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Computer Information Services RFP and Cover Letter to Vendors CAUSE INFORMATION RESOURCES LIBRARY The attached document

is provided through the CAUSE Information Resources Library. As part of the CAUSE Information Resources Program, the Library provides CAUSE members access to a collection of information related to the development, use, management, and evaluation of information resources- technology, services, and information- in higher education. Most of the documents have not been formally published and thus are not in general distribution. Statements of fact or opinion in the attached document are made on the responsibility of the author(s) alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of the CAUSE Board of Directors, officers, staff, or membership. This document was contributed by the named organization to the CAUSE Information Resources Library. It is the intellectual property of the author(s). Permission to copy or disseminate all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for commercial advantage, that the title and organization that submitted the document appear, and that notice is given that this document was obtained from the CAUSE Information Resources Library. To copy or disseminate otherwise, or to republish in any form, requires written permission from the contributing organization. For further information: CAUSE, 4840 Pearl East Circle, Suite 302E, Boulder, CO 80301; 303449-4430; e-mail info@cause.colorado.edu. To order a hard copy of this document contact CAUSE or send e-mail to orders@cause.colorado.edu. TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1 - Introduction....................................1 Definition of College...........................................1 Purpose of Request for Proposal.................................1 Structure of Request for Proposal...............................1 Vendor Proposals................................................3 General......................................................3 Organization.................................................4 Content......................................................5 Format.......................................................7 Process and Timetable........................................7 Reserved Rights.................................................8 Business and Financial Contractual Requirements.................9 Section 2 - History and Direction of College Information Services...............................................13 History......................................................13 Current Environments...........................................13

Network.....................................................13 Institutional...............................................14 Academic....................................................14 Administrative..............................................15 Direction......................................................16 Section 3 - Network Information Services................18 Hardware.......................................................18 Software.......................................................18 Transition.....................................................19 Section 4 - Institutional Information Services..........21 Hardware.......................................................21 Software.......................................................21 User Access.................................................21 Library Information System..................................22 Office Automation...........................................22 Data Sharing................................................23 Access To and From Remote Computing Facilities..............23 User Created Information....................................23 Bulletin Boards.............................................24 Industry Standard Software..................................24 Common User Interface.......................................24 Interoperable Software Applications.........................25 Uninterruptable Power Systems...............................25 Other.......................................................25 Transition.....................................................25

Section 5 - Academic Information Services...............26 General........................................................26 Overviews......................................................26 Needs.......................................................26 Solutions...................................................26 Components..................................................27 First Component: Microcomputers................................28 General.....................................................28 General Student Access to Microcomputing....................29 Hardware.................................................30 Software.................................................30 Transition...............................................30 Faculty Access to Microcomputing............................30 Hardware.................................................31 Software.................................................31 Transition...............................................31 Computer Aided Design Classroom and Laboratory Computing....31 Hardware.................................................32 Software.................................................32 Transition...............................................32 Engineering Graphics Computing..............................32 Hardware.................................................33 Software.................................................33 Transition...............................................34 Summary of First Component: Microcomputers.................34 Second Component: Networking..................................34 Third Component: Minicomputer.................................35

Hardware....................................................35 Software....................................................35 Transition..................................................36 Section 6 - Administrative Information Services.........37 Hardware.......................................................37 Software.......................................................38 Student Information and Campus Administrative System........38 Operating System and System Software........................40 Transition.....................................................41 Section 7 - Summary of Information Services.............42 Summary........................................................42 Implementation Plan............................................45 Appendix A - General Municipal Law.......................46 Section 1 - Introduction 1.1 Definition of College

Hudson Valley Community College, hereafter referred to as the "College", is a public, comprehensive community college. The College, sponsored by Rensselaer County and supervised by the State University of New York, is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Programs and curricula are registered by the State Education Department and approved by the State University Board of Trustees. The College's enrollment for Fall 1989 was composed of approximately 5,500 full-time and 3,800 part-time students. This 9,300 total student population resulted in the generation of 6,700 full-time equivalent students. The mission of the College is to serve the people of Rensselaer County and other areas in appropriate and diverse ways, striving always to improve their quality of life through education, training and service at an affordable cost. Through its dedication to teaching and learning the College makes it possible for every applicant to pursue a suitable program of study. The mission of the College is to offer a range of programs which serve the educational needs of a diverse population. The College serves students from Rensselaer County, from other areas of the State, from other states, and from foreign nations. The College's 1989-1990 Statement of Mission and 1979-1989 President's Report are included to further define our institution. 1.2 Purpose of Request for Proposal

The College invites suppliers of communications and computer hardware and software systems to submit formal responses for providing information services to the College. The services will include the hardware, software, installation, testing, data conversion, and training necessary to implement a successful vendor's response. A vendor may respond to a single part, to multiple parts, or to all parts of this Request for Proposal. 1.3 Structure of Request for Proposal

We have structured this Request for Proposal as follows.

Section 1 - Introduction This section will provide vendors with information regarding the purpose of the RFP; the structure of the RFP; the organization, content, and format for vendor responses to the RFP; the timetable for analysis of vendor responses to the RFP; and the timetable for College recommendations for acquisition of communications and computer systems. Section 2 - History and Direction of Information Services This section will provide vendors with information regarding the evolution of computing at the College from a data processing to a computing services environment and to our vision for an information services environment. Section 3 - Network Information Services This section will provide vendors with information regarding the hardware, software, and transition requirements of our vision for providing information services on acampus-wide network of computing environments. Section 4 - Institutional Information Services This section will provide vendors with information regarding the hardware, software, and transition requirements of our vision for providing campus-wide institutional information services, such as an Electronic Mail system available to all students, faculty, and staff. Section 5 - Academic Information Services This section will provide vendors with information regarding the hardware, software, and transition requirements of our vision for providing academic information services, such as increased student and faculty access to microcomputers and continued support for the industry-standard software requirements of our Computer Information Systems and Computer Science curricula. Section 6 - Administrative Information Services This section will provide vendors with information regarding the hardware, software, and transition requirements of our vision for providing administrative information services, such as an integrated Student Information and Campus Administrative System with capabilities equal to, or better than, our current system and improved software tools for user access to and manipulation of data contained in this system. Section 7 - Summary of Information Services This section will provide vendors with a summary of the previous information regarding the hardware, software, and transition requirements of our vision for providing network, institutional, academic, and administrative information services and will provide a projected plan for implementation of these services.

1.4

Vendor Proposals

1.4.1 General Vendors should stress clarity, completeness and brevity of presentation when preparing responses to this RFP. Vendors are requested not to perceive the RFP structure as a desire for them to propose some number of distinct computing environments. Vendors should propose solutions which simply and cost-effectively address our information service needs. A vendor's solution(s) may include one or many computing environments. Vendors may elect to respond jointly to this RFP and in this case, each corporation name should appear on the outside front cover and spine of the binder. Vendors may submit a primary proposal and an alternate proposal(s). Alternate proposals must be used when a vendor wishes to propose more than one solution for providing any or all of the network, institutional, academic, or administrative information services we have identified. For example, a vendor proposing two Student Information and Campus Administrative Systems must include the first in a primary proposal and the second in an alternate proposal. Primary and alternate proposals must follow the format described in thissection. Only material which differs from the primary proposal should be included in alternate proposals. All pages of alternate proposals must be clearly marked as Alternate Proposal #1 (or #2, or ...) to prevent confusion. The College invites all vendors to our campus for an RFP presentation on Wednesday, June 6, 1990 from 10:00 to 12:00 in the Faculty Staff Conference Room located on the 2nd floor of the Raymond H. Siek Campus Center. After a brief overview of the RFP, vendors will have an opportunity to ask questions for clarification of any outstanding issues. Vendors must submit 6 copies of each primary and alternate proposal and 2 copies of all supporting documentation to the College by no later than 2:30 PM on Friday, July 27, 1990. Vendor proposals must be sealed, labeled as shown below, and delivered to the Office of Business Services. Jane S. Gorzelnik Director of Business Services Hudson Valley Community College Trustees Administrative Center 45 Vandenburgh Avenue Troy, New York 12180 RFP #90-98 Computer Information Systems

