BY LAURIE MITTELMANN

Perhaps you’ve noticed the boxes
of rotting apples and black bananas up
for grabs outside the store, or walked
inside to use the bathroom and smelled
compost destined for the Lower East
Side Ecology Center in buckets next to
the toilet.
Maybe you’ve popped in to pick up
some milk, and saw a girl crouched on
the floor eating spilled raisins because
she was hungry and wanted to make
use of them.
The 4th Street Food Co-op, a
small, nonprofit, vegetarian health-
food store between the Bowery and
Second Ave. on E. Fourth St., sells
the most local, inexpensive and
organic food possible. It’s also a
community bound by ethics.
There’s a small rainbow flag sticker
on the door, and a sign propped on the
sidewalk by the front window saying
anyone can shop there. There could
also easily be a notice reading, “No
hierarchy, no transnational corpora-
tions, no waste.” The co-op values
democratic decision-making, fruits and
vegetables from nearby farms, sustain-
able practices and people helping and
learning from each other.
The co-op is a means by which Dan
Biren, of Bushwick, Brooklyn, works
“to change the world.” Members submit
a formal proposal to discuss and vote on
any suggestion that’s controversial.
“Change is not as efficient, but it
tends to happen in a better way,” Biren
said of the co-op’s internal process.
At a recent meeting, members dis-
cussed a proposal for the co-op to accept
membership dues through PayPal.
Biren argued that they shouldn’t. He
said its parent company, eBay, had fro-
zen the Leonard Peltier Defense Fund’s
account because of its activism.
The majority of people backed the
proposal to accept PayPal, however, so
it passed.
“I’m over it,” Biren said, shifting
his body toward the bulk herbs section
to his left as another member reached
BY LINCOLN ANDERSON
A few facts are clear:
Responding to a call shortly
before noon on Sat., May 9,
police found Lesia Pupshaw,
26, unconscious in her apart-
ment at 202 E. Sixth St.;
10 minutes later, Pupshaw
was declared dead by emer-
gency medical technicians;
the night before, Pupshaw
reportedly had been attacked
in Tompkins Square Park
by a group of local youths
Did attack or smack
kill Tompkins Square
‘crusty’ woman, 26?
Produce and politics mix
at 4th Street Food Co-op
Villager photo by Helayne Seidman
A diverse group of members belong to the 4th Street Food Co-op.
BY ALBERT AMATEAU
Members of the
Landmarks Preservation
Commission said on
Tuesday they were near-
ly ready to approve the
residential side of the St.
Vincent’s Hospital rede-
velopment project, but
still hoped for yet another
reduction in the height of
the proposed large apart-
ment building at One
Seventh Ave.
The commissioners
spoke at the June 16 L.P.C.
meeting that followed the
week after Dan Kaplan, of
F.X. Fowle Architects, pre-
sented the latest scaled-
own version of the resi-
dential complex that the
Rudin Organization hopes
will replace the current
hospital.
Robert Tierney, L.P.C.
chairperson, said the large
and complicated project
has come a long way since
it was introduced more
than a year ago. He added
that by the adaptive reuse
of four of the hospital’s
eight existing buildings,
the project “adheres to the
fundamental principles of
preservation.”
Tierney indicated that
the commission would
meet to vote final approval
of the project early in July.
The newest version, pre-
sented on June 9, reduced
the height of the proposed
Seventh Ave. building to
218 feet, from the previ-
ous height of 233 feet,
which itself was a reduc-
Prognosis appears
Landmarks will O.K.
Rudin 7th Ave. tower
Continued on page 16
145 SI XTH AVENUE • NYC 10013 • COPYRI GHT © 2009 COMMUNI TY MEDI A, LLC
Continued on page 6
Continued on page 7
EDITORIAL,
LETTERS
PAGE 18
KOCH
RIDES
‘PELHAM 1 2 3’
PAGE 21
Volume 79, Number 2 $1.00 West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933 June 17 - 23, 2009
Taoist
defender,
p. 17
2 June 17 - 23, 2009
GERSON RASHOMON: Councilmember Alan Gerson
not only lost Downtown Independent Democrats’ endorse-
ment two weeks ago but he also had his cell phone thrown
against the wall by club member Gil Horowitz after break-
ing up an argument Horowitz was having with Gerson’s
mother, Sophie, 84. We’ve tried to get to the bottom of
this to see what prompted Horowitz’s anger — was it an
overreaction to the councilmember’s justifiable defense
of his mother or was it physically aggressive behavior
on Gerson’s part? After speaking to everyone involved,
though, we feel like we’re in a remake of Kurosawa’s
“Rashomon.” Horowitz, 72, says Gerson grabbed and held
him while shoving him 20 feet. Then when Horowitz com-
plained to Alan, the councilmember offered the cell phone
in case Horowitz wanted to call the police. Horowitz was
so angered that he threw the phone across the large hall
in St. Anthony’s Church on Sullivan St. There were few
witnesses to the hullabaloo at the back of the room since
most attention was directed toward the speakers up front.
Allan Horland, a physician and Gerson friend who was
keeping his eye on Sophie at the request of her son, agreed
Gerson did grab Horowitz and move him away, but said
Gerson reacted appropriately since Horowitz “was waving
his finger, if not his fist” in the face of an elderly woman
who couldn’t easily get up and walk away. Sophie, who
lives with Alan, has had two major surgeries in recent
years. Gerson said he would stand by Horland’s account,
though he denies ever grabbing Horowitz. At various
times as we were trying to get to the bottom of this,
Gerson said he “may have ruffled” Horowitz as he stepped
in, that he “gently ushered” him away from his mother and
that he did what anyone would do to someone “threaten-
ing” his or her ailing mother. Horowitz, a psychologist
who is Pete Gleason’s campaign “behavioral scientist,”
says Gerson just snapped. Horowitz said he never shook
his finger at Sophie, although he does regret some of the
harsh things he told her about her son. Two witnesses with
strong loyalties to Gleason, who beat Gerson for D.I.D.’s
endorsement, said they saw Gerson take more aggres-
sive action — one said the councilmember grabbed and
shoved Horowitz about 7 feet, the other said it was more
like a pushing — but neither would speak for attribu-
tion. Another witness who is a Gleason supporter, Adam
Silvera, said he was right there and although each person
invaded the other’s personal space, he did not notice
much, if any, contact. But Silvera also does not recall
the phone throw, which every other witness remembers
clearly. Go figure.
PEDICAB RASHOMON: At the end of the Hudson
River Park Trust’s board of directors meeting last month
there was a lengthy discussion of pedicabs after Marc
Ameruso, former chairperson of the Hudson River Park
Advisory Council, mentioned that family members of
Arthur Schwartz, the advisory council’s current chairper-
son, recently had been “hit by a pedicab” on the park’s
bike path. Schwartz’s 5-year-old daughter, in fact, broke
her elbow in the collision. Pedicabs are only allowed on
the bike path if they’re not carrying passengers, and can’t
pick up fares on the route, it was pointed out, since they
aren’t allowed to conduct business on the path. Pedicabs
have been under renewed scrutiny lately, following a June
10 incident when a pedicab went careening recklessly
down the Brooklyn-side ramp on the Williamsburg Bridge,
then collided with a car, injuring the pedicab’s driver and
two of his passengers. However, Schwartz, who came
to the Trust’s meeting at the last minute and missed the
discussion, later told us, “No, I have a pedicab — and I
think they’re great.” He said his wife and daughter were
in the custom-built tricycle (i.e., the “pedicab”) and that
they were struck by a bicyclist on the path near Chambers
St. in such a way and at such an angle that it flipped them
over. Also contributing to the accident, he said, was the
presence of pedestrians on the path at the spot where the
bike and trike collided, which had caused the cyclists to
take evasive maneuvers. Schwartz said his family’s trike
— which he thinks is really cool — was built by George
Bliss, who, as Villager readers may recall, also built the
“No Impact S.U.V.” tricycle for another Villager, Colin
Beavan, a.k.a. No Impact Man. As for the bike path,
Schwartz said he plans at some point to bring together the
government agencies involved with the path, basically the
state Department of Transportation and the Trust, to see
if some ideas like speed bumps and better signage can be
implemented to increase safety.
HUDSON FIREWORKS: Speaking of Hudson River
Park, that’s where the prime viewing area for this year’s
Fourth of July fireworks display will be — since the event
is moving from the East River to the Hudson River in
honor of the quadricentennial of Henry Hudson’s sailing
into the river that bears his name. Specifically, the main
viewing strip will be 24th to 50th Sts., where six barges
packed with colorful explosives will be floating offshore.
However, the entire West Side Highway from 125th St. to
just below Chelsea Piers will be closed off to accept the
thronging masses. The Intrepid pier and the Intrepid itself
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June 17 - 23, 2009 3
St. Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan
St. Vincent’s. It’s your hospital.
www.svcmc.org 212-604-8020
Hudson Guild Fulton Center
119 9
th
Aveue (at 17
th
Street)
Tuesday, June 23
2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
St. Vincent’s Manhattan - O’Toole Building
36 7
th
Avenue (12
th
and 13
th
Street), 5
th
Floor
Tuesday, June 23 and Wednesday, June 24
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
St. Vincent’s Comprehensive Cancer Center
325 West 15
th
Street (8
th
and 9
th
Avenue)
Wednesday, June 24
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Daily News Building
450 West 33
rd
Street (9
th
and 10
th
Avenue)
Wednesday, June 24
11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association
Benevolence Association
62 Mott Street
Friday, June 26
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
RSVP to 1-800-CARE-421. Walk-ins will be welcome. Several convenient sites:
Church of the Village
201 West 13
th
Street (Corner of 7
th
Avenue)
Saturday, June 27
10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
McBurney YMCA
125 West 14
th
Street (6
th
and 7
th
Avenue)
Sunday, June 28
1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
A Father’s Day Gift from
St. Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan
PROSTATE CANCER SCREENINGS
4 June 17 - 23, 2009
BY ALBERT AMATEAU
The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
on Monday made its annual Village Awards to the people
and places that make the Village the renowned neighbor-
hood beloved by residents, merchants and visitors.
Calvin Trillin, writer and longtime Village resident, pre-
sented the awards at the G.V.S.H.P. annual meeting held
June 15 at St. Joseph’s Church on Sixth Ave. and Washington
Place. The church was one of the winners of the 2009 Village
Awards.
The society also re-elected trustees: Mary Ann Arisman,
Arthur Levin, Jonathan Russo, Judith Stonehill and Linda
Yowell, and elected a new trustee, Vals Osborne.
This year’s award honorees were a mix of landmark
merchants and institutions, a social-services provider and
restoration projects.
Fedora Dorato was honored for carrying on her family’s
tradition of welcoming generations of Villagers and visitors
to Fedora restaurant, at 239 W. Fourth St. near Seventh
Ave. Fedora Dorato came with her family from Florence
in 1931 when she was 10. She has lived upstairs from the
restaurant named for her since she married Henry Dorato in
a building that Henry’s father bought in 1921, where he ran
the restaurant speakeasy Charlie’s Garden. Except for paint
jobs and air conditioning, the place has remained the same,
with its pressed-metal ceiling, intimate tables and dedicated
waiters. Fedora, named for the opera by Umberto Giordano,
still does the cooking.
“We’ve always lived in the Village,” Dorato said. “My son
went to St. Joseph’s Academy. We’ve got the same neighbor-
hood friends and know their grandchildren when they come
in,” she said. A bust of Fedora’s granddaughter and photos
of great-grandchildren remind customers they are in a family
establishment.
University Parish of St. Joseph also received a Village
Award. The award, accepted by Father John McGuire, pas-
tor of St. Joseph’s Church, 364 Sixth Ave., cites the church’s
175th anniversary and its exterior restoration and lighting
completed in time for last Christmas. The restoration includ-
ed window woodwork, front and side doors, iron railings,
gates and missing finials, polishing historic brass plaques
and repainting the building’s front in yellow, the historically
correct color. The restoration retained virtually all of the
original materials.
Designed by John Doran in the Greek-revival style, the
cornerstone was laid June 10, 1833, and the completed
church was dedicated March 16, 1834. The church has tra-
ditionally made space available for community meetings and
cultural events, and for the past 20 years its soup kitchen has
fed more than 500 people every Saturday.
Father Demo Square on the triangle at Sixth Ave.,
Carmine and Bleecker Sts. was honored for the redesign by
George Vellonakis, designer for the Department of Parks
and Recreation, and the renovation of the center of public
life in the Italian South Village. The square was first created
in 1941 and named for the long-serving pastor of Our Lady
of Pompei Church, Father Antonio Demo. The redesign
was prompted by the Carmine St. Block Association and its
president David Gruber, Friends of Father Demo Square and
the Bedford-Downing Block Association, and financed with
city funds secured by Council Speaker Christine Quinn. The
renovation enlarged the triangle and included many benches,
a low, wrought-iron fence and an imposing central fountain.
Another recipient of a Village Award was the building
at 171-173 MacDougal St., between Waverly Place and E.
Eighth St., owned since 1927 by the 10th Church of Christ
Scientist. The building was honored for its contextual
restoration, which respectfully integrates modern features
within the historic facade. Just before the 1968 creation of
the Greenwich Village Historic District, the facade was con-
verted to a design by the architect Victor Christ-Janer that
emphasized the scale of the loft-style building, which was the
block’s tallest building when it was built in 1890. The church
sold the long-unused upper part of the building several years
ago to finance the cost of a needed renovation.
Honored for the building’s current renovation were
TRA, the architects for the residential developer, Property
Markets Group; Hanrahan Meyers Architects for the
church; and Walter B. Melvins Architect for historic pres-
ervation of the remaining facade; as well as the contractor,
Preserv, Inc.
The Children’s Aid Society – Philip Coltoff Center, at
219 Sullivan St., and its executive director, Steve Wobido,
were honored for the vital role the center has played
providing educational, recreational and service programs
for Village families for 117 years. It was opened in 1892
as the Sullivan St. School for Children’s Aid Society in
a building designed by Calvert Vaux in response to the
social-services needs of the growing Greenwich Village
immigrant and working-class population. Back then, the
school taught cooking and trades in addition to reading,
writing and arithmetic. Over the years, the center has
taken on new names and today offers early-childhood
education, after-school programs and summer camp and
teen and adult classes that enrich the social, cultural,
intellectual and creative lives of participants.
Also garnering an ’09 Village Award was Joe’s Dairy, at
156 Sullivan St. Established around the corner in 1953 and
owned now by Anthony Campanelli, Joe’s Dairy was hon-
ored for creating what many customers call the best home-
made mozzarella in the city, produced fresh every day in its
South Village store. Campanelli, who worked in the store
part time while in school, bought the place in 1977. The
small shop sells Italian basics, including olives, stuffed pep-
pers, dried pasta, olive oil, canned tomatoes and 32 variet-
ies of cheese, in addition to the sweet and hot sausages that
hang from overhead pipes. But the boxes labeled “Whole
Milk Mozzarella Curd” stacked around the store reveal the
true success secret of Joe’s Dairy, the creamy mozzarella,
smoked, salted or plain, made fresh every day.
Carmine St. Guitars, at 42 Carmine St., in a three-story
Federal-style building was honored for serving Village musi-
cians and for the artistry and tradition of the owner, Rick
Kelly, who has been handcrafting guitars at the shop for
more than 20 years. Kelly, a master luthier, has been making
guitars by hand since 1968. The Carmine St. building has
the original yellow-pine floors, exposed brick and 1890s
pressed-tin ceiling. Kelly uses many kinds of wood for his
guitars but lately has been employing reclaimed wood from
demolished old buildings dating from the 1860s to 1890s.
He makes three or four custom guitars each month and sells
to professionals and amateurs. He said his favorite customer
is “the average Joe.”
Finally, the Women’s Prison Association, located since
1874 in the historic Isaac Hooper House built in 1838 at
110 Second Ave., was honored for more than 160 years
of dedication to women with criminal-justice histories and
for the association’s diligent stewardship of its East Village
building.
Under the direction of Georgia Lerner, W.P.A. provides
direct assistance to about 2,500 women and their families
each year regarding their livelihoods, housing, families,
health and well-being, as well as their compliance with the
criminal justice system. The services are based in jails and
prisons, as well as the communities where the women and
their families live. The building was named for the Quaker
abolitionist Isaac Hooper, a leading 19th-century advocate
for prison reform. His daughter, Abigail Hooper Gibbons,
served for years as the association’s president.
Demo, dairy, a Dorato among Village Award winners
Villager photo by Tequila Minsky
Joe’s Dairy owner Anthony Campanelli, left, and his
daughter Olivia, 10, accepted a Village Award for the
Sullivan St. store from Andrew Berman, executive
director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic
Preservation, right.
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6 June 17 - 23, 2009
throwing bottles, possibly wielding a bat;
Pupshaw was known to have used heroin.
A month later, however, Pupshaw’s cause
of death has yet to be determined by the city’s
medical examiner. As of early this week, test
results were still pending.
“Some testing takes a little longer than oth-
ers,” an M.E. spokesperson said on Monday.
“It’s not unusual.”
However, citing indications police received
early on from the M.E., the Ninth Precinct’s
commanding officer said police don’t believe
Pupshaw’s death was a murder, and are pro-
ceeding accordingly.
“There is no evidence to support” that
Pupshaw was killed, said Deputy Inspector
Dennis De Quatro. “At this point, it’s not being
investigated as a homicide, but as an assault.”
But some of the Tompkins Square Park
“crusties” — a loose-knit group of mainly young
heroin users and drinkers with whom Pupshaw
used to hang out — say Pupshaw’s head was
badly injured in the attack and that police aren’t
investigating as thoroughly as if the victim had
been a “yuppie.”
De Quatro, however, said making things
more difficult, witnesses aren’t cooperating.
“There seems to be a reluctance on the part
of those in the park to talk to us,” the deputy
inspector said. “They can come into the pre-
cinct” and tell police what they know, he said.
Melissa Bishop may know the most of any-
one. Speaking in the park two weekends ago,
she said she was questioned by police, and was,
for a short time, the prime suspect in Lesia (pro-
nounced Leh-shuh) Pupshaw’s death.
Bishop, who lives on Long Island, hangs
out with the crusties and volunteers with the
Tompkins Square Park maintenance crew —
“because I love the park,” she said — and
reportedly hopes to eventually land a job with
them.
A former crack user from Atlantic City,
she said she’s been clean of crack nine years.
She said she did three years in jail for Percoset
possession, taking the fall for her mother. She
claims to have escaped being choked to death
by the main suspect in the murders of four
Atlantic City hookers in 2006.
“I used to do what I had to do,” she
said. “I’m not going to lie. My past is ugly.
... Atlantic City is a black hole — it sucks
you in.”
May 8 was Bishop’s birthday. She and
Pupshaw weren’t on good terms because
Bishop’s ex-boyfriend, Greg, had broken up
with her to go out with Pupshaw. Bishop
had been pregnant by Greg, but miscar-
ried. Bishop has a tattoo on her forearm in
memory of her lost baby.
“She didn’t like me because I was carry-
ing [Greg’s child],” Bishop said of Pupshaw.
Bishop, 29, already has two children, 15
years old and 11 years old.
Pupshaw’s presence in the park on
Bishop’s birthday was not welcome. The two
had words.
Bishop said she cursed out Pupshaw, then
turned on her heel and started to walk off.
