helped to lead Columbus Grove
to a first-place finish Saturday in the
Northwest Conference Invitational at
Delphos Country Club. The Bulldogs
finished with a 349. Paulding was sec-
ond at 366 followed by Crestview, 369,
Lincolnview, 372, Jefferson, 375, Upper
Scioto Valley, 384, Bluffton, 396 and
Allen East, 410.
Pioneer Days will begin Sept. 8 and
end Sept. 11 in the square in Kalida.
Candidates for Pioneer Queen are Cheryl
Grote, Cheryl Hoffman, Linda Siebeneck,
Amy Ricker and Donna Kehres. A parade
Sunday will highlight the last day’s activ-
ities. The theme will be “Putnam County,
Past to Present.”
50 Years Ago – 1963
The annual Alumni banquet and
dance of Fort Jennings High School
was held Saturday evening. The ban-
quet was prepared by the Catholic
Ladies of Columbia and served at
the grade school cafeteria. The dance
followed at Memorial Hall with the
Variety Trio of Fort Wayne providing
the music.
Members of the Shantell Club met
Wednesday night as guests of Mrs.
Linus Kill, Landeck. Mrs. Francis
Gengler held high score in pinochle,
Mrs. Urban Hedrick, second, and Mrs.
Albert Hageman was low. Traveling
awards went to Mrs. Eugene Weigle
and Mrs. Jerome Lindemann.
Delphos St. John’s head football
Coach Ed Zalar was guest speaker at the
meeting of Kiwanis at Vogt’s Tuesday
evening. Zalar, who is in his third year
in Delphos, told of the humor, trials
and satisfaction that comes with being
a coach. He also reviewed his team’s
prospects for the coming season.
75 Years Ago – 1938
A homecoming will be held at
Venedocia Saturday and Sunday com-
memorating the 90th anniversary of
the establishment of religious service
in Venedocia and the 40th anniversary
of the building of the present Salem
Presbyterian Church. A concert is to
be given Saturday evening. Two Welsh
sermons will be preached Sunday after-
noon and Sunday evening, there will be
a Gymanfu Ganu, a Welsh song festival.
The members of the Amity Club held
a meeting at the home of Lois Kaskel,
East Jackson Street, Friday evening for
the purpose of reorganization. Edna Jane
Nolte was named social president and
Mary Ellen Moorman, reporter. Future
activities will include a steak roast to
be held on Wednesday evening of next
week.
The Star Café and Coombs Shoe kit-
tenball teams will play a series of five
games next week to decide the soft-
ball championship of Delphos. The team
winning three of the five contests will
be declared Delphos champion. Coombs
won the right to compete in the series by
winning the first round of play. The Star
Cafe won the second round. On Friday
night Coombs won from the Star by a
score of 5 to 2. This was the final league
game on the schedule.
Associated Press
Today is Thursday, Sept. 5,
the 248th day of 2013. There
are 117 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Sept. 5, 1972, terror
struck the Munich Olympics
as the Palestinian group
Black September attacked the
Israeli Olympic delegation; 11
Israelis, five guerrillas and a
police officer were killed in
the resulting siege.
On this date:
In 1774, the first
Continental Congress assem-
bled in Philadelphia.
In 1793, the Reign of Terror
began during the French
Revolution as the National
Convention instituted harsh
measures to repress counter-
revolutionary activities.
In 1836, Sam Houston
was elected president of the
Republic of Texas.
In 1913, fire devastated
Hot Springs, Ark., destroying
some 60 blocks.
In 1914, the First Battle
of the Marne, resulting in a
French-British victory over
Germany, began during World
War I.
VAN WERT COURT NEWS
GRIFFIS, Richard
Ward, 76, of Aiken, S.C., a
Requiem Mass will be cel-
ebrated at 9 a.m. Friday at
St. Mary Help of Christians
Catholic Church, Aiken. Due
to “Aiken’s Makin,” friends
are encouraged to park in
the George Funeral Home
parking lot and walk to the
church. Interment will be pri-
vate. The family will receive
friends from 6-8 p.m. today
at George Funeral Home &
Cremation Center, 211 Park
Ave. SW, Aiken. Memorial
donations may be directed to
the M D Anderson Thoracic
Research. Expressions of
sympathy may be left at
georgefuneralhomes.com.
FUERST, Betty Joan,
78, of Delphos, Mass of
Christian burial will be at 11
a.m. Friday at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church,
with Father Chris Bohnsack
officiating. Burial will fol-
low at St. John’s Cemetery.
Visitation will be from 2-8
p.m. today at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home and a
Parish Wake will be at 6 p.m.
There will also be a VFW
Auxiliary. service today.
Memorial contributions may
be made to VFW 3035 or St.
John’s Parish Foundation. To
leave online condolences for
the family, visit www.hart-
erandschier.com.
Nicholas Adam Mason, at 18
years of life, entered the pres-
ence of Heaven to be with his
Lord and Savior.
He graduated in May from
Lincolnview High School
and Vantage Career Center in
the Auto Tech program. Nick
“Cookie” was a member of
the high school wrestling team
and was undefeated champion
in the heavyweight division in
2009. He was very active in
the Slippery Creek Baptist Bible
Camp for the past seven sum-
mers as a camper, maintenance
worker and as a counselor-in-
training. He also worked at the
DARE Haunted Forest since
seventh grade.
After graduating, his dream
was to go to Alaska and in June,
he fulfilled that dream.
He is survived by his lov-
ing parents, Steven A. and
Deannalynette Mason; a sis-
ter, Rebekahlynette Mason of
Winter Haven Fla.; a brother,
John S. Mason, who is still in
high school and lives at home;
his paternal grandparents, Jerry
L. and Mary (Wright) Mason of
Van Wert; maternal grandpar-
ents, Rev. Dennis D. and Delores
I. (Nicholes) Rood of Canton;
and 12 uncles and aunts, 14
cousins, numerous great uncles
and wonderful friends.
He was preceded in death by
both his paternal and maternal
great grand parents.
Funeral services will be held
at 2 p.m. Friday at Brickner
Funeral Home, Van Wert, the
Revs. Dennis D. Rood and Ted
House officiating. Private fam-
ily burial will follow in Ridge
Cemetery.
Friends may call at the funer-
al home from 5-8 p.m. today
and one hour prior to services
Friday.
Steve asks his friends who
have bikes to ride with him to
the cemetery as an escort to
Nick.
He and Deannalynette invite
all of their family and friends to
come to their house at 7 p.m.
Friday for a bonfire in honor of
Nick. They will furnish all food
and ask everyone to bring their
own chairs.
Nicholas Adam
Mason
Trivia
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The swastika had several positives before Hitler appro-
priated it. In Sanskrit, the word swastika means “condu-
cive to well-being.” The Aryans of India believed swasti-
kas represented the sun moving across the sky; a symbol
of its goodness and regenerative power. The Greeks and
Persians believed it represented prosperity and happiness.
Early Christians disguised the cross as a swastika to avoid
persecution. North American Indian tribes used a similar
symbol as a sign of peace.
Spilling salt is considered bad luck because salt was
once valuable and difficult to obtain. Another reason is the
belief that spilled salt refers to the devil. Both French and
Americans toss salt over their left shoulder to hit the devil
in the eye.
Today’s questions:
Who first sited the land that became New York City?
What used to stand at the site of the Empire State
Building?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were drawn
Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
05-21-37-38-47-49, Kicker:
8-5-7-8-0-1
Estimated jackpot: $45.2 mil-
lion
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $95 million
Pick 3 Evening
1-2-9
Pick 3 Midday
4-6-9
Pick 4 Evening
4-5-9-9
Pick 4 Midday
3-6-6-3
Pick 5 Evening
7-8-2-7-7
Pick 5 Midday
0-3-0-3-3
Powerball
02-09-26-45-47, Powerball: 11
Rolling Cash 5
07-10-22-23-39
Estimated jackpot: $120,000
2
Prices good 8am Saturday, September 12 to midnight Sunday, September 13, 2009 at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations.
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selected varieties
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Seyfert’s
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Save up to $1.00
Angelfood
Cake
Iced or Lemon
Angelfood Cake
Save $2.11; select varieties
Super Dip
Ice Cream
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In the Bakery
Sale starts Saturday!
24 oz.
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Regular or Thick Cut
$
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1102 Elida Ave., Delphos • 419-692-5921
www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
www.Facebook.com/ChiefSupermarket
Open: 24 Hours Monday-Friday
Saturday & Sunday: 7am-midnight
Thursday, September 5, 2013 The Herald – 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Allen Co. Republican
Luncheon set for
Friday
Information submitted
LIMA — The Allen County
Republican Party will host a lun-
cheon at noon Friday.
The guest speaker for
the event is Jim Link, Lima
Municipal Clerk of Court. He
was appointed this position on
Jan. 14 and prior to this, served as
the Allen County Treasurer. The
duties of the Municipal Clerk
are many and varied. Link will
give attendees an overview of
his office.
The luncheon will be held at
the Elk’s Lodge at 302 W. North
St., Lima. The cost of lunch is $8.
Everyone is welcome to
attend but reservations are
required. To make reservations,
call 419-331-5655 or email
republicans@allencountyohiog-
op.com.
E - The Environmental
Magazine
Dear EarthTalk: Is it true that human over-
population isn’t such a big issue any more as
numbers are expected to start declining in a few
decades?
— Melinda Mason, Boone, IA
Ever since Thomas Malthus published “An
Essay on the Principle of Population” in 1798,
positing incorrectly that humans’ proclivity for
procreation would exhaust the global food supply
within a matter of decades, population growth has
been a hot button issue among those contemplating
humankind’s future. Indeed our very success going
forth and multiplying, paired with our ability to
extend our life expectancy, has meant that we are
perpetually pushing the limits of the resource base
that supports us.
When Malthus was worrying about the planet’s
“carrying capacity,” there were only about a bil-
lion of us on the planet. Today our population tops
seven billion. While better health care and medicine
along with advances in food production and access
to freshwater and sanitation have allowed us to
feed ourselves and stave off many health ills, some
so-called Neo-Malthusians believe we may still be
heading for some kind of population crash, perhaps
triggered or exacerbated by environmental factors
related to climate change.
But others are less concerned given projections
that world population will likely start to decline
once the world’s less developed nations urbanize
and start lowering their birth rates, as has already
happened in Europe, the U.S., Australia and parts of
Asia. For example, Europe’s “fertility rate” between
2005 and 2010 was just 1.53 live births per woman
(the standard replacement rate to maintain a stable
population is 2.1). Without immigration, Europe’s
population would already be shrinking.
Of course, the immigration that continues to fuel
population numbers in developed countries is com-
ing from somewhere. Indeed, population numbers
are still growing in many of the world’s developing
countries, including the world’s most populous
nation, China, and its close rival, India. Also fertil-
ity rates in Africa continue to be among the highest
in the world, as many countries there are growing
fast, too. Poverty and health problems due to poor
sanitation, lack of access to food and water, the low
social status of women and other ills continue to
cripple these regions. Overpopulation could plague
us indefinitely if fertility rates don’t drop in these
areas, especially as they ramp up their Western-style
development.
Globally, the United Nations estimates that the
number of humans populating the planet in 2100
will range from as few as 6.2 billion—almost a
billion less than today—to as many as 15.8 billion
on the high end. Meanwhile, other researchers
confirm the likelihood of world population levels
flattening out and starting to decline by 2100
according to the lower UN estimate. To wit, the
Austria-based International Institute for Applied
Systems Analysis (IIASA) recently unveiled
research showing that if the world stabilizes at a
fertility rate comparable to that of many European
nations today (roughly 1.5), the global human
population will be only half of what it is today by
the year 2200, and only one-seventh by 2300.
It is difficult to say which way the global popu-
lation pendulum will swing in centuries to come,
given ever-changing cultural, economic and politi-
cal attitudes and the development demographics
they affect. As such the jury is still out as to whether
human overpopulation will become a footnote in
history or the dominant ill that stands in the way
of all other efforts to achieve sustainability and a
kinder, gentler world.
EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy
Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trade-
mark of E - The Environmental Magazine (www.
emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@
emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/
subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/
trial.
The jury is still out as to whether human
overpopulation will become a footnote in
history or the dominant ill that stands
in the way of all other efforts to achieve
sustainability and a kinder, gentler world.
Pictured: A crowded street in Kathmandu,
Nepal. (Pavel Novak photo)
Judge blocks bid to force
Amish girl to have chemo
Associated Press
A judge has again blocked an Ohio hospital from forcing a
10-year-old Amish girl to resume chemotherapy after her par-
ents decided to stop the treatments.
The order siding with the parents comes just a week after an
appeals court sent the case back to the judge and told him to give
more consideration to the request by Akron Children’s Hospital.
The hospital wants a registered nurse to take over lim-
ited guardianship of Sarah Hershberger and decide whether she
should continue treatments for leukemia. The hospital believes
Sarah’s leukemia is treatable and says she will die without che-
motherapy.
Andy Hershberger, the girl’s father, said the family agreed to
begin two years of treatments for Sarah last spring but stopped
a second round of chemotherapy in June because it was making
her extremely sick.
Judge John Lohn, in Medina County, said in his ruling
Tuesday that not allowing the parents to make medical decisions
for their daughter would take away their rights. He also said
there is no guarantee that chemotherapy would be successful.
“They are good parents,” he said. “They understand com-
pletely the grave situation their daughter is in and the conse-
quences of their choice to refuse chemotherapy for Sarah at this
time.”
Lohn said also that allowing for a guardian would go against
the girl’s wishes.
“Even if the treatments are successful, there is a very good
chance Sarah will become infertile and have other serious health
risks for the rest of her life,” the judge said.
The hospital did not immediately respond to an email
requesting comment. Officials there have said they are morally
and legally obligated to make sure the girl receives proper care.
While state laws give parents a great deal of freedom when
it comes to choosing medical treatment for their children, that’s
not always true when the decision could be a matter of life or
death. Courts most often will draw the line when doctors think
the child’s life is in danger and there’s a good chance that the
treatments being suggested will work, according to several
medical ethicists.
The Ohio judge ruled in July that Sarah’s parents had the
right to make medical decisions for her, but the appeals court
said Lohn failed to consider whether appointing a guardian
would be in the girl’s best interest and ordered him to re-con-
sider the decision.
Sarah’s father said she begged her parents to stop the chemo-
therapy and they agreed after a great deal of prayer. The family,
members of an insular Amish community, shuns many facets of
modern life. They live on a farm and operate a produce stand
near the village of Spencer in Medina County, about 35 miles
southwest of Cleveland.
They opted to consult with a wellness center and treat Sarah
with natural medicines, such as herbs and vitamins, and see anoth-
er doctor who is monitoring their daughter, Hershberger said.