Proposals which are not sealed will be rejected. Proposals which are notreceived by the deadline for submission will not be accepted. Proposals will be opened in the Conference Room of the Trustees Administrative Center at 3:00 PM on Friday, July 27, 1990 and the names of those firms or individuals submitting proposals will be publicly announced. No other public disclosure will be made until all

proposals have been reviewed and evaluated. All provisions of a vendor's proposal must be in effect for a minimum of 180 days starting with the day after the deadline for submission of proposals. Allinquiriesand correspondence regarding this RFP must be directed to: Bryan L. Eaton Director of Computer Services Hudson Valley Community College 80 Vandenburgh Avenue Troy, New York 12180 Telephone: 518-270-7311 All inquiries of a substantive nature must be submitted in writing, citing the particular page,section, and text in question, whenever applicable. Answers to questions of this type will be detailed to all vendors who have notified the College of their intent to respond to this RFP unless the question is of such a nature that it relates to proprietary information. Vendors who intend to respond must submit written notification to the above address to this effect by June 20, 1990. Failure to provide such notification will not preclude a vendor from responding to this RFP. However, only vendors complying with this requirement will be placed on the mailing list for official RFP communications. 1.4.2 Organization The proposal must begin with a cover letter indicating the vendor's submission of a response to this RFP and designating the vendor's authorized representative to the College. This cover letter must be signed by the vendor's authorized representative to the College. The proposal must be organized and presented using at minimum the following Table of Contents. Vendors wishing to differentiate further, any or all sections of their proposal, may do so in a clearly defined manner. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Corporate History 1.2 Proposal Summary 2. ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 2.1 Vendor Contacts 2.2 Vendor Certification Statement 2.3 Vendor Customer References 2.4 Pricing Information 2.4.1 Overview of All Information Services 2.4.2 Network Information Services 2.4.3 Institutional Information Services 2.4.4 Academic Information Services 2.4.5 Administrative Information Services 3. NETWORK INFORMATION SERVICES 3.1 Hardware

3.2 Software 3.3 Transition 4. INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION SERVICES 4.1 Hardware 4.2 Software 4.3 Transition 5. ACADEMIC INFORMATION SERVICES 5.1 Hardware 5.2 Software 5.3 Transition 6. ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION SERVICES 6.1 Hardware 6.2 Software 6.3 Transition APPENDICES 1.4.3 Content Section 1.1 Vendors must provide a brief history of their

involvement in the information services industry with pertinent information regarding their corporation's innovativeness, financial stability, and commitment to higher education. Section 1.2 Vendors must provide a brief summary of their proposal

including narrative(s) on how their proposal satisfies any, or all of the information services we have identified and including a listing of the major hardware and software components being proposed for any, or all of the information services we have identified. Section 2.1 Vendors must provide a point of contact, including

name, job title, job function, address, and telephone number, within their organization for each major section of their proposal. Section 2.2 Vendors must complete and provide a signed copy of the

certification statement regarding General Municipal Law included in Appendix A of this RFP. Section 2.3 Vendors must provide at minimum four customer

references. Each reference should be a comparably sized institution of higher education using the proposed hardware and software products. Since we expect to visit a number of customers in the evaluation of vendor responses, references should be located as close in proximity as possible to the College. Vendors must submit the following information for each customer reference. - the organization name, address, and telephone number

- the name of a key senior-level contact person, his/her title, and his/her telephone number - a written narrative describing the organization's similarity to our College and the organization's use of the proposed hardware and software products - a description of the number and type of computer and/or communications personnel needed to support the organization's requirements Section 2.4 Vendors must propose new, not used or refurbished,

hardware components in the early phases of their product life cycles. Vendors must propose hardware and software components of the latest technology. Vendors must provide list pricing, discounted pricing, state contract pricing whenever available, monthly maintenance pricing, discounted monthly maintenance pricing, delivery charges, and installation charges for each hardware and software component proposed. This pricing section must follow the structure shown in Section 1.4.2 and must be separated into the three identified components: hardware, software, and transition, for each information service area shown in Sections 3 through 6. Sections 3-6 Vendors must provide narrative defining their proposed

solution(s) corresponding to Sections 3 through 6 of this RFP. While the hardware components of these sections are important, the College will place emphasis on the software and transition components. The College views this RFP process as a software, solution-oriented one, and views the transitioning to an information environment which provides better services to the College, as an important part of this solution-oriented approach. All aspects of moving from our current environment(s) to the proposed environment(s) must be included in the transition component. The College is especially interested in the conversion and training aspects of this transition. Appendices Vendors may provide any material related to their proposal to assist the College with our evaluation. 1.4.4 Format Vendors must submit proposals in loose-leaf binder form with their corporation name on the outside front cover and spine of the binder. All proposals must be typewritten on standard 8 1/2 x 11 inch paper at 10 or 12 pitch (larger paper is permissible for spreadsheets, charts, etc...). The major sections of the proposal shown in the Table of Contents must be labeled with index tabs that identify the titles of those sections. The section headings of the proposal must be numbered to reflect those shown in the Table of Contents. Each page of the proposal must be numbered consecutively by page in the same manner in which pages of this RFP are numbered. 1.4.5 Process and Timetable

In early 1989 the Computer Procurement Committee, hereafter referred to as the "CPC", was formed with responsibility for investigating, evaluating, and recommending the network, institutional, academic, and administrative information service requirements of the College. The CPC is composed of the following College professionals. Dale Bryant Don Bowman Maureen Crean Bryan Eaton - Chairperson Joel Fatato John Fogarty Fred Zipprich Assistant Professor of Mathematics Dean of Enrollment Services Director of Institutional Planning Director of Computer Services Chief Fiscal Officer Associate Director of Computer Services Dean of the School of Engineering and Industrial Technologies

The CPC has established the following timetable of events. April June - May - August 1989 1989 1990 1990 1990 1990 Conduct presentation(s) to CPC on computing directions in higher education Develop schedule of events for educating and surveying user community Coordinate vendor presentations for our user community and conduct user survey Develop RFP to be sent to vendors Vendors - Prepare RFP responses Analyze vendor RFP responses including presentations / demonstrations by vendors and site visits to customer references Evaluate vendor RFP responses Recommendations to the College

September - January February - May June - July August - October

November - December 1990 January 1991

Vendors should clearly understand that the College will not make decisions on what product(s) to purchase based solely on pricing. We will take into consideration many other factors such as the vendor's commitment to higher education, the vendor's commitment to current and evolving industry standards,and the ability of a vendor's proposed products to satisfy our current and evolving information requirements. 1.5 Reserved Rights

The College reserves the following rights. - Examine the responsibility of bidders for contracts and proposed subcontractors on a case-by-case basis including, but not limited to, an examination of the skill, judgement, integrity, good faith, sufficiency of financial resources, quality of execution, performance and conduct on prior similar contracts, and labor practices, of a bidder and/or of a proposed subcontractor; and to investigate and consider the background of such bidders and subcontractors for this purpose including their ownership, management, affiliation, history of past performance, and compliance

with relevant state and federal laws and regulations - Reject any, and all proposals received in response to this RFP - Select one vendor, or many vendors to support the information service needs of the College - Modify or waive irregularities in any proposals received after consultation with the vendor(s) -Adjust and correct any vendor supplied cost figures found to be in error with notification to the vendor(s) - Utilize any and all ideas submitted in the proposals received unless those ideas are covered by legal patent or proprietary rights as stated by the vendor(s) - Adopt any, or all parts of a vendor's proposal in selecting the optimum configuration - Negotiate hardware and software configurations different from those proposed by the vendor(s) - Amend the RFP specifications after release in order to correct errors, respond to oversights, or modify requirements - Begin contract negotiations with another vendor in order to serve the best interests of the College in the event that we are unsuccessful in negotiating a contract with the selected vendor(s) - Change any of the scheduled dates - Seek 3rd party financing - Acquire 3rd party hardware and software - Accept or reject price decreases made after submission of proposals 1.6 Business and Financial Contractual Requirements