Immediately afterward, she said, she heard
glass breaking. Turning back around, she
said she saw Pupshaw getting up off the
ground and heard her say, “Look at my eye.
Look at my eye.”
“I got a good look at three of ’em,”
Bishop said. The suspects are Hispanic, or
black with medium skin color, she said.
“They’re saying she OD’d,” Bishop said
of police. “She had a concussion. I could see
from her eye.” At a later point, she added,
“They had a bat — I saw it.” Asked if it was
a metal or wood bat, Bishop said it “looked
wooden.”
Bishop gave a brief description of the
suspects’ clothes: “A black, white and gray
hoodie, cargo pants, cargo shorts, boots... .”
Bishop said she helped another victim
of the attack, Adam, whose shirt was all
bloody, into an ambulance, but that Pupshaw
refused medical treatment — then lied about
the incident to her boyfriend.
“She went home and told Greg I beat
her up,” Bishop said. She said Pupshaw also
accused her of paying the attackers to beat
her up.
Meanwhile, Bishop said, she believes
a gang called the Cash Money Boys, from
Avenue D between Third and Fifth Sts., are
behind the assault.
“I’m going to find out who these kids
are,” she vowed. “They turned my life upside
down for a couple of hours — and they
could have ruined my life.
“I’m a Marine’s niece,” Bishop declared.
“I want them to come at me — and I’m
going to show them what I’m trained to do.
I want them to come at me, and they won’t
— because they go for the weak.”
A group of neighborhood youths and the
crusties had clashed a few times earlier in
the week before the violence on the night
before Pupshaw’s death. The attacks report-
edly had started out with things like water
balloons, then escalated to broken bottles
and blood.
According to a local blog, subsequent
to May 8, more attacks are said to have
occurred by a roving gang of local youths,
but police don’t necessarily agree.
“As for documented incidents, we have
that one weekend back in the beginning of
May involving this group,” De Quatro said.
An older man with a gray beard hanging
out among the crusties in their usual area on
the benches near the park’s southwest corner
two weekends ago, said he knew Pupshaw
for some years.
“I’m Bob — they call me Uncle Bob,” he
said. “I’m an old stagehand, tech. ... Lesia
used to be out with us. She drank. She did a
little heroin from what they say. The police
want to just write it off as heroin. They want
to close the case. They don’t want to pros-
ecute people. I think she was killed by these
punk kids. ... The water balloon kids haven’t
hit while I’ve been out here.
“She was just a drunk,” Bob said. “She
was just a girl out here like any other girl
in the neighborhood. Family life wasn’t that
good, so she came out here.”
As for Bishop’s saying she was the prime
suspect in Pupshaw’s death, De Quatro said
that may just be her opinion.
“I can’t say by whose definition she was
a suspect,” De Quatro said. “She might have
considered herself a suspect because she was
being questioned.”
Bishop angrily said police aren’t taking
Pupshaw’s death as seriously as if she was
“some yuppie-ass rich woman.”
“Absurd” was De Quatro’s response to
that accusation. “It’s our duty to investigate
the assault. If you are assaulted today and
you die in an automobile crash in New Jersey
tomorrow, we still investigate. One’s got
nothing to do with the other.” He added, “It
potentially becomes more difficult [to inves-
tigate] if you don’t have a complainant.”
De Quatro said, however, that police
obviously would devote fewer resources to
an assault compared to a homicide.
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Did attack or smack kill Tompkins Square ‘crusty’?
Villager photo by Lincoln Anderson
Melissa Bishop in Tompkins Square Park
Continued from page 1
June 17 - 23, 2009 7
will be the center of Macy’s show with a
staging area for music and performances.
As for Hudson River Park, the sections
that will be open for the crowds, at least
according to preliminary information, will
be Clinton Cove in the W. 50s, Pier 54 at
W. 13th St. and all or part of Pier 84 at W.
44th St. The park’s bikeway will be closed
to cyclists and pedestrians and will be used
as an emergency access path.
RIDER NEEDS HELP: David McWater,
owner of Doc Holliday’s bar on Avenue
A at Ninth St., alerted us to an upcoming
fundraiser for the bar’s former bouncer,
Eamon Cronin, who is the drummer and
singer in The Doors cover band Riders
on the Storm. Cronin was on tour with
his band in Vigo, Spain, when he fell off
a 15-foot stage and suffered a near-death
head injury. “He is still in I.C.U. in Spain,
without medical insurance, and the club
is saying they have no insurance,” said
Joanna Leban, manager and head bartend-
er at “Doc’s.” “Although an investigation
has begun to hold the club responsible, he
has to pay for some of the large medical
bills (or they will transfer him to a public,
inferior-care hospital) and he’s suffering
financial hardship due to the injury.” To
help one of their own, Doc Holliday’s will
hold a raffle and silent auction Thurs., June
18, from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Many local
businesses are donating items, such as din-
ner for two, tattoo time, bar tabs, shoes,
clothing, “baskets of booze,” chiropractor
services, massages, several East Village bar
crawls paid for by the bar (and hosted by
two gorgeous Doc’s bartenders per crawl),
personal-training sessions, personal chef
cooking lessons and more. One hundred
percent of door proceeds ($20 suggested
donation) and all raffle and auction pro-
ceeds, plus all bartender tips and 50 per-
cent of bar sales will all go for Cronin’s
assistance.
‘MOSAIC’ MOVES IN: Jim Power, the
“Mosaic Man,” has found a home, tempo-
rarily at least, with an East Village artist
who has taken him in. When we called
him last week — to let him know that a
Brooklyn woman had contacted us want-
ing him to do a mosaic in her backyard
— Power was busy working on a mosaic
piece for a local bar, and sounded like
things were looking up.
Please join us for the
Informed
Neighbor
Monthly
Discussion
Informed Neighbor will bring
together organizations, local officials, and community
members at NYU for monthly meetings to provide
information on projects and initiatives at the University,
including updates on construction, upcoming events,
sustainability, and other happenings that are pertinent
to the community. Please join us for our first meeting!
Wednesday, June 24, 2009
6:30–8 p.m. • 19 University Place, 1st Floor Great Room
THI S MONTH’ S TOPI CS
1. Overview of information sharing
2. Senior services presentation
3. CoGen construction update
Refreshments will be served.
RSVP TO NYU’s Office of Government and Community Affairs
at 212.998.2400 or community.affairs@nyu.edu
SCOOPY’S NOTEBOOK
Continued from page 2
tion from the 265-foot building originally
proposed.
But although several commissioners
said this Tuesday that they were comfort-
able with the new height, others hoped
for a still-lower Seventh Ave. building
— “by another floor,” one L.P.C. member
said. Commissioner Pablo Vengoechea,
who called for a lower Seventh Ave.
building, urged that a further reduction
not be conditioned on added height on
other buildings.
Commissioners also suggested that the
proposed penthouse for mechanical sys-
tems on the north portion of the Seventh
Ave. building was out of scale and should
be reduced.
Several commissioners also found the
mechanical penthouses on the preserved
Smith Raskob and Nurses Residence
buildings on W. 12th St. and on the pre-
served Spellman building on W. 11th St.
were too large.
Commissioner Margery Perlmutter,
who has opposed both the 299-foot-
tall new hospital building that L.P.C.
approved last month for Seventh Ave.’s
west side, as well as the residential side
of the project, was out of town this week.
Nevertheless, she commented last week
that even the Seventh Ave. building’s new
reduced height “was not justified.”
Commissioner Roberta Brandes Gratz
declined on Tuesday to comment on the
project.
“I’m so adamantly opposed to the
whole project that I didn’t think I had
anything else to say,” Gratz told The
Villager after the meeting.
Because St. Vincent’s is in the
Greenwich Village Historic District,
L.P.C. is charged with reviewing whether
any changes, demolition or new construc-
tion on the site is appropriate. Last month
the commission approved the demolition
of the hospital’s O’Toole building at 20
Seventh Ave. on the avenue’s west side to
make way for the proposed new hospital
building. The approval followed the com-
mission’s granting of St. Vincent’s hard-
ship application. However, a lawsuit filed
by Protect the Village Historic District, a
group of local residents, seeks to overturn
the hardship application that allowed the
demolition of O’Toole.
The residential side of the project calls
for demolition of the hospital’s Coleman,
Link and Cronin buildings, but adapts the
Nurses Residence and the Smith, Raskob
and Spellman buildings for residential
use.
Prognosis seems Landmarks
will O.K. Rudin 7th Ave. project
Continued from page 1
www. THEVI LLAGER. c o m
8 June 17 - 23, 2009
East Village sex abuse
Ninth Precinct police responded to a report
of sex abuse on Monday morning June 15 and
spoke to a girl, 12, who told them that a man
followed her into the elevator of her E. Fourth
St. building shortly before 10 a.m., showed
her pornography on a DVD player that he was
carrying, and then groped her. She was able to
flee when the elevator door opened.
Johan Garcia, 28, of the Bronx, was
arrested in the neighborhood in connection
with the case a short time later and charged
with sexual abuse. Garcia had been arrested
last December for kidnapping a 14-year-old
girl from her Washington Heights building
and driving her to a Bronx motel, where she
was able to escape while he went to rent a
room, according to a Daily News article. The
suspect was also reported arrested in 2003
for indecent exposure and public lewdness.
MacDougal clubber dies
Police responded to a call at 3:10 a.m.
Sun., June 14, about an unconscious man in
Love, the club at 179 MacDougal St. near W.
Eighth St. and found the victim, a white male,
28, unconscious and unresponsive. He was
taken to St. Vincent’s Hospital where he was
declared dead on arrival. He had been drink-
ing and taking ecstasy before he passed out,
according to witnesses. The incident is under
investigation and the victim’s name was not
released pending family notification.
Seek cop impostors
Police are looking for two men wanted
in an April 26, 12:30 a.m., robbery in which
they told a man on E. 13th St. that they were
police officers and robbed him. The robbers
approached the victim, 22, near E. 14th St.
and Avenue B, said they were police and
then began to search him, police said. They
then forced the victim to an A.T.M. and
made him withdraw $400, which they took
before fleeing, police said.
Handbag attack
A man in his thirties came up behind
a woman on E. Third St. near the Bowery
at 5:15 a.m. Tues., June 9, punched her,
wrestled her to the ground and ripped off
her handbag with her laptop and cell phone,
then fled, police said.
Stiff board
Police arrested Victor Anderson, 48, on
Saturday night June 13 on Seventh Ave.
at Christopher St. and charged him with
assault for hitting a man in the legs with a
plywood board.
Shoplifting spree
Police arrested three men and a woman
from New Jersey on Wed., June 10, and
charged them with shoplifting from eight
clothing boutiques, including Max Studio,
426 West Broadway between Spring and
Prince Sts., and Anthropologie, 375 West
Broadway near Broome St., in Soho and
shops on the Upper East Side.
The suspects walked into the shops with
plastic bags lined with aluminum foil, which
obstructs surveillance devices, stuffed the
bags with merchandise and walked out,
police said. They went from store to store in
a car, according to police.
The suspects include Marjorie Cedeño,
43; Armando Astudillo, 41; Freddy Ornaza,
28, and Robert Sandoval, 27. In addition to
the Max Studio and Anthopolgie in Soho,
they were accused of stealing from Gap,
Arden B, Bolton’s, BCBG and Chico’s on the
Upper East Side.
Targets older men
Police are looking for a strong-arm robber
who follows elderly men into their buildings
in the Village and Stuyvesant Town during
the daylight hours and takes their wallets.
The most recent offense was at 3:10 p.m.
Sun., June 7, when a man, 62, was robbed
in the lobby of his residence at 440 E. 23rd
St. in Peter Cooper Village.
The robber previously attacked a 91-year-
old man in the elevator of his Village resi-
dence at 247 W. 12th St. at 1:40 p.m. Fri.,
May 29. When the elevator reached the
third floor, the robber grabbed the victim,
who resisted. But the suspect hit the victim,
removed $400 from his wallet and fled from
the elevator when it returned to the lobby,
police said. The suspect was described as
a bald black man, 5 feet 5 inches tall and
about 45 years old.
Before that, the suspect robbed a man,
77, in the lobby of the victim’s residence at
447 E. 14th St. in Stuyvesant Town at 9:35
a.m. Mon., May 25.
Park molester
Police arrested Louis Lanclos, 47, on
Tuesday afternoon June 9 and charged him
with sexually abusing a woman, 76, in
Sara Delano Roosevelt Park on Forsyth St.
near Delancey St. The suspect grabbed the
woman’s breasts and buttocks and put his
mouth on her neck. Witnesses called police,
who arrested Lanclos near the scene.
Cold-case arrest
A Sixth Precinct police officer spotted a
man opening the freezer door of an ice cream
delivery truck parked in front of 3 Sheridan
Square at 3 p.m. Wed., June 10, while the
driver was making deliveries to Gristedes.
The officer arrested Patrick Merolle, 32,
and charged him with taking three cases of
Häagen-Dazs ice cream.
Mugged on 6th Ave.
A Brooklyn man, 29, walking on the west
side of Sixth Ave. between 13th and 14th
Sts., around 8:30 a.m. Tues., June 2, was
accosted by a man who took his backpack
containing a DVD player and DVD discs,
a bottle of skin lotion, a stick of deodorant
and a package of cookies, police said. Sharif
Seconda Washington, 23, was arrested a
short time later with the bag and its contents
and was charged with robbery.
Rob attempt
A suspect pushed a man, 44, under the
scaffolding over the sidewalk on Christopher
St. near Bleecker St. during the early hours
of Fri., June 12, and tried to pull the
wallet from the victim’s pocket, but fled
without taking anything, police said. The
suspect may have followed the victim from
Employees Only, the bar on Hudson St.
between Christopher and W. 10th Sts.
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June 17 - 23, 2009 9
BY PAUL A. CARROLL
Raymond J. Carroll, a Newsweek editor,
author and longtime Village resident, died at
his Prince St. home on May 16. He was 84.
A prolific writer on foreign affairs, he was
the author of four books for Franklin Watts
Publishers: on the Caribbean, Palestine, the
United Nations and on Anwar Sadat of
Egypt. He also worked for Reader’s Digest
publications on articles on American Indians,
Eskimos, Vietnam, the life of Zoroaster and
the life of Saint Patrick. His last book, co-
authored with Richard J. Berenson, was a
Central Park guidebook published by Barnes
& Noble in 1999.
Ray Carroll was also a regular local
theatergoer, attending many productions at
Pearl Theater Co. and the Jean Cocteau
Repertory Theater with his companion of 30
years, the anthropologist and writer Helen
E. Fisher. His photo hung in the window
of Rocco’s Spring St. barbershop for many
years, until 2008.
He was born in Brooklyn in 1924. His
mother, Margaret McCarthy Carroll, was a
social worker in the 1930s, living to the age
of 95. His father, Raymond, ran for public
office against “the Machine” but never won.
His older sister, Virginia, was a double
Dutch jump rope champion in the 1930s,
and survives him.
He went to Boys High in Brooklyn and
enlisted in the Army in World War II, serving
in the Pacific and surviving a devastating hurri-
cane on Okinawa, where he was stationed. He
later recalled returning after the war on a ship
entering San Francisco Bay and seeing Alcatraz
inmates standing in their island prison waving
and cheering the returning soldiers.
He received a B.A. degree in political
science from Hamilton College on the G.I.
Bill and later studied at Columbia University
and Johns Hopkins School of Advanced
International Studies. During this period
Carroll became friends with the actor Peter
Falk and the filmmaker Preston Collins and
spent many hours at the White Horse Tavern
among a circle of friends that included the
poet Delmore Schwartz.
In the early 1950s he moved to Washington,
D.C., where he owned a bookstore, Cadmus
Books. Not finding the Jim Crow environment
in D.C. congenial, he moved to New York City
where he married Ann Starck. They had two
children and lived for many years in the West
Village until their divorce in the mid-1970s.
Ann Carroll, who survives, worked in New
York University President James Hester’s
office and later became general secretary
of the New York Yacht Club.
Raymond J. Carroll served for many
years as United Nations bureau chief for
Newsweek, interviewing many world lead-
ers, including the very young Benazir Bhutto
of Pakistan, along with her father. He also
helped edit the early bestselling books of his
companion, Helen Fisher.
After years of boozy diplomatic receptions
and writers’ powwows at the Hotel Berkshire
bar, he quit drinking cold turkey more than
25 years ago. Nevertheless, he retained a
charming capacity to break out into song and
quote poetry almost until the end.
In addition to his former wife and his
companion, an older sister, Virginia; a son,
Paul Adem Carroll, executive director of the
Muslim Consultative Network, based at Judson
Memorial Church; and a daughter, Suzanne
Carroll Anderson, office manager of the account-
ing firm Raich Ende Malter, also survive.
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10 June 17 - 23, 2009
St. Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan
St. Vincent’s. It’s your hospital.
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Walk-ins will be welcome.
June 17 - 23, 2009 11
BY PATRICK HEDLUND
NEW D.O.B. RULE EXTENDED
The Department of Buildings’ new plan
for the length of the public review process
regarding building-permit applications has
been extended to 45 days after the city agency
initially proposed a 30-day challenge period.
The new regulations will take effect on
July 13, and “the reforms will give New
Yorkers a stronger voice in the development
of neighborhoods, create greater transpar-
ency, and clarify the process for the public
and for developers,” D.O.B. Commissioner
Robert LiMandri said in a statement.
Under the new initiative, architects and
engineers will be required to submit a diagram
of any new proposed building or major enlarge-
ment for the public to view the development’s
size and scale before construction can proceed.
After D.O.B. determines that the application
complies with zoning regulations, the diagrams
will be posted online for a 45-day review period.
The current process has no formal time frame.
“New Yorkers have a right to know
what’s being built in their neighborhood,
and now they can easily find out by visiting
our Web site,” LiMandri said in the state-
ment. “This new, easy-to-read diagram opens
the doors to the construction process like
never before and will give more certainty to
the community and developers on the future
of any project in the city.”
However, some who were critical of the
original proposal still doubt the process will
prove effective.
“The bad news…is that D.O.B. did not
address the myriad other issues we (and many
others) raised about how the rule could actu-
ally shield inappropriate developments from
challenge rather than help ensure that they
are caught, as D.O.B. claims the rule change
will do,” Andrew Berman, Greenwich Village
Society for Historic Preservation executive
director, said in an e-mail. “We fear that in
many more cases, this may force members of
the public to file a [Board of Standards and
Appeals] case if they want to challenge the
granting of a permit, as opposed to being able
to bring it to D.O.B.”
Berman questioned the new rule’s effec-
tiveness, explaining that B.S.A. cases are
expensive and time consuming, and often
not settled until after buildings are largely or
entirely constructed.
Also on the offensive was Queens
Councilmember and mayoral candidate
Tony Avella, who denounced the plan as
“shameful.”
“While Mayor Mike Bloomberg and D.O.B.
Commissioner LiMandri are claiming that this
will empower the public with greater oversight
over new developments, they could not be fur-
ther from the truth,” Avella said. “The imple-
mentation of any comment period, whether
it is 30 or 45 days, will actually diminish the
ability of residents to contest new construction
by creating a de-facto statute of limitations
to challenge a new development. In effect,
this procedure will only benefit unscrupulous
developers who will simply wait out the clock
to avoid community challenges. As a result, I
demand D.O.B. scrap this plan!”