Hershberger said they have not ruled out returning to Akron
Children’s Hospital if Sarah’s health worsens. The hospital
has said the girl’s illness — lymphoblastic lymphoma — is an
aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
Putnam Co. Help
Me Grow offers free
screenings
Information submitted
PUTNAM COUNTY —
Putnam County Help Me Grow
Early Childhood Specialists
will be available to screen
Putnam County infants, tod-
dlers and preschoolers free of
charge. Developmental screen-
ings that are available include:
hearing, vision, physical devel-
opment (crawling, walking,
etc.), speech and language,
behavioral and play skills.
The free screenings are
offered to Putnam County
residents monthly. Our next
screening will take place
from 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 24.
Screenings are by appointment
only, please call 419-523-6059
or toll free at 1-877-738-1866.
10-week free parenting
classes available in
Putnam County
Information submitted
PUTNAM COUNTY —
Parenthood is filled with many
questions. You are not alone! If
you have children ages birth to 8
and would like to come together
with other parents to talk, learn
and enhance the parenting skills
you already have, please join us
for The Incredible Years.
Learn to help your child con-
trol and express their emotions,
use problem solving skills, com-
municate better, gain friendship
skills and cope with peers. Parents
will learn how to motivate your
child, use praise, incentives and
rewards and use time-out and
other positive discipline.
The Incredible Years starts
Sept. 26 at the Putnam County
Educational Service Center. The
group will meet every Thursday
for 10 weeks from 6-8 p.m.
Parents, grandparents, guardians
and caregivers of children ages
birth to 8 are invited to attend this
free program. Free childcare will
be provided on-site for all chil-
dren ages 6 weeks old or older.
A free family-style meal will be
held 30 minutes prior to pro-
gram each week for those who
are interested.
Registration is required by
Sept. 23. Call the Putnam County
Educational Service Center, 419-
523-5951 extension 3023. Space
is limited. This program is spon-
sored by the Putnam County
Educational Service Center
through the Ohio Children’s Trust
Fund.
Celebrating Heritage
opens Sept. 20
Information submitted
LIMA — ArtSpace/Lima
announces the opening of
Celebrating Heritage: Paul
Huffer / Kenneth Smith on
Sept. 20.
Celebrating Heritage is a
two-gallery show featuring the
works of two painters whose
heritage is intimately bound
with the Lima area. Paul
Huffer, BFA from The Ohio
State University and recently
retired from the Smithsonian
Institution, attributes the earli-
est stages of his mastery of
painting and design to two art
teachers in the Lima school
system: “namely, Miss Leahy
of Lima Central Junior High
School and Mrs. Kirk of Lima
Senior High School. Through
their influence, encourage-
ment, and dedication to the
fine arts during my forma-
tive years, each put me on a
path to my dual careers as a
painter and museum profes-
sional.” Huffer’s work, a series
of large abstract paintings, will
be mounted in the Ellen Nelson
Gallery.
Kenneth Smith is an impor-
tant name in the early annals of
the Lima Art Association, later
ArtSpace/Lima. He was among
the early founding members
of the association, serving
as a member of the Board of
Trustees, heading up commit-
tees, and winning prizes in
exhibits, all while maintaining
his day job as a designer at
Lima Neon Products. In his
late teens, Smith took class-
es at the Chicago Institute of
Art, from which experience
he developed a range of tech-
niques, producing art in oils,
watercolor, pencil, colored
pencil, and pastels. His work is
realistic in style with a careful
attention to detail.
There will be an open-
ing reception for Celebrating
Heritage from 6:30 p.m.-8:30
p.m. Sept. 20. The exhibit runs
through Nov. 2.
ArtSpace/Lima is a not-for-
profit arts organization with a
mission to promote the arts in
northwest Ohio and to provide
artists with a venue to pres-
ent and to sell their work.
ArtSpace/Lima is supported
in part by a grant from the
Ohio Arts Council. For further
information on Celebrating
Heritage or information regard-
ing other ArtSpace/Lima pro-
grams, please call Bill Sullivan,
Operations Manager, at
ArtSpace/Lima 419-222-1721.
1
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502 N Main St. Delphos, Oh  (419) 695-1060
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CHILD’S APPOINTMENT WITH A
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NEW PATIENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME!
419.692.GRIN
(4746)
Open Mon-Wed-Thurs 8-5,
Fri 8-11
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www.mohrsmilesohio.com
*Age 17 and under.
Does not include prophy or x-rays.
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D & C Motor SaleS
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We Are Your Used & Pre-Owned
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AGRIBUSINESS
4 — The Herald Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Choosing cover crops depends on crop rotation, goal for soil
FFA members continue success at Van Wert County Fair
BY JAMES J. HOORMAN
Ag Educator
OSU-Extension
Putnam County
As crops start to mature, farmers
are thinking about what to plant next.
Planting cover crops to protect the soil
from erosion and to improve soil health is
a great option. Farmers plant cover crops
to harvest sunlight and to feed the soil
microbes. Plant roots directly feed the
soil by exuding carbon compounds that
soil microbes may use for food. In return,
the soil microbes recycle soil nutrients
for the plant and together they improve
soil aggregation and soil structure.
I often get asked, “What is the
best cover crop to plant?” The answer
depends upon the crop rotation and what
you want to accomplish. After corn for
grain, cereal rye or winter rye is usually
the best option. Cereal rye germinates
at 32 degrees Fahrenheit and may grow
under the snow. For best results, drill
cereal rye at least 1 inch deep or down
to moisture. Cover crops can be flown
on, applied with a highboy applicator
between the rows (drop down nozzles),
or broadcast with fertilizer or by them-
selves. With dry conditions, broadcast-
ing cover crop seed is risky because the
seed generally does not germinate until
weather conditions improve.
Seeding rates can vary from 0.5 bush-
el to 2 bushel per acre. Farmers who
harvest corn silage will often seed cereal
rye at 2 bushel per acre, apply manure,
and then harvest 3-5 tons of spring for-
age before planting corn or soybeans.
Manure or extra nitrogen is critical for
good forage growth and to prevent the
corn from turning yellow (N deficiency)
next spring. In 2013, one dairy farmer
harvested 5 tons/A of good quality for-
age from cereal rye (worth at least $200/
ton) before planting corn for silage. He
applied dairy manure in the fall and the
spring (8,000 gallons/A) or roughly 120
pounds of N each time. His crude protein
was 12.5 percent where no manure was
applied and 21% with manure applied
twice. Cereal rye will absorb of its total
biomass almost 3-3.5-percent soil N and
0.2-percent soil P.
Oats seeded after corn silage at 2
bushel per acre is another option if for-
age is desired resulting in 1-3 tons (with
adequate moisture) by mid-December. If
the farmer does not want forage, 0.5 to
1 bu/A oats, cereal rye or barley makes
a great cover crop going to soybeans.
Without manure, farmers should avoid
planting grass cover crops before corn
due to high carbon to nitrogen ratios
unless they are willing to apply a large
amount of N fertilizer.
What cover crop should I use if I have
soybeans going to corn?
If the soybeans come off early
(September), oilseed radish, oats, crim-
son clover, or winter peas may be options.
Farmers can either drill or broadcast oil
seed radish (Daikon varieties) at 3-5#/A
by themselves or drill radish 1-2#/A with
crimson clover (7-8#/A) or with winter
peas or Canadian field pea (Windham or
winter hardy variety at 17-18#/A, 1 inch
deep). The legumes may supply 75-100#/
A N to the next crop with good stands and
adequate growth in the spring.
Most of these cover crops do best
if seeded early in September with
more variable results towards the end
of September and early October for
Northwest Ohio. All cover crops need
moisture and adequate sunlight to grow
and they need a minimum of 60 to 90
days of growth. With diminishing sun-
light and colder temperatures, a day in
September may be like 3 days of growth
in October and a week in November.
Planting an early maturing soybean or
corn variety which is harvested earlier
can greatly increase the success of fall
planted cover crops.
Other cover crops to consider are
kale and rape/canola which can tolerate
colder weather. Kale seeded at 10#/A can
produce as much as 10 tons of biomass/A
in deer plots. Kale can also be grazed
by cattle with protein levels as high as
25%. Kale should be planted 0.5-0.75
inches deep and at 3-4#/A as a cover
crop. Rape is a wild cousin of canola
and more hardy. Rape can also be grazed
(9-10#/A) or seeded as cover crop at
3-4#/A about .5 inches deep. Both Kale
and Rape are small seeded, brassicas
(same family as oil seed radish) and
require adequate sulfur for good growth.
Brassica plant species tend to fumigate
the soil and suppress weeds but they also
can stink when they decay.
Planting cover crops help farmers pro-
tect their soils but also improve soil quality.
Karen Cline exhibited two market lambs, receiving
As on both of her projects. She also participated in
Intermediate Showmanship.
Brock Bonifas garnered Champion in Senior Swine
Showmanship with his market hog.
Brock Bonifas exhibited market hogs at the fair and
finished Reserve Champion Barrow, Reserve Champion
Overall Market Hog and Reserve Champion in the Ryan
Trentman Memorial Open Show. (Submitted photos)
Jason Wittler showed in Senior Swine Showmanship
and placed fourth overall in the senior division. He also
placed second and fourth, respectively, with his two market
hogs in their classes.
Josh Kroeger participated in the Intermediate Swine
Showmanship placing fourth overall. He also showed two
market hogs, placing fourth in class with one of them.
Sophia Wilson received the award for Champion
Lightweight Market Lamb.
Sophia Wilson received Champion Performance Lamb
at the 2013 Van Wert County Fair. She also won Champion
Overall Sheep Showman.
Sophia Wilson earned her right to participate in the
Champion of Champions show by winning Overall Sheep
Showman. In this show, she showed 10 different breeds
of livestock trying to earn the award of Showman of all
Showman of all breeds. She ended up third overall in the
show.
Rileigh Tippie placed second in her class in the Market
Hog Barrow Show and also participated in intermediate
showmanship.
Thanks for reading
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
Nancy Spencer, editor
419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Don Hemple, advertising manager
419-695-0015 ext. 138
dhemple@delphosherald.com
News About Your Community
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1
Thursday, September 5, 2013 The Herald — 5 www.delphosherald.com
COMMUNITY
Landmark
Calendar of
Events
SEPT. 6
Greg Jones
Matt Elwer
Amber Schuck
Hannah Benavidez
Kate Strayer
Julia Ford
Art Grothouse
SEPT. 9-13
MONDAY: Sub sandwiches with lettuce and tomato, maca-
roni salad, mixed fruit, coffee and 2 percent milk.
TUESDAY: Marinara meat sauce with spaghetti noodles,
cauliflower, garlic toast, cookie, coffee and 2 percent milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked fish, cole slaw, bread, margarine,
fruit, coffee and 2 percent milk.
THURSDAY: Cube steak, mashed potatoes, mixed vegeta-
bles, dinner roll, margarine, apricots, coffee and 2 percent milk.
FRIDAY: Pork chop, sweet potatoes, cabbage, bread, mar-
garine, dessert, coffee and 2 percent milk.
SEPT. 5-7
TODAY: Sue Vasquez, Dorothy Hedrick, Mary Rigdon,
Sandy Rigdon, Sue Wiseman and Sara Miller.
FRIDAY: Irma Buettner, Linda Spring, Valeta Ditto and
Marge Kaverman.
SATURDAY: Millie Minning, Millie Spitnale, Sandy Hahn
and Rita Nesbitt.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like to volunteer should contact Catharine
Gerdemann, 419-695-8440; Alice Heidenescher, 419-692-5362;
Linda Bockey, 419-692-7145; or Lorene Jettinghoff, 419-692-
7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
TODAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Museum of Postal History,
339 N. Main St., is open.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for
shopping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for
shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for
shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul
Society, located at the east
edge of the St. John’s High
School parking lot, is open.
10 a.m.-2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. — Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
6 p.m. — Middle Point
Village Council meets
6:30 p.m. — Shelter from
the Storm support group meets
in the Delphos Public Library
basement.
7 p.m. — Marion Township
trustees at township house.
Middle Point council meets
at town hall.
Delphos City Council meets
at the Delphos Municipal
Building, 608 N. Canal St.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.
Delphos City School Board
of Education meets in the
Administrative Building on
Jefferson Street.
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Tacos in Pasta Shells
1 1/4 pounds ground
beef
1 package (3 ounces)
cream cheese with chives,
cubed, softened
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon chili pow-
der
18 jumbo pasta shells,
cooked, drained
2 tablespoons butter,
melted
1 cup prepared taco
sauce
1 cup (4 ounces) shred-
ded cheddar cheese
1 cup (4 ounces) shred-
ded Monterey Jack cheese
1 1/2 cups crushed tor-
tilla chips
1 cup dairy sour cream
3 green onions,
chopped (optional)
Preheat oven to 350
degrees. Butter 13x9-inch
baking pan. Cook beef in
large skillet over medi-
um-high heat until brown,
stirring to separate meat;
drain drippings. Reduce
heat to medium-low. Add
cream cheese, salt and
chili powder; simmer 5
minutes. Toss shells with
butter. Fill shells with
beef mixture using spoon.
Arrange shells in prepared
pan. Pour taco sauce even-
ly over each shell. Cover
with foil. Bake 15 min-
utes. Uncover; top with
cheddar cheese, Monterey
Jack cheese and chips.
Bake 15 minutes more
or until bubbly. Top with
sour cream and onions.
Garnish, if desired. Serves
4.
Apple Pie with
Cinnamon Candies
5 cups peeled, sliced
apples
¾ cup sugar
3 tablespoons flour
1 tablespoon quick-
cooking tapioca
3 tablespoons red hot
candies
1 2-crust pie shell
Mix sugar and flour;
sprinkle small amount in
pastry lined 9-inch pie
plate. Add tapioca and
candies. Pile apples in
pie plate; pour remaining
sugar mixture over top.
Add top crust. Bake at
425 degrees for 50-60
minutes.
If you enjoyed these
recipes, made changes or
have one to share, email
kitchenpress@yahoo.com.
Serve a new version of
tacos and apple pie for
your next meal. Listen
for the applause.
The Putnam County District Library in Ottawa will host
local author Beth Huffman at 1 p.m. Sept. 21.
Join Huffman and Kim Brinkman Smith for a book signing
and to discuss excerpts from her book “Listen to Me.”
This is the story of Columbus Grove resident Smith, who
was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 16, given a 75-percent
chance of surviving and told by doctors that she’d likely never
be able to have children due to the chemotherapy and radiation
treatments.
Kim defeated the cancer and she and her husband have two
children.
Books will be available for purchase.
For any questions, call the Ottawa Library at 419-523-3747.