Transfer of Subcontracting of Contract - No contractor to whom any contract for these specifications shall be awarded shall assign, transfer, convey, sublet, or otherwise dispose of the same or his right, title, or interest therein, or his power to execute such contract, to any other persons or corporation without the previous consent in writing of the College. Default Provisions - In case of default by the contractor, the College may procure the article or services from other sources and hold the contractor responsible for excess costs occasioned thereby. Contractor's Guarantee - By submitting on these specifications, the vendor binds himself to all conditions in these specifications, irrespective of any formalities in his order acknowledgement. No attachment or part may be substituted or applied contrary to manufacturer's recommendations and standard practice. Any variance with the specifications must be stated within the submitted bid, and may, after review of all consequences of the variance, disqualify the bid. Accessories supplied shall be compatible with the rest of the

equipment. Contractor guarantees that the equipment is standard new equipment, latest model of regular stock product with all parts regularly used with the type of equipment offered. Each unit delivered is guaranteed against faulty material and workmanship for a period of one year after acceptance of delivery by the College, unless otherwise specified. If, during this period, any such faults develop, the unit or part affected is to be replaced without any cost to the College. All regularly manufactured stock electrical items shall be listed by Underwriter's Laboratory, Incorporated. Other electrical equipment shall be constructed to conform to applicable portions of National Electrical Code. Where electronic components are part of the equipment, the manufacturer's standard guarantee shall apply. Permits and Ordinances - In all operations connected with the work herein specified, all city and town ordinances and laws controlling or limiting in any way the action of those engagedin the work, must be respected and strictly complied with. Contractor must obtain all permits and pay fees, if and as required. Hazardous Materials - Any materials required by this order that are deemed hazardous will be packaged, marked, and shipped by the seller to comply with all present and future federal, state, and local regulations and will further comply with any special company requirements. All MSDS sheets are to be directed to the attention of the Campus Safety Officer. Safety and Health Devices - All equipment shall meet the requirements of the Federal Government, the State of New York, and the County of RensselaerSafety and Health Regulations, as well as the local safety and health regulations of the City of Troy. Equipment shall conform to applicable standards of all national regulations. Payment - It is the desire of the College to pay promptly. It is the vendor's responsibility to submit invoices directly to the Accounts Payable department. Hudson Valley Community College Attention: Accounts Payable P.O. Box 569 Troy, New York 12181-0569 Invoices shall include purchase order number and date, College item number, description of items, catalog number, sizes, quantities, unit prices, extended prices, and date of delivery. Invoices not on printed billheads shall be signed by vendor. Invoices exceeding the limits established by the contract,or for materials or services not qualifying under its specifications, are not subject to payment. Partial payments may be made upon properly executed invoices of delivered goods, unless otherwise stated in the bid. Final payment will occur when the materials, supplies, or equipment items have been fully delivered and accepted.

Insurance Coverage - The successful bidder shall provide the Director of Business Services with a certificate or proof of insurance coverage for a minimum of: Property Damage and Liability Bodily Injury Liability $ 250,000 $ 500,000 - $ 1,000,000

Protection - Contractorshall be held liable for any injury to persons and/or property during the execution of his work and shall take all safety measures required or affirmed during execution of his work. Contractor's Liability Insurance - The contractor shall maintain such insurance as will protect him from claims under Workmen's Compensation Acts and other employee benefit acts; from claim for damages because of bodily injury, including death, to his employees and all others; and from claims from damages to property, any or all of which may arise out of, or result from, the contractor's operations under this contract. Equal Opportunity - Affirmative Action - Executive Order Number 11246, as amended, relative to Equal Employment Opportunity and all other applicable laws, rules, and regulations, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, are incorporated herein by this specific reference. In addition, all laws, rules, and regulations applicable to the hiring of disabled veterans, veterans of the Vietnam era, and individuals with physical or mental handicaps are incorporated herein by this specific reference. The contractor further agrees that: (a) in the hiring of employees for the performance of work under this contract, the contractor shall not discriminate against any citizen in the employment of a person qualified and available to perform the work under the contract, by reason of race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, national origin, or ancestry; (b) the contractor or any person acting on his behalf, shall not, in any manner, discriminate against, intimidate, or retaliate against any employee hired for the performance of work under the contract on account of race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, national origin, or ancestry; (c) the contractor shall include this language in all subcontracts entered into, for the performance of the contract Fair Labor Standards Act - The contractor warrants and represents that the goods covered by this contract have been manufactured in accordance with the requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act and all other applicable federal, state, and municipal laws, rules, and regulations. Minority Business Enterprise - It is the policy of the College to take affirmative action to ensure that minority business enterprises are given the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to provide the College with goods and services at competitive prices. Taxes - The College is a tax exempt organization and therefore lacks the authority to pay taxes. Section 2 - History and Direction of College Information Services

2.1

History

The College has a long history of providing data processing, and then computing services for our students, faculty, and staff. In the late 1960's an IBM 1401 computer system was introduced to the College and served both academic and administrative computing. In the early 1970's a Burroughs B2500 computer system was installed and again served both academic and administrative computing. In the middle 1970's, while the Burroughs B2500 continued serving administrative computing, a Prime 400 computer system was installed to serve academic computing. Since that time the College has upgraded both academic and administrative computing environments within the Prime and Unisys/Burroughs family of computer systems respectively. Microcomputers were introduced to the College in the early 1980's. Apple, Commodore, IBM, and Radio Shack microcomputers were integrated into academic computing and Burroughs microcomputers were integrated into administrative computing. In the middle 1980's the College decided to standardize on IBM PC or PC-compatible microcomputers and evaluated microcomputers from many different vendors with Zenith Data Systems being selected as the standard PC-compatible microcomputer vendor. Since that time the College has experienced tremendous growth in the integration of microcomputers into both academic and administrative computing. Five microcomputer classrooms have been constructed, two student open-access microcomputer areas have been created, and hundreds of microcomputershave been provided for faculty and staff. 2.2 Current Environments

2.2.1 Network The College's current computer networks exist uniquely, and separately, from each other. These data communication systems include distinct networks for the two academic super-minicomputers and the one administrative mainframe computer. Allattacheddevices, including terminals, microcomputers, and printers, are directly wired to the specific computer system(s) to which the user requires access. The College is in the beginning stages of a campus-wide network pilot project. The project will allow the use of our existing campus-wide broadband cabling plant as a campus-wide Ethernet backbone. An academic computer system, an academic microcomputer local area network file server, a group of academic terminals, and the administrative computer system will be connected to this backbone. TCP/IP will be used in the project as a standard terminal protocol allowing common workstation access to multiple, and different, computing environments. 2.2.2 Institutional The College does not currently have an institutional computing environment. Information services such as electronic mail, calendars, schedulers, bulletin boards, access to off-campus computing resources, and a library information system are not available campus-wide. These services either do not exist at all, or exist in a unique computing environmentwhich is not accessible to our entire campus population. 2.2.3 Academic

The College's academic computing environment includes two Prime 9955 ModelII computer systems with over 250 attached devices, including terminals, microcomputers, and printers, and over 250 microcomputers in classrooms, laboratories, student open-access areas, and faculty offices. During the 1988/89 academic year over 2800 student users logged in to the Prime systems over 110,000 times for a total accumulated connect time of over 4,000,000 minutes. During the 1988/89 academic year over 1600 students were enrolled in courses using our microcomputer classrooms which are among the most heavily used classroom facilities at the College. Student usage of microcomputers in our open-access areas was also consistently heavy. The following charts detail the Prime academic computing environments. Prime 9955 II Single Processor - System A Memory Disk Storage Tape Drive Printer Attached Devices 16 1.5 1 1 130 Megabytes Gigabytes/3 Fixed Disk Units 800/1600/6250 BPI 650 LPM Terminals/Microcomputers/Printers

Prime 9955 II Single Processor - System B Memory Disk Storage Tape Drive Printer Attached Devices 24 1.5 1 1 130 Megabytes Gigabytes/3 Fixed Disk Units 800/1600/6250 BPI 650 LPM Terminals/Microcomputers/Printers

Prime 9955 II System Software Operating System Editors Database Management Compilers PRIMOS EMACS and ED ORACLE ASSEMBLER BASIC C COBOL 74 DEBUGGER PRIMELINK

FORTRAN IV FORTRAN 77 PASCAL RPG PRIMENET

Programming Tool Communication Prime 9955 II Application Software Computer Aided Design Computer Assisted Instruction Authoring Language Electrical Circuit Analysis Graphics Electronic Mail Statistical

ANVIL 4000 KATY P-SPICE IGL PLOT 10 MAIL - from SUNY Brockport SPSS

The following narrative details the microcomputer academic computing environment. Microcomputer Systems The majority of the approximately 450 microcomputers at the College

are IBM PC and PC/XT compatible systems with Intel 8088 processor chips from Zenith Data Systems. The College has approximately 350 of these microcomputers installed. The College has recently begun to purchase Zenith microcomputers with Intel 80286 and 80386 processor chips and now has approximately 100 of these microcomputers installed. From this population of microcomputers, approximately 220 systems are installed in purely instructional environments. The College has a total of 135 systems installed in 4 classrooms each equipped with 30 microcomputers and in 1 classroom equipped with 15 microcomputers. Two classrooms are equipped with dual-floppy systems, two classrooms are equipped with hard disk systems and one classroom is networked to a file server using Novell Netware LAN software. The College has approximately 50 systems installed in laboratories in many different academic departments and approximately 35 systems installed in student open-access areas. From the remaining 230 microcomputers, approximately 90 systems are installed in faculty and department chairperson offices and are used for instructional and academic administrative functions and approximately140 systems are installed in staff offices and are used for administrative functions. The College is committed to providing access to education for our community's disabled student population. An important aspect of this commitment is providing the necessary facilities to allow for the use of computing. We are now constructing for our disabled student population a 5 workstation lab for general computing and a 15 workstation lab for computing in our technologies curricula. 2.2.4 Administrative The College's administrative computing environment includes a Unisys A10H computer system with over 300 attached devices, including terminals, microcomputers, and printers. The following chart details the Unisys administrative computing environment. Unisys A10H Dual-Processor Memory Disk Storage Tape Drive Printer Attached Devices 24 4.5 3 2 300 Megabytes Gigabytes/9 Fixed Disk Units 1600/6250 BPI 650 LPM and 2000 LPM Terminals/Microcomputers/Printers