GETTING DOWN TO BID’NESS
The recently minted Hudson Square
Business Improvement District will get to
work out of its new offices on Varick St.
starting July 1.
The BID — which will serve the area
roughly bounded by Houston St. to the
north, Canal St. to the south, Sixth Ave. to
the east and Greenwich St. to the west — is
being headed by new president Ellen Baer.
The improvement district’s offices, at 180
Varick St. near the corner of Charlton St., sit
across the street from radio station WNYC’s
new headquarters.
The BID will focus on marketing the
neighborhood and quality-of-life issues, but
will not handle other traditional improve-
ment district duties, such as street cleaning
and security. The district’s $1.7 million bud-
get comes from property owners, who pay a
fee of about 19 cents per square foot.
“As Hudson Square emerges as the new
home for next-generation creative compa-
nies, the BID’s goal is to channel the inno-
vation occurring in every building into the
public realm,” Baer said.
The BID’s board of directors is comprised
of property owners, commercial tenants, an
area resident and local elected officials, and
is chaired by WNYC President and C.E.O.
Laura Walker.
Tobi Bergman, a Hudson Square resident
and Community Board 2’s nonvoting repre-
sentative to the BID, said easing neighborhood
traffic will be one of the organization’s main
concerns moving forward. The former Printing
District’s retail viability and beautifying the
streetscape also remain central goals, he said.
Bergman did have one gripe, though.
“I wish they would have come up with a bet-
ter name than Hudson Square,” he lamented
of the oft-debated topic of the neighborhood’s
name. “It sounds like a shopping mall.”
HIGH HONOR FOR HIGH LINE
Adding to its seemingly endless stream
of plaudits, the High Line recently received
one of the Society of American Registered
Architects’ top honors for innovative design.
As part of the 14th Annual Professional
Design Awards, S.A.R.A.’s New York
Council presented its Medallion of Honor
Award to Friends of the High Line for the
nonprofit group’s work on the elevated
railway-turned-park.
“Not only did they succeed in preserv-
ing an historic structure; they have created
a new public ‘park in the sky,’ which has
spurred the rezoning of West Chelsea, pre-
cipitating its transformation from a barren
industrial wayside to a verdant, vibrant and
popular cultural, commercial and residential
area,” the announcement stated.
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12 June 17 - 23, 2009
BY ALBERT AMATEAU
The Hudson Square Sanitation Steering
Committee last week showed the Department
of Sanitation the details of its Hudson Rise
plan for a scaled-back, two-district Sanitation
garage with a park on top at Spring and
Washington Sts.
The community-friendly Hudson Rise plan,
however, depends on Sanitation’s agreeing to
remove District 5 garbage trucks from the city-
approved plan for a three-district Spring St.
garage. Hudson Rise calls for developing the
UPS-owned Spring St. site to accommodate
only Sanitation trucks serving Districts 1 and 2
— Greenwich Village and Lower Manhattan.
Phil Mouquinho, a steering committee
member who attended the June 12 meet-
ing that included Deputy Mayor Ed Skyler
and representatives of City Council Speaker
Christine Quinn, reported that Department
of Sanitation officials said they would look at
the Hudson Rise plan and would respond to
it this week.
The Hudson Rise plan calls for a two-dis-
trict Spring St. D.O.S. garage no taller than 75
feet. The city’s plan for a three-district garage
calls for a 120-foot-tall building. Both plans
would allow UPS, the current owner of the lot,
to continue using the site as a holding area for
its delivery garage on Greenwich St.
Mouquinho said also that D.O.S. officials
indicated last Friday that the department had
investigated two of three proposed alterna-
tive sites for the District 5 equipment.
One site, which extends between W. 50th
and W. 51st Sts. between 11th and 12th
Aves., includes a parking lot owned by Gary
Spindler, an ally of the steering committee
willing to sell the property to the city for a
District 5 garage, Mouquinho said. The loca-
tion, however, includes two other adjacent
properties that might have to be acquired for
the department’s use.
The other alternative for District 5 trucks
is in the Riverside South property on W.
60th St., now owned by the residential
developer Extell, which acquired the site
from the Trump Organization. Sanitation
officials said Extell’s plans for five build-
ings comprising 3 million square feet at the
site is currently undergoing the city’s uni-
form land use review procedure, or ULURP.
Mouquinho said it appeared Extell was
unwilling to alter the project to accommo-
date a District 5 garage.
Department officials on Friday refused
to talk about putting a District 5 garage on
Pier 76 at W. 36th St., according to Matthew
Washington, assistant director of Friends of
Hudson River Park who also attended the
June 12 meeting. Washington noted that
the Friends’ report on Pier 76 two years ago
indicated there was space on the pier for a
single-district D.O.S. garage, as well as a
marine waste-transfer station, plus the auto
tow pound that currently occupies the pier
across from the Javits Convention Center.
The Friends, a park advocacy group,
settled a lawsuit in 2005 calling for D.O.S.
to get its Districts 2, 4 and 5 trucks off the
Gansevoort Peninsula between Gansevoort
and Little W. 12th Sts. so that the 8-acre
peninsula would be ready for park use by
the end of 2012. The settlement called for
significant payments by Sanitation to the
Hudson River Park Trust, the city-state
agency building the 5-mile-long riverfront
park, if Sanitation remains on the peninsula
beyond 2012.
The Friends would be willing to forgo
the payments after 2012 if D.O.S. needed
more time to find an alternative to Spring
St. for its District 5 trucks, Washington
said. He added, however, that the Friends
would want a time limit on any suspension
of payment.
“We would not sign off on an open-ended
suspension,” he said.
Earlier this year, a coalition of property
owners in Hudson Square and Tribeca filed
a lawsuit challenging Sanitation’s Spring
St. plan. The property owners, including
several members of the Sanitation Steering
Committee, charged that the settlement of
the Friends lawsuit, which forced Sanitation
to propose the three-district Spring St. proj-
ect, was in effect an unlawful change in the
Hudson River Park’s legislation. The suit
also charged that the department’s decision
to locate the three-district garage at Spring
St. was arbitrary and that the department
failed to conduct a good-faith review of an
alternative at Block 675, a site at W. 30th
St. at 11th Ave.
The city responded last week saying that
Sanitation thoroughly reviewed all poten-
tial alternatives. The city’s response also
said that challenging the 2005 settlement
of the Friends of Hudson River Park’s suit
was years too late. The settlement chal-
lenge should have been brought within four
months of its signing, not three and a half
years, the city said.
The property owners’ action against
D.O.S. was originally before State Supreme
Court Justice Edward Lehner. But in April
city attorneys moved to transfer the case
to State Supreme Court Justice Michael
Stallman, who brokered and signed the
settlement of the Friends’ lawsuit against
Sanitation.
The coalition of property owners agreed
with the transfer to Stallman, even though
their case is partly based on challenging the
validity of the settlement.
Fami l y Chi ld Care (FCC) Recrui tment Campaign
Joi n the Fami l y Chi ld Care (FCC) Ini ti ati ve sponsored by NYU and coordi nated
by Uni versi t y Set tlement (US), a wel l-establ i shed provider of chi ld
devel opment and chi ld care ser vices i n Lower Manhat tan.
The NYU/US FCC Initiative seeks to recruit, train and support individuals
interested in providing high quality, home-based child care services to NYU
faculty, staff and students.
If you have the interest, dedication and commitment to provide child care
services from your home, we will provide the following:
• Support in obtaining, completing and meeting licensing requirements
• All necessary and ongoing training for your professional growth
• Grants to purchase equipment and materials
• Support from an Early Childhood Teacher
• Referrals from NYU families seeking child care services
• Guidance, training and support in managing a profitable business
For more i nformat i on,
cal l : (212) 453-4524
Megagarage opponents are still pushing alternatives
Sanitation officials refused
to discuss a District 5
garage on Pier 76.
June 17 - 23, 2009 13
New Downtown Community Center and P.S. 234 home locations.
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Field sports, karate, computers, arts, crafts, movement, more!
Experienced administrators, teachers and childcare professionals.
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Age appropriate skills training, FIFA recommended formats,
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Diverse opportunities
for diverse companies.
At The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey we want our partnerships
to reflect the diversity of our business activities and our region.
Each year we award millions of dollars in contracts to minority, women-owned
and small businesses (M/W/SBEs) — over $575 million in 2008 alone. Hundreds
of M/W/SBEs play a major role, delivering critical services and products that fuel
one of the largest transportation systems in the nation.
If you’re an M/W/SBE we’re here to connect you to our contractors, tenants
and internal business units. To find out more about our supplier diversity program
and contract opportunities at the Port Authority visit us at objonynj.info.
For information specific to opportunities at the World Trade Center, call our
Business Resource Center at 212-435-7843.
Let us get your company connected.
PEOPS PROJECT BY FLY - WWW.PEOPS.ORG
TERRY KID LUCKY LEWIS - 03/30/2K9 - LOWER EAST SIDE NYC
ONE OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE HUMAN BEATBOXERS
YOU WILL EVER SEE!! BEATBOXERENT@GMAIL.COM
MYSPACE.COM/BEATBOXERENTERTAINMENT
14 June 17 - 23, 2009
The exhibition is made possible by Bank of America.
Additional support is provided by The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation and Paula Cussi. The exhibition
was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and Tate Britain, London, in partnership with the
Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
Francis Bacon, Self Portrait, 1973. Private collection, courtesy of Richard Nagy Ltd., London. ©2009 The Estate of Francis Bacon / ARS, NewYork / DACS, London.
metmuseum.org
THROUGH AUGUST 16
FRANCIS BACON
A CENTENARY RETROSPECTIVE
Villager photos by Lincoln Anderson
High turnout for High Line
The wait to get onto the High Line was about 15 to 20 minutes on Sunday. People
stood in a double line coiled down Gansevoort St., above, then got a white bracelet,
and were allowed into the new park. The Friends of the High Line say that for a while
they will be gauging the flow and numbers of parkgoers, and Sunday with its sunny
weather drew a big crowd. Below, Hidemi Takagi, right, William Bastien and their
daughter, Luné Takagi-Bastien, enjoyed one of the park’s new benches. “I can’t wait
till it goes to 34th St.,” Bastien said of the park, which is now only built up to 20th
St. Asked about the slanting bench, he said, “It works — it works for backache. It’s
working right now.”
June 17 - 23, 2009 15
The Substance Use Research Center at Columbia University
needs non-treatment seeking STIMULANT USERS (includes Meth,
Cocaine, Ecstasy, stimulant pills, or others) age 21 – 45 to participate
in residential studies evaluating drug effects. Live on a research unit
at the NYS Psychiatric Institute for 22 days.
You can earn approximately $1479.
For more information (212) 543-6743.
Do you use uppers?
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Villager photos by Clayton Patterson
Mixed media: Seen around the Downtown arts scene
From top to bottom: Lorraine Leckie — wife of Billy Leroy of Billy’s Antiques & Props on East Houston St. — and her Demons playing folk rock at the Bowery Ballroom; Lower
East Side restaurateur Lucien Bahaj, left, and actor Waris Ahluwalia (“The Darjeeling Limited”) at the recent opening of former Warhol Factory painter/poet Rene Ricard’s “The
Torturer’s Apprentice” at Half Gallery on Forsyth St.; Grammy-winning singer Maya Azucena and musician Robert Aaron — who performed at the White House with Mick Jagger
— at Collective Hardware on the Bowery earlier this month when Beyond Race magazine was filming a TV pilot on musical figures.
16 June 17 - 23, 2009
into the store’s only refrigerator.
Members don’t stock products made by
large corporations. Last year, some revolt-
ed when they realized Small Planet Foods
produced the Muir Glen canned fire-
roasted tomatoes sold in the store. They
found articles saying General Mills owned
the company, and that its main share-
holders included McDonald’s, Starbucks,
ExxonMobil and PepsiCo. In time, the
canned tomatoes disappeared from the
shelves, never to be ordered again.
“I think the co-op is practical, in a
way,” Biren said. “It’s a way to work in
a capitalist system to try and create an
alternative means of buying.”
Biren was taking a rare break to explain
the store’s practices when another member
walked past him to get a bag of cashews.
“Helayne’s looking at me funny,” Biren
said, exchanging smiles with her. “She
doesn’t know why I’m not working.”
Members communicate in postings as
well as in conversations. On the register,
there is a sticker reading, “Eat more kale.”
By the chip section, the “New Recipe
of the Week” folder recently featured
instructions for cooking vegan pancakes
and raw mushroom ravioli.
Little is squandered at the co-op.
Members compost everything from orange
peels to biodegradable spoons, and they
discount food going bad or give it away.
They’re also happy to eat what can’t be
sold. Jason Trachtenburg, 39, of Bushwick
said he spilled sunflower seeds once and
they became “floor seeds.”
“So what happens with floor seeds?
Not too much,” he said. “You can’t really
sell them. You can munch on them a little
bit, I think. The official procedure is you
weigh them and then you have to write it
off as a spillage.”
Trachtenburg said he encountered the
co-op as many others do.
“You walk by it like, ‘What is this
place? Is this some kind of fruit box
depository?’ ” When he got past the boxes
and bins he saw scattered around the
produce section, he tried food he thought
was delicious and bought it.
“I was won over by their groceries
pretty quickly,” he said. “Like O.K., this
is a really delicious apple. Oh man, that’s
a good apple. Look at that lettuce. I’ve
never seen lettuce like that so cheap. And
the beans. I love bulk beans, scooping
them right into your bag.”
Though the co-op may seem tucked
away, nestled on a quiet block between
two bustling avenues, its members are
anything but withdrawn.
“The floor in front of the cash register
was like the main stage,” Trachtenburg
said, as he related his early impressions
of the store. “And people would just be
talking to whoever was listening, even if
no one was listening.”
Trachtenburg realized the first time
he shopped at the co-op that it involved
something besides commerce.
“They’d be talking out loud about politi-
cal thought and the organic movement and
health-related matters,” he said of workers
and some customers. He laughed. “People
often get angry about gluten.”
Trachtenburg returned several times
before joining.
“Even if you’re not a member, even if
you’re not working there, it’s still more
economical than anywhere else,” he said.
“It’s common-sense shopping. It’s also
community oriented.”
On a recent Monday afternoon, Helen
Stevens, 60, of the East Village asked
Helayne Seidman, 55, also of the East
Village if she’d noticed another member
buying a lot of produce the week before.
Seidman told her it was for his juice
diet.
“Good for us,” Stevens said, referring
to the money the man spent.
Seidman looked at the glistening lem-
ons and Pennsylvania apples on display in
front of her, and then back at Stevens.
“Good for him,” she said.
“I want to build a District
Attorney’s office that’s defined
not by how we handle the big,
high profile cases, but by how we
handle the tens of thousands of
cases each month that won’t ever
get written about—cases that don’t
involve infamous acts or famous
people, but whose outcomes mat-
ter every bit as much.
“I’ll never forget that as your
next DA.”
— Cy Vance
B=:3/@<;=@3=@53B7<D=:D32D7A7B(
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A passion for justice.
The experience to deliver it.
Produce and politics mix at 4th Street Food Co-op
Villager photo by Helayne Seidman
Members do all the work at the 4th Street Food Co-op.
Continued from page 1
Villager photo by Laurie Mittelmann
A food co-op member enjoyed a snack.
June 17 - 23, 2009 17
BY LINCOLN ANDERSON
To some, in its later years, it was perhaps just known as
“that building with the cage on top.” But hidden inside the for-
mer Church of All Nations on East Houston St. was a Taoist
temple and martial arts-training facility led by an aphorism-
spouting kung fu master known as Sifu Jai.
Michael Schiller, a Lower East Side filmmaker and jour-
nalist, documents Sifu Jai and the rise and fall of the temple
— and of the building itself — in his new film, “The Tao of 9
Second Ave.”
The Church of All Nations was demolished in 2005 as
part of the Cooper Square Urban Renewal Plan. Today, on the
site where it once stood — across the street from the Whole
Foods Market — is a new, luxury apartment building that was
developed by AvalonBay.
To Schiller, the story of Sifu Jai and his temple mirrors that
of the East Village’s and Lower East Side’s gentrification.
“In the most obvious way, it’s the story of this place,”
Schiller said. “Sifu Jai was the last resident of that building
after hundreds and hundreds of people had passed through
its doors: First, immigrants...abandoned in the ’70s and ’80s...
then taken back for community use.”
Schiller, 35, who documented Sifu Jai and the temple for
six years, had close to 100 hours of footage, but edited it down
to 35 minutes, feeling that was the right amount for the story
he wanted to tell.
“It was a labor of love,” he said, adding he doubts he’ll ever
recoup the money he invested in making the project.
He originally was shooting a dance film in the building
in 1996 when someone suggested he should visit the Taoist
temple upstairs. He went up and knocked on the double doors
with Chinese characters on them, and there entered the mys-
terious world of Sifu Jai.
The film shows parents and their children doing kung fu
in the temple, building up both their bodies and family bonds.
A former drug addict talks about how Sifu Jai’s martial arts
saved his life and helped him stay clean.
There are shots of Sifu Jai lighting candles, lots of candles
(at one point the building had no electricity) — and burning
Taoist prayers on pieces of paper on the building’s roof. The
kung fu master is shown playing a manic, yet strangely musi-
cal, piano solo, and commenting on the fate of the Church of
All Nations building and that of the city.
According to Schiller, Sifu Jai, now 47, grew up on Third
St. and First Ave., not far from 9 Second Ave. His mother was
Chinese born in Thailand and his father half-black and half-
Jewish from the Bronx. Sifu Jai grew up speaking Chinese and
trained at one of the biggest kung fu schools in Chinatown in
the 1970s, and also trained in Hong Kong.
Schiller said he checked out “a lot” of the martial-arts
teacher’s story.
“C’mon, he looks crazy,” Schiller admitted, “like a total
madman. I’ve done all the due diligence. He definitely is
the real deal.”
The film shows Sifu Jai during his eviction in 2002, sit-
ting on the sidewalk with his belongings around him.
After first lamenting that he can’t “frickin’” believe
what’s going on in the neighborhood and why new build-
ings are even needed to replace the perfectly good existing
ones, Sifu Jai ultimately resolves, in true Taoist/fatalistic
fashion, that “when it’s time to go — go with the flow.”
The building itself — both physically speaking and its
history — is as much, if not more, of a character in the film
as Sifu Jai.
“Visually, I just really fell in love with the building,”
Schiller said, “the way the light would come in.”
In doing the documentary, Schiller said he inadvertently
ended up becoming a historian of the block.
Before the Church of All Nations — which was a
Methodist-run settlement house — was built in 1922, the
block bounded by Bowery, Second Ave. and Houston and
First Sts. was home to a warren of interconnected buildings
known as Germania Hall, famed for its “assembly rooms.”
There were gambling rooms and brothels. The infamous bar
McGurk’s Suicide Hall was part of the unsavory complex.
“It was Bowery vice central,” Schiller explained.
The Methodists razed most of the seedy structures,
though the Mars Bar building still survives from the former
dens of iniquity, according to Schiller.
The Church of All Nations offered language classes,
dances, social activities and sports, like boxing and
baseball.
“It was the social gospel,” Schiller said. “Their underly-
ing goal was conversion. They had Christian services in
Yiddish to try to convert the Jews — it was insane. ... But
the social mission took over.”