Visit mypcdl.org for more programs.
Ottawa library to host local author
Check us out online: www.delphosherald.com
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If you aren't already taking advantage of our convenient home delivery service,
please call us at 419-695-0015.
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Herald keeps
you in the local
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Sometimes the market reacts poorly to changes in the
world. But just because the market reacts doesn’t mean
you should. Still, if current events are making you feel
uncertain about your fnances, you should schedule a
complimentary portfolio review. That way, you can help
ensure you’re in control of where you want to go and
how you can potentially get there.
You can’t control
the market, but you
can control your decisions.
Take control. Schedule your free portfolio review today.
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Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
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6 – The Herald Thursday, September 5, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
Does the Big Ten
need a wakeup call?
By JIM METCALFE
Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
So, the Big Ten has announced that though it is
discouraging its member schools from scheduling the
Football Championship Series teams in future years,
especially once the new College Football Playoff format
begins, it will not punish them for doing so.
One question: why not? Are they on a death wish?
Strength of schedule is going to be one of the criteria
— my guess is, one of THE biggest — that the new selec-
tion committee will use to make those picks.
As far as I am concerned, whether the FCS schools are
left out of the lurch or not is irrelevent.
Is it fair that this could happen, that the small schools
will lose their major paydays? No — but as we all know,
life isn’t fair.
College football is making these decisions, not fair-
ness. College football will punish those teams who play
these lesser lights.
When some major archrivalries are in danger — like
Texas/Texas A & M — of not being played because of
all the movement in major-college football these days,
that’s a problem.
Those small schools will not only NOT help build
a respectable SOS for the big boys but they will drain
needed points.
I realize the supposed need to have seven home games
each season to make ends meet but with all the money
that is being thrown around with expanding TV contracts,
etc., I wonder if that is really true anymore.
What does having that seventh home game against
Kill Me A & I help you make ends meet when in the long
run, it’s going to suck money from your coffers when you
aren’t potentially getting the huge-money playoffs?
Let’s ask this question: does a potential 5-star recruit
from Baton Rouge want to see Ohio State play San Diego
State or Florida State, for example?
The Big Ten teams are in a fight for their collec-
tive lives to stand up to the bullies of the Southeastern
Conference, as well as the formidable teams of the PAC
12, in hopes of making those Playoffs.
Let’s face it: the SEC has far more truly heavyweight
matchups — with far better weather and locations — that
the Big Ten can muster. Outside of Ohio State and That
Team Up North — perhaps throwing in Wisconsin —
the Big Ten doesn’t really have those heavyweights you
really need to build up that impeccable resume.
Nebraska — once one of the elites in major-college
football — hasn’t been the same since Tom Osborne left
the sideline, though they have had some good coaches
and solid teams since he retired, and Penn State may be
done as a player in the national spotlight for a decade or
more. Who knows if they can ever recover the glitter that
once was in Happy Valley.
To think that Maryland or Rutgers is really going to
add to the heavyweight-ness of the Big Ten is whistling
Dixie.
If you are talking about bringing in a Notre Dame,
Oklahoma, Texas, Pittsburgh — you have something.
Whether the middle two on that list were real targets
or had real ideas of moving north in their conference
affiliation, no one really knows.
The outer two are likely still on the radar and with this
new format coming, one wonders at some point if they
don’t bite the bullet and agree to come in.
I can see Notre Dame wanting to maintain those rival-
ries but with all the movement in the game of college
football, one has to wonder if this will be possible in the
coming decade.
Perhaps they can but perhaps it will be like stopping
the tide from coming in.
T-Birds wear down Blue Jays at the net
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — First-year St. John’s vol-
leyball coach Carolyn Dammeyer is trying
to build the program into a consistent unit
year after year.
Lima Central Catholic is one of those
programs she would like to emulate.
The Lady Blue Jays learned up close
and personal how far they have to go as
they fell 25-21, 25-18, 25-12 Wednesday
night at Robert A. Arnzen Gymnasium.
“LCC always seems to have a solid
team. They have a lot of weapons and they
force you to defend them,” Dammeyer said.
“We need to build consistency. We have a
lot of new girls on the varsity and they need
to learn how to play at this level from the
first point to the last. Teams like LCC have
those veteran players that know how to do
that; we only had two players back from
last year that really experienced varsity last
fall, so we’re learning.”
Thunderbird head man Wes Horstman
relied on that.
“We played five matches in five days, so
we were a little tired coming into the match
tonight. Plus, St. John’s came out fired up,”
he added. “It took us a while to get things
rolling. We depend a lot on our setter and
we have an experienced one in Sydney
(Mohler); this is her second year of start-
ing, so she knows how to spread the ball
around. We don’t have the one great player
but we have a lot of good hitters, so that just
wears a defense down. I think that’s what
happened as we went on.”
In the first two sets, the Jays (1-4)
battled on relatively even terms,
In the first set, the Jays stayed close
behind a solid defense and not many errors
(17 hitting miscues overall). They did a
nice job of keeping the ball in play, get-
ting touches at the net and digging up the
Lady Thunderbird (4-3) hitting efforts. The
visitors led 18-12 at one point on an ace
by senior setter Mohler (27 assists, 2 aces)
but the Jays ran off a 6-2 span — fueled
by some LCC hitting errors (16 for the
night) — to get within 20-18 on a push
by junior Bekah Fischer (3 kills, 2 aces).
Unfortunately, a stuff by Fischer to get
within a point was ruled to be in the net
and the T-Birds ran off the set, getting a
serving error (9 for the night) on set point
by the Jays.
The second set went the same way as
the opener. The Jays couldn’t quite get
on a roll but they didn’t let the visitors do
so, either. LCC led 18-13 on a hit off the
defense by Sydney Zerante (7 kills) and the
Jays couldn’t get closer. They did get within
19-16 as sophomore Hayley Jettinghoff
put down a hit off the block but a crucial
5-0 spurt — four on hitting miscues by the
hosts and the final on an ace by Meredith
Niese (3 aces) — put the visitors on the
verge of a 2-0 set lead. A hitting error and a
kill by junior Kestley Hulihan only delayed
the inevitable. On set point, another serving
error gave LCC the 2-set edge.
The Jays remained competitive to start
the third set, leading 4-2 at one point
early on a hit off the LCC block by junior
Brittney Claypool (3 kills). However, a
hitting error got the visitors on the road
back and slowly but surely — combining
some hitting mistakes by the home unit
and a varied attack at the net that Mohler
could turn to — they began to put the
finishing touches on the sweep. Despite
Dammeyer calling a pair of timeouts, LCC
had too much as they secured the sweep
on the ninth serving error by the Blue and
Gold.
“We have come a long way in the three
months I have had these girls, from the first
open gym to now. They have worked hard
and they have a great attitude,” Dammeyer
added. “We celebrate every point and have
a lot of positive things going. The chemistry
I have with these girls is great, so the transi-
tion has been fantastic. We just have to keep
getting better.”
The Jays host New Knoxville in MAC
play tonight (5:30 p.m. junior varsity start).
LCC plays Lima Senior in an Elida tri-
match 1 p.m. Saturday.
The Thunderbirds got a 25-15, 25-23
junior varsity triumph.
St. John’s sophomore Hayley Jettinghoff lines up a kill attempt as Lima
Central Catholic’s Sydney Zerante and Sydney Mohler look to apply the
block Wednesday night at Arnzen Gymnasium. (Delphos Herald/Randy
Shellenbarger)
Earnhardt Jr.’s car finally fully funded
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. —
Dale Earnhardt Jr. will have a
new look during the Chase for
the Sprint Cup Championship
as Hendrick Motorports
has finally sold the remain-
ing inventory on his No. 88
Chevrolet.
Time Warner Cable signed
on as primary sponsor for five
races this season, beginning
Saturday night at Richmond
in the final race before the
12-driver Chase field is set.
Time Warner will also spon-
sor Earnhardt at Chicago, New
Hampshire, Kansas City and
Charlotte.
It closes out the inventory
on the No. 88, which opened
the season with races to sell.
Hendrick was able to fill the
void over the course of the year
when National Guard picked
up an additional eight races,
pushing its total to 29 total
races. Diet Mountain Dew also
sponsors five events.
Time Warner’s sponsorship
is part of an expanded sponsor-
ship package with Hendrick
Motorsports that saw the com-
pany add one additional race
with Kasey Kahne, bringing
its total to six this year, while
adding five races in 2014 and
2015. The additional races
means the No. 5 Chevrolet is
sold out for 2014 for Kahne,
who has been featured in
Time Warner’s “Enjoy Better”
national brand campaign.
“This is the second time
in the last year that Time
Warner Cable has expanded
its commitment to Hendrick
Motorsports and NASCAR,”
added team owner Rick
Hendrick. “We’re now lever-
aging more of our assets, from
both Hendrick Motorsports
and Hendrick Automotive
Group, to drive even greater
value into what’s been a very
effective program. It’s a ter-
rific partnership that works on
multiple levels.”
Time Warner Cable will
become a marketing partner
with Hendrick Automotive
Group to collaborate on offer-
ings specific to the automotive
industry.
“We’ve been extremely
happy with the results from our
NASCAR initiatives,” added
Jeffrey Hirsch, Time Warner
Cable’s executive vice presi-
dent and chief marketing offi-
cer. “The on-track performance
of Hendrick Motorsports is
well documented but they’ve
also put significant resources
into building a world-class
marketing operation. It’s been
a team effort and we’re seeing
terrific exposure and return.”
———
FRESH PLASTER:
Martin Truex Jr. had a new
cast applied to his broken right
wrist after the one he had on
last week appeared to melt
in the late stages of Sunday
night’s race at Atlanta.
Despite the issues, Truex
managed to finish third to stay
in contention for a spot in the
Chase. He heads into Saturday
night’s race at Richmond
ranked 13th in the standings
with one win on the season,
good enough for the second
wild card. Truex is only 15
points out of 10th but believes
his Michael Waltrip Racing
team is far better than where
they sit in the standings.
“To be honest, with the sea-
son we have had with all the
ups and downs, I am so excited
to still be in this thing,” he
said. “We have fought so hard
this year and have overcome
a lot to be in this position. It
will be awesome and a huge
deal for us if we can make it in
again. This NAPA team is not
a 12th- or 13th-place team. In
my opinion, we are a top-five
team. We want to get in and
make up for the mistakes and
mishaps we experienced ear-
lier in the year to have a great
ending to our season.”
He doesn’t expect any issues
with his wrist at Richmond,
either. He was injured in a
wreck at Bristol two weeks
ago.
“The cast did its job at
Atlanta. It got a little soft in
the palm area during the race
but all and all, everything went
fine,” he added. “I’ve had it
checked over again and had a
new cast put on. We’ve made
a few adjustments to this new
cast and I expect it to be a
whole lot better. Everything
has gone well so far. I can-
not complain. I mean to go to
Atlanta and to have a shot at
the win at the end, at that point,
what pain I felt was gone.”
———
Around the Track
Notre Dame says so
long to Big House
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
In a sense, Michigan coach
Brady Hoke was right when
he said Notre Dame was
“chickening out” of its rivalry
with the Wolverines.
No, the Fighting Irish
are not literally scared to
play Michigan but if the
Wolverines weren’t generally
so good, Notre Dame might
not have pulled out of the
series between two of col-
lege football’s most famous
teams. As is the case with all
heavyweight programs, Notre
Dame needs to manage the
difficulty of its schedule and
guarantee regularly playing
seven home games.
The Fighting Irish (1-0)
visit the Big House on
Saturday, their last scheduled
trip to Ann Arbor. Michigan
(1-0) plays at South Bend,
Ind., next season and then
the rivalry takes an indefinite
hiatus.
It’s a rivalry that is both
historical and significant —
and really cool. Winged hel-
mets vs. golden domes.
But when Notre Dame
agreed to play five games
against Atlantic Coast
Conference opponents per
season, starting next year, it
needed to clear some space
— and Michigan got the boot.
“It’s just there’s so many
complexities with our sched-
ule and our agreement with
the ACC that it’s difficult
and frustrating,” Notre Dame
coach Brian Kelly said. “I can
see the frustration that would
be there.”
Why Michigan and not
Navy or Purdue or even
Michigan State?
To be fair, there is a lot
of history with those rival-
ries. The Irish have played the
Midshipmen more (86 times)
than even Southern California
(84).
They’ve played Purdue 84
times as well and Michigan
State is next on the most-
played list at 75. Michigan’s
40 is behind Pitt (68), Army
(50) and Northwestern (47).
Just as important: Notre
Dame doesn’t necessarily
need another heavyweight on
its schedule.
Next season Notre Dame
plays the usual suspects:
Stanford, USC, Michigan. No
Michigan State. The deal with
the ACC added Louisville and
Florida State. There is also a
road game against Arizona
State that the Irish couldn’t
get out of, plus Northwestern
and North Carolina.
You never know for sure
how tough a schedule will
be until it plays out but that
has potential to be one of the
most difficult in the country.
To start for Buckeyes, you begin on special teams
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Outside of their
friends and family, almost no one notic-
es the often anonymous players running
headlong downfield or muscling aside
opponents on special teams.
Ohio State coach Urban Meyer sure
does.
“We kind of have a rule around here
that you can’t play unless you’re involved
in special teams,” Meyer said.
So before you can be a starter, let alone
a star, for the Buckeyes, you have to put
on a hard hat, pack your lunch pail and
join those sweating it out on the teams
that take the field when the offense and
defense don’t.
Almost every well-known Buckeye has
played his way onto the first team based
on what he did on those grunt squads —
and several have cost themselves a starting
job by not committing to them.
Have an awful game? Get into trouble
off the field? Skip a class or two? The first
step in redeeming yourself in the eyes of
the coaching staff is to contribute when
you’re not in the spotlight, when you’re
blocking for or defending against kicks
and punts.
“Nothing is given to these guys,” run-
ning backs coach Stan Drayton said. “It
starts with special teams. We have a phi-
losophy that if you want to play your
respective position, you have to provide
some value to this team on special teams.”
It’s democracy in action. Players work
their way up the depth chart and nobody
elbows in ahead of anybody else without
first serving on those often-overlooked
groups.
Front-line players such as Bradley
Roby, Rod Smith and Carlos Hyde are
rediscovering that right now as the third-
ranked Buckeyes pre-
pare for Saturday’s
home game with San
Diego State. Up-and-
coming tailback
Bri’onte Dunn is, too.
Roby, an All-Big
Ten cornerback and
Smith, a backup tail-
back, first caught the
eye of coaches by their
work on special teams.
They went on to be solid players at their
positions. Then each was suspended for
the opener, Roby for his role in an Indiana
bar skirmish and Smith for an undisclosed
violation of team rules. Now both are back
with the commoners this week, trying to
get back in the good graces of the coaches
by showing they’re team players on kick
teams.