Unisys A10H System Software Operating System Editor Communications Management Database Management Compilers Operations Resource Management Communication MCP/AS CANDE COMS DMSII ALGOL and DCALGOL COBOL 74 MARC SMFII NDLII and IDC

Unisys A10H Application Software User Inquiry Tool Electronic Mail Student Information and Campus Administrative System ERGO MAIL - from Division of Criminal Justice Services includes the components listed in Section 6

From thetotal population of 450 microcomputers at the College, approximately 140 systems are installed in staff offices and are used for administrative functions and approximately 90 systems are installed in faculty and department chairperson offices and are used for instructional and academic administrative functions. Approximately 180 of these 230 microcomputers are connected to the Unisys A10H system. 2.3 Direction

The College is in the process of changing from a computing to an information services environment. The information needs of our College have changed and grown tremendously in the last few years. With our current computing environments we are having a difficult time supporting these new demands for campus-wide information services. Of primary importance to our strategy for providing information services to users is access from a single workstation to whatever computing environment(s) are required to perform their jobs. We expect to evolve to an Ethernet network using TCP/IP as the standard terminal protocol with our campus-wide network pilot project being a first step in this process. We have identified information services needed by the institution as a whole. These services can be, and in some cases are currently being, provided separately to the user groups of our academic and administrative computing environments. As only one example, we have electronic mail for our academic users and for our administrative users. These two mail systems are distinct and a user of one cannot send mail to a user of the other. We expect to evolve to an environment where these institutional information services will be accessible and common to all user groups. The College is experiencing tremendous growth in the integration of microcomputers into academic curricula and in the use of microcomputers by faculty as a productivity tool. We expect to evolve to a more complex academic computing environment involving stand-alone microcomputers;departmental networked micro or mini computer systems; and a centralized mini, super-mini, or mainframe computer system. The departmental computing environments may include networked microcomputer systems using an operating system such as Novell Netware, minicomputer systems using an operating system such as UNIX, or some combination of these systems. All of these academic computing environments will be connected to, and accessible from, the campus-wide network. The College is also experiencing tremendous growth in the integration of microcomputers into administrative departments, in the use of microcomputers by staff as a productivity tool, and in the demand for access to our institutional data base. We expect to evolve to an environment where a centralized, integrated institutional data base

will continue to support the on-line and batch processing requirements of the College and will improve our users access to data for supporting their own unique and dynamic information needs. The previous brief narratives, relative to our vision for providing network, institutional, academic, and administrative information services, represent an overview of information contained in each area specific section of this RFP. Section 3 - Network Information Services 3.1 Hardware

Within the next few months the College will be entering into a campus-wide network pilot project and will be installing a broadband Ethernet supporting IEEE 802.3 standards and using TCP/IP as a standard terminal protocol. This data communication network will attach to an already installed campus-wide broadband video backbone trunk cable which consists of the following. - 1/2" Belden 9292, or equivalent, coaxial cable - 300 MHZ indoor self-powered, blonder tongue, trunk amplifiers, equipped with reverse feed amplifiers and filters for 5 MHZ - 50 MHZ "T" channels Vendors should include hardware components for all proposed computer systems, terminal servers for all proposed terminals, and microcomputer bridges for all proposed microcomputer file servers to provide for connectivity to a network compatible with these standards. This does notimply that a proposed microcomputer local area network must be Ethernet topology, but does indicate that a proposed microcomputer local area network must be able to connect to our campus-wide Ethernet backbone. The design of the hardware to connect microcomputers to the network should not impact the performance capacity of the microcomputer. For example, a faculty member using a microcomputer for basic applications, such as word processing and spreadsheeting, should not be required to purchase additional memory or to sacrifice processing speed when connecting to the campus-wide network. Vendors should include any additional hardware components and/or computer systems necessary for providing management of this network. 3.2 Software

The major focus of network software will be to support communication from any terminal or microcomputer to any College computing host, including microcomputer file servers and mini, super-mini or mainframe computer systems. We do not expect, nor desire, that a microcomputer user connected to the network be allowed direct access to the files on some other microcomputer user's hard disk, or be allowed to initiate processing on some other user's microcomputer system. We also do not expect to develop a microcomputer local area network operating system across multiple file servers using our campus-wide Ethernet backbone. However, vendors should propose this kind of

computing environment if they believe that a campus-wide microcomputer network operating system will provide significant advantage and benefit to the College. The following are some examples of the campus community making use of the network software to allow them to access different computing resources and to perform different information service functions. - An administrator connecting through a microcomputer to an institutional computing resource to send and receive electronic mail - A secretary sending a document from a microcomputer to a computing host that functions as a queue manager and print server -A faculty connecting through a microcomputer to a BITNET server to send and receive a file from a colleague at some other SUNY institution - A student connecting through a microcomputer to an administrative computing resource to check the status of his/her financial aid Vendors should include software components for all proposed computer systems, terminal servers for all proposed terminals, and microcomputer bridges for all proposed microcomputer file servers to providefor connectivity to a network compatible with these standards and to provide at minimum the capabilities described below. - Support for communicating across the network to any College computing host with terminal emulation and file transfer facilities - Support for establishing shared peripheral devices, especially high quality printers - Support for establishing a communication link through the network to provide access to SUNYNET and BITNET Vendors should include any additional software components necessary for providing accounting, configuration, fault, performance, and security management functions of this network. The security management functions of the network will be critical. The ability to collect information including times and types of usage of the network will be very useful. If possible, the ability to collect similar information whenever a microcomputer workstation is powered on by means of its connection to the network would be very helpful to the College in the management and distribution of our microcomputing resource. 3.3 Transition

Vendors should propose a plan for transition from our current environment, where attached devices are directly connected to a host computer system, to an environment where attached devices are directly connected to the campus-wide network. These attached devices include terminals, printers and microcomputers. Vendors should include any necessary hardware or software components for connection of our current population of microcomputers to this network. Microcomputers in a microcomputer local area network should be attached to the campus-wide network through a microcomputer file server. This transition plan should include, but not be limited to, site

preparation, hardware and software installation, support for off-campus dial up access to and from on-campus computing facilities, training,and implementation support. This transition plan should incorporate, and be incorporated into, all other components of a vendor's proposal. The training of our network and system support personnel is especially important to the College. Vendors may propose a plan for transition from our current network environment to a network environment where all attached devices are not directly connected to the network. Some attached devices would remain directly connected to a host computer system. Vendors should clearly explain the benefits to the College of this network environment. Section 4 - Institutional Information Services 4.1 Hardware

The hardware component(s) of the computer system(s) which will be used for providing institutional information services must support connection to a campus-wide Ethernet backbone and use of TCP/IP as a terminal protocol. Some institutional information services, such as data sharing, are applicable to any, and all of the computing environments being proposed. Whenever applicable, vendors must incorporate these institutional information services into other sections of their proposal. 4.2 Software