By the mid-’70s, though, the settlement house’s day had
waned. There was only a small Methodist contingent still
using the building, and a local Puerto Rican group named
CUANDO felt it should be turned over to the larger com-
munity. Schiller said he found out much of his information
about 9 Second Ave. from this period in an excellent 1975
master’s thesis by a Union Theological Seminary student.
The dissertation recounted how, in 1974, the church’s
last pastor wrote, in a fateful journal entry, that he was being
pushed out of the building by “a gang called CUANDO.”
Although CUANDO initially had good intentions,
Schiller said Sifu Jai and the group had a hostile relation-
ship, that they didn’t keep up the building and tried to
evict him. By the end, Sifu Jai was the only one actually
maintaining the place, which — save for two artists who
worked there — CUANDO had essentially abandoned, the
filmmaker said.
“They did run a daycare and rented space to arts groups —
but they just sort of evaporated,” Schiller said of CUANDO.
Schiller documents the building’s destruction in wrench-
ing, prolonged shots, with closeups of the faces of women
watching the destruction who used to use the building when
they were young girls. He said he heard of one of these for-
mer neighborhood residents through word of mouth when
he stopped in the Liz Christy Garden, and was able to track
her down.
“It was so solid,” this woman says in the film, tears in her
eyes, as the jackhammers and drills slash and rat-a-tat-tat
away at the building, reducing it to a pile of broken bricks.
The documentary also includes a poignant anti-gentri-
fication rap by Baba Israel accompanied by his father, the
well-known performance artist/comedian Steven Ben Israel,
of Soho, on “beatnik beatbox,” as Schiller put it.
The film closes with Sifu Jai sitting on a bench in Tompkins
Square Park, musing on the subject of “impermanence.” The
last shot is of him ambling away across the basketball courts,
with a brisk, muscular stride, his back to the camera.
According to Schiller, Sifu Jai is basically “retired,” and has
since been bouncing around between a place Upstate and a
place in the Bronx — a wandering Taoist, as it were.
Although he was just covering Sifu Jai as a filmmaker and
journalist and wasn’t a student of his before, today Schiller is
one of only a few people taking kung fu classes with Sifu Jai.
“The Tao of 9 Second Ave.” had its premiere at the New
Museum on the Bowery and has been aired on the Discovery
Channel. It is currently available on Amazon.com.
Tao master documentary takes chop at gentrification
Photo by Michael Schiller
One of the filmmaker’s collection of photos of Sifu Jai.
The building itself — both physically
speaking and its history — is as
much, if not more, of a character in
the film as Sifu Jai.
18 June 17 - 23, 2009
EDITORIAL
Continued on page 18
Off and rolling
As thousands of people, not only from across the
region, but tourists from around the world, descended
on the High Line on a beautiful Sunday, they found
they had to wait in line to get up on the intriguing new
— or rather, newly renovated — structure.
Indeed, 12,000 people visited the new “park in the
sky” on Sunday alone. Admittedly, the weather was
spectacular, plus it was the first weekend before the
start of summer and the High Line had only opened
the previous Monday. Despite rainy weather for much
of the time, more than 70,000 people visited the High
Line in less than a week.
In fact, on days when attendance is expected to be
heavy, the Friends of the High Line will be “clicking”
people in as they enter the park. The waits, if there are
any, will be short, like last Sunday. This monitoring is
so the Friends, the park’s conservancy, can get a sense
of how many people are using the park and when, and
this will be ongoing during the next several weeks.
As of now, for the park’s first completed section —
between Gansevoort and W. 20th Sts. — there is a cap
on the amount of people who can be on the High Line
at once. The Parks Department has been advised by the
Department of Buildings and the Fire Department that
— based on the park’s ability to provide emergency
egress — the High Line’s capacity is currently 1,632
people. So far, this cap has only been enforced once,
on Sunday, when the park’s walkways reached capac-
ity, and people entering the park were told to wait until
crowding was reduced. When the High Line’s second
section, between 20th and 30th Sts., opens in sum-
mer 2010, the number of parkgoers allowed up will
increase relative to the High Line’s greater capacity.
Another issue some may have contemplated is
whether the High Line will be frequently off limits
for private affairs. After all, high-powered private
donors who gave millions of dollars — like Diane von
Furstenberg and Barry Diller and Philip Falcone —
played a key role in making this extraordinary project a
reality. The park’s first section cost $86 million; section
two will cost $66 million.
Monday night, in fact, the High Line was closed off
from Gansevoort to 18th Sts. after 8 p.m. for a private
affair. However, it was the Friends of the High Line’s
annual Summer Benefit, and $2 million was raised in
just one night. As the Friends contend, and we agree,
it’s worth it to shut down most of the park for two
hours to raise that kind of money. Under an agreement
with the city, the Friends must raise 70 percent of the
funds for the park’s maintenance and operation. This
figure for the Friends currently is $2 million — though
it’s sure to grow as the park does.
Actually, during the park’s “opening season,”
through the fall, there’s thankfully a moratorium on
private events or movie or photo shoots. However,
the Friends say, in the future, there will likely be some
events on the converted viaduct, as there are in other
city parks, most likely in wide areas — such as under
and around the Chelsea Market and the new High Line
Building.
What is clear is that the High Line is a bold and
imaginative step forward in park thinking and in reuse
of our city’s infrastructure — just as, before it, was the
redevelopment of the Hudson River waterfront and its
former shipping piers into the Hudson River Park.
Here’s to the successful completion of the High
Line’s section two, and, hopefully, of a section three
— the majestic loop around the Long Island Rail Road
yards up to 34th St., still unfortunately in limbo. But
the High Line is off and rolling — off to a stunning
start. Bravo!
The solution to Albany’s woes.
High Line’s sweet side
To The Editor:
I am a dyed-in-the-wool New Yorker. For my entire life,
lo these 83 years, I have lived in New York. After I retired,
I started traveling around the world and began writing
stories. In the last 18 years, I have visited six continents
and more than 60 countries.
So here I was today, visiting New York’s great new
park called the High Line. I had a marvelous time walk-
ing along the new, old railroad almost tracks. I met my
friend Connie Jensen at the 16th St. entrance, which has
the elevator. We had to wait for about 10 minutes because
the place was so crowded. It was a wonderful experience
because it is a park with a history.
And there is some history, too, as relates to we
Weisbergers and the High Line. Our family came over
from Austria-Hungry in the middle of the 19th century.
There were nine Weisbergers; four boys and five girls,
who all lived on Delancey St. One of my cousins, Anna
Weisberger, needed to go to work after she had a baby
boy.
Anna found a job in the old National Biscuit Company
on 10th Ave. and 16th St. She and thousands of other
ladies went to work each day packing cookies, which had
just come on the market. They were called OREOs.
When she went to work on her first day, she was told
that she could eat as many cookies as she wanted. She
came home that first night and told the family how many
cookies she ate. I remember after her first day, she never
had another cookie.
Wow! That must be fun, we all said.
Over the next 20 years, Anna had a secure, rather
well-paying job, but she never considered eating OREO
cookies as one of her benefits.
But, unfortunately, NBC found that it was not finan-
cially beneficial to remain in the New York area and they
closed the plant.
For almost 40 years, the tracks leading up to the for-
mer plant lay barren, until some wealthy New Yorkers
put together a program to turn transportation into
beauty.
Recently, Connie invited me to see what is happen-
ing with the old railway sidings, that for all those years
brought, flour, sugar and chocolate into the National
Biscuit factory where my cousin, Anna, used to put those
cookies into boxes for little kids to enjoy.
Gene Weisberger
Pier 40 déjà vu
To The Editor:
Re “With longer lease at Pier 40, would Related re-
emerge?” (news article, June 10):
Having just read the articles on the continuing saga
of Pier 40 in both The Villager and Downtown Express,
I am disgusted that unlike Rip Van Winkle, who awoke
after 20 years to find everything different, I am finding
déjà vu all over again. The same obdurate contempt for
the public interest expressed by Diane Taylor, chairperson
of the Hudson River Park so-called Trust; her arrogant
characterization of the community opposition as a “prob-
lem” and her dismissal of community consultation or
consensus; Franz Leichter’s description of the formerly
agreed-upon 30-year lease as “handcuffs”; and the same
lack of forthright political support for The People’s Pier
proposal that would increase the city’s educational and
recreational facilities.
Does the cabal for the “Trust” really believe that we
need more traffic on the Lower West Side, more upscale
restaurants, more space for expensive entertainment
like Cirque du Soleil (now nicely ensconced at Randall’s
Island, easily reached by public transportation and with a
huge parking lot) and more eyesore fakery like the second
Yankee Stadium? Or should we just cynically “follow the
money”?
Joan Gregg
The true cost of new park
To The Editor:
Alone, I return to Washington Square Park at the off-
hour of 7 p.m. on a Friday. I’m curious to check in with
myself again on my first impressions.
Entering through the northwest gate (location of the
famous Hanging Tree), where the old men played chess, I
notice that those natural stone tables have been replaced by
the same material that now makes up the slabs for seating
around the fountain — charcoal synthetic? Instead of the
seats that formerly accompanied the tables, now there are
benches — silly-looking and nonfunctional. And with the
widened path comes a grassy island in the middle that feels
much like furniture clutter.
The sensation one has entering now is of a mall, a flat prom-
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Continued on page 20
IRA BLUTREICH
June 17 - 23, 2009 19
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NEWS NEWSTM
THEATER
WBAI at the turning point after political infighting
BY PAUL DERIENZO
When trying to understand the problems and politics of
radio station WBAI it’s most important to define our terms.
WBAI, located on the dial at 99.5 FM with studios based
on Wall St. in New York City, really doesn’t exist. In fact
the Pacifica Foundation, a Berkeley-based nonprofit, wholly
owns WBAI as part of the largest privately controlled, non-
commercial radio network in the United States. Political
realities in the day-to-day operations of WBAI often lead
to the misconception among local listeners that the station
is its own independent entity. Nothing can be further from
the truth. WBAI is currently facing the greatest financial
challenges of its 50-year history; therefore, so is Pacifica.
The Pacifica Foundation is celebrating its 60th anniver-
sary this year. The organization was founded in 1949 by a
group of California conscientious objectors led by a wealthy
pacifist named Lew Hill. Hill and other C.O.’s were sent
to labor camps set up by the U.S. government to imprison
young men who had won a draft deferment by proving they
were bona fide peaceniks. During that time in the camps,
Hill and his associates came up with the idea for a postwar
radio network to spread their pacifist ideals.
The network began by setting up the first Pacifica radio
station, KPFA, the flagship station, located in Berkeley. In
1960 a wealthy iconoclast commercial broadcaster named
Louis Schweitzer who had become disillusioned with com-
mercial radio donated WBAI to Pacifica. The foundation
had picked up Los Angeles station KPFK the year before.
The three continent-spanning radio stations were governed
according to a mission set by Hill to further intellectual dis-
course and understanding among people and a commitment
to social justice. These ideals have, maybe unsurprisingly,
sparked controversy and discord throughout Pacifica’s
history. Over the years, two more stations were acquired
by Pacifica, WPFW in Washington, D.C., and KPFT in
Houston. The five stations make up the Pacifica network,
which serves about 500,000 listeners and is financed by
about 50,000 paying subscribers who provide nearly 85
percent of the network’s funding.
That’s the back story.
Now the current reality: As usual with the fractious
Pacifica community, it’s hard to get the straight story because
some members of the faction you’re listening to often fit the
facts to their own self-serving version of events. I try not to
be one of those persons.
Currently, I’m not a member of any faction, but a decade
ago I was a reporter for the “WBAI Evening News” and
I opposed a rebellion by some programmers and listeners
who believed that Pacifica was going “corporate” and giving
up its traditional radical ideals. In fact, I saw the rebellion,
which reached its peak in 2001, as a senseless, fratricidal
war that could ultimately destroy the network.
Proponents of that rebellion had various rationales for
the ugly infighting, which included threats, break-ins, the
use of public-relations firms and, interestingly enough, anti-
black attacks aimed at the interim station manager, Utrice
Leid. Longtime WBAI news editor Amy Goodman was pro-
ducer of a Pacifica-sponsored program that she now owns
called “Democracy Now.” Goodman claimed that Pacifica
was trying to muzzle free speech, while Pacifica managers
maintained the popular daily radio host had crossed the
line when she allegedly used Pacifica press credentials to
smuggle Green Party candidate Ralph Nader onto the floor
of the 2000 Democratic National Convention.
A listener group wanted to rewrite the foundation
bylaws to shift governance to local station boards, called
L.S.B.’s, that would be elected by paying listeners, paid
staffers and volunteers. Many unpaid programmers and
volunteers wanted a union that would represent nonsala-
ried employees. Pacifica and supporters of the same folks
who until recently managed WBAI challenged the unpaid
workers union and were later backed up by the National
Labor Relations Board. Paid staff had their own repre-
sentation at WBAI through the American Federation of
Television and Radio Artists. I was WBAI’s first AFTRA
steward and saw firsthand that the staff often had inter-
ests diametrically opposed to the volunteers Pacifica
depends on to run most of WBAI and much of their
network.
After a 2002 agreement put the dissident factions in
control, each station began to elect their own L.S.B.’s in
convoluted campaigns that could last up to eight months
and cost the network upward of $200,000 per election. In
the first WBAI election, I was a top vote-getter and served
during three tumultuous years as a board member from
2003 through 2006. I saw firsthand how quickly WBAI
hardened into two mutually antagonistic factions that fought
Villager photo by Isaac Rosenthal
Artist Paul Pagk in front of part of “Cosmic Sex Poem…Children of the Revolution,”
his painting intervention last week at “Exhibition,” a temporary space in a vacant
storefront at 211 Elizabeth St. between Prince and Spring Sts. A single, multi-
artist, continuous work, “Exhibition” is showing for six months. According to its Web site, the artwork is “an
intervention upon interventions, belongs to no one and is not for sale, and can be modified, parasitized and
destroyed. The artist is drawn from a hat. The artist works in areas determined by a roll of dice.” Pagk said
he couldn’t remove the “Vote Hamas” that a previous artist had painted since it wasn’t in either of two spaces
he was allowed to intervene in, so he added an “abstract” yellow symbol across from it. Three days later,
another artist intervened. The space is open through August, Wed. to Sun., 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
SCENE
PUBLISHER & EDITOR
John W. Sutter
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Lincoln Anderson
ARTS EDITOR
Scott Stiffler
REPORTERS
Albert Amateau
Josh Rogers
Julie Shapiro
Patrick Hedlund
OFFICE MANAGER
David Jaffe
PUBLISHER EMERITUS
Elizabeth Butson
SR. V.P. OF SALES AND MARKETING
Francesco Regini
SR. MARKETING CONSULTANT
Jason Sherwood
ADVERTISING SALES
Allison Greaker
Jeremy Marks
Dani Zupanovich
RETAIL AD MANAGER
Colin Gregory
ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
Troy Masters
ART DIRECTOR
Mark Hassleberger
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Jamie Paakkonen
CIRCULATION SALES MNGR.
Marvin Rock
DISTRIBUTION & CIRCULATION
Cheryl Williamson
CONTRIBUTORS
Ira Blutreich
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Patricia Fieldsteel
Ed Gold
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Jefferson Siegel
Jerry Tallmer
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Elisabeth Robert
Jefferson Siegel
Clayton Patterson
Decades of mismanagement and
neglect by Pacifica fertilized a culture
of anger, conspiracy and mistrust.
Continued on page 28
TALKING POINT
20 June 17 - 23, 2009
enade, with grass all around. Yet, Washington Square Park is
not the Great Lawn in Central Park, in spite of what some
would have you think. Jane Jacobs had this one right, too.
Washington Square Park is a park for the people, not
flowering plants.
The plaza “raised to grade” — to use the leveling lan-
guage of the contractors — is not the same place. What’s
so great about seeing the fountain from all angles? Before,
you had the sense of a journey. As you entered the park,
there was somewhere to go; the fountain plaza was a des-
tination — that’s what made Washington Square unique
among city parks, it had a center. Now, you feel exposed,
there’s no place to hide — or is that the idea, I wonder, as
one of the Parks Department personnel barrels down the
path in a go-cart?
The contrast between the new Washington Square and
the old one is made tangible by a glance at the as-yet-
untouched eastern side, which is like comparing a jungle
to a manicured mall. The lush trees providing shade, the
gently sloping paths, and the low, friendly pipe-rail fences
you can park your butt on all look inviting. One feels
drawn to this comfortable unrenovated area, as if to shel-
ter. It won’t be long now before it too is gone, as plans to
start the second phase of the reconstruction project won’t
wait for summer to end.
Only after the whole park has been “landscaped” will
folks begin to understand just what has been lost. The
statue of Garibaldi, in fighting mode, seems to be defend-
ing the region from attack, as he prepares to unsheathe his
sword and do battle with the evildoers. He looks pissed.
Who can blame him? This is his turf. You’re next, sucker,
Parks seems to say.
I wouldn’t mess with Gari, if I were Parks.
Tonight the fountain is a flood. A grand total of three
young people bravely perch on its perimeter. In the historic
park you could sit on the fountain’s rim for hours read-
ing a book. That’s been rendered impossible now. A stone
plaque in front of the fountain as you enter from Fifth Ave.
through the arch, gives credit, where credit is due:
Tisch
Fountain
The Restoration of the Fountain and Plaza
Was made possible by the families of
Lawrence A. Tisch and Preston R. Tisch
Translation: This radical redesign was brought to you
courtesy N.Y.U.’s corporate donors.
Being fully visible from the entrance, the park has lost its
mystery, its aura made smaller by becoming part of the grid,
an extension of Fifth Ave., whereas, before, it had been a
gateway to Greenwich Village, somewhere to go.
The basic question we need to ask is who is the park
for? There is a tendency to see everything as a show,
designed for the eyes only. What’s at stake is not just
aesthetics — but what is the purpose of this park? When
you think about what has been the essence of Washington
Square Park — as a gathering place — you begin to “see”
the cost.
Kathryn Adisman


The square is looking good
To The Editor:
I’m delighted to have Washington Square Park back,
and I’ll take it quadrant by quadrant, however it’s done.
The landscaping looks hardy and familiar. Removing that
central statue makes sense. Opening the views so you
can enjoy looking through to the lights of Sixth Ave. and
Broadway feels so, well, frankly, Parisian. And it seems
that my neighbors are enjoying it, as well. We’ve all been
to the park.
The signs about passive grass and how dog waste ruins
lawns are instructive and sensible. I hear the new stone
benches, unfortunately, are prime targets for skateboarders,
whose wheels can damage them. I didn’t see any damage. I
saw a jazz band and an electric piano. Can’t imagine schlep-
ping a piano to the park but what a lovely sound. No turtle
races at night nor the jump-the-cans guys. Just a lovely eve-
ning with adult sights and sounds, groups of people talking
and listening and the sounds of conversation. Maybe the
local restaurants could take some hints about reasonable
noise levels.
I wonder about the dog runs and the mounds and the
spillover effect of too many dogs in small spaces and
the vermin in the mounds. But the renovation seems to
have found reasonable solutions to existing problems,
and I trust it will, hopefully, do something about those
mounds.
I couldn’t ask for more, and I look forward to greeting
each new quadrant as it returns renovated to the park.