Hyde won’t return for another couple
of weeks, the result of a 3-game suspen-
sion for his involvement in an alleged
conflict with a female this summer. Even
though he was Ohio State’s leading scorer
and second-leading rusher last year, he’ll
have to work his way back into the lineup.
Dunn is considered a promising runner
but the coaches have not been enthralled
with his effort or attitude when called
upon to do anything other than play his
position. As a result, Dunn didn’t get into
the opener against Buffalo.
“The head coach is very clear and in
fact there were some guys who prob-
ably didn’t get to play as position play-
ers on Saturday because they
didn’t start or play on special
teams,” said Kerry Coombs, the
Buckeyes’ assistant who over-
sees both cornerbacks and kick
teams. “If you don’t perform in
those areas, you’re not going to
play.
“So the competition on special
teams units is high.”
Playing on those selfless
squads not only helps the team,
it shows that a player isn’t in it strictly for
the glory or the playing time. He wants
to win.
One player who did not have a stel-
lar game in the 40-20 win over Buffalo
on Saturday was Armani Reeves, who
started his first collegiate game in place of
Roby at corner. He had a pass-interference
penalty, was frequently beaten on routes
and was clearly picked on by Buffalo’s
offense.
But he also played 68 plays on defense
and 12 more on special teams on a hot,
humid day when several teammates were
overcome with leg cramps.
Reeves’ willingness to play anywhere
and everywhere didn’t go unnoticed.
See FOOTBALL, page 7
See RACING, page 7
6 – The Herald Thursday, September 5, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
Does the Big Ten
need a wakeup call?
By JIM METCALFE
Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
So, the Big Ten has announced that though it is
discouraging its member schools from scheduling the
Football Championship Series teams in future years,
especially once the new College Football Playoff format
begins, it will not punish them for doing so.
One question: why not? Are they on a death wish?
Strength of schedule is going to be one of the criteria
— my guess is, one of THE biggest — that the new selec-
tion committee will use to make those picks.
As far as I am concerned, whether the FCS schools are
left out of the lurch or not is irrelevent.
Is it fair that this could happen, that the small schools
will lose their major paydays? No — but as we all know,
life isn’t fair.
College football is making these decisions, not fair-
ness. College football will punish those teams who play
these lesser lights.
When some major archrivalries are in danger — like
Texas/Texas A & M — of not being played because of
all the movement in major-college football these days,
that’s a problem.
Those small schools will not only NOT help build
a respectable SOS for the big boys but they will drain
needed points.
I realize the supposed need to have seven home games
each season to make ends meet but with all the money
that is being thrown around with expanding TV contracts,
etc., I wonder if that is really true anymore.
What does having that seventh home game against
Kill Me A & I help you make ends meet when in the long
run, it’s going to suck money from your coffers when you
aren’t potentially getting the huge-money playoffs?
Let’s ask this question: does a potential 5-star recruit
from Baton Rouge want to see Ohio State play San Diego
State or Florida State, for example?
The Big Ten teams are in a fight for their collec-
tive lives to stand up to the bullies of the Southeastern
Conference, as well as the formidable teams of the PAC
12, in hopes of making those Playoffs.
Let’s face it: the SEC has far more truly heavyweight
matchups — with far better weather and locations — that
the Big Ten can muster. Outside of Ohio State and That
Team Up North — perhaps throwing in Wisconsin —
the Big Ten doesn’t really have those heavyweights you
really need to build up that impeccable resume.
Nebraska — once one of the elites in major-college
football — hasn’t been the same since Tom Osborne left
the sideline, though they have had some good coaches
and solid teams since he retired, and Penn State may be
done as a player in the national spotlight for a decade or
more. Who knows if they can ever recover the glitter that
once was in Happy Valley.
To think that Maryland or Rutgers is really going to
add to the heavyweight-ness of the Big Ten is whistling
Dixie.
If you are talking about bringing in a Notre Dame,
Oklahoma, Texas, Pittsburgh — you have something.
Whether the middle two on that list were real targets
or had real ideas of moving north in their conference
affiliation, no one really knows.
The outer two are likely still on the radar and with this
new format coming, one wonders at some point if they
don’t bite the bullet and agree to come in.
I can see Notre Dame wanting to maintain those rival-
ries but with all the movement in the game of college
football, one has to wonder if this will be possible in the
coming decade.
Perhaps they can but perhaps it will be like stopping
the tide from coming in.
T-Birds wear down Blue Jays at the net
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — First-year St. John’s vol-
leyball coach Carolyn Dammeyer is trying
to build the program into a consistent unit
year after year.
Lima Central Catholic is one of those
programs she would like to emulate.
The Lady Blue Jays learned up close
and personal how far they have to go as
they fell 25-21, 25-18, 25-12 Wednesday
night at Robert A. Arnzen Gymnasium.
“LCC always seems to have a solid
team. They have a lot of weapons and they
force you to defend them,” Dammeyer said.
“We need to build consistency. We have a
lot of new girls on the varsity and they need
to learn how to play at this level from the
first point to the last. Teams like LCC have
those veteran players that know how to do
that; we only had two players back from
last year that really experienced varsity last
fall, so we’re learning.”
Thunderbird head man Wes Horstman
relied on that.
“We played five matches in five days, so
we were a little tired coming into the match
tonight. Plus, St. John’s came out fired up,”
he added. “It took us a while to get things
rolling. We depend a lot on our setter and
we have an experienced one in Sydney
(Mohler); this is her second year of start-
ing, so she knows how to spread the ball
around. We don’t have the one great player
but we have a lot of good hitters, so that just
wears a defense down. I think that’s what
happened as we went on.”
In the first two sets, the Jays (1-4)
battled on relatively even terms,
In the first set, the Jays stayed close
behind a solid defense and not many errors
(17 hitting miscues overall). They did a
nice job of keeping the ball in play, get-
ting touches at the net and digging up the
Lady Thunderbird (4-3) hitting efforts. The
visitors led 18-12 at one point on an ace
by senior setter Mohler (27 assists, 2 aces)
but the Jays ran off a 6-2 span — fueled
by some LCC hitting errors (16 for the
night) — to get within 20-18 on a push
by junior Bekah Fischer (3 kills, 2 aces).
Unfortunately, a stuff by Fischer to get
within a point was ruled to be in the net
and the T-Birds ran off the set, getting a
serving error (9 for the night) on set point
by the Jays.
The second set went the same way as
the opener. The Jays couldn’t quite get
on a roll but they didn’t let the visitors do
so, either. LCC led 18-13 on a hit off the
defense by Sydney Zerante (7 kills) and the
Jays couldn’t get closer. They did get within
19-16 as sophomore Hayley Jettinghoff
put down a hit off the block but a crucial
5-0 spurt — four on hitting miscues by the
hosts and the final on an ace by Meredith
Niese (3 aces) — put the visitors on the
verge of a 2-0 set lead. A hitting error and a
kill by junior Kestley Hulihan only delayed
the inevitable. On set point, another serving
error gave LCC the 2-set edge.
The Jays remained competitive to start
the third set, leading 4-2 at one point
early on a hit off the LCC block by junior
Brittney Claypool (3 kills). However, a
hitting error got the visitors on the road
back and slowly but surely — combining
some hitting mistakes by the home unit
and a varied attack at the net that Mohler
could turn to — they began to put the
finishing touches on the sweep. Despite
Dammeyer calling a pair of timeouts, LCC
had too much as they secured the sweep
on the ninth serving error by the Blue and
Gold.
“We have come a long way in the three
months I have had these girls, from the first
open gym to now. They have worked hard
and they have a great attitude,” Dammeyer
added. “We celebrate every point and have
a lot of positive things going. The chemistry
I have with these girls is great, so the transi-
tion has been fantastic. We just have to keep
getting better.”
The Jays host New Knoxville in MAC
play tonight (5:30 p.m. junior varsity start).
LCC plays Lima Senior in an Elida tri-
match 1 p.m. Saturday.
The Thunderbirds got a 25-15, 25-23
junior varsity triumph.
St. John’s sophomore Hayley Jettinghoff lines up a kill attempt as Lima
Central Catholic’s Sydney Zerante and Sydney Mohler look to apply the
block Wednesday night at Arnzen Gymnasium. (Delphos Herald/Randy
Shellenbarger)
Earnhardt Jr.’s car finally fully funded
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. —
Dale Earnhardt Jr. will have a
new look during the Chase for
the Sprint Cup Championship
as Hendrick Motorports
has finally sold the remain-
ing inventory on his No. 88
Chevrolet.
Time Warner Cable signed
on as primary sponsor for five
races this season, beginning
Saturday night at Richmond
in the final race before the
12-driver Chase field is set.
Time Warner will also spon-
sor Earnhardt at Chicago, New
Hampshire, Kansas City and
Charlotte.
It closes out the inventory
on the No. 88, which opened
the season with races to sell.
Hendrick was able to fill the
void over the course of the year
when National Guard picked
up an additional eight races,
pushing its total to 29 total
races. Diet Mountain Dew also
sponsors five events.
Time Warner’s sponsorship
is part of an expanded sponsor-
ship package with Hendrick
Motorsports that saw the com-
pany add one additional race
with Kasey Kahne, bringing
its total to six this year, while
adding five races in 2014 and
2015. The additional races
means the No. 5 Chevrolet is
sold out for 2014 for Kahne,
who has been featured in
Time Warner’s “Enjoy Better”
national brand campaign.
“This is the second time
in the last year that Time
Warner Cable has expanded
its commitment to Hendrick
Motorsports and NASCAR,”
added team owner Rick
Hendrick. “We’re now lever-
aging more of our assets, from
both Hendrick Motorsports
and Hendrick Automotive
Group, to drive even greater
value into what’s been a very
effective program. It’s a ter-
rific partnership that works on
multiple levels.”
Time Warner Cable will
become a marketing partner
with Hendrick Automotive
Group to collaborate on offer-
ings specific to the automotive
industry.
“We’ve been extremely
happy with the results from our
NASCAR initiatives,” added
Jeffrey Hirsch, Time Warner
Cable’s executive vice presi-
dent and chief marketing offi-
cer. “The on-track performance
of Hendrick Motorsports is
well documented but they’ve
also put significant resources
into building a world-class
marketing operation. It’s been
a team effort and we’re seeing
terrific exposure and return.”
———
FRESH PLASTER:
Martin Truex Jr. had a new
cast applied to his broken right
wrist after the one he had on
last week appeared to melt
in the late stages of Sunday
night’s race at Atlanta.
Despite the issues, Truex
managed to finish third to stay
in contention for a spot in the
Chase. He heads into Saturday
night’s race at Richmond
ranked 13th in the standings
with one win on the season,
good enough for the second
wild card. Truex is only 15
points out of 10th but believes
his Michael Waltrip Racing
team is far better than where
they sit in the standings.
“To be honest, with the sea-
son we have had with all the
ups and downs, I am so excited
to still be in this thing,” he
said. “We have fought so hard
this year and have overcome
a lot to be in this position. It
will be awesome and a huge
deal for us if we can make it in
again. This NAPA team is not
a 12th- or 13th-place team. In
my opinion, we are a top-five
team. We want to get in and
make up for the mistakes and
mishaps we experienced ear-
lier in the year to have a great
ending to our season.”
He doesn’t expect any issues
with his wrist at Richmond,
either. He was injured in a
wreck at Bristol two weeks
ago.
“The cast did its job at
Atlanta. It got a little soft in
the palm area during the race
but all and all, everything went
fine,” he added. “I’ve had it
checked over again and had a
new cast put on. We’ve made
a few adjustments to this new
cast and I expect it to be a
whole lot better. Everything
has gone well so far. I can-
not complain. I mean to go to
Atlanta and to have a shot at
the win at the end, at that point,
what pain I felt was gone.”
———
Around the Track
Notre Dame says so
long to Big House
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
In a sense, Michigan coach
Brady Hoke was right when
he said Notre Dame was
“chickening out” of its rivalry
with the Wolverines.
No, the Fighting Irish
are not literally scared to
play Michigan but if the
Wolverines weren’t generally
so good, Notre Dame might
not have pulled out of the
series between two of col-
lege football’s most famous
teams. As is the case with all
heavyweight programs, Notre
Dame needs to manage the
difficulty of its schedule and
guarantee regularly playing
seven home games.
The Fighting Irish (1-0)
visit the Big House on
Saturday, their last scheduled
trip to Ann Arbor. Michigan
(1-0) plays at South Bend,
Ind., next season and then
the rivalry takes an indefinite
hiatus.
It’s a rivalry that is both
historical and significant —
and really cool. Winged hel-
mets vs. golden domes.
But when Notre Dame
agreed to play five games
against Atlantic Coast
Conference opponents per
season, starting next year, it
needed to clear some space
— and Michigan got the boot.
“It’s just there’s so many
complexities with our sched-
ule and our agreement with
the ACC that it’s difficult
and frustrating,” Notre Dame
coach Brian Kelly said. “I can
see the frustration that would
be there.”
Why Michigan and not
Navy or Purdue or even
Michigan State?
To be fair, there is a lot
of history with those rival-
ries. The Irish have played the
Midshipmen more (86 times)
than even Southern California
(84).
They’ve played Purdue 84
times as well and Michigan
State is next on the most-
played list at 75. Michigan’s
40 is behind Pitt (68), Army
(50) and Northwestern (47).
Just as important: Notre
Dame doesn’t necessarily
need another heavyweight on
its schedule.
Next season Notre Dame
plays the usual suspects:
Stanford, USC, Michigan. No
Michigan State. The deal with
the ACC added Louisville and
Florida State. There is also a
road game against Arizona
State that the Irish couldn’t
get out of, plus Northwestern
and North Carolina.
You never know for sure
how tough a schedule will
be until it plays out but that
has potential to be one of the
most difficult in the country.
To start for Buckeyes, you begin on special teams
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Outside of their
friends and family, almost no one notic-
es the often anonymous players running
headlong downfield or muscling aside
opponents on special teams.
Ohio State coach Urban Meyer sure
does.
“We kind of have a rule around here
that you can’t play unless you’re involved
in special teams,” Meyer said.
So before you can be a starter, let alone
a star, for the Buckeyes, you have to put
on a hard hat, pack your lunch pail and
join those sweating it out on the teams
that take the field when the offense and
defense don’t.
Almost every well-known Buckeye has
played his way onto the first team based
on what he did on those grunt squads —
and several have cost themselves a starting
job by not committing to them.
Have an awful game? Get into trouble
off the field? Skip a class or two? The first
step in redeeming yourself in the eyes of
the coaching staff is to contribute when
you’re not in the spotlight, when you’re
blocking for or defending against kicks
and punts.