The following sections will describe the information services we have identified as being needed by our entire institutional population including students, faculty, and staff. These services will not necessarily correspond to a single software application. In some instances vendors will need to propose a software environment including more than one software application on more than one hardware platform. We understand that for some of our institutional information services we are defining a direction and may not be able to implement a complete solution at this time. Vendors are requested to respond wherever possible with complete solutions. When a complete solution is not possible vendors are requested to respond with a partial or directional solution which defines for the College the stages of implementation required to reach our service goal. 4.2.1 User Access Students, faculty, and staff at the College must be able to access all levels of computing resource where the information services needed to perform their jobs are provided. We have separated computing resources at the College into three levels. The Personal Level reflects those computing resources which are used by individuals and are typically stand-alone microcomputers. The Departmental Level reflects those computing resources which are used by a group of individuals and are typically microcomputers in a networked micro or mini computer system. The Institutional Level

reflects those computing resources which are used by large segments of, or by the entire, campus population and are typically mini, super-mini, or mainframe computer systems. A critical component of access to multiple computing resources by so many people is the ability to secure access to these resources so that attempts at unauthorized access are tightly controlled. Vendors should describe in detail how access security is implemented for all proposed computing environments. Tracking of the usage of all computing resources at the College is needed. Vendors should describe how usage information is collected and reported for all proposed computing environments. 4.2.2 Library Information System The implementation of a Library Information System is of primary importance to the College. The Library Information System being proposed by vendors must either be a component of, or allow for data transfer to and from, the Student Information and Campus Administrative System. This information environment should allow for access to the holdings of other libraries. The proposed Library Information System must include the following functional areas. On-Line Public Access Catalog Circulation Bibliographic and Authority Control The proposed Library Information System should include, but does not have to be limited to, the following additional functional areas. Overdue Notice Acquisitions Serial Control Material Control Reserve Room 4.2.3 Office Automation A common Office Automation System including electronic mail with access to BITNET and activity management functions such as calendars, schedulers for meetings and rooms, action lists, and reminders is also of primary importance to the College. We view this system as the center for electronic exchange of information at the College. The proposed Office Automation System should include an electronic mail facility which allows for the sending and receiving of information including mail messages, data files, and microcomputer files created with word processing, spreadsheet, data base, or graphic applications. 4.2.4 Data Sharing The sharing of data among all levels of computing resource has become very important to the College. As computing, especially microcomputing, has been integrated into virtually all aspects of the College, there has developed the real need for students, faculty, and staff to easily and electronically share data among our own College community. There has also developed the real need for our College Inter Library Loan Collection Development Collection Inventory Equipment Loan

community to easily and electronically share data with other educational institutions and with state and federal agencies. This includes capabilities such as the electronic exchange of student transcripts with other colleges and the electronic exchange of student loan processing information with governmental agencies. Vendors should describe their electronic mail facility's ability to integrate data from different computing environments as described previously in Section 4.2.3 on Office Automation. Vendors should also describe any additional software and capabilities, such as data extraction, data transfer, or virtual disks, which may be used in the sharing of data. 4.2.5 Access To and From Remote Computing Facilities The ability of users to access College computing facilities from their homes and to access off-campus computing facilities, such as BITNET or the LEXIS database of legal information used by our Criminal Justice students and faculty, has become very important. Vendors should describe their ability to provide students, faculty, and staff with the capability of off-campus dial up access to and from on-campus computing facilities. 4.2.6 User Created Information The ability of users to access institutional data and to create their own unique and dynamic information has also become very important to the College. Vendors should describe a software environment which allows for easy access to, manipulation of, and reporting of institutional data. Vendors should include in this environment a high performance statistical analysis tool to support our increasing need for academic and administrative research. Relational database technology and an industry standard SQL-baseduser interface may provide the College with the basis for a solution to these service needs. Vendors should not limit their responses to a single computing host environment or to a multiple host environment. Vendors should propose a solution based on the integration of data being collected at any of the three levels of computing resource described before. Vendors should also describe their ability to provide a desktop publishing solution which will allow for user department creation of their own internal or external College reports or publications. 4.2.7 Bulletin Boards Vendors should propose a solution for allowing the creation of public information such as announcements of meetingsor events, a campus telephone directory, and schedules of open hours for College facilities (Bookstore, Computer Labs, Learning Resource Center, Physical Education Building, ...). This public information should be accessible to any user of computing at the College. 4.2.8 Industry Standard Software The College is interested in software solutions which will provide

independence from computer hardware platforms. Wherever possible, we would like to implement software solutions compatible with current, or evolving, industry standards. Vendors should describe their commitment to industry standards and should propose for all sections of this RFP, software solutions which conform to these standards. Vendors should also propose solutions which best support the current, and evolving requirements of the College. The melding of industry standard and best solutions is important to the long-term information services environment we are attempting to create at the College. 4.2.9 Common User Interface The way in which a user accesses student records, a catalog of our library holdings, electronic mail, departmental budget records, computer assisted instruction modules, or any other information source should be consistent. We are describing an environment which is much more than a menu for choosing access to one of these information sources. We are describing an environment where the "look and feel" of all software applications used to provide information is the same. Vendors should describe their ability to provide this environment for the software applications being proposed. This ability may include the capability for the College to customize the user environment to create this common user interface. 4.2.10 Interoperable Software Applications Vendors should describe the ability of the software applications being proposed to execute across all three levels of computing resource described before. For example, if the College were to standardize on a data base management system or a statistical analysis system which executed on the three levels of computing, the training and support of our users would become much simpler. Vendors should apply this concept in their proposal wherever possible and wherever in their judgement, the solution does not become weakened by using interoperable software applications. 4.2.11 Uninterruptable Power Systems Vendors should include Uninterruptable Power Systems with sufficient capacity for providing protection from momentary power interruptions for all proposedmicrocomputer file servers and for all proposed mini, super-mini, and mainframe computer systems. 4.2.12 Other Vendors should propose any other institutional information services which we have not identified and which would be of benefit to the College. 4.3 Transition

Vendors should propose a plan for implementation of these information services. This plan should include all aspects of the transitioning from those information services we currently have to the vendor's proposed environment. The training of our system support and

departmental user personnel is especially important to the College. Section 5 - Academic Information Services 5.1 General

The hardware and software components of the computer system(s) which will be used for providing academic information services must support connection to a campus-wide Ethernet backbone and use TCP/IP as a terminal protocol. The College's plan for providing academic information services is complex in structure and includes three major components. These components will be achieved in stages which will likely cover several years. Each component will be described in terms of its own hardware, software and transition requirements. In describing each component we will share the rationale for our plan so that vendors may propose, where they believe appropriate, alternate approaches to achieving our objectives. 5.2 5.2.1 Overviews Needs

Over the last decade, the College has developed a strong computer support structure for specific curricula, basically through the use of large minicomputers. Our needs for the 1990's include the following. - Continuing support for existing curricula - Increasing the availability of computing to larger numbers of students and faculty who will be doing more diverse applications - Better serving courses that have special hardware needs, such as Computer Aided Design - Promoting greater communication among students and faculty within our own academic community and between other academic communities - Sharing and effectively managing our computing resources flexibly and

- Reducing our dependence on a single vendor for hardware and software - Providing easier access to industry standard tools to support our vocational training curricula 5.2.2 Solutions Meeting these needs for the 1990's will require the following. - Support of a large computer system environment, comparable to one of the Prime computer systems currently available - Increased access to microcomputers for general student use and for both general, and more complex, faculty applications - Development of special departmental computing environments for particular academic constituencies, such as Computer Aided Design

and Engineering Graphics, that support current industry standard software packages - Connection of these campus-wide network different computing environments to the

- Accessibility of all major computing resources from any part of the academic computing environment - Usage monitoring of all major computing resources of the academic computing environment - Preference for industry standard software that is available on multiple vendors' hardware platforms 5.2.3 Components

Transitioning parts of our academic community from a centralized minicomputer to a more diverse and distributed networked environment cannot realistically be accomplished in a single acquisition, nor probably in a single year. We must do a significant amount of software conversion and must change the orientation of both students and faculty with substantial training. We must also engage in institutional learning about what different hardware, software, and network facilities can, and cannot, do. In order to provide for this institutional adjustment we anticipate three components or dimensions in the acquisition of this new academic information services environment. Each component will have different hardware, software, and transition concerns. FIRST - The first component will address our microcomputing infrastructure. We will be interested in acquiring a variety of low, medium, and high level microcomputing systems. Some of these systems will be connected into departmental networked micro or mini computer environments. During this first component, the College will begin to convert some minicomputer applications to one of these other environments and will focus both students and faculty on microcomputers as the basic resource for individual initiative computing. SECOND - The second component will address the networking of this microcomputer infrastructure with itself, and with all other computing resources at the College. Any microcomputer user, with appropriate security access rights, should be able to connect to, and log into, any College computing resource. The network should support the sharing of peripheral devices, such as laser printers. Network access by students and faculty from their homes is very important. As discussed in Section 3.2, we do not expect to develop a microcomputer local area network operating system across multiple file servers using our campus-wide Ethernet backbone. THIRD - The third componentwill address our mini, super-mini, or mainframe computing needs. The availability of the first two components will allow some academic applications to migrate from the current minicomputer environment to a new departmental networked micro or mini computer environment. At that time our academic computing needs for a larger computer system will be more clearly defined. We

fully expect to continue to require computing of this order to support some amount of instructional computing. 5.3 5.3.1 First Component: Microcomputers General

