2013

Key Findings
Unmet Needs

Overview
Catholic Charities USA conducted an online survey of its membership during May of 2013 to measure programs and services provided between January 1, 2013 and March 31, 2013. The survey also included a special section on mental health services. Responses were received from 58 agencies located in 31 states and territories. These agencies serve an estimated 4,147,249 clients annually.1

SNAPSHOT SURVEY
FIRST QUARTER

In Focus: Mental Health Services
Access

Reporting agencies turned away more than 22,422 people who came to them for services last quarter, including the following:

12,764 1,896 1,872

85%

of Catholic Charities agencies reported that low-income persons do not have sufficient access to mental health services in their community.

people seeking Emergency Financial Assistance

Barriers to Access Most Frequently Cited by Agencies

people seeking Temporary Housing

people seeking Senior Services of agencies kept waiting lists or turned individuals in need away last quarter.

93%

74% 67% 59% 56% 54%
Client Population Groups
Percent of agencies reporting an increase in clients relative to Q4 2012 by population group:
Services are too expensive Individuals Transportation Stigma reluctant to seek services they need Lack of bilingual counselors

Working Poor

64% Immigrants 61% Families 59%

Veterans

58% Refugees 55% Seniors 50%

‘‘

Other than Catholic Charities, all other agencies and private providers charge fees that are too high for low income individuals to afford. They often get only emergency services and do not stay in counseling until the problem is resolved. - Catholic Charities, Dubuque, IA

2013 SNAPSHOT SURVEY
FIRST QUARTER

Services
Eighty percent of respondents directly provide mental health services.2 Responding agencies serve nearly 140,000 clients in mental health services on an annual basis.3 Percent of Agencies Providing Different Types of Services

Challenges

64%

of agencies reported waiting lists for their mental health services. Of these, 30 percent had waiting lists that were 4 weeks or longer.

‘‘
100% 98% 79% 44% 37% 26%
Individual Family Group Diagnosis Crisis Psychiatric Counseling Counseling Counseling and Intervention Medication Assesment

We are under constant pressure to abandon this service due to the increase consumption of limited dollars that then take away from other programming. - Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Green Bay, WI

Thank you to the agencies that participated:
Catholic Social Services, Anchorage, Catholic Charities Archdiocese of New Orleans, Catholic Community Service, Juneau, Catholic Charities Maine, Portland, Catholic Social Services, Birmingham, Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan,Catholic Charities Community Services, Phoenix, Catholic Charities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Catholic Community Services of Southern AZ, Inc., Tucson, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of New Ulm, Catholic Charities of Los Angeles, Catholic Charities of Central & Northern Missouri, Catholic Charities of the East Bay, Catholic Charities, Omaha, Catholic Charities CYO, San Francisco, Catholic Charities-Diocese of Las Cruces, Catholic Charities of Orange County, Catholic Charities of Buffalo, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Monterey, Catholic Charities of Southwestern Ohio, Cincinnati, Catholic Charities of Central Colorado, Catholic Charities, Toledo, Catholic Charities of Fairfield County, Inc. Bridgeport, Catholic Charities Diocese of Youngstown, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Norwich, Inc., Catholic

83%
Funding

of agencies provide mental health services particularly targeted toward children.

79%

of agencies report that their mental health services have run consistently in the red over the last five years. Despite this, 70 percent of agencies have maintained or expanded their services over that same period.

Charities Agency, Inc., Greensburg, Catholic Charities Inc., Diocese of Wilmington DE, Social Ministry Secretariat, Providence, Catholic Charities Bureau, Inc., St. Augustine, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Charleston, Inc., Catholic Charities, Inc. Palm Beach, FL, Catholic Charities of East Tennessee, Inc., Catholic Charities Diocese of St. Petersburg, Inc., Catholic Charities, West Tennessee, Memphis, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Venice, Inc., Catholic Charities of Tennessee, Inc., Nashville, Catholic Charities Atlanta, Catholic Charities of Corpus Christi, Texas, Catholic Charities, Des Moines, Catholic Charities of Dallas, Catholic Charities, Dubuque, Catholic Charities of Fort Worth, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston Houston, Catholic Charities, Joliet, Catholic Charities, San Antonio, Catholic Charities Diocese of Peoria, Catholic Community Services of Utah, Salt Lake City, Catholic Charities of Evansville, Vermont Catholic Charities, Burlington, Catholic Charities, Inc., Covington, KY, Catholic Charities of The Diocese of Green Bay, Catholic Charities Diocese of Lexington,

‘‘
1,3 2

We serve clients who are poor and can pay very little. We do not turn away people because of inability to pay. We lose money every year. - Catholic Charities of Los Angeles, CA

Catholic Charities, Milwaukee, Catholic Charities of Louisville, Inc., Catholic Charities Bureau, Inc., Superior, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Baton Rouge, Catholic Charities West Virginia, Inc.

Based on agency information as reported in the Catholic Charities USA 2011 Annual Survey Respondents are a representative sample of the overall network – 82% of all agencies provide mental health services

2050 Ballenger Avenue Suite 400 Alexandria, VA 22314 www.CatholicCharitiesUSA.org

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