“Nothing is given to these guys,” run-
ning backs coach Stan Drayton said. “It
starts with special teams. We have a phi-
losophy that if you want to play your
respective position, you have to provide
some value to this team on special teams.”
It’s democracy in action. Players work
their way up the depth chart and nobody
elbows in ahead of anybody else without
first serving on those often-overlooked
groups.
Front-line players such as Bradley
Roby, Rod Smith and Carlos Hyde are
rediscovering that right now as the third-
ranked Buckeyes pre-
pare for Saturday’s
home game with San
Diego State. Up-and-
coming tailback
Bri’onte Dunn is, too.
Roby, an All-Big
Ten cornerback and
Smith, a backup tail-
back, first caught the
eye of coaches by their
work on special teams.
They went on to be solid players at their
positions. Then each was suspended for
the opener, Roby for his role in an Indiana
bar skirmish and Smith for an undisclosed
violation of team rules. Now both are back
with the commoners this week, trying to
get back in the good graces of the coaches
by showing they’re team players on kick
teams.
Hyde won’t return for another couple
of weeks, the result of a 3-game suspen-
sion for his involvement in an alleged
conflict with a female this summer. Even
though he was Ohio State’s leading scorer
and second-leading rusher last year, he’ll
have to work his way back into the lineup.
Dunn is considered a promising runner
but the coaches have not been enthralled
with his effort or attitude when called
upon to do anything other than play his
position. As a result, Dunn didn’t get into
the opener against Buffalo.
“The head coach is very clear and in
fact there were some guys who prob-
ably didn’t get to play as position play-
ers on Saturday because they
didn’t start or play on special
teams,” said Kerry Coombs, the
Buckeyes’ assistant who over-
sees both cornerbacks and kick
teams. “If you don’t perform in
those areas, you’re not going to
play.
“So the competition on special
teams units is high.”
Playing on those selfless
squads not only helps the team,
it shows that a player isn’t in it strictly for
the glory or the playing time. He wants
to win.
One player who did not have a stel-
lar game in the 40-20 win over Buffalo
on Saturday was Armani Reeves, who
started his first collegiate game in place of
Roby at corner. He had a pass-interference
penalty, was frequently beaten on routes
and was clearly picked on by Buffalo’s
offense.
But he also played 68 plays on defense
and 12 more on special teams on a hot,
humid day when several teammates were
overcome with leg cramps.
Reeves’ willingness to play anywhere
and everywhere didn’t go unnoticed.
See FOOTBALL, page 7
See RACING, page 7
Thursday, September 5, 2013 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
BOWLING
Wednesday Industrial
Aug.28, 2103
K-M Tire 12-4
Unverferth Mfg. 12-4
Westrich 10-6
Flexible Foam 10-6
Heather Marie Photo 10-6
Topp Chalet 8-8
D R C 13th Frame Lounge 8-8
D & D Grain 8-8
Cabo 6-10
Buckeye painting 4-12
Rustic Cafe 4-12
John Deere 4-12
Men over 200
Shawn Stabler 213-207,
Travis Hubert 254-221-232, Rob
Shaeffer 213-211, Butch Prine
Jr. 215-255, Kyle Early 208-
248-234, Dave Moenter 230-258,
Randy Fischbach,203-235, Dan
Wilhelm 201-235, Jason Mahlie
247-235, Dale Riepenhoff 210,
Bruce Moorman 234, Dan Kleman
208, Matt Lautzenheiser 202,
Brent Jones 268-214-227, Erin
Deal 201-300, Don Boyed 246-
228, Brent MIller 201-244, Brian
Sharp 224, Chris Goedde 210,
Matt Hamilton 216, Don Rice 201-
233-278, Brian Gossard 213-237,
Shawn Allemeier 208-213-215,
Bruce VanMetre 214-227-247,
Phil Austin 244-206, Frank MIller
202-201, Joe Geise 203, Charlie
Lozano 235-202, John Allen
217-228, John Jones 207-235,
Jeff Milligan 201, Dave Knepper
255-234, Zach Sargent 244-233,
Josh DeVelvis 224-201-226, Alex
VanMetre 201-209, Scott German
20, Tom Stevenson 207, Dave
Jessee 212-210.
Men over 550
Shawn Stabler 606, Travis
Hubert 707, Rob Shaeffer 609,
Butch Prine Jr. 627, Kyle Early
690, Dave Moenter 667, Randy
Fischbach 611, Dan Wilhelm
626, Jason Mahlie 681, Dale
Riepenhoff 563, Brent Jones
709, Erin Deal 685, Don Boyed
635, Brent MIller 627, Brian
Sharp 605, Don Rice 712, Brian
Gossard 641, Shawn Allemeier
636, Bruce VanMetre 688, Phil
Austin 620, Frank Miller 569, Joe
Geise 567, Charlie Lozano 616,
John Allen 619, John Jones 615,
Dave Knepper 679, Zach Sargent
663, Josh DeVelvis 651, Alex
VanMetre 601, Scott German
558, Lenny Hubert 559, Dave
Jessee 615, Terry Trentman 564.
1
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Dow­Jones­Industrial­Average­ 14,930.87­ +96.91
S&P­500­ 1,653.08­ +13.31
NASDAQ­Composite­ 3,649.04­ +36.43
American­Electric­Power­Co.,­Inc.­ 42.21­ +0.0500
AutoZone,­Inc.­ 422.81­ +3.0500
Bunge­Limited­ 76.27­ -0.0400
BP­plc­ 41.41­ +0.0800
Citigroup,­Inc.­ 49.60­ +0.2300
CenturyLink,­Inc.­ 32.50­ +0.1300
CVS­Caremark­Corporation­ 58.62­ +0.1000
Dominion­Resources,­Inc.­ 57.62­ +0.4025
Eaton­Corporation­plc­ 64.99­ +1.9100
Ford­Motor­Co.­ 16.91­ +0.5700
First­Defiance­Financial­Corp.­ 24.76­ -0.16
First­Financial­Bancorp.­ 15.01­ +0.12
General­Dynamics­Corp.­ 84.99­ +0.6400
General­Motors­Company­ 35.85­ +1.7100
The­Goodyear­Tire­&­Rubber­Company­ 20.76­ +0.48
Huntington­Bancshares­Incorporated­ 8.39­ +0.15
Health­Care­REIT,­Inc.­ 61.20­ +0.3600
The­Home­Depot,­Inc.­ 74.14­ +0.2400
Honda­Motor­Co.,­Ltd.­ 37.08­ +0.5900
Johnson­&­Johnson­ 86.90­ +0.4800
JPMorgan­Chase­&­Co.­ 51.87­ +0.7400
Kohl’s­Corp.­ 51.45­ +0.0500
Lowe’s­Companies­Inc.­ 45.97­ +0.3600
McDonald’s­Corp.­ 95.16­ +0.6400
Microsoft­Corporation­ 31.195­ -0.685
Pepsico,­Inc.­ 79.53­ -0.1025
The­Procter­&­Gamble­Company­ 77.49­ -0.2600
Rite­Aid­Corporation­ 3.4600­ -0.0800
Sprint­Corporation­ 6.65­ -0.0300
Time­Warner­Inc.­ 61.99­ +0.6300
United­Bancshares­Inc.­ 12.40­ +0.13
U.S.­Bancorp­ 36.13­ +0.0700
Verizon­Communications­Inc.­ 46.78­ +0.7700
Wal-Mart­Stores­Inc.­ 72.91­ +0.2300
STOCKS
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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business September 4, 2013
Jeffcats stay perfect on volleyball season
Jefferson senior Lindsay Deuel and junior Claire Thompson provide a roadblock for a Miller City hitter Wednesday
night at Jefferson High School. (Delphos Herald/Randy Shellenbarger)
Information submitted
Lady ’Cats stay perfect in vol-
leyball
DELPHOS — The Jefferson vol-
leyball unit improved to 3-0 with
a 25-9, 25-14, 25-9 domination of
invading Miller City Wednesday
night at Jefferson High School.
There was no junior varsity match.
The host Wildcats were led by
senior Katie Goergens by going
12/15 at the serve (5 aces), adding
seven kills at the net. Junior Brooke
Culp had 14 assists.
“We started off slow in the first
set tonight but finished strong!
Katie really stepped up, leading at
the net and serving line,” Jefferson
coach Joy Develvis noted. “Our girls
fought hard at the net and were able
to mix up our offensive options.
Moving forward, we need to work on
our serving consistency. It feels great
to start off the season so strongly!”
Jefferson travels to Ottoville
tonight (6 p.m. JV start) and Pandora-
Gilboa on Saturday morning (10 a.m.
start).
———
Jefferson secures NWC golf tri
DELPHOS — Led by the 41 of
Zach Wannemacher, Jefferson’s boys
golfers grabbed an NWC tri-match
176-185-194 over Bluffton and
Columbus Grove on the par-35 front
nine at the Delphos Country Club
Wednesday afternoon.
Carter Mox added a 43 for the
host Wildcats (10-8, 7-4 NWC), who
are in a Spencerville Quad 4 p.m.
Monday.
Eli Runk paced the Pirates (15-7,
8-3 NWC) with a 41.
Kyle Welty and Logan Diller card-
ed 46s for the Bulldogs (1-15, 1-10
NWC), who are in an NWC tri at
Paulding today.
Team Scores:
Jefferson 176: Zack Wannemacher
41, Carter Mox 43, Ryan Bullinger
45, Nick Fitch 47, Jacob Hamilton
48, Tyler Rice 49.
Bluffton 185: Eli Runk 41, Rich
Streicher 44, Aaron Shaw 47, Joel
Ritter 53, Brandon Skilliter 54,
James Schaad 55.
Columbus Grove 194: Kyle
Welty 46, Logan Diller 46, Brandon
Hoffman 47, Logan Hardeman 55,
Cody Woods 57.
JV scores:
Jefferson: Kyle Berelsman 55,
Andrew Foust 55, Evan Mox 57,
Alex Theobald 57, Tristan Moore
58, Brooke Gallmeier 65, Bailey
Gorman 65, Connor Berelsman 69.
———-
Musketeers edge Commodores
DELPHOS — The Fort Jennings
golfers bested Perry 189-194 on the
par-36 back nine of the Delphos
Country Club Wednesday.
Jennings is at Arlington (Sycamore
Springs) 4:30 p.m. today.
——-
LadyCats whitewash MC
MILLER CITY — The Kalida
girls soccer team goose-egged host
Miller City 4-0 in Putnam County
League action Wednesday.
For LadyCats scored for Kalida
(3-0-1, 1-0-0): Brittany Kahle,
Justine Verhoff, Paige Roller and
Jackie Gardner.
Kahle, Verhoff, Mariah Doepker
and Courtney Buss had assists.
Kalida owned the shots on-goal
15-3; Amanda Simon had nine saves
for the hosts (1-5-1, 0-2-0) and Laine
Laudick three for the hosts.
Kalida entertains Fort Jennings 5
p.m. Friday.
Local Round Up
10 targeting penalties, 3 overturned ejections
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
NEW YORK — The new penalties for target-
ing in college football resulted in 10 ejections in
75 FBS games during the first weekend of the
season, though three of the ejections were over-
turned by instant replay.
National Coordinator of Officials Rogers
Redding said today that the rate of targeting pen-
alties was similar to last season, when there was
one called for every eight games.
“Officials have handled it well and the players have
begun to get the message,” he said.
He said It’s too soon to know if the ejection that goes
along with the 15-yard penalty will affect how frequently
the penalty is called.
“I think I would have been pleased and surprised if we
only had three or four and I would have been disappointed
if we had 20,” he said.
The NCAA changed the penalty for targeting a defense-
less player with a hit to the head to add an ejection this
season. Targeting has been a penalty for five seasons.
Redding explained he is encouraged by signs that play-
ers are changing their targets when they hit.
“From what I watched, several times player looked like
they began to change their behavior,” he said.
He noted he spotted examples
of receivers going over the middle,
vulnerable to a big hit, and defen-
sive backs not dealing out the most
punishing blows.
“Last year, he might have lit (the
receiver) up. You could see a little
breakdown, lowering the target,”
Redding continued.
Ejections were overturned
against players for California,
Colorado State and Southern University, which played
Houston.
“What the replay official is looking at is not the action
of the player, they’re not second-guessing the targeting
action,” Redding revealed. “What they are looking at is
was the contact with the crown of the helmet and was the
contact to the head and neck area.”
In the case of the penalty against California defensive
lineman Chris McCain, he was ejected in the second half
of the Bears’ game against Northwestern. By rule, that
meant he would also miss the first half of Cal’s next game.
However, that was overturned on Monday by the Pac-12,
which consulted with Redding.
A communication problem between the replay booth and
the field prevented the play from being properly reviewed,
Redding added.
Furyk left off US team
for first time since ’96
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
Jim Furyk kept waiting for the phone to ring to learn about
the Presidents Cup. News came from the buzz of a text mes-
sage, a peculiar way to find out he would not be part of an
American team for the first time since Tiger Woods was still
trying to get his PGA Tour card.
U.S. captain Fred Couples used his captain’s picks
Wednesday on Webb Simpson and Jordan Spieth, the 20-year-
old rookie and youngest American in Presidents Cup history.
“I’m disappointed,” said Furyk, who began his streak of 15
consecutive teams at the 1997 Ryder Cup. “I’m sure Dustin
Johnson is disappointed and Bubba (Watson) is disappointed.
Webb and Jordan, I think they’re good picks and they’re going
to be excited. You’ve got to say ‘yes’ to somebody and ‘no’ to
somebody.”
Getting the news through a text was awkward, especially
because Furyk at first thought the picks were to be announced
on Tuesday, one day after the final qualifying event at the
Deutsche Bank Championship.
“I felt he would pick Webb because he was so close to mak-
ing the team, the difference of about $6,000 in the last tourna-
ment,” Furyk said. “I thought I was the last guy up in the air.”
Couples said Furyk and Steve Stricker were two players “I
wanted dearly to be on the team.” Stricker was runner-up at
the TPC Boston to earn one of the 10 qualifying spots. Furyk
essentially was beaten out by Spieth, who started the year with
no status and already has a win, a runner-up after losing in a
playoff and is guaranteed a trip to the Tour Championship.
Couples said he couldn’t handle a phone call, so he “took
the easy way out and sent him a text.”
“The whole thing was not fun,” Couples added.
Furyk wound up 13th in the Presidents Cup standings,
about $250,000 short of Zach Johnson at No. 10. Just his luck,
this was a year like few others when it came to making two
captain’s picks. Couples narrowed it down to Furyk, Dustin
Johnson, Spieth and Simpson. Furyk is No. 15 in the world,
a higher ranking than every player on the International team
except for Masters champion Adam Scott. Dustin Johnson is at
No. 22, one spot behind Watson in the ranking.