Renee Feinberg
Oh man, what a bummer
To The Editor:
Re “It’s official: Park’s phase one is formally opened” (news
article, June 3):
Makes me miss the ’60s even more. We had some swell times
in that park when we gathered there — where the water now
snorts and caterwauls — and danced our psychedelic dances and
sang our groovy songs. I’m glad I kept the photographs.
J. Wishwood
Vilnius is our cathedral
To The Editor:
Re “Dolan celebrates ‘200 years of love’ at Old St. Pat’s”
(news article, June 10):
I would very much like to talk to Archbishop Dolan about
Our Lady of Vilnius. This church has played a very impor-
tant role in my ongoing spiritual development, and I know
that I am not alone. I speak for many of my fellow parishio-
ners who are now attending other churches. They continue
to attend Mass, but describe their new parish experience as
“not the same” and somewhat lacking. Life goes on, but it is
not the same, not as rich.
Archbishop Dolan should know what Our Lady of Vilnius
meant to us. There was something there that needs to be respect-
ed, treasured and propagated, not discarded and dismissed.
The Archdiocese of New York needs to understand what we
have lost and what we mourn, even as we pray and work for
our church’s restoration.
There is a flame here that needs to be nurtured, not extin-
guished. Even if the archdiocese wants to demolish Our Lady of
Vilnius, they should still be very interested in this flame.
Christina Nakraseive
E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to
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Villager, Letters to the Editor, 145 Sixth Ave., ground floor,
NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirma-
tion purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters
for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not
publish anonymous letters.
Who’s Your
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Happy Father’s Day to
the King of the Castle.
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ESTABLISHED SINCE 1880
When it comes to Chocolate...
Father knows best!
Happy Father’s Day from Lilac
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Continued from page 18
June 17 - 23, 2009 21
BY TRAV S.D.
On a recent Sunday afternoon, at an hour
of the day when most nightclubs are shut-
tered and silent, Joe’s Pub was the setting for
an amazing alternative cabaret show. The sun
was blazing outside; but inside, it may as well
have been one o’clock in the morning.
Called “Idol Idle Idyll Worship – Sacred
and Profane,” the show was hosted by trash-
mouthed “Christian” country singer Tammy
Faye Starlight. Guests included Justin Bond
(a.k.a. Kiki of Kiki and Herb) singing glam
versions of torch songs; fellow drag artist Our
Lady J (a remarkable songwriter and Jerry Lee
Lewis style boogie-woogie piano player); and
Lisa Faith Phillips, whose performance piece
concerned her career as a topless dancer and
phone sex worker. Aside from the general
level of outrageousness, these performers all
share something in common: their voice
teacher.
In a city (and an industry) of gimmicks
and angles, Chelsea resident Barbara Maier
has carved out a niche for herself as the
vocal coach to New York’s more outré
chanteuses. Her client roster includes not
only those ladies named above but also
Debbie Harry, Penny Arcade, Murray Hill,
Diamanda Galas, Amber Martin, Roseanna
Vitro, Meow Meow, Lady Rizzo, Lava Sperry
and Sanda Weigl.
“I love teaching a variety of different
kinds of performers,” says Maier, “The chal-
lenge of working with such individuals is
that I don’t dictate what it will sound like.
I work within the parameters of what they
want. I’m just there to help them do what
they do without hurting their voices. The
challenge is in finding words to communi-
cate to them across so many different styles.
Teaching is like performing in that respect.
It’s trying to get your message across.”
Perhaps not surprisingly, Maier says she
never expected her path to lead her here.
Born and raised in small-town Booneville,
Indiana during the Great Depression, she
comes from a family that wasn’t even par-
ticularly musical. “My aunts may even have
been tone deaf,” she laughs. Still, she took
voice and piano lessons from a young age,
and remembers fondly a certain aunt who
“was like Auntie Mame. She used to bring
me on trips to Chicago to see all the big
shows that toured there from Broadway.”
Her family encouraged her love for music
and theatre — up to a point. “They definitely
didn’t want me to pursue it professionally,”
she says, “That — and the fact that I really
hated music theory — was why I majored in
psychology.” Maier seems to have learned a
trick or two from her chosen major, how-
ever. She enrolled at Columbia to get her
Masters in psychology, which very conve-
niently required her to move to New York
(where she took private singing and acting
lessons on the side). By the time she was
working toward her psychology Ph.D., she
started getting singing work in opera and
musical theatre.
From the late 1950s through the 1970s,
she traveled the globe (including such far
flung ports of call as Cairo and Hong Kong)
— performing everywhere from the New
York City Opera to summer stock. “Because
I’m only four foot eleven [in height], I was
a natural ingénue,” Maier says. “But when I
got to be in my 40s those parts sort of dried
up, so I fell into teaching. I never expected
to.”
She began teaching voice at the American
Musical and Dramatic Academy at the
Ansonia Hotel in 1976. According to Maier,
her psychology training came in handy at her
new calling. “At times, it’s like being a thera-
pist,” she says. For a while, her eclectic slate
of pupils included cantorial students; but in
the 1980s, avant-garde superstar Diamanda
Galas became one of her pupils. Galas
referred her to Debbie Harry and soon word
of mouth had innumerable performers from
the downtown scene reaching out to her.
By 1974, downtown had become her
natural habitat anyway. “My husband and I
had been living at 72nd and Broadway until
our daughter came along,” says Maier, “We
needed a bigger place, and that’s why we
moved to Chelsea. I’ve lived here ever since.
It’s changed enormously in that time. I love
all the art galleries and restaurants. None of
that was here when we first moved to the
neighborhood.”
Her affinity for what she calls “artsiness”
stands her in good stead among her current
clientele. Recently, her work has taken her
out of the classroom and into the theatre.
She coached the cast of the Broadway show
“Passing Strange” last year, completed “Are
You Going to Arabay” at Dixon Place and
staged a benefit show for the Living Theatre
at Joe’s Pub. Her most recent project has been
a proposed series of “Depression Brunches”
at the latter venue: early shows at which
audience members are encouraged to bring
their own food in order to keep the cost of
the night club outing down. Hence the twelve
noon start time of “Idol Idle Idyll Worship.”
The range of talent she works with was
fully represented in the show. Tammy Faye
Starlight’s act is mix of country and faux
gospel, meant as a simultaneous tribute to
and parody of the sounds of Nashville. Justin
Bond’s repertoire is typically all over the
map. The current occasion is no exception,
as he uses the show’s depression theme as
an occasion to try the Yip Harburg standard
“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” — before
switching to a selection from “Marat/Sade.”
Our Lady J performs her own songs which
are more in a modern pop, post-rock and
roll vein. Lisa Faith Phillips is not a singer at
all; her voice training supports the lengthy
monologues she delivers. The sheer variety
of this group alone is enough to keep anyone
interested.
“I love my students so much,” says Maier, “I
can’t think of doing anything else. Sometimes
I think I want to die at my piano saying ‘No,
no, no! You’re doing that all wrong!’”
But she hastens to add, “That may be a
couple of decades from now. People in my
family tend to live into their nineties.” Which
is good news for students — and New York
audiences.
VILLAGERARTS&ENTERTAI NMENT
Vocal coach valued by the talented, profane, slightly insane
Chelsea-based Maier envisions long life of cheering & chiding
Photo by Katie Szczypinski
Barbara Maier, at her home in Chelsea
“THE TAKING OF PELHAM 1 2 3” (+)
This remake of the 1974 film provides an
adequate evening of entertainment, but it is
not as exciting or memorable as the original
version. Those who saw the first movie and
are expecting a blockbuster will be disap-
pointed.
When the first film was released, Abe
Beame was the mayor of New York City.
The city was approaching the abyss of bank-
ruptcy and its citizens, appalled by the dan-
gers of subway crimes, were turning to city
buses for their commute to work. The graf-
fiti-covered subway cars at the time added to
the fear of being trapped in a cramped, tun-
neled space. No fear of riding in the subway
labyrinth exists in the current film.
For all the mayhem in the picture, it
contains no intense suspense. While I don’t
remember every detail of the original version
released 35 years ago, I do recall that it was
a very exciting and suspenseful film.
The same drama exists between two prin-
cipal figures. Ryder (John Travolta), leader
of the group that has taken the subway
hostages, is demanding a ten million dollar
ransom from the city. The mayor (James
Gandolfini) authorizes the payment to pre-
vent Ryder from killing any more passen-
gers. Ryder demonstrated his willingness to
kill when the police, represented by hostage
negotiator Camonetti (John Turturro), didn’t
respond quickly enough to his demands.
Ryder prefers dealing with Walter Garber
(Denzel Washington), a former high-ranking
MTA official accused of bribery. While
awaiting his trial, Garber has been demoted
to the position of subway dispatcher.
I did not bond with any of the characters
and, therefore, felt no involvement. Of all
the actors in the picture, Denzel Washington
is the most believable. Turturro is much
too bland and without nuance, Gandolfini
is adequate but not towering, and Travolta
KOCH
ON FILM
ARTIST PROFILE
Continued on page 24
22 June 17 - 23, 2009
BY STEVEN SNYDER
Samuel Douek says he never could have
imagined, when he first launched the Hola
Mexico Film Festival some 8,000 miles away
in Australia, that the event would resonate
every bit as strongly with New Yorkers as it
did with audiences half a world away. “I was
in Australia starting my Master’s and I’ve
always loved film and I started noticing that
they’d have all these ethnic movie festivals;
each new week, there was an Italian and
Russian and German film festival,” recalls
Douek, a native of Mexico City. “These festi-
vals all ran much the same way, showing 15
or 20 films in a single week, and so I started
thinking: Why is there nothing here to cel-
ebrate Mexican films, which are every bit as
unique and specific as those other cultures?”
The initial plan was modest: To bring
Mexican films to a select few Australian cit-
ies. But what started as a regional affair
quickly grew in popularity, spreading across
the outback and then across the Pacific. In
2008, Douek returned to North America after
his masters, and agreed to arrange a hand-
ful of screenings as part of the New York
International Latino Festival. “It was a much
smaller thing, where we only did it for four
days, and had a smaller slate of titles,” he says.
“But the crowds that turned out really caught
us by surprise — more than 2,000 people, and
a lot of them recent new immigrants who were
in town to work or go to school.”
Douek had tested the waters, and received
a tidal wave of encouragement; and so, he
set about launching a far more ambitious
plan for 2009. The result: The largest incar-
nation of the Hola Mexico Film Festival yet,
making a series of North American stops in
Los Angeles (June 9) and Chicago (June 19)
before arriving in New York at the Quad
Cinemas June 23.
The eclectic 2009 program — a total
of 26 events, which incorporates a slate of
more than a dozen films— is a testament to
the diverse stories and themes that permeate
Mexican cinema. Douek says the highlight of
this year’s fest is an Angelica Maria tribute
scheduled for the evening of Thursday, June
25th. “She’s a pop icon in Mexico who, as the
Mexican film industry started dying, started
appearing in some 150 films,” Douek says.
“She helped to bring people out, and it was
very interesting, some of the writers and direc-
tors she worked with. I’m hoping this helps to
explain to audiences what was happening, and
why these films were so important in helping
our industry to move forward.”
Maria will appear in person as part of
the celebration. This festival centerpiece will
also include a lecture on Mexican popular
culture by Jose Agustin, a special message
from Luis Zapata, as well as screenings of
two Maria hits: 1968’s “Five of Chocolate
and One of Strawberry” and 1971’s “La
Verdadera Vocación de Magdalena.”
Working in the Mexican film industry
from 1950 through 2002, Maria racked up
a dense and diverse portfolio, and Douek
said he sought to match that diversity in
crafting the festival’s full lineup. “Hola
Mexico” opens on June 23rd with “Tear
This Heart Out,” Roberto Sneider’s sweep-
ing epic that in many ways parallels the
iconic American masterpiece “Gone With
the Wind.” Swapping out the Civil War for
Mexico’s turbulent post-revolutionary era of
the 1920s and ‘30s, “Tear This Heart Out”
focuses on a young woman who’s wooed
and wed by an older, magnetic general.
More than just a compelling story, the film
doubles as a thorough entrée for unfamiliar
audiences into Mexican culture — the big-
screen adaptation of a novel by Mexican
author Angeles Mastretta and starring both
former telenovela star Ana Claudia Talancon
and the long-time Mexican leading man
Daniel Gimenez Cacho. A soaring spectacle
in every possible way, it’s little surprise that
it was selected by Mexico to be the nation’s
Academy Award entry for the 2009 best
foreign-language film.
Other notable festival titles include “I’m
Gonna Explode” (showing June 27, 28), about
a teenage boy and girl who escape a world of
depression and sexual harassment and launch
a “coup” against the adult world. “The Old
Thieves” (June 26, 27) chronicles the daring
and audacious bank heists that roiled Mexico
in the 1960s, turning the successful criminals
into everyday heroes of the masses. “Teo’s
Journey” (June 25, 28) is a timelier story,
about a 9-year-old trying to illegally cross the
American border by night, separated from
his father when the group is attacked by drug
cartels. The movie chronicles dozens of char-
acters and their fruitless attempts to cross
into the nation to the north.
Douek says the primary focus of his pro-
gramming was diversity — integrating a full
mix of documentaries, family films, horror
thrillers and animated movies in hopes of
revealing the wide-ranging variations of the
Mexican experience. “When you talk about
‘Mexican cinema,’ some people get one
vision in their minds,” he says. “But we’re
hoping to show a Mexico that is far more
cutting-edge and cosmopolitan than some
people might expect and to broaden their
perspective, that Mexico is a far more varied
and richly textured place.”
Douek is also sensitive to the fact that the
Hola Mexico Film Festival arrives on a wave
of negative press about his country. Just a
week ago, the headlines involved a shootout
between police and drug cartels in Acapulco.
Earlier this year, Mexico City was forced to
shut off its water for several days due to
severe drought. Poverty is gripping the coun-
try, illegal immigrants continue to stream
into America, and even the global H1N1
pandemic has been traced back to a small
Mexican village. “This has definitely been
a hard time, and some of our films reflect
that,” Douek says. “But we’re also hoping to
show people a different side — to show New
Yorkers that Mexico isn’t just overwhelmed
with problems and conflicts but also that it
has a rich culture with important things to
say. You can learn a lot about us through
these movies.”
1 5 5 1 s t Ave n u e at Ea s t 1 0 t h St r e e t
Reservations/Info 254-1109
Tickets available online at www.theaterforthenewcity.net
BELLE OF THE
BALL BEARINGS
Conceived & Performed by
ELIZABETH BATTERSBY
Directed by
CAROLINE MURPHY
Music by
YOUN YOUNG PARK
Thursday - Sunday,
June 18 - 21
Thu-Sat 8pm,
Sun 3pm $10/tdf
TOMANDO
CAFE
Written & Performed by
ROSATERESA
CASTRO-VARGAS
Directed by
JOANIE FRITZ ZOSIKE
Thursday - Sunday,
June 18 - 28
Thu-Sat 8pm,
Sun 3pm $12
TAMUR LENK
Written & Directed by
EUGENIA
MACER-STORY
Thursday - Sunday
June 25 - July 12
Thurs-Sat at 8pm
Sun at 3pm
All Seats $12/tdf
‘Unique and specific’ films bring focus to Mexican culture
Sweeping epic, horror, family fare & a pop icon on the plate
A scene from Roberto Sneider’s “Tear This Heart Out”
HOLA MEXICO FILM FESTIVAL
June 23 through 28
Quad Cinema, 34 West 13th Street (between
5th and 6th Ave.)
(212) 255-8800 or www.holamexicoff.com
FILM
June 17 - 23, 2009 23
BY JERRY TALLMER
The opening words of Anna Ziegler’s
“Dov and Ali” are good enough to quote.
They are spoken by a 16-year-old Muslim
girl named Sameh, a headscarf-wearing high-
schooler in Michigan who, before the play is
ended, will have been forcibly railroaded
by the males of her family (more exactly,
airlifted) out of the U.S. and into a life of
loveless marriage and servitude and silence
and baby-making — to an aging widower in
far away Pakistan.
Barack Obama, who in his pivotal Cairo
speech had taken pains to include a few
words of his own about the status of women
in Islamic societies, would appreciate
Sameh’s summation:
“Once upon a time, in the middle
of a school in the middle of Detroit
in the middle of the United States of
America, there was a confused teacher
and there was a precocious student.
One had the short cropped hair of a
soldier and one had hair in constant
need of a trim. One happens to be my
idiot brother. Both had fathers whose
love was opaque, hard to measure and
make out…”
The confused teacher is Dov Gold, 30-ish,
Jewish, the son of an ultra-Orthodox rabbi
to whom Dov does not dare admit his, the
son’s, deep fondness for a tall blonde shiksa
“whose idea of spirituality is a really good
movie” — more yet “[w]hose love I can only
return in a world in which I no longer exist
to my parents…”
The precocious student is Ali, 17, Muslim
American, fiery young dissident, troubled
self-seeker, brother of Sameh, semi-obedient
son of their old-school Muslim father. The
kind of kid who will go out of his way to
provoke teacher Dov into saying: “Ali, do
you want to have a civilized conversation or a
sparring match?” But whose jabs like: “Don’t
all Jews ask those sorts of questions — Who
am I? Why am I here? What am I meant to
do?” — is really talking about himself.
A point of issue between them is the book
Dov has assigned the class to read, William
Golding’s stark, disconcerting 1954 “Lord
of the Flies,” in which, among a handful of
youthful castaways on a remote jungle island,
a boy named Jack — a Fascist in the mak-
ing — incites the murder of two other boys,
Piggy and Simon, for the greater good of the
greater number.
To Ali, Jack’s actions are “entirely natu-
ral.” To Dov, the teacher, the rationalist, those
actions are savage. “Is it savage to want to
survive?” asks Ali. And the stormy set-to goes
on from there.
This is the same Ali who will betray his
sister — lead their father to where the defi-
ant girl is dancing with her Muslim (but
unapproved) boyfriend. And that Ali will
feel guilty for it — Jewish style — for the
rest of his life. But Sameh will never be able
to spring free of her life of marital servitude,
Islamic style.
Are you now or have you ever been
a schoolteacher, an interviewer inquires of
“Dov and Ali” dramatist Anna Ziegler.
“Yes,” she replies with a touch of amuse-
ment, “I’ve taught high school, and right now
I’m teaching top 5th grade at Saint Ann’s
School in Brooklyn. When I wrote the play I
was teaching English lit at a Jewish day school
outside Washington, D.C.”
That certainly must lie somewhere behind
the birth of the play, along with “Lord of the
Flies”?
“Yes,” the playwright says, “ ‘Lord of the
Flies’ did indeed, and it’s a great teach.”
I never liked that book, says the inter-
viewer.
“No, it’s not a pleasant book,” she con-
curs, “but it certainly is a provocative book,
and it did inspire the play, at least in part. But
so did a number of things, including the fact
that I, who am not particularly religious — I
come from a Reform Jewish family — was
teaching at a religious school. And also the
fact that I had a colleague at that Jewish
school, a woman teaching English, post 9/11,
who was a Moslem.
“There was certainly never any confronta-
tion, but what would have happened if…” she
lets it trail off.