This component of the RFP addresses the continued development of a microcomputer infrastructure. Microcomputers are seen as appropriate to support "low intensity" computing, such as word processing, because they are relatively inexpensive, are stand-alone, are highly mobile and offer a broad selection of software. More powerful microcomputer systems will be needed to support special Computer Aided Design and Engineering Graphics environments. These systems allow a broad selection of software and offer more fault tolerant laboratory settings. Microcomputer systems are so diverse that it is important to be specific about what levels of performance are required without constant reference to particular pieces of equipment. The following terms will be used in describing our performance expectations. The terms are defined in reference to MS-DOS systems because this is our current campus microcomputing environment and makes a convenient reference. This does not mean however, that only these types of microcomputers are acceptable. The following basic information provides more detail regarding the low, average, and high level of microcomputing systems the College requires. Vendors should propose systems to approximate as closely as possible, these performance levels. Vendors should propose a range of printers, from dot-matrix to laser technology, from which the College can select when developing this microcomputer infrastructure. LOW LEVEL - These systems will be used to support basic microcomputing applications, such as word processing, and should be at least comparable to an Intel 8088, 8 MHz clock, 640K memory system. In thisclassification, video resolution should be at minimum, the VGA level, 640x480 pixel. MEDIUM LEVEL - These systems will be used to support more computationally intensive processing, such as computer language programming, and should be at minimum, comparable to an Intel 286, 12 MHz clock, 1 MB memory system with extended memory support. In this classification, the availability of floating point coprocessors and video resolution above the standard VGA level are important options. HIGH LEVEL - These systems will be used to support very computationally intensive processing, such as three-dimensional Computer Aided Design or symbolic manipulation of mathematical entities. These systems should be at minimum, comparable to an Intel 386, 25 MHz clock, 2 MB memory system with extended memory support. As with medium level systems, the availability of floating point coprocessors and video resolution above the standard VGA level are important options. Operating system software to support the use of this classification of microprocessors as a microcomputer file server or computer host of a small, 10 to 30 workstation, classroom or laboratory network is also an important option. Vendors should reference Section 2.3 for a description of departmental computing environments.

In addition, all microcomputer systems must have a clock to support usage monitoring which maintains the date and time when the system is powered off. A serial port is required so that these microcomputer systems can be used as terminals on some other specific computing system, as nodes connected to a departmental network, or as nodes connected to the campus-wide network. Vendors should provide information regarding the maintenance of proposed microcomputers. This includes at least two options. The first option includes the cost for vendor provided maintenance support and a description of how this would be accomplished. The second option includes the cost for spare parts and training if the College were to continue to provide maintenance support on our own or by becoming an authorized repair center for a vendor's products. The four specific user environments that will be addressed in the first component include the following. General Student Access to Microcomputing Faculty Access to Microcomputing Computer Aided Design Classroom and Laboratory Computing Engineering Graphics Computing General Student Access to Microcomputing

5.3.2

Students, regardless of their course of study, need to have access to low level microcomputing facilities to support paper preparation with word processing, analytical work with spreadsheeting, and course enrichment with provided instructional software. This microcomputing resource needs to be available to the general student population on a 24 hours per day, 7 days per week basis. Since this microcomputing resource must be public access, the use and management of hard disk systems is not realistic. Microcomputers will begin to replace terminals currently available on our academic computing systems. A student workstation would then be multi-functional and would be capable of acting as either a stand-alone microcomputer, or as a terminal connected to a larger computing system. Vendors should describe their involvement with providing access to computing for disabled persons. The continued development of computing access for our disabled student population is very important to the College. 5.3.2.1 Hardware The College expects to acquire in the range of 10 to 40 low level microcomputer systems with dual floppy disk drives and monochrome monitors in this student access environment. 5.3.2.2 Software The College expects to provide inexperienced users with simple and inexpensive access to basic microcomputer applications. Software needed in this environment includes an entry level word processor and spreadsheet, an easy to use file transfer product, a standard terminal emulator, and a user interface support shell to the operating system.

5.3.2.3 Transition This environment represents the formal introduction of a new level of service to our student population. The College will need to develop an ongoing process to train students in the use of these microcomputing systems. Vendors should include any training support materials appropriate to this level of microcomputing. These materials may include CDROM or videotape presentations, explanatory or tutorial software, or trouble shooting manuals or texts. 5.3.3 Faculty Access to Microcomputing

The College has approximately 250 faculty in about 140 office spaces. We currently have about 50 faculty offices populated with microcomputer systems. Faculty require microcomputer support for the development of instructional materials, for the processing of routine clerical work, for electronic communication with both on-campus and off-campus user communities, and for the integration and use of instructional software. The College will continue to support this type of work by providing microcomputer systems for faculty. Since a faculty office typically represents a small group of users and is not publicly accessible, the use and management of hard disk systems is realistic and expected. 5.3.3.1 Hardware The College expects to acquire in the range of 10 to 40 low level microcomputer systems with single floppy and hard disk drives, monochrome monitors and printers in this faculty access environment. We expect in succeeding years to continue to provide this type of microcomputer system to all interested faculty. The College expects to acquire some smaller number, from 1 to 10, high level microcomputer systems for special faculty initiatives and projects. For example, a Mathematics faculty investigating the use of symbolic manipulation software, such as MAPLE and MATHEMATICA, in Calculus courses, will need access to a high level microcomputer system. 5.3.3.2 Software The College expects to provide faculty with basic microcomputer applications including a word processor, a spreadsheet, a database management system, a file transfer product, a standard terminal emulator, and a user interface support shell to the operating system. 5.3.3.3 Transition This environment represents the continued development of faculty access to microcomputing. The College will need to develop an ongoing process to train faculty in the use of these microcomputer systems. Most of this training will be done on campus by staff and faculty. Vendors should include any training and usage support materials appropriate to these levels of microcomputing. Materials may include CDROM or videotape presentations, explanatory or tutorial software, or trouble shooting manuals or texts. 5.3.4 Computer Aided Design Classroom and Laboratory Computing

The learning of Computer Aided Design requires a classroom and laboratory environment in which students receive instruction, and afterinstruction, have the opportunity for practice. This type of laboratory currently exists in our Technologies Division with one lab of terminals supporting instruction using ANVIL 4000 on our Prime computer system and another lab of microcomputers supporting instruction using AUTOCAD on stand-alone microcomputers. The College expects to support this type of instruction with a network of microcomputer workstations which will allow the sharing of files between students and faculty and the sharing of output devices, such as plotters and printers. Vendors should propose the hardware and software components to create these departmental networked micro or mini computer systems and the hardware and software components to connect these systems to the campus-wide network. Vendors should reference Section 2.3 for a description of departmental computing environments. The College will first undertake the Computer Aided Design transition from our current Prime computer system to a departmental system and then will implement the connection of these environments to the campus-wide network. 5.3.4.1 Hardware The College expects to develop two Computer Aided Design classrooms or laboratorieseach equipped with a departmental networked micro or mini computer host; 15 microcomputer workstations; several faculty microcomputer workstations; the appropriate departmental computer host hardware for connection to the campus-wide network; and the appropriate departmental computer host and microcomputer workstation hardware for connection to a departmental network. These microcomputer systems should be in the high level category with large memory configurations, substantial hard disk capacity, and numeric coprocessors. Large 19 inch high resolution color monitors are important options. 5.3.4.2 Software The College expects to support these laboratories with software applications including, but not limited to, P-SPICE, ANVIL 5000 V.2, AUTOCAD V.10, ANSYS/PC, FRAME-3D, TIMELINE, and AEC modeling systems or their equivalents. Network facilities will be needed for uploading and downloading software and work files to and from the departmental computer host, for monitoring of equipment usage, and for sharing of output devices. 5.3.4.3 Transition This environment represents a significant change in the instruction in the Technologies Division. The training use the network facilities and the application software important. Vendors should include any training support appropriate to this computing environment. 5.3.5 Engineering Graphics Computing delivery of of faculty to is very materials

The Engineering Science curriculum requires an environment for the instruction of FORTRAN programming and for the use of Graphics