“Before we started Boston, I was looking at the list of guys
who could be picks — Stricker, DJ, Bubba … wow, “ Furyk
said. “The bad news is it’s always tough to pick. Everyone is
going to argue what the right call is and hindsight is 20-20. He
had so many good players in and around the top 12, he wasn’t
going to make a bad choice.”
Being left off the team was the latest blow for Furyk over
the last few years. He had at least a share of the 54-hole lead
three times last year without winning, including the U.S.
Open. He finished bogey-bogey in the Ryder Cup to lose a
pivotal singles match to Sergio Garcia. He also had a 1-shot
lead over Jason Dufner going into the final round of the PGA
Championship, where Dufner outplayed him and closed with
a 68 to win.
Racing
(Continued from page 6)
LABONTE STILL
AILING: Bobby Labonte
will miss his second consecu-
tive race while recuperating
from three broken ribs suf-
fered in a cycling accident
near his North Carolina home
Aug. 28. AJ Allmendinger
will again drive the No. 47
Toyota for JTG Daugherty
Racing at Richmond on
Saturday night.
“I am feeling a lot better
but I don’t want to put the
race team in any compro-
mising position this week-
end,” Labonte said. “It just
makes more sense to focus
on my rehab one more week
to ensure that I’m ready to
go at Chicago with no issues.
I plan to be back with the
team then and back behind
the wheel.”
Allmendinger was named
last week the full-time driver
by JTG for 2014 and Labonte,
the 2000 NASCAR cham-
pion, is looking for a ride.
“Bobby Labonte means
a lot to the JTG Daugherty
Racing team and to our
sport,” Allmendinger said.
“For me, it’s a tough situ-
ation. I do not want to get
more races with the team
because someone is injured.
Bobby is a guy that I believe
is a Hall-of-Famer and he is a
champion. It’s tough to have
that type of injury. Hopefully,
he gets better as soon as pos-
sible to get back into the
(car).”
———
ANOTHER RACE FOR
TRUEX: Richard Petty
Motorsports development
driver Ryan Truex will get
another shot at a Sprint Cup
Series race on Saturday night
when Phoenix Racing gives
him a shot at Richmond.
Truex made his Cup debut
at Bristol two weeks ago, but
got only 39 laps under his
belt before crashing out of
the race.
“My first Cup start didn’t
go the way I wanted, so I’m
grateful for the opportunity
to get another chance,” Truex
said. “I was really happy with
qualifying 18th at Bristol but
we cut a tire and that was
disappointing. It’s just nice
to get back in the seat and get
another chance so quickly.”
It’s been slow going for
the younger brother of Martin
Truex Jr., with only one Cup
start and one Truck Series
start on the year. The 21-year-
old has yet to put together the
funding for a full season at
any NASCAR national level
but does have some experi-
ence at Richmond, where he
has four previous Nationwide
starts. His best finish was
fourth in 2011.
“Now that I’ve got that
first (Cup) start out of the way
and I know what to expect, I
can’t wait to get back on the
track,” Truex added. “We’re
trying to secure some spon-
sorship with RPM for next
year and a good run helps. I
just want to go out, learn as
much as possible and com-
plete all the laps.”
Football
(Continued from page 6)
As much as programs and
conferences are looking for
ways to bulk up their future
schedules, they are doing so
carefully. Notice how much
discussion has gone on in
the Southeastern Conference
about possibly playing nine
league games and eliminating
cross-division rivalries.
Not wanting to give up
home games is one of the rea-
sons Florida so rarely plays
Miami. The Gators visit the
Hurricanes on Saturday and
have no plans to play again.
What Notre Dame is doing
with Michigan is similar and
understandable but hopefully
it won’t be permanent.
The picks:
MAIN EVENTS
No. 6 South Carolina (plus
3) at No. 11 Georgia
Jadeveon Clowney gets
chance to catch his breath …
GEORGIA 27-23.
No. 14 Notre Dame (plus 3
1/2) at No. 17 Michigan
Under the lights,
Wolverines protect the Big
House … MICHIGAN 23-20.
MARQUEE MATCHUPS
No. 12 Florida (minus 3)
at Miami
Fourth regular-season
meeting since 1987 …
FLORIDA 31-21.
No. 15 Texas (minus 7)
at BYU
Cougars offense was
washed away by Virginia
rain, should be better at home
… TEXAS 24-20.
West Virginia (plus 20 1/2)
at No. 16 Oklahoma
Sooners rediscovered
their defense last week …
OKLAHOMA 45-21
Washington State (plus 15)
at No. 25 Southern California
Whoever is the quarter-
back for USC needs to play
better … USC 35-17
UPSET SPECIAL
Syracuse (plus 12) at No.
19 Northwestern
Wildcats came back from
California banged up …
SYRACUSE 30-24.
PLUCKY UNDERDOGS
No. 2 Oregon (minus 22)
at Virginia … OREGON
38-14.
San Diego State (plus 28)
at No. 3 Ohio State … OHIO
STATE 41-17.
San Jose State (plus 26
1/2) at No. 5 Stanford …
STANFORD 35-14.
Virginia is coming off a
soggy victory against BYU,
and could probably use
another rain storm to help
slow down the Ducks. San
Diego State is coming off
a surprising loss to Eastern
Illinois, but should be better.
8 – The Herald Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
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Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
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To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
dhi
MEDIA
dhi Media is searching for a full-time sales
representative. If you appreciate working as part
of a team, enjoy working with businesses large and
small, thrive in a busy and creative environment,
and love using the web and social media sites, this
position may be a perfect match for you.
Candidates who succeed in sales possess above
average written and oral communications skills,
work with multiple deadlines and projects and
demonstrate effective organizational, time man-
agement and planning skills.
The successful applicant will learn and work with
dhi Media’s many products. Applicants must dem-
onstrate a working knowledge of the internet and
active participation in social networking and media.
The successful candidate will play a key role in
developing the company’s online campaigns and
social media strategies.
We pay our sales representatives using a draw
and commission plan. The parent company offers
a full schedule of benefts including Health Insur-
ance, 401K and vacation. We are an equal oppor-
tunity employer.
For consideration, please forward a professional
resume and cover letter detailing how you will ap-
ply your skills and experience to the marketplace.
Incomplete applications will not be considered.
Mail to: Don Hemple, Advertising Manager
405 N. Main Street, Delphos, Ohio 45833
E-mail to dhemple@delphosherald.com
Or deliver to 405 N. Main Street, Delphos, Ohio
Sales Representative Position
Home Health Aides
IMMEDIATE HIRING - PUTNAM COUNTY
Part-time, training a plus, not necessary.
Good work ethic, able to work weekends &
extra shifts. References, valid driver license,
auto insurance and drug testing required.
Application online or pick-up at:
Community Health Professionals
602 E. Fifth St., Delphos OH 45833
ComHealthPro.org
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU
can place a 25 word
classified ad in more
than 100 newspapers
with over one and a half
million total circulation
across Ohio for $295. It’s
easy...you place one or-
der and pay with one
check through Ohio
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you.
No other classified ad
buy is simpler or more
cost effecti ve. Cal l
419-695-0015 ext. 138
305
Apartment For
Rent
1BR APARTMENT for
rent. No pets, $325/mo
+deposit. 537 W. Third.
Call 419-692-2184 or
419-204-5924
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
RENT OR Rent to Own.
1,2 or 3 bedroom mobile
home. 419-692-3951
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
521 S. Franklin. Friday
9/6, 8:30am-? Boys &
Girls sizes 0-8, adult
clothes, books, toys,
baby bedding, lots of
misc.
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080 Help Wanted
DRIVERS HOME DAILY
$1000 Sign on Bonus,
Mthly Safety Bonus. Full
Benefits Package with
l ow empl oyee cost.
Cl ass- A CDL w/ 6
months trac/trl experi-
ence required.
BULK TRANSIT CORP.
(888)-588-6626.
pmcclintock@bulktransit.
com or online app
www.bulktransit.com
HOME HEAL T H
Aides/STNAs needed for
homecare in Delphos
and Van Wert immedi-
ately. Daytime and eve-
ni ng hour s. Cal l
419-228-2535 or stop in
to apply at Interim
Heal t hCar e, 3745
Shawnee Rd., Suite 108,
Lima, OH 45806
HVAC-PLUMBING EX-
PERIENCED Technician
needed. Benefits include
vacation, holiday, retire-
ment, medical. Washam
Plumbing Heating & Air.
Call:419-339-0729
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k.
Home weekends, & most
nights. Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
SEEKI NG EXPERI -
ENCED & friendly serv-
ers for fast-paced envi-
ronment. Excellent wage
potential. Must be willing
to work weekends. Apply
in person Tues-Fri after
4:00pm @ Topp Chalet
Restaurant, 229 W. 5th
St., Delphos
080 Help Wanted
Now hiring –
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facility
providing skilled reha-
bilitation services, as-
sisted living, post acute
medical care and more.
We are looking for
caring, outgoing, en-
ergetic STNA’s to join
our team. We currently
have part time position
available for skilled
STNA’s. Nurse Aide
Classes will be offered
in September for those
who wish to begin a
rewarding career as an
STNA. Class size will
be limited. Please stop
by our Delphos location
and fill out an applica-
tion.
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
303 Duplex For Rent
1BR DUPLEX, 702 N.
Main St., stove & fridge,
washer/dryer hook-up.
No Pets. 419-236-2722
953
Free and Low
Priced Merchandis
FREE: APPLES, for
sauce/cider. Backyard at
603 W. 5th St., Delphos
Classifieds
Sell!
To advertise
call
419-695-0015
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Subscribe today!
The Delphos Herald 419-695-0015
Fitzgerald
Power Washing
& Painting
419-303-3020
Interior, Exterior, Residential,
Commercial, Decks, Fences,
Houses, Log Homes, Stripping,
Cleaning, Sealing, Staining,
Barn Painting, Barn Roofs
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured • References
A+ rating with the Better
Business Bureau
Repairs
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney
Repair
419-204-4563
Welding
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Q
uality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
Tree Service
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
CALL
419-991-4400
For appointment time.
• interior design service
• furniture • rugs • accessories
• custom draperies
Deborah Miller • Kelley Balyeat
CALLDEB
419-991-4400
For appointment time.
• interior design service
• furniture • rugs • accessories
• custom draperies
1747Allentown Rd. • Lima, OH45805
T S B
Construction
BUILDING &
REMODELING
419-235-2631
Roofng, Garages, Room
Additions, Bathrooms,
Kitchens, Siding, Decks,
Pole Barns, Windows.
30 Years Experience
Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
DAY’S PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
LLC
Brent Day
567-204-8488
• Mowing
• Landscaping
• Lawn Seeding
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
GESSNER’S
PRODUCE
OPEN 7 DAYS
9 AM - 5 PM
Sundays 11-4 PM
9557 St. Rt. 66, Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-5749 419-234-6626
AVAILABLE NOW!
EARLY GOLDEN,
GALA APPLES
CANNING PEACHES
& TOMATOES
MUMS AND ASTERS
Concrete leveling of
floors, sidewalks,
patios, steps, driveways,
pool decks, etc.
Call Dave cell
419-236-1496
419-692-5143
home/office
Mike
419-235-1067
U
N
E
V
E
N
C
O
N
C
R
E
T
E
?
VONDERWELL
CONTRACTING
CONCRETE
LEVELING
WORK
WANTED
Any
• Carpentry • Framing
• Siding •Roofng
• Pole Barns
•Any repair work
FREE ESTIMATES
30 years experience!
419-733-6309
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Hardwood Floor
Installation & Refnishing
Renovations - Makeovers
Handyman
First Floor
Construction LLC
Insured - Free Estimates
Call (419) 236-5867
Ask for Joe
Home Improvement
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
“You buy, we apply”
Hohlbein’s
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
Home
Improvement
Windows,
Doors, Siding,
Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
B & S Millwright, LLC
• Grain Bins
• Support Structures
• Dump PIT’s • Conveyors
• Continuous Dryers
• Custom Fabrication
Offce: 419-795-1403
419-305-5888 • 419-305-4732
bsmillwright@frontier.com
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
SELL IT FAST
in the
Classifieds
419-695-0015
Advertise in the
Service
Directory
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Dry, as wine
4 TV brand
7 Soy product
11 Dined
12 Deserve
14 Brown nester
15 Indoor mall
17 Major Hoople’s word
18 -- the Hun
19 Immediately
21 Small amount
22 Grade-schooler
23 Colorado resort
26 Whispered loudly
29 Brimming over
30 Hokum
31 Margarine container
33 Golf bag item
34 Floor coverings
35 “-- Upon a Time”
36 Forbidden things
38 Shallow dish
39 Moonbeam
40 Library abbr.
41 Green flm
44 Baltimore bird
48 Pre-owned
49 Talked idly
51 Ding-a- -- (airhead)
52 It has rings
53 Paint container
54 Window part
55 Mess up
56 Oklahoma town
DOWN
1 Lengthy story
2 Iowa, to Jacques
3 Early Briton
4 Retrieve a fsh (2 wds.)
5 Diamond measure
6 Onassis nickname
7 Nubby woolens
8 Special interest grps.
9 Exploit
10 Reverse
13 Linen closet items
16 Slander’s kin
20 Jeopardy
23 Near the stern
24 Tallow source
25 Urgent appeal
26 Embraces
27 Sicilian spouter
28 Conduit
30 Like a life jacket
32 Nectar gatherer
34 Sorrel or bay
35 Kukla’s pal
37 Connecting passage
38 Sleeping car attendant
40 Ballot caster
41 Logger’s commodity
42 -- Minor
43 Dollywood loc.
45 Killer whale
46 Heavy metal
47 Novelist -- Ferber
50 Exist
There’s something youthful
about tater tots. They’re
typically purchased frozen,
then cooked and served with
burgers, hotdogs or sloppy joes.
Some families enjoy tater tot
casserole, too (check out the
recipe at frugalvillage.com/
forums/casseroles/106363-tater-
tot-casserole.html). Tater tots
probably don’t make the cut
as a go-to potato side dish in
your meal rotation. But what
if you made them yourself?
Sure, it takes a bit of work, but
it’s cheaper than frozen, and it
might even become a delicious
new option your entire family
can enjoy.
The first reader-submitted tip
shares a recipe:
Homemade tater tots: If I
had known they were this easy,
I would have made them years
ago! I baked potatoes yesterday,
then put them in the fridge to
firm up overnight. I rubbed the
skins off and grated them today,
then seasoned and rolled them
into balls. I fried them for 1-2
minutes until browned, but you
can bake them, too.