If 17-year-old Ali destroys his own beloved
sister, along with any possibility of ever again
seeing that sister, when forced by their rigidly
Muslim father into precisely such betrayal,
then Dov Gold, twice Ali’s age, kowtowing
to his own Fear of Father — more exactly,
of breaking the heart of the Orthodox rabbi
father with whom Dov cannot even commu-
nicate — will instead kill off the love affair
with Sonya, that tall blonde shiksa who has
given Dov such uncomplicated joy.
“I think both characters, Dov and Ali,
have parent problems,” says the Manhattan-
born, Brooklyn-bred young woman, daughter
of two lawyers — she’ll hit 30 on December
9 — who created those two characters.
And yourself? Parental problems?
“There were years in which I disagreed
with my parents over something they did
behind my back, but at least the pressures put
on me don’t have any religious source.”
“Dov and Ali” got enthusiastic reviews
upon its world premiere last summer at
London’s Theatre503. An earlier play of hers
that won some attention was “BFF,” which
for those of you (and me) who don’t know
cybernetic baby talk means “Best Friends
Forever” and is about two teenage girls in
suburban America.
Is one of them you, Ms. Ziegler?
“No.”
A play of hers that has had various
readings but, as yet, no production, is “To
Be Fair,” described by its author as “about
a Middle East woman who befriends — I
should say befriends and seduces — two teen-
age American boys.”
Seems worth a shot.
“I agree,” says its author.
She is a product of Cobble Hill, Brooklyn
Heights, Saint Ann’s School, Yale (BA in
English), the University of East Anglia (degree
in poetry), and NYU’s Tisch School of the
Arts (MFA in Dramatic Writing).
Lives now in Brooklyn Heights with her
boyfriend, Will Miller, an attorney for New
York City. And no, he’s not Jewish, not
Muslim.
“It’s interesting for me to think about
people who are in a different position than
I am,” says the playwright who is not Dov,
not Ali, not Sameh, and, for that matter, not
a tall blonde shiksa named Sonya.
74A East 4th Street,
New York, NY 10003
Box Office: 212-475-7710
www.lamama.org etc.
74A East 4th Street, NY, NY 10003
Box Office: 212-475-7710
www.lamama.org
Luzimbu
An Opera from the heart of Africa
Written & Directed by Prisca Ouya / Additional text by Benjamin Marcantoni
Music by Richard Cohen, Benjamin Marcantoni, Pline & Yukio Tsuji
Choreography by Prisca Ouya, Gervais Tomadiatunga,
Prince Dethmer Nzaba, Lungusu Malonga and Potri Ranka Manis
June 18-28, 2009
Thursday-Saturday at 7:30 / Sunday at 2:30
CAST: Nasiba Abdul-Karim, Tommy Agarwal, Nia Austin-Edwards,
Inderia Carr, Sheila Dabney, Alexis Doster-Pennerman, Angela K. Harmon,
Aïda Issaka, Lungusu Malonga, Benjamin Marcantoni, Valois Mickens,
Allon Morgan, Rachida N’Gouamba, Deadra Renne Nelson Mason, Nayel
Amira Nelson-Young, Prisca Ouya, Chaney Pollard, Tiffany Rose, Fitz Sam,
Rohiatou Siby, N’tifafa Akoko Tete-Rosenthal, Jojo Tosin and Kat Yew
La MaMa La Galleria ~ 6 East First Street NYC
TAINTED LOVE from Visual AIDS
Curated by Steven Lam & Virginia Solomon
Featuring: Luis Camnitzer, Jose Luis Cortes, fierce pussy,
General Idea, Gran Fury, Matt Lipps, Catherine Lord,
Charles Lum, Ivan Monforte, Wu Ingrid Tsang
June 11-28, 2009
Thursday - Sunday 1-6 pm
The high price of guilt, marital servitude, lost love
‘Lord of the Flies’ style betrayals doom teacher and student
Photo by Erik Pearson
Adam Green as Dov & Utkarsh
Ambudkar as Ali
DOV AND ALI
Written by Anna Ziegler
Directed by Katherine Kovner
Through June 27
At the Cherry Lane Studio, 38 Commerce Street
(212) 239-6200 or playwrightsrealm.org
THEATER
‘Is it savage to want to
survive?’ asks Ali. And the
stormy set-to goes on from
there.
24 June 17 - 23, 2009
BY GUS SOLOMONS JR
Two exciting dance makers –– Nicholas Leichter and Larry
Keigwin –– both irresistibly driven by rhythm, are sharing a week
at the Joyce Theater, alternating days. Both represent New York-
style, highly physical, buoyant, joyful dancing with an intriguing
edginess lurking just beneath the highly entertaining surface. But
each has a distinct and distinctly appealing choreographic voice.
Since its founding in 1996, Nicholas Leichter Dance has
been exploring the territory between the vocabularies of
concert dance and of vernacular movement. For his Joyce
Theater debut, Leichter’s new “Killa” asks, according to the
company release, “how dance music, from B-boy to House,
Punk-Funk to Reggaeton, functions both as a social and
political force.”
Leichter overlays funky, elbow-flapping, crotch-grabbing
moves –– an infectious mix of hip hop, West African, and
disco-drag –– with references to money, politics, and fash-
ion. Wall Street meltdown, unemployment anxiety, war, and
platform high heels are all in the mix.
In the section he calls “the routine” –– down-and-dirty
Afro-disco –– the cast wears what he calls “camouflage-
couture, ready-to-wear, mesh-with-a-bra, black-glasses, total
Iraq chic.” Leichter explained, “And then I hope I can get us
blinged out for the ‘chicken dance.’ The hard part is figuring
out if we can change clothes that quickly.”
Music by Basement Jaxx, M.I.A., and Lionrock, and live
performance by Monstah Black –– whom Leichter refers
to as “our fearless drag leader” –– drives “Killa.” In fact,
Black’s fabulousness partially inspired the work. “In the
concert world,” Leichter said, “you don’t go onstage unless
[the dance] is tight, but [in drag culture] their idea is, it’s the
outside first; Monstah’s whole thing is ‘You don’t go onstage
unless you look good!’”
Sharing the limelight in “Killa” will be students Leichter
discovered at Sacramento and Wayne State Universities during
residencies there, who he said can do anything. Besides being
sensational dancers, he noted their generational tendency not to
draw value distinctions between high- and low-brow, freely min-
gling styles. Street dance rubs elbows with art dance –– no judg-
ment. Leichter observed that gender lines are blurring as well for
tweens and Gen-X-ers. “Like with [David] Bowie,” he said, “you
can wear high heels, gay or straight, it doesn’t matter.”
Leichter is also remounting and updating his “Free the
Angels” (2001), featuring several of the original cast members.
Keigwin founded his troupe Keigwin + Company in 2003
with associate director Nicole Wolcott and has made a lot of noise
in the downtown dance world since then. His sense of humor,
emotional clarity, and athletic dancing have garnered him a boatload
of fans.
His premiere of “Triptych” is a bit of a departure. Unlike the
zany, romantic duets of “Love Songs” (2006) or “Natural Selection”
(2004), an ode on Darwinian theory — both also on the bill —
“Triptych” is a formal piece, a compositional essay with original
music by Jonathan Pratt.
Last year, Keigwin made a dynamic piece for Juilliard students.
“That was the first time I worked with a composer,” he said, “so I
wanted to extend the collaboration with that composer and with the
lighting designer,” Clifton Davis.
Keigwin’s last piece for his own company was “The Elements,”
seen last summer at the Joyce. “People really responded to the
last section, ‘Air,’ and that was particularly a lot of dancing, and I
wanted to get back to that,” he said. “The stage is going to be very
white, with a strip of neon on the floor, and the dancers are in black
leotards.”
The finale of Keigwin’s program will be a reprise of his hilari-
ous take on Ravel’s “Bolero” for a cast of 50 performers. It stole
the show at NYU’s Skirball Center in 2007. And after a New York
Times review advised, “Go!,” the second performance was delayed
for half an hour to accommodate the crowd that wrapped around
the block to buy tickets.
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Slaves to the Rhythm
Nicholas Leichter, Larry Keigwin bring distinctive dance voices to Joyce
TOM CARAVAGLIA
Nicholas Leichter dance’s updated “Free the Angels”
will accompany the premiere of “Killa.”
KEIGWIN + COMPANY
Jun. 23 at 7:30 p.m.; Jun. 25 at 8 p.m.
Jun. 27 at 2 & 8 p.m.
NICHOLAS LEICHTER DANCE
Jun. 24 at 7:30 p.m.: Jun. 26 at 8 p.m.
Jun. 28 at 2 & 7:30 p.m.
Joyce Theater
175 Eighth Ave. at 19th St.
$19-$49; joyce.org
Or 212-242-0800
DANCE
is over the top.
A long scene of police cars transporting the ransom from
Brooklyn to the hostage car at Grand Central is nowhere near as
exciting or memorable as scenes in other films, e.g., the car chase
in “The French Connection.” One scene involving Turturro
and Washington taking a helicopter from Wall Street to Grand
Central is ridiculous. They depart the MTA headquarters on
Madison Avenue, go down to the Wall Street heliport and chop-
per back to Grand Central Station. They could have walked the
few blocks from the headquarters to Grand Central.
With so many dreary films out there, this one is a welcome
relief — but it did not have the impact I had hoped for. The
original film was far superior and will be remembered in years
to come, while the current remake will soon be forgotten.
HS said: “I have become a fan of the subways over the
last seven years. I ride the 6 train that the killers attacked. I
hope it never happens again (the event seems to recur every
35 years) but if it does, I hope Denzel Washington is around.
“The movie was flashy, splashy and colorful; decent
summer entertainment in an air-conditioned theater. Did it
rise to greatness? No. They ought to bring back the 1974
movie so people can compare the technology and the human
interaction. The subway fare in 1974 was 35 cents. First
run movies were $2.50. I wonder what the 2044 remake
will be like.”
Koch on film
Continued from page 21
WE DELIVER COMPLETE DINNERS
CALL:677-3820/475-9828
106 West Houston Street 677-3820 475-9828
Happy Poppa Day to All!
Don’t forget Father’s Day, June 21!
June 17 - 23, 2009 25
AVRAM FEFER TRIO
Help longtime
LES resident and
jazz saxophonist
Avram Fefer cele-
brate the release
of this ninth CD.
Praised by the
online journal
“All About Jazz,”
as possessing
an “undeniable
spiritual feel for
the music, “Fefer
(who wrote most
of the tracks on
the CD) will be
joined by Michael
Bisio (bass) and
Warren Smi th
(drums). Not just a party, of course, the event
will feature performances from the new release,
“Ritual” (find it on www.cleanfeed-records.
com). June 22, 9:00p.m., at The Local 269, 269
East Houston Street (corner of Suffolk Street).
Tickets are $10. Visit www.AvramFefer.com.
MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS
Established in 1985, Art Without Walls is dedicated
to fostering original and innovative social, historical,
cultural and educational fine arts programs throughout
NY State. This event, “Museums Without Walls: 9/11,
City, Country, Memories, ” features an Art Exhibition/
Sale whose artfully designed works delve into the
wishes, dreams, interests and personalities of those who
lost their lives on 9/11. Free; Saturday, June 20, from
10:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.; at Battery Park. For information
visit www.artwithoutwalls.net.
PEARL CLEAGE
Since June 12, Richard Allen Center for Culture and Art has
been sponsoring performances, readings and forums which
praise, analyze and otherwise celebrate the work of acclaimed
activist, novelist and dramatist Pearl Cleage. “Convergence: A
Theatrical Study of Pearl Cleage” concludes on June 21. Friday,
June 19, at 7:00p.m., Karen Malina White (Charmaine of “The
Cosby Show” fame ) returns to the role in Cleage’s “Chain”
which she first played 16 years ago — a young NYC crack
addicts who was chained to a radiator by her family (as a
last resort to keep her away from the destructive drug). At the
Shooting Star Theater, 40 Peck Slip, South Street Seaport. $10.
For information on times at dates of all the events, call 917-
239-6690 or visit http://web.me.com/raccaseaportsalon/www.
raccaseaportsalon.com/Welcome.html
GAY PRIDE GROUP SHOW
Although there’s nothing wrong with marching down Fifth
Avenue in little more than a rainbow boa and a thong,
powerful contributions to June’s Gay Pride observances
can be found on the walls as well as in the streets. “Gay
Pride Group Show” contains contributions from over a
dozen artists whose work celebrates the acceptance that
started 40 years ago when a watershed incident at a bar
called Stonewall started it all. Curator Harv Toback says
this exhibition is designed to “acknowledge and rejoice in
the Gay Pride Movement victories.” As if you need another
reason to be proud, a portion of the proceeds from this
show will be donated to God’s Love We Deliver. Through July
2; at Gallery 225, 225 West 14th Street (btwn. 7th & 8th
Aves.). For galley hours and more information, call 917-
880-2752 or visit www.225gallery.net.
THE DEER PARK
In March of 2007, Norman Mailer invited actor/
director Stephan Morrow to co-direct a film of his
play “The Deer Park.” Sadly, with Mailer’s pass-
ing, that project never materialized. As a tribute
to what might have been, though, Morrow, The
Great American Play Series and The Nuyorican
Poets Café present “The Deer Park” (or “Hollywood
Goes to Hell”) for two nights only — the final pro-
duction to have Mailer’s personal imprint. Using
1950s Hollywood as a metaphor for Purgatory (and
framing the action within the context of the Nevada
Atomic tests of the time), Mailer’s dark humor and
spicy dialogue shines as much light on his era as
it does a 2009 full of Hollywood stars gone wild and
nuclear proliferation gone mad. Need to discuss
much? A post play confab between audience and director might help you leave the room feeling a little better. Sunday
June 21 at 5:00p.m. and Monday, June 22 at 7:00p.m.; at Nuyorican Poets Café, 236 East Third Street (btwn. Aves B & C).
Tickets: $15, $10 for students/seniors. Call 212-505-8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org.
Photo by Kimberly Scott
Karen Malina White
Fruits of artistic labor, from the 2008 event
Photo supplied by the artist
Michael Anastasio’s “Rock Climber”
Photo by Paul Meo
Geoff Molloy and Daniel Pollack (older man)
Photo by David Plakke
Avram Fefer
A
LIST
THE
COMPILED BY
SCOTT STIFFLER
Scott@thevi l l ager.com
ART
THEATER
M
U
S
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T
H
E
A
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ART
26 June 17 - 23, 2009
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19801. Arts. of Org. filed with
DE Sec. of State, 401 Fed-
eral St., Dover, DE 19901. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF ATLANTIC UKUS, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
3/16/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Jocelyn White, 273
W. 12th St., NY, NY 10014.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF TEXTILES SOURCING
AND SERVICES LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
10/15/08. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: 1410 Broadway, 24th
Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF BOTSARIS MORRIS
REALTY LLC AMENDED
TO BOTSARIS MORRIS
REALTY GROUP, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
4/3/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Attn: Guy Morris, 358
Fifth Avenue, NY, NY 10001.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF NB ALTERNA-
TIVES HOLDINGS LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/27/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 02/19/09. Prin-
cipal office of LLC: 605 3rd
Ave., NY, NY 10158. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to c/o Corpora-
tion Service Co. (CSC), 80
State St., Albany, NY 12207-
2543. DE address of LLC:
c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville
Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington,
DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. Jeffrey W. Bullock,
Div. of Corps., P.O. Box 898,
Dover, DE 19903. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
XIV RIVER CONSULT-
ING LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/5/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to The LLC
200 Riverside Blvd #10A New
York, NY 10069. Purpose: Any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
TEN90 SOLUTIONS, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/16/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to C/O David
Schanoes 150 Thompson
Street, Apt. 3C New York, NY
10012. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
TRIPLE T 143 HOLDINGS
LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/24/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Mark Friedland-
er Esq 15 Maiden Lane Suite
2000 New York, NY 10038.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
GARY G. VENTER, FCAS,
CERA, ASA, MAAA, LLC
Company Articles of Org.
filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY)
3/12/2009. Office in NY Co.
SSNY design. Agent of LLC
upon whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Gary Venter 5
West 91ST Street Suite 6E
New York, NY 10024. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
TULLY’S BAKERY LLC
Company Articles of Org.
filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY)
4/17/2009. Office in NY Co.
SSNY design. Agent of LLC
upon whom process may
be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Helen
Tully Lewis 201 West 11TH
Street, APT #3G New York,
NY 10014. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF AQUA ROSA
ADVISORS, LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
2/25/2009. Office location: NY
Co. LLC formed in Delaware
(DE) on 2/17/2009. SSNY des-
ignated as /agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to Oded Lev-Ari 327
E 12TH Street-Ground Floor
NY, NY 10003. DE address of
LLC: 2711 Centerville Road
Suite 400 Wilmington, DE
19808. Arts. Of Org. filed with
DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal
ST, Suite 3 Dover, DE 19901.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF LITTLE APPLES PHO-
TOGRAPHY, LLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
04/10/09. Office location:
NY County. SSNY has been
designated as an agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the LLC is to: Little
Apples Photography, 160
Riverside Blvd., Apt 32A New
York, NY 10069. Purpose:
To engage in any lawful act
or activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF 143 PROPERTIES LLC
Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
12/23/04. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC for service of
process. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: 875 Ave. of Americas
#501, New York, NY 10001.
Present name of LLC: 143
Development Partners, LLC.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF GO PRETTY LLC
Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy. Of
State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/09.
Office location: NY County.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC for service of process.
SSNY shall mail process to:
888C 8th Ave. #106, New
York, NY 10019. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
247 REALTY ASSOCI-
ATES LLC
Arts of Org filed with NY Sec
of State (SSNY) on 02/26/08.
Office: NY County. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process may
be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to: c/o Redi
Management Corp., 4 Wash-
ington Ave. South, Lawrence,
NY 11559. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF REALM PART-
NERS FUND LP
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 5/5/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. Princ. bus.
addr.: 390 Park Ave., 16th Fl.,
NY, NY 10022. LP formed in
DE on 1/22/09. NY Sec. of
State designated as agent
of LP upon whom process
against it may be served and
shall mail process to: c/o CT
Corporation System, 111 8th
Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agt.
upon whom process may be
served. DE addr. of LP: 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Name/addr. of genl.
ptr. available from NY Sec. of
State. Cert. of LP filed with DE
Sec. of State, 401 Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NAME OF LLC: MY FAIR
ROSES, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with NY
Dept. of State: 4/24/09. Office
loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State
designated agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served and shall
mail process to: c/o Business
Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste.
101, Albany, NY 12205, regd.
agt. upon whom process
may be served. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFI-
CATION OF FLEXIBLE
OPPORTUNITIES, LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 3/4/09. NYS ficti-
tious name: Flexible Opportu-
nities Fund, LLC. Office loca-
tion: NY County. LLC formed
in DE on 2/26/09. NY Sec.
of State designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served and
shall mail process to the prin-
cipal business addr.: 522 5th
Ave., NY, NY 10036. DE addr.
of LLC: c/o The Corporation
Trust Co., 1209 Orange St.,
Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts.
of Org. filed with DE Sec. of
State, 401 Federal St., Dover,
DE 19901. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF REALM PART-
NERS SUB-FUND LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 5/5/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. Princ. bus.
addr.: 390 Park Ave., 16th Fl.,
NY, NY 10022. LLC formed
in DE on 4/30/09. NY Sec.
of State designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served and
shall mail process to: 111 8th
Ave., NY, NY 10011. Regd.
agt. upon whom process
may be served: CT Corpora-
tion System, 111 8th Ave.,
NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of
LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilm-
ington, DE 19801. Arts. of
Org. filed with DE Sec. of
State, 401 Federal St., Dover,
DE 19901. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF ASTAR 325
ROUTE 17M - MONROE
LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 4/29/09. Office
location: NY County. Princ.
bus. addr.: 1114 Ave. of the
Americas, 39th Fl., NY, NY
10036. LLC formed in DE on
3/31/09. NY Sec. of State des-
ignated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served and shall mail pro-
cess to: c/o CT Corporation
System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY
10011, regd. agt, upon whom
process may be served. DE
addr. of LLC: c/o The Corpo-
ration Trust Co., 1209 Orange
St., Wilmington, DE 19801.