Libraries to accomplish elementary graphics applications. The advanced course makes use of a three-dimensional Computer Aided Design during part of the semester. Currently, this instruction is supported on the Prime computer system with the Tektronics IGL PLOT 10 library, a FORTRAN 77 compiler, and Tektronics 4014 graphics emulation. The College expects to support this type of instruction with a network of microcomputer workstations which will allow the sharing of files between students and faculty and the sharing of output devices, such as plotters and printers. Engineering Science students need open access to the microcomputer systems for doing programming exercises, but do not require a dedicated laboratory environment. These microcomputer systems will not be located in a single room or building. They will be located in a number of student open access areas with connectivity provided to the departmental networked micro or mini computer system through our campus-wide network. The major activity of these systems will be computer program development, that is, editing, compiling, executing and debugging. Since this microcomputing resource must be public access, the use and management of hard disk systems is not realistic. Vendors should propose the hardware and software components to create this departmental networked micro or mini computer system and the hardware and software components to connect this system to the campus-wide network. Vendors should reference Section 2.3 for a description of departmental computing environments. The College will first undertake the Engineering Graphics transition from our current Prime computer system to a departmental system and then will implement the connection of this environment to the campus-wide network. 5.3.5.1 Hardware The College expects to develop one Engineering Graphics open access network equipped with a departmental networked micro or mini computer host; 15 microcomputer workstations; several faculty microcomputer workstations; the appropriate departmental computer host hardware for connection to the campus-wide network;and the appropriate departmental computer host and microcomputer workstation hardware for connection to a departmental network. These microcomputer systems should be in the high level category with at minimum 3 MBs of memory and numeric coprocessors. Large 19 inch color monitors supporting video resolution in the 1000x800 pixel range are required on at least 3 of the 15 workstations. Standard VGA level color monitors should be included on the remaining workstations. All 15 microcomputer workstations will require dual floppy, high density disk drives, and not hard disk drives. 5.3.5.2 Software The College expects to support these laboratories with software applications including, but not limited to, a text editor, a FORTRAN 77 compiler, and a graphics library of standard graphics subroutines capable of supporting all proposed color monitors. Two options are available for student use of the software. One is to provide a copy of the software to each student on a high density

floppy. The other approach is to have a single copy of the software on the hard disk of the departmental networked micro or mini computer host and provide access through the departmental or campus-wide network. Vendors should propose the software option they believe will most simply and cost-effectively support this computing environment. Network facilities will be needed for uploading and downloading software and work files to and from the departmental computer host, for monitoring of equipment usage, for sharing of output devices, and for maintaining private disk directories. Application software capable of supporting three-dimensional Computer Aided Design will be needed. Since the student nodes of this network will not have hard disks, this software must be able to load from or operate from the departmental computer host. 5.3.5.3 Transition This environment represents a significant change in the delivery of instruction in Engineering Science. The training of faculty to use the network facilities and the application software is very important. Most of the current applications are written using Tektronics IGL PLOT 10 library calls. Vendor support for converting such applications to the call format of the proposed graphics library would be very helpful. Vendors should include any training support materials appropriate to this computing environment. 5.3.6 Summary of First Component: Microcomputers

In summary, the first component of the academic section of this RFP includes the need to establish, or continue development of, the following four different computing environments. General Student Access to Microcomputing Faculty Access to Microcomputing Computer Aided Design Classroom and Laboratory Computing Engineering Graphics Computing

The College expects to acquire different microcomputer hardware and software platforms for the different computing environments. Departmental networked micro or mini computer systems are seen as the most straightforward computing environments to service our needs in Computer Aided Design and Engineering Graphics. The microcomputer and computer systems in each of these four environments must have the capacity to connect to our developing campus-wide network. 5.4 Second Component: Networking

The diverse and distributed computing environments described in the first component are effective at providing for special needs and are cost-effective in supporting general student and faculty computing. However, as disconnected computing environments, they are not a means of facilitating communication, cannot share important resources, and cannot be effectively administered on the basis of utilization. The second component of our new academic information services environment, connection to the campus-wide network, will provide for facilitating communications, sharing resources, and monitoring usage. All academic computing systems will be able to communicate with each

other, with all other College computing systems, and with other remote computing systems. All institutional information services described in Section 4 must be made available to the academic community at the latest during this second component. Dial up communication capabilities to the network for access to College computing systems and from the network for access to remote computing systems is very important to the College. With a large student population using microcomputers for basic applications, such as word processing, the sharing of high quality printers through the network will become essential to support the printing requirements students will have when composing research papers or reports. The time on task is an important component of the evaluation and advisement of students. The network should provide support for faculty to assess how often and to what extent their students are using the College's computing facilities. 5.5 Third Component: Minicomputer

The student and faculty microcomputer infrastructure developed in the first component and connected by the networking accomplished in the second component will remove some of the academic computing workload from the current minicomputer. However, the College will still requirea mini, super-mini, or mainframe computer system for the delivery of instruction in areas such as computer programming and job control language. 5.5.1 Hardware

The hardware component(s) of this computer system must support connection to a campus-wide Ethernet backbone and use of TCP/IP as a terminal protocol. Vendors should describe a computer hardware system comparable to the Prime System B described in Section 2. 5.5.2 Software

The College will require software to support this environment including, but not limited to, EMACS; compilers for FORTRAN 77, COBOL 74, PASCAL, C, and RPG; an assembler language; program debugging tools; and a SQL database system. IBM JCL, or an IBM JCL emulator, is also required to support student instruction in our Computer Information Systems curriculum. The ability to easily customize computing environments is required in instructional computing. The mini, super-mini, or mainframe computer operating system needs to allow for easy customization of the user interface with symbolic abbreviations and command files to adapt to the needs of a class or individual user. Software facilities for communicating among students and faculty, both directly, using messages or mail and indirectly, using techniques such as the capturing of student terminal input and output in a file to facilitate debugging, are needed in this instructional environment. The security system is critical and must be able to resist determined and persistent probing. Security must be strong enough to distinctly separate student files from each other, yet be flexible enough to allow faculty access to their own students' files.

5.5.3

Transition

The College will require support for the conversion of current applications and the training of faculty. The conversion of instructional software currently in use on the Prime computer system will represent a major effort for faculty whose curricula require a large computer system platform. Vendors should describe their ability to assist in converting PASCAL,BASIC, COBOL 74, FORTRAN IV, FORTRAN 77, and C computer programs. The training, or retraining, of faculty and system support personnel is very important. Vendors should describe their ability to provide this training on our campus. Section 6 - Administrative Information Services 6.1 Hardware

The hardware component(s) of the computer system which will be used for providing Administrative information services must support connection to a campus-wide Ethernet backbone and use of TCP/IP as a terminal protocol. The computer system hardware being proposed by vendors should include or support the following characteristics and capabilities. - Support the processing requirements of an institution with at least one and one-half times the total student population of our College and with a comparable processing environment to our College - Support at least 500 on-line transaction processing users of, in addition to the normal batch processing requirements of, the proposed Student Information and Campus Administrative System - Support dial-up access from remote locations through the campus-wide Ethernet network - Include a disk subsystem with at least one and one-half times the storage capacity required for a minimum retention of six years of historical data and for the anticipated on-line and batch requirements of the proposed Student Information and Campus Administrative System - Include a disk subsystem with sufficient redundancy to support and allow for continued operation of the proposed Student Information and Campus Administrative System in the event of single disk drive failure - Include a tape subsystem capable of supporting both 1600 and 6250 BPI tape formats and a tape cartridge option for the tape subsystem - Include both impact and laser printers with sufficient capacities for the anticipated printing requirements of the proposed Student Information and Campus Administrative System 6.2 SOFTWARE

6.2.1 Student Information and Campus Administrative System

The College's current Student Information and Campus Administrative System has been user written and developed in-house to operate on a Unisys A10H computer system. This development has occurred utilizing Unisys proprietary software for communications and data base management, the Communications Management System (COMS) and Data Management System II (DMSII) respectively. All application programs have been written in COBOL74 without the use of any source code generating software or 4th generation languages. The maintenance of current programs and development of new applications are very labor intensive functions. Due to these maintenance and new development demands, we are not always able to devote adequate resources to enhance current software systems to provide better support for the changing needs of our users and to improve operational efficiencies. The modular development over a period of time of the College's current Student Information and Campus Administrative System has created many complex relationships between data elements. These complex relationships, and the capabilities of our current inquiry and ad-hoc reporting tool, create an environment where our users have great difficulty in supporting their own unique and dynamic information needs. The College's current database implementation does not utilize relational database technology nor does it provide an industry standard SQL-based user interface for inquiry and ad-hoc reporting. A vendor supplied and maintained Student Information and Campus Administrative System utilizing current relational database technology and providing a SQL-based user interface may provide the College with a solution to these problems. Vendors should propose a Student Information and Campus Administrative System which includes, but is not limited to, support for the following application areas. Accounts Payable Admissions Alumni/Development Budget Continuing Education County Chargeback Degree Audit Enrollment Management Services (including prospect development and persistence tracking) Exam Scheduling Extra Curricular Activities Facilities Management (including facilities maintenance and utilities management) Financial Aid (including analysis and disbursement) General Ledger Grade Reporting Human Resources/Personnel Institutional Research Inventory Management (including barcode technology)

Library Automation Mailing List Processing Master Class Schedule Master Course Catalog Payroll Public Safety Purchasing Room Scheduling Student Accounts Receivable Student Advisement Student Billing Student Class Scheduling Student Health Insurance Student Health Reports/Immunization Student Job Placement and Tracking Student Registration Student Transcript The Student Information and Campus Administrative System being proposed by vendors should include or support the following characteristics and capabilities. - Be highly integrated and flexible - Be accessible to all users with appropriate security controls - Interface with office automation facilities - Include the use of industry standard software applications and tools - Support at least 500 on-line transaction processing users - Allow for student use of an on-line telephone registration system - Support continuous, 24 hours per day and 7 days per week, on-line inquiry and update processing - Support database tape backup while on-line inquiry and update processing is in progress - Support complete transaction and database synchronized recovery in the event of hardware or software failure - Support the logging of all on-line update transactions including the date, time and user identification of the transaction initiator - Include complete vendor software support - Comply with the "Code of Standards and Procedures for the Administration and Operation of Community College under the Program of State University of New York State" - Support sub-second transaction response time - Include source code for each proposed software component The vendor's response and proposal of a Student Information and Campus Administrative System must include the following.