I used the Indian-spiced
tots recipe at chow.com/
recipes/29272-indian-spiced-
potato-tots, but you can season
them however you like. -- C.H.,
Missouri
Buying affordable crocheted
baby blankets: This is for
Tammy from Alabama, a reader
who was asking about handmade
crocheted baby afghans. Your
advice regarding online video
tutorials was great, as it would
be easier than reading a book.
She could also purchase an
informational CD on the Internet
or borrow one from her local
library. In addition, the website
Etsy.com features craft supplies,
as well as handmade and vintage
items. There are LOTS of baby
items to choose from on Etsy. --
Flo, Mississippi
Lots of frugal cooking
tips: Oatmeal is a great cheap
breakfast that you can spice
up with seasonings of your
choice. Rice served sticky with
cinnamon and a pinch of sugar
makes another nice breakfast.
Almost any fruit can be used to
make muffins, if you just learn
the correct consistency to make
moist muffins, as well as the
appropriate cooking time.
You can bread meats and fish
with almost any bread product.
Combine a few seasonings with
ground-up crackers, potato chips
or corn flakes to make Shake
N Bake. Put the mixture in a
bread bag, then drag a piece of
meat through an egg and place
it in the bag, shaking to coat the
meat. Place on a greased cookie
sheet and bake.
While most people have
heard of “leftover soup,” fewer
people know about “leftover
broth.” Take ANY vegetable
peelings (carrots, onions or
potatoes, for example), leaves
off almost anything (such as
celery, spinach or lettuces) and
ends of veggies (onions, carrots,
root crops, etc.) and cover with
water in a stockpot. You can
also add bones to make meat
broths. Bring to a boil, then let it
sit on a backburner to cool. Run
the broth through a colander to
remove solids before using. You
may need to run broths made
with chicken bones through
a strainer to remove bone
fragments before using. You
can freeze all of these vegetable
parts and bones in a freezer bag
until you have enough to make
a batch.
If you like flavored rices,
search the Internet for do-it-
yourself recipes. Many Rice-
A-Roni-style dishes can be
duplicated with bouillon cubes,
one or two spices, an onion
and a pat of butter. It’s easy to
cook up a whole pound of rice,
separate it into individual meal-
sized freezer bags and freeze for
later use.
Spinach makes a versatile
and healthy salad. Use it in salad
until it starts to droop, then wilt
the remaining lettuce in the
microwave for 90 seconds with a
little water. Allow it to cool, then
freeze it until you have enough
to add to a lasagna or quiche.
Grind it up and experiment with
adding it to almost anything,
especially soups.
Check nearby markets for
discount sections. Finding a
market that regularly marks
down meats, produce and breads
can save a lot of money. Plan
your shopping trip around the
days when the manager marks
down these products. -- Cas,
Kansas

(Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a website
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City,
MO, 64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage.com.)
SARA NOEL
Frugal
Living
It’s cheaper to make your own tater tots
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Putnam County
Eugene U.
Stechschulte LE
and Mmary Jane
Stechschulte LE, Lot 143
and Lot 144 Kalida, to
Lynn M. Czubik, David
Eugene Stechschulte,
Lori Ann Erhart, Michele
M. Doepker, Leslie Ann
Stechschulte, Eugene
Urban Stechschulte
Jr. and Mark R.
Stechschulte.
John Mershman
and Stephanie K.
Mershman, 1.502 acres
Sugar Creek Township
to John Mershman and
Stephanie K. Mershman.
John H. Fisher and
Carol J. Fisher, 2.084
acres Sugar Creek
Township, to John
Mershman and Stephanie
K. Mershman.
Haselman Bros.,
40.832 acres Liberty
Township to Haselman
Bros. LLC.
Donald L. Cromly and
Pauline F. Cromly, Lot
231 Continental, to Mark
A. McCullough.
Brad L. Goecke Sr.
and Debra A. Goecke,
Lot 792 Leipsic, to Good
Home Properties LLC.
Richard C. Ricker TR,
Norene P. Ricker TR,
John A. Ricker TR, Lisa
M. Beining TR and R &
N Ricker Trust, 15.183
acres Jennings Township,
10.00 acres Jennings
Township, 20.229 acres
Jennings Township,
19.878 acres Jennings
Township, 40.00 acres
Jennings Township, to
DN Ricker LLC.
Becky A. Grismore
fka Becky A. Goedde,
1.763 acres Blanchard
Township to Becky A.
Grismore.
Kevin T. Schroeder
and Tammy L. Schroeder,
Lot 608 and Lot 609,
Ottawa, to Leroy K. Bruce
and Cynthia J. Bruce.
Mary C. Nartker, 1.69
acres Ottawa Township
to Matthew J. Schulte and
Darcie A. Schulte.
Dean P. Luginbill and
Mary J. Luginbill, 18.763
acres Riley Township to
Mennonite Foundation
Inc.
Frances L. Reese,
Lot 435 and Lot 434
Pandora, to Patricia J.
Shanahan and Richard
C. Reese.
Dorothy P. Moser,
parcel Riley Township, to
Chad J. Beechboard and
Kelly J. Beechboard.
Thomas A. Moser TR
and Linda K. Moser TR,
parcel Riley Township, to
Chad J. Beechboard and
Kelly J. Beechboard.
Carl M. Kahle and
Joyce M. Kahle, 16.155
acres Greensburg
Township, 1.302 acres
Greensburg Township,
1.302 acres Greensburg
Township and Lot 25
Greensburg Township to
Joyce M. Kahle TR and
Carl M. Kahle TR.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday, September 5, 2013 The Herald — 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Man’s ogling may be
more than a ‘guy thing’
Dear Annie: I recently
broke up with a 70-year-
old man who could not stop
ogling women and making
sexually inappropriate re-
marks to them. I talked to
him about it many times and
clearly stated that this is emo-
tional cheating and he should
stop or we’d be fnished. He
didn’t change, and it escalat-
ed to ogling strangers on el-
evators and women at parties.
It was creepy. I was humili-
ated and embarrassed. After
I broke up with him, I found
out that he made
sexually inappro-
priate remarks to
some very young
girls, saying he
wanted to see them
naked. I suggested
therapy. He said
all men do this and
told me to relax.
A friend of
mine says he is a
sexual predator
and probably a sex
addict. He always
reads your column. Maybe
you can shed some light. Is it
a mental defcit or emotional
cheating? — Wondering in
Canada
Dear Canada: Both. If
this inappropriate behavior
began within the past few
years, it could be an indica-
tion of early dementia. Sug-
gest he see his doctor. How-
ever, if he has always been
like this, it is not only emo-
tional cheating, but also wor-
risome. When you say “very
young girls,” how young? If
you believe he is preying on
underage girls, please report
him to the authorities.
Dear Annie: I am a
35-year-old man. Years ago,
my mother developed a bad
habit. Whenever I was in the
passenger side of the car, if
she stopped short, she would
put her arm against my chest
to prevent me from going
through the windshield. This
infuriated me. I’m already
wearing a seatbelt, and there
is no way a woman her size
could protect me. Every
time she did this, I would
yell, “Keep your hands on
the wheel!” Eventually, she
stopped.
My mother has always
looked for ways to control
me. She complains about ev-
ery problem under the sun,
and when I offer a workable
solution, she says, “Well,
some people can’t afford to
do those things,” and we end
up arguing. Her arguments
are always stupid, and she’ll
fip sides to make me look
like the aggressor. It’s very
manipulative and makes me
furious.
In the past two years, I’ve
avoided seeing or speaking to
my parents. Recently, Mom
asked me to see my grand-
mother. Against my better
judgment, I went with her,
and out of the blue, she did
that thing again, putting her
arm across my chest when
she stopped sud-
denly.
I told her to pull
over. She said, “I’m
sorry, but I get ner-
vous.” I said, “Then
I don’t think I can
trust you to drive”
and walked home. I
don’t know anyone
else who does this.
It’s not normal. I
suspect my mother
wants to feel like
the boss of the situ-
ation. What do you say? —
N.Y.
Dear N.Y.: Every parent
we know does this. You in-
terpret it as controlling and
manipulative, but it is done
out of an instinctive impulse
to protect someone they
love. Try to recognize that
your feelings could indicate
a skewed perspective about
Mom’s motives and may be
coloring your entire relation-
ship. The two of you don’t
seem to communicate in the
same language. Please ex-
plore this with a professional
counselor and work on ways
to relate in a healthier and
more productive manner. And
ask your mother to go, too.
We suspect she could beneft,
as well.
Dear Annie: “Leave Us
Alone” should tell her rela-
tives they don’t want to start
a family they can’t fully sup-
port. They should say they
have set up two funds — one
to pay off their college loans
and one for future children.
When their loans are paid off
and the one for future children
is completely funded, they
will consider trying. Then
ask the nosy family member
how much they are willing to
contribute. — Some Humor
in Dallas
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013
Taking a look at the way others do
things will spark new ideas for future
projects in the year ahead. You will be
able to move forward with ambitious
objectives and the help and support
you need. Your rewards will be greatly
enjoyed and much deserved.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Opportunity and discipline will take you
a long way. Don’t put off anything that
will bring you closer to your goal. Call
in favors and reestablish connections
that could help you advance.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Consider what isn’t working in your life
and begin the process that will lead to
peace of mind and a bright future. Don’t
hesitate to give someone else the chance
to take control.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- A geographical change will spark
enthusiasm and inspiration. You may
need to negotiate with someone who
could greatly help your cause. Learn as
you go, and you will excel.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) --
Be secretive about your plans. Strategize
carefully and get everything in place
before you make your move. You can
come out on top, but your timing must
be faultless.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --
Don’t let your emotions stand between
you and success. Someone you love
may sabotage your plans if you have
been neglectful of them. Take care
of both personal and professional
responsibilities to minimize obstacles.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --
Partnership situations will be difficult.
Expect to face a standoff that could
alter the way you do things in the future.
Offer an experimental way to solve
differences, and you may find common
ground.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
You’re in a good cycle for contracts,
agreements and moneymaking
opportunities. Share ideas with someone
who has as much to contribute as you
do. An unusual path could be the one to
take to reach your objective.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Consider a certain change, but don’t
jump in too quickly. You aren’t likely to
get what you want if you are restless and
impatient. Let someone else make the
first move.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Keep
things moving along. Stubbornness
will be what stands between you and
success. A practical approach to a job
will help you avoid complaints and
interference.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Travel
and communication will inspire you.
The fresh ideas coming your way may
seem challenging at first, but with a
couple of adjustments you’ll find a way
to make things happen.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If
you invite friends over to enjoy the
comfort of your home, you will be
able to successfully ask for favors and
support. At the very least, a fun time will
be had by all.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Not
everyone will agree with your choices,
but you have to do what’s best for you.
Be receptive and polite in the face of
criticism, but trust your own mind above
others. Love is on the rise.
COPYRIGHT2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday Evening September 5, 2013
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The
Delphos Herald
(419) 695-0015
Neil Armstrong of
Wapakoneta, Ohio, became
the first man to walk on the
moon.
10 – The Herald Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
(Continued from page 1)
2013 Hot Air Festival events at the Van Wert County
Fairgrounds will begin Friday at 3 p.m. with the opening
of gates, the infield, information center, raffle and gift dis-
play, food court, vendors, and Brew Ha-Ha Biergarten. The
Brew Ha-Ha Biergarten will be open from 3 p.m. to 12 a.m.
on Friday with entertainment from Jeff Tucker and On the
Beach at 8:30 p.m.
Other entertainment beginning at 3 p.m. will include an
adult and youth trackless train rides, amusement rides and
games, miniature golf, pony rides, a petting zoo, crafts and
garage sales in the Commercial Building, a Rolling Thunder
POW-MIA/military display, helicopter rides in the infield,
and a model train display in the Commercial Building.
This year a variety of vendors have signed up to be a part
of the event including AM Concessions, The Cream Puff,
Don’s Potato Wagon, Express Cart Concessions with lemon-
ade shake-ups, Farmer’s Daughter, Fiske, Gibson’s Barnyard
BBQ, KJG Buerger Concessions, Lugabill Homemade Ice
Cream, Nacho Pig, Stumpy’s Kettle Korn, Venedocia Lion’s
Club, and Wild Willy’s Pizza.
From 1-4 p.m. the Kids’ Dream Day event hosted by
Farm Bureau will be held. Balloon launch preparations will
begin at 5 p.m., and during this time a spaghetti supper will
be held from 5-7 p.m. Official opening ceremonies will
begin at the Grandstand at 5:30 p.m. with a special POW-
MIA special event and a McDonalds Blimp viewing in the
infield.
The Plein Aire Paint out throughout the fairgrounds will
also begin at 5:30 Local artists are encouraged to bring their
supplies and find a spot on the fairground to captures spe-
cial moments going on throughout the event through their
artwork.
Distant balloon rides are expected to begin around 5:30
p.m. followed by tethered balloon rides at the Grandstand
Infield. A flag-bearing sky jumper will be landing in the
infield at approximately 6 p.m. A spectacular sight is sched-
uled 8:15 p.m. with the Balloon Glow, an event also held at
the 2012 event. This event will be taking place following the
sunset, and balloons will remain on the ground while their
pilots light the burners for a unique light show. Gates will
close at midnight following the conclusion of free entertain-
ment with Jeff Tucker and On the Beach in the beer tent.
Saturday’s events will begin before sunrise with a brand
new events, the Pre-Dawn Glow and Dawn Patrol launch.
Gates will open at 5 a.m. with new events beginning at
5:30 a.m. These special events are seldom seen east of the
Mississippi River let alone in small town Van Wert.
“This is expected to be a really exciting event that will
mark the first of its kind in this part of Ohio,” noted Mazur.
“Six balloons will depart 59 minutes before dawn and will
land following sunrise.”
Balloon launch preparations for the 7:30 a.m. launch will
begin at 6:30 a.m. Crew rides will also be available during
this launch. At 8 a.m., craft and garage sales, train displays,
helicopter rides, and the food court will again open to the
public.
All other events as seen on Friday will begin at 9 a.m.
A First Friends Youth Activity which includes both activi-
ties and seminars will be open from 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.
From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. the Farm Bureau Tractor Driving
Kids’ Dream Day event will be held in the infield. Fees to
this event are in addition to festival entrance fees.
At 11 a.m., a firearm safety seminar will be held by
4H/NRA Rifle Range in the Junior Fair Building. Kim
Hohman’s Danceworks will be hosting entertainment in
the Gospel Pavilion beginning at 1 p.m. Also at the time,
the Brew Ha-Ha Biergarten will reopen with football on a
widescreen TV, and a corn-hole tournament will be held at
the Agricultural Building.