Arts. of Org. filed with DE
Sec. of State, 401 Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
real estate investments and
finance.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF O-CAP GP, LLC
App. For Auth. filed with
Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY)
on 4/23/2009. Office loca-
tion: New York County. LLC
formed in DE on 4/21/2009.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process
to: 140 E. 63rd St., Apt. 17C,
New York, NY 10065, Attn:
Michael Olshan. DE address
of LLC: 615 S. DuPont Hwy.,
Dover, DE 19901. Cert. of
Form. filed with DESS, P.O.
Box 898, Dover, DE 19903.
Purpose: to engage in any
act or activity lawful under
the NY LLC Law.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF CAPOSALDO 37TH
STREET, LIMITED PART-
NERSHIP
Certificate filed with Secy.
of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
1/8/09. Office location: New
York County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LP upon
whom process against it
may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to: Davis &
Gilbert LLP, 1740 Broadway,
New York, NY 10019. Name/
address of each genl. ptr.
available from SSNY. Term:
until 1/8/2089. Purpose: any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NAME: STONE LANE
PICTURES, LLC
Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. Of
State of NY 02/05/09. Off.
Loc.: New York Co. Corpora-
tion Service Company desig-
nated as agent upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY to mail copy
of process to THE LLC, C/O
CSC, 80 State Street, Albany,
NY 12207. Purpose: Any law-
ful act or activity.
Vil 5/27 – 7/1/09
MANGALA NAIK, PHYSI-
CIAN, PLLC,
Articles of Org. filed N.Y. Sec.
of State (SSNY) 7th day of
April, 2009. Office in New
York Co. at 630 1st Avenue,
Suite 31D, New York, New
York 10016. SSNY design.
agt. Upon whom process
may be served. SSNY shall
mail a copy of process to 630
1st Avenue, Suite 31D, New
York, New York 10016. Reg.
Agt. Upon whom process
may be served: Spiegel &
Utrera, P.A., P.C. 1 Maiden
Lane, NYC 10038 1 800 576-
1100 Purpose: Medicine.
Vil 5/27 – 7/1/09
MIHARO GAMES LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/6/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Orcun Koro-
glu 88 Edgecombe Ave Ap
2 New York, NY 10030. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
LAZ RESOURCES, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/4/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to THE LLC 205 W
57TH ST. 6AD New York, NY
10019. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
BULLSEYE VENTURES
LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/26/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Jonathan Bull
56 Perry ST. APT. 1R New
York, NY 10014. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NANDITA KHANNA
ASSOCIATES LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/24/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to THE LLC 160
East 38TH Street, #28H New
York, NY 10016. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF DCMF LIQUI-
DATING COMPANY LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
4/22/2009. Office location: NY
Co. LLC formed in Delaware
(DE) on 4/8/2009. SSNY des-
ignated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to THE LLC 461 Fifth
Ave, 10TH Flr NY, NY 10017.
DE address of LLC: Corpo-
ration Trust Center 1209
Orange Street Wilmington,
DE 19801. Arts. Of Org. filed
with DE Secy. of State John
G. Townsend Building P.O.
Box 898 Dover, DE 19903.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF NB ALTERNA-
TIVES ADVISERS LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/28/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 02/19/09. Prin-
cipal office of LLC: 605 3rd
Ave., NY, NY 10158. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to c/o Corpora-
tion Service Co. (CSC), 80
State St., Albany, NY 12207-
2543. DE address of LLC:
c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville
Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington,
DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. Jeffrey W. Bullock,
Div. of Corps., P.O. Box 898,
Dover, DE 19903. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFI-
CATION OF CARBON
VISUAL EFFECTS LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
05/07/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 04/30/09. Prin-
cipal office of LLC: 180 Varick
St., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10014.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to
c/o Corporation Service Co.,
80 State St., Albany, NY
12207-2543. DE address of
LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste.
400, Wilmington, DE 19808.
Arts. of Org. filed with DE
Secy. of State, Div. of Corps.,
John G. Townsend Bldg., 401
Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE
19901. Purpose: Design and
produce graphics for com-
mercial broadcasting.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
PUBLI C NOTI CES
June 17 - 23, 2009 27
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF SUITE ACCESS,
LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
05/13/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 05/01/09. Princi-
pal office of LLC: c/o Suite 850
LLC, 230 Park Ave., Ste. 850,
NY, NY 10169. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to Attn: Marc Adel-
man at the principal office of
the LLC. DE address of LLC:
2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400,
Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts.
of Org. filed with Secy. of
the State of DE, Corp. Dept.,
Loockerman & Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF SUPER LAW GROUP,
LLC
Art. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
3/23/09. Off. Loc.: NY Co.
SSNY designated as agent
upon whom process against
the LLC may be served and
shall mail process against the
LLC to the principal business
addr.: 156 William St, Ste 800,
NY, NY 10038. Purpose: any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF ANTIPODEAN
DOMESTIC PARTNERS,
LP
App. for Auth. filed Sec’y of
State (SSNY) 3/25/09. Office
location: NY County. LP org.
in DE 3/23/09. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LP upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to 499 Park
Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10010.
DE office addr.: c/o CSC, 2711
Centerville Rd., Wilmington,
DE 19808. Cert. of LP on
file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg.,
Dover, DE 19901. Name/
addr. of each gen. ptr. avail.
at SSNY. Purpose: any lawful
activities.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF TOCQUEVILLE
GOLD PRIVATE EQUITY
GP, LLC
App. for Auth. filed Sec’y of
State (SSNY) 4/8/09. Office
location: NY County. LLC org.
in DE 7/23/07. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Attn: John
Hathaway, 40 W. 57th St.,
19th Fl., NY, NY 10019. DE
office addr.: c/o CSC, 2711
Centerville Rd., Wilmington,
DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on
file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
any lawful activities.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF TOCQUEVILLE
GOLD PRIVATE EQUITY
FUND, L.P.
App. for Auth. filed Sec’y of
State (SSNY) 4/8/09. Office
location: NY County. LP org.
in DE 7/23/07. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LP upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Attn: John
Hathaway, 40 W. 57th St.,
19th Fl., NY, NY 10019. DE
office addr.: c/o CSC, 2711
Centerville Rd., Wilmington,
DE 19808. Cert. of LP on
file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg.,
Dover, DE 19901. Name/
addr. of each gen. ptr. avail.
at SSNY. Purpose: any lawful
activities.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF METROPOLI-
TAN REAL ESTATE PART-
NERS GLOBAL III, L.P.
App. for Auth. filed Sec’y of
State (SSNY) 3/2/09. Office
location: NY County. LP org.
in DE 2/26/09. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LP upon
whom process against it
may be served. SSNY shall
mail copy of process to Attn:
Felipe Dorregaray, 135 E. 57th
St., 16th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE
office addr.: c/o CSC, 2711
Centerville Rd., Wilmington,
DE 19808. Cert. of LP on
file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg.,
Dover, DE 19901. Name/
addr. of each gen. ptr. avail.
at SSNY. Purpose: any lawful
activities.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF GF INVESTORS, LLC
Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec.
Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
05/01/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Emanuel Gerard, 1 E.
End Ave., NY, NY 10075. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF SHANY LANDMARKS
LLC
Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec.
Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
05/01/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: The LLC, 12 E. 86th
St., #727, NY, NY 10028. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF GRAND CEN-
TRAL OPPORTUNITIES
FUND, LP
Authority filed with Secy
of State of NY (SSNY) on
06/12/08. LP formed in DE on
06/03/08. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated
as agent of LP upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: The LP, 230 Park Ave.,
Ste. 539, NY, NY 10169. DE
address of LP: 160 Green-
tree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE
19904. The name & address
of each general partner is
available from SSNY. Cert
of LP filed with DE Secy of
State, 401 Federal St, Dover
DE 19901. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF LOCUST VALLEY, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with NY
Dept. of State on 4/22/09.
Office location: NY County.
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail pro-
cess to the principal business
addr.: c/o Jacobson Family
Investments, Inc., Carnegie
Hall Tower, 152 W. 57th St.,
56th Fl., NY, NY 10019. Pur-
pose: all lawful purposes.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF KONDAUR
VENTURES VIII OFF-
SHORE REO 1, L.L.C.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 5/12/09. Office
location: NY County. LLC
formed in DE on 4/30/09. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail pro-
cess to: c/o CT Corporation
System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY
10011, regd. agt. upon whom
process may be served. DE
addr. of LLC: c/o The Corpo-
ration Trust Co., 1209 Orange
St., Wilmington, DE 19801.
Cert. of Form. filed with DE
Sec. of State, Townsend
Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF LEAD LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
6/23/2006. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Scott Martel, 245 East
54th Street, Ste 29B, New
York, NY 10022. Purpose: any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/27-7/1/09
NOR JEWELRY LLC,
Articles of Org. filed N.Y. Sec.
of State (SSNY) 5th day of
February 2009. Office in New
York Co. at 72 Bowery, New
York, New York 10013. SSNY
desig. agt. Upon whom pro-
cess may be served. SSNY
shall mail copy of process
to 72 Bowery, New York,
New York 10013. Reg. Agt.
upon whom process may
be served: Spiegel & Utrera,
P.A., P.C. 1 Maiden Lane, NYC
10038 1 800 576-1100 Pur-
pose: Any lawful purpose.
Vil 6/3 – 7/8/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF SPYE DESIGN STU-
DIO, LLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
04/02/09. Office location:
NY County. SSNY has been
designated as an agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the LLC is to: The
LLC, PO Box 1150, New
York, NY 10037. Purpose:
To engage in any lawful act
or activity.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF BOTTOM LINE CON-
CEPTS LLC, A DOMESTIC
LLC.
Arts. of Org. filed with the
SSNY on 04/01/09. Office
location: NY County. SSNY
has been designated as agent
upon whom process against
the LLC may be served.
SSNY shall mail a copy of
process to: c/o Feffer & Feffer,
LLC, 440 E 57th St. #18 C-D,
NY, NY 10022. Purpose: Any
Lawful Purpose.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
MARTIGNETTI PLANNED
GIVING ADVISORS, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/30/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Anthony
Martignetti 900 Park Terrace
East 4TH Floor NY, NY 10034.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Registered Agent: Robert B.
Moy 575 Lexington Avenue,
23RD FLR NY, NY 10022.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF TEMPEST CAPITAL
ADVISORS, LLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
04/20/09. Office location:
NY County. SSNY has been
designated as an agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the LLC is to: Tem-
pest Capital Advisors, LLC,
520 West 19th Street #5B,
New York, NY 10011. Pur-
pose: To engage in any law-
ful act or activity.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF T&L SPORTS
AND ENTERTAINMENT,
LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
05/15/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 04/24/09. Princ.
office of LLC: 275 Madison
Ave., 35th Fl., NY, NY 10016.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to
the LLC at the princ. office
of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC:
2711 Centerville Rd., Wilm-
ington, DE 19908. Arts. of
Org. filed with Secy. of State
of DE, John G. Townsend
Bldg., 401 Federal St., Dover,
DE 19901. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF LEXINGTON
CAPITAL PARTNERS
VII, L.P.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 3/4/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. LP formed
in DE on 1/15/09. NY Sec.
of State designated as agent
of LP upon whom process
against it may be served and
shall mail process to the prin-
cipal business addr. of the LP:
660 Madison Ave., 23rd Fl.,
NY, NY 10065. DE addr. of LP:
The Corporation Trust Co.,
1209 Orange St., Wilming-
ton, DE 19801. Name/addr. of
genl. ptr. available from NY
Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed
with DE Sec. of State, 401
Federal St., Dover, DE 19901.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF 367 BROOKLYN, L.L.C.
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
11/20/08. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: 570 Lexington Ave-
nue, 40th Fl., NY, NY 10022.
Purpose: any lawful act or
activity.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF 2131 MERRICK LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
5/8/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: The LLC, Attn: Jeff
Sutton, 500 Fifth Ave., 54th
Fl., NY, NY 10110. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 6/3-7/8/09
JADETRIBE, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/11/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to THE LLC
Kimberly Hartman 99 Bank
Street APT 2C New York, NY
10014. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
MEDITERRA COLLEC-
TION LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/18/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Sema Tekinay
300 East 56 Street APT. 28B
New York, NY 10022. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
THE TAX STRATEGISTS,
LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/11/2003.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to The LLC 2 Wall
St., Ste. 500 NY, NY 10005.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Registered Agent: Dan Korn-
blatt 2 Wall St., Ste. 500 NY,
NY 10005.
6/10-7/15/09
EISDORFER DENTAL
PLLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 5/5/09. Office
in NY Co. SSNY desig. agent
of LLC upon whom process
may be served. SSNY shall
mail copy of process to 121
E. 60th St., Ste. 7C., NY, NY
10022. Purpose: To practice
the profession of dentistry.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF PANTOGA LLC
Articles of Organization filed
with Secretary of State of
New York (SSNY) on 4/07/09.
Office location: NY County.
SSNY has been designated
as an agent upon whom pro-
cess against the LLC may
be served. The address to
which SSNY shall mail a
copy of any process against
the LLC is to: The LLC, 4014
13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brook-
lyn, NY 11228. Purpose: To
engage in any lawful act or
activity.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
NOTICE OF REGISTRA-
TION OF MICHELMAN &
ROBINSON, LLP
Certificate filed with Secre-
tary of State of N.Y. (SSNY)
on 03/26/09. Office location:
NY County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLP upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLP, 15760
Ventura Boulevard, 5th Floor,
Encino, CA 91436. Purpose:
To engage any lawful act or
activity.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
LUDLOW6 LLC
a domestic Limited Liability
Company (LLC) filed with the
Sec of State of NY on 4/14/09.
NY Office location: New York
County. SSNY is designated
as agent upon whom pro-
cess against the LLC may be
served. SSNY shall mail a
copy of any process against
the LLC served upon him/her
to The LLC, 333 Hudson St.,
6th Fl., NY, NY 10013 General
purposes
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
ACCELAPAYMENT LLC
a domestic Limited Liability
Company (LLC) filed with the
Sec of State of NY on 4/2/09.
NY Office location: New York
County. SSNY is designated
as agent upon whom pro-
cess against the LLC may be
served. SSNY shall mail a
copy of any process against
the LLC served upon him/
her to The LLC, 105 E. 34th
St., Ste. 163, NY, NY 10016
General purposes
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF AH 88 GREEN-
WICH LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
5/13/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 7/1/05. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to: c/o National
Registered Agents, Inc., 875
Avenue of the Americas, Ste.
501, NY, NY 10001. Address
of the principal office: 45
Horatio St., NY, NY 10014.
Address to be maintained in
DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste.
101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts.
of Org. filed with DE Secy. Of
State, 401 Federal St., Ste 4.,
Dover, DE 19901 . Purpose:
any lawful activities.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF SEG LATIGO
ADVISORS GP, LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
05/19/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 03/31/09. Princ.
office of LLC: 590 Madison
Ave., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10022.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to
c/o Corporation Service Co.
(CSC), 80 State St., Albany,
NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of
LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville
Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington,
DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed
with DE Secy. of State Div.
of Corps., John G. Townsend
Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
NAME OF LLC: BIG SLIDE
ENTERTAINMENT LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with NY
Dept. of State: 1/27/09. Office
loc.: NY County. Sec. of State
designated agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served and shall
mail process to: 10 E. 75th
St., NY, NY 10021, Attn: Jer-
emy H. Schneider, regd. agt.
upon whom process may be
served. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF SALA ASSOCI-
ATES LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 5/14/09. Office
location: NY County. LLC
formed in DE on 2/27/07. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail pro-
cess to the principal business
addr.: 44 Still Rd., Ridgefield,
CT 06877, Attn: Louis Sala.
DE addr. of LLC: c/o The
Corporation Trust Co., 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Arts. of Org. filed with
DE Sec. of State, 401 Fed-
eral St., Dover, DE 19901. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 6/10-7/15/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that license number 1226533
has been applied for by the
undersigned to sell liquor at
retail in a restaurant under
the Alcoholic Beverage Con-
trol Law at 202 204 West 36th
Street, New York, N.Y. 10018
for on-premises consump-
tion. JPD RESTAURANT LLC
d/b/a PIG’N WHISTLE
Vil 6/10/09 & 6/17/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a license, #TBA has
been applied for by Water
Taxi Beach Governors Island
to sell beer, wine and liquor
at retail in a restaurant. For
on premises consumption
under the ABC at Governors
Island NY, NY 10004.
6/17/09 & 6/24/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a license, #1226919 has
been applied for by Artifakt
54, Inc. to sell beer, wine and
liquor at retail in a restaurant.
For on premises consump-
tion under the ABC law at 54
Watts Street NY, NY 10013.
6/17/09 & 6/24/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a license, #1226799 has
been applied for by Food 2
Lex LLC d/b/a TBD to sell
beer, wine and liquor at retail
in a restaurant. For on prem-
ises consumption under
the ABC law at 2 Lexington
Avenue NY, NY 10010.
6/17/09 & 6/24/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a license, G748950 to be
assigned has been applied
for by the undersigned to sell
beer at retail under the Alco-
hol Beverage Control Law at
5923 7th Avenue, Brooklyn,
NY 11220 for on/off premises
consumption. Jerry Grocery
Store Inc.
Vil 6/17/09 & 6/24/09
NOOVU LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/9/09. Office
in NY Co. SSNY design.
Agent of LLC upon whom
process may be served.
SSNY shall mail copy of pro-
cess to The LLC 151B Gates
Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11238.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
CAREY STRATEGIC
COMMUNICATIONS LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/29/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Joseph
W. Carey Suite 12-A 211 East
53RD Street New York, NY
10022. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
FORTIUS PHYSICAL
THERAPY, PLLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 5/5/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to THE LLC 850
7TH Avenue Suite 406 NY,
NY 10019. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
AIRY TECHNOLOGY, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 5/15/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to The LLC 19
West 44TH Street, Suite 415
New York, NY 10001. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
DAHL LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 1/21/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to The LLC 347 W.
36TH ST #1002 New York, NY
10001. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
176 CLOTHING LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 5/27/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to THE LLC 230
West 39 Street, 15 Floor New
York, NY 10018. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF ASOLARE CAPI-
TAL MANAGEMENT, LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
5/15/2009. Office location:
NY Co. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 5/8/2009. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to THE LLC
159 Bleecker Street, APT 4D
NY, NY 10012. DE address
of LLC: Corporation Trust
Center 1209 Orange Street
Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts.
Of Org. filed with DE Secy. of
State, PO Box 898 Dover, DE
19903. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
PUBLI C NOTI CES
28 June 17 - 23, 2009
each other without rest for ultimately seven
years and are still fighting each other today.