From 1-4 p.m., Balloon Sculpturing, Pleine Aire judging,
awards, and sales, and RC model airplanes in the infield will
be held. A special musical event will be held from 1:30-
4:30 p.m. with the Fort Wayne Scottish Pipes and Drums.
Judging and awards for the McDonald’s coloring contest
will begin at 3 p.m.
From 3-5 p.m., the GSA display/seminar will be held
at the Gospel Pavilion, and a special POW-MIA military
tribute special event will be held from 4-5 p.m. A Van Wert
Professional Firefighters BBQ Dinner with pork chop and
chicken will be held from 4-7 p.m., and tethered balloon
rides will continue in the infield from 5:30-10 p.m.
At approximately 6 p.m., balloons will launch into the
Van Wert sky. This will be followed by the Todd Allen
Show at 7:30 p.m. in the Grandstand. The event is free with
reserved box seating available. A second sundown balloon
glow will be held around 8:15 p.m. Free musical entertain-
ment will be held in the beer tent by DJ Steve Crippen from
9:30 p.m. to midnight. A light parade and judging of light
parade entries will be held in the infield beginning at 10
p.m. and a theatrical fireworks display will follow at 10:15
p.m. Gates will close to the public at 12:30 a.m.
Sunday will be the final day for the 2013 Van Wert Hot
Air Festival which will again open at 5 a.m. for a pre-dawn
glow and Dawn Patrol launch. Balloon launch preparations
will begin at 6:30 p.m. with the second launch set for 7:30
a.m. A pancake breakfast will be held from 7-11 a.m.
Helicopter rides will again be available beginning at 9
a.m., and a non-denominational service held by Gary Adams
and the Trinity Group will begin at the Gospel Pavilion at
9:30 a.m. Regular Hot Air Festival events will begin at 10
a.m. with another new event, bed races beginning at 1 p.m.
A bed race parade and people’s choice voting will also be
held at 12:15 p.m.
RC model airplanes will be in flight in the infield from
1-4 p.m., and the beer tent will be open from 1-6 p.m. Free
entertainment at the Brew Ha-Ha will be held at 2:30 p.m.
with Ken and Mary Turbo Accordions.
Raffle drawings will be held at 4 p.m. with winners
announced at 5 p.m. Gates of this yearly event will close to
the public at 6 p.m. All Hot Air Festival and balloon activi-
ties are subject to weather conditions and some events may
be delayed or cancelled due to these reasons. Balloons are
unable to launch if winds are above 10 mph, an issue that
came into effect during the 2012 event. Refunds will not be
available.
“This year we are looking forward to favorable weather,”
remarked Mazur. “Partly cloudy skies and calm wind speeds
are currently expected, so we are optimistic.” Parking for
the event is available at the fairgrounds from gate four
and five on Fox Road or gate one at Balyeat Ave. and Park
Street. Camping at the event is available, and rates for
camping can be found at Vanwerthotairfestival.com. 2013
Distant Balloon Ride reservation forms can also be found
on this website. Currently, 47 balloon rides are already con-
firmed, and Mazur expects all reservation spots to be filled
by this afternoon. Six of these balloon rides have been con-
firmed out of Toledo. At least 60 balloon rides are expected
to take place in Van Wert over the weekend.
“The economic impact of such a large event should
be great,” said Mazur. “If we attract the large crowds we
are expecting to see, over 30,000 people could be making
their way into town which means new money to Van Wert.
The trickle down effect of this event will be good for us
as a city and county.” The 2013 Hot Air Festival has been
advertised in at least four states and in over 43 counties.
Even McDonalds has contributed to the event and become
and advertiser. The impact of all the advertisement of the
festival is expected to be very favorable for Van Wert.
(Continued from page 1)
Fischer gets everything
needed — side dishes and
paper products — and deliv-
ers the goods to the tent on
Friday morning where vol-
unteers are on hand to help
dish up applesauce. Saturday
is when the majority of the
work is done; setting up
tables and preparing the area
for all the patrons.
There are four shifts
on Saturday and three on
Sunday and each shift con-
sists of four to six dedicated
volunteers that can be count-
ed on to help with the event
year after year.
“Most are from our home-
town banks and some are
dear friends,” Berger said.
“They know when I come
calling its Canal Days chick-
en time and they are always
there to lend a hand.”
“Helping the Canal Days
committee give the commu-
nity the opportunity to come
together during the celebra-
tion makes me feel good,”
Fischer said.
Berger said she was
“raised” to work at events of
this nature.
“Back home in Tiro, we
have a Firemen’s Festival
every year, which grows larg-
er each year,” she detailed. “I
worked right along with my
parents and town volunteers
to put the event into motion.”
Berger loves the together-
ness she shares with all the
volunteers and says Canal
Days just keeps getting bet-
ter and better every year.
Fischer says he loves to
see all the member of the
community having an enjoy-
able and safe time.
“I enjoy doing the chick-
en dinners on Saturday and
Sunday; however, I really
love that we have added The
Toast on Thursday night,”
Berger said.
She is also on that com-
mittee and working on get-
ting the local restaurants
involved.
“We have a wonderful
group that has made this
quite a success to our Canal
Days weekend,” she added.
(Continued from page 1)
Through a spokeswom-
an, Castro’s three victims
declined to comment.
Castro was sentenced
Aug. 1 to life in prison plus
1,000 years after pleading
guilty to 937 counts, includ-
ing kidnapping and rape, in
a deal to avoid the death
penalty. At his sentencing,
he told the judge: “I’m not
a monster. I’m sick.”
Castro had been in a cell
by himself in protective
custody, meaning he was
checked every 30 minutes,
because of fears his noto-
riety could lead to attacks
from other inmates, authori-
ties said.
He was not on a sui-
cide watch, which entails
constant supervision, Smith
said. She would not say
why.
Officials would not say
whether he left a suicide
note.
Castro had been on a sui-
cide watch for a few weeks
in the Cuyahoga County
jail, before he pleaded
guilty and was turned over
to state authorities, and
police said after his arrest
that they had found a years-
old note in which he talked
about suicide. But authori-
ties at the jail dropped the
suicide watch in June after
concluding he was unlikely
to take his own life.
Castro’s captives —
Amanda Berry, Gina
DeJesus and Michelle
Knight — disappeared
separately between 2002
and 2004, when they were
14, 16 and 20. They were
rescued from Castro’s run-
down house May 6 after
Berry broke through a
screen door.
Elation over the women’s
rescue turned to shock as
details emerged about their
captivity. Castro fathered a
child with Berry while she
was being held. The girl
was 6 when she was freed.
Investigators also dis-
closed that the women were
bound with chains, repeat-
edly raped and deprived of
food and bathroom facili-
ties.
Knight told authorities
that Castro impregnated her
repeatedly and made her
miscarry by starving her
and punching her in the
belly. Berry said she was
forced to give birth in a
plastic kiddie pool.
The three women are
declining to comment on
his reported suicide at a
central Ohio prison.
The Jones Day law
firm said in a statement
Wednesday that neither the
women nor their attorneys
would be granting inter-
views.
Air
Obama wins Senate panel’s
backing on Syria strike
By DAVID ESPO and
DONNA CASSATA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama’s request for speedy
congressional backing of a military
strike in Syria advanced Wednesday
toward a showdown Senate vote, while
the commander in chief left open the
possibility he would order retaliation
for a deadly chemical weapons attack
even if Congress withheld its approval.
Legislation backing the use of force
against President Bashar Assad’s gov-
ernment cleared the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee on a 10-7 vote
after it was stiffened at the last min-
ute to include a pledge of support for
“decisive changes to the present mili-
tary balance of power” in Syria’s civil
war. It also would rule out U.S. combat
operations on the ground.
The measure is expected to reach
the Senate floor next week, although
the timing for a vote is uncertain. Sen.
Rand Paul, a Kentucky conservative
with strong tea party ties, has threat-
ened a filibuster.
The House also is reviewing
Obama’s request, but its timetable is
even less certain and the measure could
face a rockier time there.
The administration blames Assad for a
chemical weapons attack that took place
on Aug. 21 and says more than 1,400
civilians died, including at least 400
children. Other casualty estimates are
lower, and the Syrian government denies
responsibility, contending rebels fighting
to topple the government were to blame.
The Senate panel’s vote marked the
first formal response in Congress, four
days after Obama unexpectedly put
off an anticipated cruise missile strike
against Syria last weekend and instead
asked lawmakers to unite first behind
such a plan.
In Stockholm, Sweden, where
Obama was traveling on Wednesday,
the White House praised the vote, and
said it would continue to seek support
for “a military response that is nar-
rowly tailored to enforce the prohibi-
tion on the use of chemical weapons,
and sufficient to protect the national
security interests of the United States
of America.”
Earlier, at a news conference Obama
said, “I always preserve the right
and responsibility to act on behalf of
America’s national security.” In a chal-
lenge to lawmakers back home, he said
Congress’ credibility was on the line,
not his own, despite saying a year ago
that the use of chemical weapons would
cross a “red line.”
Secretary of State John Kerry said
he believes Obama will address the
nation on Syria in the next few days.
The president returns home from over-
seas Friday night.
Obama’s request also received its
first hearing in the House during the
day, and Kerry responded heatedly
when Rep. Jeff Duncan, R-S.C., said
that the secretary of state, Obama and
Vice President Joseph Biden all had
advocated for caution in past conflicts.
“Is the power of the executive branch
so intoxicating that you have aban-
doned past caution in favor of pulling
the trigger on a military response so
quickly?” Duncan asked.
Kerry, who fought in Vietnam in
the 1960s and voted to authorize the
war against Iraq a decade ago, shot
back angrily: “I volunteered to fight
for my country, and that wasn’t a cau-
tious thing to do when I did it.” When
Duncan interrupted, the secretary of
state said,” I’m going to finish, con-
gressman,” and cited his support as
senator for past U.S. military action in
Panama and elsewhere.
The Senate committee’s vote capped
a hectic few days in which lawmakers
first narrowed the scope of Obama’s
request — limiting it to 90 days
and banning combat operations on the
ground — and then widened it.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., a propo-
nent of aggressive U.S. military action
in Syria, joined forces with Democratic
Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware to add a
provision calling for “decisive changes
to the present military balance of power
on the ground in Syria.”
At their urging, the measure was
also changed to state that the policy
of the United States is “to change the
momentum on the battlefield in Syria
so as to create favorable conditions
for a negotiated settlement that ends
the conflict and leads to a democratic
government in Syria.” McCain, who
has long accused Obama of timidity in
Syria, argued that Assad will be willing
to participate in diplomatic negotia-
tions only if he believes he is going to
lose the civil war he has been fighting
for over two years.
The changes were enough to attract
bipartisan support, but political fault
lines were clear on a military action that
polls show a war-weary public opposes.
Seven Democrats and three
Republicans supported the mea-
sure, while two Democrats and
five Republicans opposed. Among
Republicans, opposition came from
lawmakers with the closest ties to tea
party activists, including Paul and
Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, both presi-
dential aspirants.
Many vets’ caregivers cut
out from federal benefit
By KEVIN FREKING
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — John Thomas Doody
was in a coma and on a ventilator, but his
mom refused to follow a doctor’s advice and
put the Iraq war veteran in a nursing home.
Chris Ott quit her job, moved the family
to Tampa, Fla., so her son, known as J.T.,
could be near the Veterans Affairs hospital.
She spends most of her waking hours trying
to meet his many needs.
He was shot while serving with the Marines
in Fallujah and suffered an infection and
series of strokes during his recovery. She says
he’s paralyzed and nearly blind but has made
dramatic improvement over the years.
To ease the financial burden, Ott relies on a
relatively new federal program that pays her a
stipend of about $2,000 per month, trains her
on how to care for J.T. and provides at least 30
days of respite care each year.
Once every three months, a VA inspector
comes by her house to check on her and J.T.
“Now, I can still love him and hug him and
kiss him and talk to him and laugh with him.
Oh yeah, I still have my son,” she said.
The extra help has eased one family’s
financial hardship. Yet there’s a question of
fairness. For every family receiving the care-
giver benefit, many more make do without.
For example, Pauline King of Anna, Ill.,
is not eligible for the stipend even though her
husband, Jerry, a Vietnam veteran, needs help
with bathing, dressing and going to the bath-
room as a result of multiple sclerosis.
When lawmakers created the program in
2010, it limited participation to veterans who
had served since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
King said the move to exclude Vietnam
veterans shows “they’re still not paying atten-
tion” in Congress.
Cost was a factor on Capitol Hill. The
caregivers for veterans from earlier wars can
get some help from the VA, such as counsel-
ing and a lesser amount of respite care, but no
monthly stipend.
Ordered by Congress to study the feasibil-
ity of expanding the program, the Department
of Veterans Affairs expressed reservations
in a report Wednesday, projecting the cost
at between $1.8 billion and $3.8 billion in
the first year alone. The VA estimated that
an additional 2,000 full-time workers would
need to be in place to handle the workload of
an expanded program.
“VA believes the expansion of benefits
to caregivers of eligible veterans of all eras
would make the program more equitable,” the
agency said in a statement. “Unfortunately,
core health care services to veterans would
be negatively impacted without the additional
resources necessary to fund the expansion.”
Given tight budget times, with most federal
agencies already forced to make cuts and fur-
lough workers, the prospects of adding billions
of dollars to the VA budget seems unlikely. The
VA thus far has been exempted from the man-
datory cuts, known as sequestration.
Still, in July, the Senate Veterans’ Affairs
Committee passed a bill that would expand
the program to veterans from all eras. The
bill also increased the types of injuries and
illnesses that would qualify a veteran’s care-
giver for extra assistance. Any veteran with
a “serious-service connected disability” who
needed help with basic activities of daily liv-
ing would qualify.
But concerns about cost will be diffi-
cult to overcome. Currently, about 11,000
caregivers are enrolled in the program. The
Congressional Budget Office estimated that
an additional 70,000 caregivers would par-
ticipate by 2016 if the bill, sponsored by Sen.
Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., becomes law.
Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., chairman of the
House Veterans’ Affairs Committee, said the
intent of the Senate legislation is admirable
but that Congress has an obligation not to
expand existing programs without first ensur-
ing they work correctly. He said he was also
concerned that the Senate legislation does not
identify how to pay for an expansion.
“The VA’s cost estimate for the care-
giver expansion presents a serious obstacle
in an enormously constrained fiscal climate,”
Miller said.
The Wounded Warrior Project agrees with
Miller about holding off on an expansion.
The advocacy group was instrumental in
pushing Congress for the enhanced benefit for
Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. The group says
improvements for are needed before the VA
expands the caregiver benefit. For example,
it says the VA set what it called unduly strict
participation criteria for veterans with mental
health conditions. The appeals process is inad-
equate, the group adds.
Suicide
Chicken

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