The fights are often couched in provoca-
tive and polarizing terms like “racism” and
“anti-Semitism” or “corporatism” and “cor-
ruption” that, as in any group of imperfect
people, exist to certain degrees. But the
real reason for the fighting has more to
do with WBAI’s role in the New York City
radio market. Decades of mismanagement
and neglect by Pacifica leaders fertilized a
culture of anger, conspiracy and mistrust
at Pacifica that was topped off by a feeling
that there are no rules that anyone is bound
to follow. WBAI has often attracted pro-
grammers at the end of their careers with
nothing left to achieve or to lose.
The reform faction at WBAI led by Green
Party activist Mitchell Cohen and million-
aire liberal Steve Brown, among others,
want to see what they call a “democratic”
WBAI. Former WBAI Program Director
Bernard White and NY ACT-UP organizer
Bob Lederer lead groups who see WBAI as
a crucial information pipeline to followers
in a variety of Marxist and other radical
groups. For the most part, elections are a
means to an end, political control, for the
self-styled radical group, which calls itself
the Justice and Unity Campaign. While the
“democratic” Pacifica group is less mono-
lithic, they are no less bombastic, often
referring to White as a “corrupt” manager
who narrowcast black nationalist views
from dawn to dusk on WBAI. The pro-
Bernard White faction, in turn, refers
to their political enemies as “racist” and
unwilling to follow black leadership under
White and his supporters.
The conflict has bred many dis-
turbing confrontations at L.S.B. meet-
ings, often degenerating into scream-
ing matches and occasional violence
between members and their supporters.
Police have had to be called to quell dis-
turbances at public meetings, with many
idealistic Pacifica listeners in attendance
leaving the meeting shaking their heads in
despair. Meanwhile, listener support
of WBAI and throughout Pacifica over
the past several years has tanked to the
point where WBAI fell behind on its rent.
Although White’s advocates blame the
high rent at 120 Wall St. and at the Empire
State Building transmitter site, critics point
to the abysmal ratings — often less then a
tenth of a percent of the potential audience
— and a shrinking pool of contributors.
Eventually, White’s opponents gained
the upper hand on the WBAI L.S.B. and
joined with like-minded folks at other sta-
tions to get him suspended and then fired.
In a subsequent fund drive with a Pacifica-
appointed African-American woman
named LaVarn Williams at the helm,
WBAI reportedly marked a 40 percent
increase in contributions. In the parlance of
Pacifica, these changes mean little more
than engaging in a new battle.
The former managers removed by
Pacifica are planning demonstrations and
other activities to regain their control in
elections scheduled for this summer. Many
longtime L.S.B. members heavily involved
in the factionalism are precluded from
running again by term limits. Anyone who
becomes a member of WBAI in the next
few weeks by donating at least $25 or three
hours of volunteer service can vote or run.
Some hope that a new board, with new
members and new priorities, will take
WBAI and Pacifica in a new direction that
actually serves the mandate of progressive,
democratic and socially active community
radio.
DeRienzo is a progressive broadcaster,
author and teacher who co-hosts “Let
Them Talk” with Joan Moossy Tuesday’s
at 8 p.m. on Channel 56 on Manhattan
Neighborhood Network. The radio version
of “Let Them Talk” was heard on WBAI
from 1992 until 2002, during which time
DeRienzo was also a reporter with the
“WBAI Evening News.”
WBAI at the turning point after political infighting
Continued from page 19
Villager photo by Isaac Rosenthal
Paul Pagk in front of part of his site-specific painting intervention at “Exhibition,”
at 211 Elizabeth St.
PUBLI C NOTI CES
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF 5 GEMS LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
05/26/09. Office location:
NY County. Princ. office of
LLC: 145 W. 71st St., NY, NY
10023. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to the LLC at the princ.
office of the LLC. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF EAST 93RD
MANAGER LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
05/26/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 05/21/09. Princ.
office of LLC: 152 W. 57th St.,
60th Fl., NY, NY 10019. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to the LLC at the
addr. of its princ. office. DE
addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation
Service Co., 2711 Centerville
Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington,
DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed
with DE Secy. of State, Div.
of Corps., John G. Townsend
Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF FORMA-
TION OF HOBBS CIENA
DEVELOPER LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
06/04/09. Office location: NY
County. Princ. office of LLC:
902 Broadway, 13th Fl., NY,
NY 10010. SSNY designated
as agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to the LLC at the addr. of
its princ. office. Purpose: Any
lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF LAW OFFICES OF
ADAM R. SANDERS,
PLLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
05/29/09. Office location:
NY County. SSNY has been
designated as an agent upon
whom process against the
PLLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the PLLC is to: Law
Offices of Adam R. Sanders,
PLLC, 419 Lafayette Street,
3rd Floor, New York, NY
10003. Purpose: To engage
in any lawful act or activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF VICEROY CONSULT-
ING LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
5/28/09. Office location: NY
Co. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLC, Attn:
Steven D Oppenheim, Esq.,
488 Madison Ave., 17th Fl.,
NY, NY 10022. Duration:
12/31/2059. Purpose: any
lawful activities.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF CITY / COUNTRY
GARDENERS, LLC
Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec.
Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
05/20/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLC, 200 W.
108th St., #10-A, New York,
NY 10025. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF BROADWAY 36TH
REALTY LLC
Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec.
Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
01/22/08. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail
process to: C/O Broadway
Export LLC, 57 W. 38th St.,
7th Fl., New York, NY 10018.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF RD WINTER
ASSOCIATES LLC
Application for Author-
ity filed with Secretary of
State of New York (SSNY)
on 4/3/09. N.Y. Office loca-
tion: New York County. LLC
formed in NJ on 2/13/2009.
SSNY has been designated
as agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. The P.O. address to
which the SSNY shall mail a
copy of any process against
the LLC served upon him/
her is C/O the LLC: 41 Crest-
wood Drive, Maplewwod, NJ
07040. The Principal Busi-
ness Address of the LLC is: 41
Crestwood Drive, Maplew-
wod, NJ 07040. Purpose of
LLC: Modeling Agency.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF DIANNE B. COSMET-
ICS DISTRIBUTION LLC
Articles of Organization filed
with Secretary of State of
New York (SSNY) on 5/6/09.
Office location: NY County.
SSNY has been designated
as an agent upon whom pro-
cess against the LLC may be
served, and the Secretary of
State shall mail a copy of any
process against the company
served upon him or her to
c/o Larry Kramer CPA. The
name and address in NY of
the company’s registered
agent upon whom process
against the company may be
served is Larry Kramer CPA,
575 Madison Avenue, 10th
Floor, NY, NY 10022. Pur-
pose: To engage in any law-
ful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFI-
CATION OF ANSON
STREET LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 5/29/09. Office
location: NY County. Princ.
bus. addr.: 625 Pilot Rd., Ste.
4, Las Vegas, NV 89119. LLC
formed in DE on 4/17/07. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail process
to: CT Corporation System,
111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011.
DE addr. of LLC: The Corpora-
tion Trust Co., 1209 Orange
St., Wilmington, DE 19801.
Arts. of Org. filed with DE
Sec. of State, 401 Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that license number 1226660
has been applied for by the
undersigned to sell liquor at
retail in a restaurant under
the Alcoholic Beverage Con-
trol Law at 110 John Street
a/k/a 3-5 Platt Street, New
York, N.Y. 10038 for on-prem-
ises consumption. 110 JOHN
STREET PUB INC.
Vil 6/17/09 & 6/24/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that license number 1220448
has been applied for by the
undersigned to sell wine at
retail in a restaurant under
the alcoholic beverage
control law at 271 Bleecker
Street, New York, N.Y. 10014
for on-premises consump-
tion. KESTE GROUP LLC
Vil 6/17/09 & 6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF FRENCH BULL LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
2/11/02. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: 161 E. 61st St., NY,
NY 10065. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF GLOBAL BIO-
FUND GP, LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
2/25/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 2/23/09. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to: The LLC, 787
Seventh Ave., 48th Fl., NY,
NY 10019. DE address of LLC:
Stellar Corporate Services
LLC, 3500 South DuPont
Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Cert.
of Form. filed with DE Secy.
of State, 401 Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF HERSHEY
STRATEGIC CAPITAL, LP
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
5/20/09. Office location: NY
County. LP formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 5/15/09. SSNY
designated as agent of LP
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to: 660 Madison
Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10021.
DE address of LP: Stellar
Corporate Services LLC, 3500
South DuPont Hwy., Dover,
DE 19901. Name/address of
each genl. ptr. available from
SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with
DE Secy. of State, Townsend
Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF OPTIMAL ASSET
SOLUTIONS LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
5/8/09. Office location: New
York County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: c/o The LLC, 600
Lexington Avenue, 4th Fl.,
New York, NY 10022, Attn:
Andrew Jones. Purpose: any
lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF MOULTON
POINT CAPITAL LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
5/12/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 5/4/09. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to: 40 E. 78th
St., #10-C, NY, NY 10075. DE
address of LLC: 1209 Orange
St., Wilmington, DE 19801.
Arts. of Org. filed with DE
Secy. of State, 401 Federal
St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 6/17-7/22/09
TO PLACE A
LEGAL
NOTICE
in The Villager,
call Dave Jaffe
at 646-452-2477
or email
david@thevillager.com
June 17 - 23, 2009 29
After the Greenwich Village Little League’s
end-of-season Thank You Party on Pier 40
Wednesday evening, George Usher, center in
photo at right, officially became the league’s
new president. Usher takes the reins from
the previous president, Rich Caccappolo, left,
with whom, following league tradition, he had
been co-president this season. At far right,
is the league’s vice president, Daniel Miller.
While Caccappolo specializes in e-commerce
and investing, Usher is a rock-and-roller. He
formerly played with the cowpunk band Beat
Rodeo, the Bongos and the Schramms, as well
as fronting his own groups, House of Usher
and the George Usher Group. He has a new
solo album, “Yours and Not Yours,” coming
out soon. He describes his sound as in the
vein of The Byrds and Tom Petty. Usher, who
lives on W. Fourth St., noted his father was a
councilman in Lakewood, Ohio, where he grew
up, and was active in promoting local youth
sports and that a ball field there is named after
him. The new league president said G.V.L.L.,
among other goals, will focus on being “more
interactive” with other local Little Leagues,
which will lead to more sharing of ball fields,
which is critical in Manhattan. The league also
hopes to get J.J. Walker field at Clarkson and
Hudson Sts. resurfaced with new FieldTurf,
since the current turf is about 10 years old.
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Little League will rock on with new rockin’ president
Villager photo by Lincoln Anderson
30 June 17 - 23, 2009
BY HARRY BARTLE
Cooper Union students had the chance
to display their very own formula-style race
car that they designed and built completely
by themselves at the World Science Festival
held in Washington Square Park on Sunday.
As many of the festival’s younger visitors
took turns getting their pictures taken inside
the car, the four Cooper Union Formula SAE
Project representatives took turns explaining
why the vehicle was far more than just a
good photo-op for local parents.
The car — red and gold, with the logos
of the team’s sponsors scattered across its
sides — looks like a scaled-down version of a
professional race car. It certainly sounds pro-
fessional: Not only can it reach speeds up to
100 miles per hour and accelerate from zero
to 60 in less than three seconds, it’s also been
equipped with such advanced racing technol-
ogy as a Wi-Fi system that allows the team to
check and tune certain elements on the go.
The vehicle represents the third genera-
tion of a budding tradition at Cooper where
every September a team of driven engineer-
ing students gathers to design and build a
car entirely from scratch that, eventually,
is entered into the Michigan International
Speedway competition in June. Led by
Professor George Delagrammatikas, Cooper
scored in the top third of the 120 compet-
ing teams this year and was formally recog-
nized at the speedway’s culminating award
ceremony as one of the only teams to have
scored in each of the competition’s events.
The road to Michigan, however, was
not easy.
Each of the team’s 16 students was
responsible for designing a specific sub-
system of the vehicle, manufacturing the
necessary parts, and integrating it into the
car as a whole.
“Every student had to wear a different
hat,” said Delagrammatikas, “Technical,
executive, outreach, marketing. There were
a lot of different tasks to address with a
limited number of people.”
Indeed, some of the students had to
wear several hats at once. Senior Dennis
Robertson, the project’s technical director
and captain, was not only responsible for
designing and analyzing the vehicle’s frame,
but also led the suspension and brake units.
Many of the team’s members, especially
the seven or so that made up the project’s
“core,” spent anywhere from 60 to 80 hours
a week over nine months working on the
project, all the while balancing their school-
work at Cooper, one of the more rigorous
undergraduate institutions in the country.
“Everybody was intense,” said
Delagrammatikas. “The ones that had the
bug, you had to practically fight to get them
out of the lab at a decent hour.”
Before the car’s first screw was even put
in place, the team spent the first semester
scouring over blueprints, crafting scaled
models and conducting computer-simulated
analyses. After teaching themselves to use
programs like Fluent or COSMOSWorks,
the students tested the vehicle’s compu-
tational fluid dynamics, carried out finite-
element analysis and checked hundreds of
other quantities and measurements.
In January, the team began manufacturing
and assembling the vehicle’s parts. The Cooper
facilities, however, while certainly advanced,
were not entirely equipped for heavy auto-
motive manufacturing. So, the team had to
construct its own testing stands and structures
in addition to the welding, drilling and huge
amount of electronic work that was necessary
for such an ambitious project.
Fortunately, team members like senior
James Cole-Henry, the team’s licensed weld-
er and go-to material expert in the machine
shop, had already worked on the three pre-
vious generations of Cooper’s formula SAE
vehicles — allowing for quicker building
times this year and the chance to improve
systems, such as the crash structure.
“Every year before us helped for this
year,” said Robertson, a three-year veteran
of the program himself. “We saw the car
as sort of an evolution of cars from past
years. There were some things that went
well last year that we decided not to play
with, but others we knew that we had to
fix.” That extra experience of some of the
core members helped catapult the team 30
places higher than their previous best at the
Michigan competition this year.
The team also received a boost from a
variety of extremely generous sponsorships,
ranging from Cooper’s own Mechanical
Engineering Department to companies
like Con Edison and Scotia Technology, a
prime-tubing supply firm. In addition to a
donation of $10,000, Con Ed supplied the
Cooper team with state-of-the-art engineer-
ing parts that, according to Robertson, far
surpassed their monetary contribution.
“They were very good about getting us
what we needed, and they made a lot of
components that we wouldn’t have been
able to make,” Robertson said. He added,
jokingly, “Of course, the needs of the city
outweighed our needs. I’ve heard electricity
is pretty important… . But without them we
really wouldn’t have been able to get where
we did.”
Despite their prestigious sponsorships
and years of experience, however, the
Cooper team entered the Michigan compe-
tition as relative underdogs. As one of the
smallest institutions in the contest, not to
mention the only full-tuition, paid-schol-
arship school, they had considerably less
resources than some of larger universities
and international schools. Michigan State,
one of the top competitors and located in
the center of the automotive world, had
a budget of $500,000, nearly 10 times
Cooper’s. A team from Finland, whose Web
site prominently features their 10 engineers
in matching uniforms flanked by two boda-
cious blondes clad in skintight red patent
leather, had their own indoor practice race-
track. Cooper had to trek out to College
Point in Queens to test their out their car in
The New York Times facility’s parking lot.
Getting the 8-foot, 479-pound car out there
was an ordeal in itself.
The intensity at the Michigan competi-
tion was incredibly high, but Cooper’s own
grueling schedule over the previous nine
months helped prepare them for it.
“People think it’s strictly a race,” said
Delagrammatikas. “It’s more like an engi-
neering challenge.” The five all-nighters
during the competition, while not easy,
were manageable.
“We were used to it by then,” Robertson
said. “This group was sort of the cream of
the crop. There was no way we were going
to give up once we were there.”
Going up against some of the world’s top
engineering schools, the team underwent a
series of heavy examinations conducted by
industry experts in which they had to pres-
ent the vehicle’s technical aspects, justify all
their design choices, create a hypothetical
business pitch for the car and, finally, actu-
ally race it on the track. After each event,
the team would take the car back to the lab
and continue to do the necessary body work
to prepare for the day ahead.
As might be expected, the team ran into a
few problems at the competition. During the
skid-pad suspension test, for example, the
team ran out of fuel and was just barely able
to pass the event. The endurance race almost
turned into a catastrophe: At 22 kilometers
of high-speed racing, the event — called
“endurance” for the amount of stress it puts
on the driver as well as on the vehicle —
was tough to begin with; but about halfway
through, a judge noticed that a small safety
was missing from one of Cooper’s tires.
Without the pin, the judge said, the team
would not be allowed to finish. Thankfully,
the team found a small loophole. Although
they were not allowed to modify the car, they
were allowed to switch from “dry tires” to
“wet tires” because of the damp track from
rain earlier in the day. The two members of
the team allowed to work on the car raced
furiously against the clock to install the
second set of tires as quickly as possible.
Ultimately, the missing pin didn’t wasn’t too
costly; Cooper was one of the only teams
able to finish the endurance event.
In the three years Cooper has entered the
Michigan competition, the team has gone
from 89th place all the way down to 37th.
Despite the huge improvement rate, the
team’s future looks slightly cloudy at this
point. Many of the team’s leaders, including
Robertson, Cole-Henry and electronics direc-
tor Adam Vaughan, are all either graduating
seniors or master’s students at Cooper, and
next year’s team will be comprised of new and
fewer faces. The plan as of now is to modify
the current car enough — some subsystems
will have to be totally revamped — that it
will still be able to be resubmitted into the
competition.
As for long-term plans, many of the team’s
members aspire to go professional with their
automotive engineering skills.
“Ultimately, I’d like to be in the automo-
tive industry,” said Robertson. “But I don’t
want to leave New York.”
Delagrammatikas seemed convinced his
students are ready for the next step.
“Every engineering student should have
this kind of hands-on experience,” the profes-
sor said. “You can’t rely on a textbook for
this kind of learning. These guys are changing
the way the curriculum is handled, even for
others not involved… . The past nine months
has trained them in every aspect of small-
company management.”
The recent car industry collapse has led
to the cancellation of one tournament spon-
sored by the Big Three that the team was
planning to attend in Virginia this year. Yet,
in an industry shrouded in darkness, it seems
there’s a bright beacon of hope shining from
Cooper Square.
Cooper students engineer a race car from scratch
Villager photo by Harry Bartle
At the World Science Festival in Washington Square Park on Sunday, with The
Cooper Union’s formula race car, from left, Kwame Wright, Adam Vaughan, faculty
adviser George Delagrammatikas and Dennis Robertson.
June 17 - 23, 2009 31
DEADLINE WEDNESDAY 5:00PM MAIL 145 SIXTH AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL 646-452-2485 FAX 212.229.2790
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Notice is hereby given, pursuant to law, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a
Public Hearing on Wednesday, June 24, 2009, at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on the petition
from Greenwich Village Bistro LTD, to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café
at 13 Carmine Street, in the Borough of Manhattan, for a term of two years. Request for copies of the
proposed Revocable Consent Agreement may be obtained by submitting a request to: Dept. of Con-
sumer Affairs, 42 Broadway, New York, NY 10004, Attention: Foil Officer.
Vil 6/17/09 & 6/24/09
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32 June 17 - 23, 2009
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