- A cross-reference report, indicating which module of the proposed system, supports each of the application areas listed previously - A complete data element dictionary for each of the modules of the proposed system - Sufficient documentation for each of the modules of the proposed system to allow the College to evaluate the proposed solution with respect to our current system features and future needs 6.2.2 Operating System and System Software The Operating and System software being proposed by vendors should include or support the following characteristics and capabilities. - Include system resource management tools - Support the detection, logging, and diagnosis of hardware, software, and/or security faults or problems - Support the logging of all jobs and programs run including the date, the time, the user identification of the job or program initiator, the files accessed, the system resources used (processor, input-output, memory), the termination status, and other data necessary for appropriate system accounting and management - Support the on-line and batch analysis of system log files -Support usage of the system from remote locations by dial-up access through the campus-wide Ethernet network 6.3 Transition Vendors should propose a plan for transition from our current administrative environment to their proposed Student Information and Campus Administrative System hardware and software environment. This plan should include, but not be limited to, site preparation, hardware and software installation, data conversion, training, and implementation support. The training of our system support and departmental user personnel is especially important to the College. Section 7 - Summary of Information Services 7.1 Summary

The College is evolving from an environment where computing services are provided by separate and distinct centralized computing resources to an environment where information services are provided by both centralized and decentralized computing resources. Personal level information services will be provided to individuals by stand-alone microcomputing systems. Departmental level information services will be provided to small groups of individuals by networked micro or mini computer systems. Institutional level information services will be provided to large segments of the campus population by mini, super-mini or mainframecomputing systems. These three levels of computing resources provide different information services. Our users must be able to easily access the computing resource(s) required to obtain the information service(s)

needed to perform their jobs. For most of our users this will require access to more than one of these three levels of computing resources. For many of our users this will require access to multiple computing resources within a particular level. For example, a faculty advisor in our Engineering Science Department would likely need access to all three levels of computing resources for obtaining at minimum the following information services. Personal - For the creation of course instructional materials and student handouts using stand-alone applications on a microcomputer Departmental - For the development and testing of course assignments using the library of graphic subroutines on a departmental networked micro or mini computer system Institutional - For communicating with students using the campus-wide electronic mail facility on a particular computing host; for communicating with faculty at some other institution using the campus-wide electronic mail facility for access to BITNET on the same computing host; or for advising students using the Student Information and Campus Administrative System on the same, or some other, computing host The development of a campus-wide network, allowing for user access to any of our departmental or institutional computing resources and allowing for user access to remote computing facilities, is of critical importance to the delivery of the information services described in this RFP. A user, by a single connection of his/her workstation to this campus-wide network, should have access to the information services needed to perform his/her jobs. Vendors should not perceive our distinction between network, institutional, academic, and administrative information services as a desire for them to propose four distinct computing environments. Vendors should propose solutions which simply and cost-effectively address our information service needs. A vendor's solution(s) may include one, or many computing environments. Vendors should propose industry standard hardware and software architectures for both the communications and computing resources needed in our development of this information services environment. The College is keenly aware of the importance of planning for this transition in the four information services areas we have described. We are very interested in allaspects of the transition plans which vendors will propose. We view this transition process as one which will become more clearly defined for the College as vendor recommendations and plans are reviewed. The campus-wide network pilot project will begin within a few months and will result in the installation of a broadband Ethernet supporting IEEE 802.3 standards and the use of TCP/IP as a standard terminal protocol. Vendors should include hardware and software components for all proposed computing systems, terminal servers for all proposed terminals and microcomputer bridges for all proposed microcomputer file servers to provide for connectivity to a network compatible with these standards. Vendors should also include any necessary hardware or software components for connection of our current population of microcomputers to this network.

In our new information services environment, the critical element in providing services to the College will become the campus-wide network. Vendors should include hardware and software components for managing the network and should clearly describe how these components will allow the College to effectively maintain and secure this resource. The development of institutional information services will greatly benefit the flow of information throughout our entire campus community. For example, students, faculty, and staff should have access to a common Office Automation System for both intra-campus and inter-campus electronic mail and data sharing. Students,faculty, and staff should have access to a Library Information System for both academic and administrative research. We understand that for some of the services defined in this section we are describing a direction and may not be able to implement a complete solution at this time. Vendors are requested to respond wherever possible with complete solutions. When a complete solution is not possible vendors are requested to respond with a partial or directional solution which defines for the College the stages of implementation required to reach our service goal. The academic and administrative information services sections describe complex, and changing, computing environments. The notion of centralized computing resources being able to support all of the needs of academic and administrative computing is no longer appropriate. The College has already undergone significant transitioning to more diverse and distributed environments with the tremendous integration of microcomputing into many academic curricula and into virtually all academic and administrative departments. However, the perspectives presented in the academic and administrative information services sections are clearly different. The following situations are examples to help vendors understand these different perspectives, are not universally applicable to all academic, and administrative departments and may in fact, not be applicable to these specific departments. In providing academic services we describe an environment where both instructional, and instructional support, computing is decentralized. For example, a Mechanical Engineering Technology faculty would teach Computer Aided Design using an application on a departmental networked micro or mini computer system and would create course materials using stand-alone applications on his/her microcomputer. In providing administrative services we describe an environment where administrative computing is centralized and administrative support computing is decentralized. For example, an Admissions counselor would process student applications using the Student Information and Campus Administrative System on an institutional computing resource and would analyze downloaded data using a stand-alone spreadsheet application on his/her microcomputer. We do not expect to departmentalize administrative computing in the same way that we do expect to departmentalize academic computing. In the academic information services section, the continued growth of microcomputing, the development of departmental computing environments, and the connection to and use of the campus-wide network

for instruction, and instructional support, are the first stages described. As we more clearly understand the impact of the integration and use of these environments, we will be better able to define our need for a mini, super-mini, or mainframe computer system to support instructional computing. In the administrative information services section, the capabilities of the proposed Student Information and Campus Administrative System and the benefits to the College of using this product should be clearly described. Our current administrative solution does not provide users with the tools they need to access institutional data and to create their own unique, and dynamic, information. The ability of our users to create their own information using institutional data has become very important in the daily performance of their jobs and in the effective management of our College. 7.2 Implementation Plan

The development of a final implementation plan for the information services described in this RFP will be affected by many factors. We expect this final implementation plan to be more clearly defined after we have analyzed vendor responses to this RFP and have made decisions on what products will provide what information services for the College. We expect active participation from selected vendors in the process of developing a final, more detailed implementation plan. The following preliminary implementation plan is an attempt to extract the major components from each of the information services areas, to prioritize these components based on their importance to the College, and to schedule these components based on the availability of College personnel to support the implementation. Vendors should understand that information services not extracted as major components for this preliminary implementation plan will become part of our final implementation plan; that all information services described in this RFP are important to the College; and that the scheduling of major components based on the availability of College personnel does not preclude the option of vendor personnel support to improve the timeframe for implementation of information services. January 1991 - August 1991 Network Academic Install Install Install Install Install network management system student open access microcomputers faculty access microcomputers first computer aided design system engineering science system

September 1991 - August 1992 Institutional Academic Administrative Install Install Install Install office automation system bulletin board system second computer aided design system student information and campus administrative system and user support tools

September 1992 - August 1993 Network Institutional Academic Install network components to attach remaining devices directly to campus-wide Ethernet Install library information system Install large computer system

Appendix A - General Municipal Law S. 103-a. Ground for cancellation of contract by municipal corporations and fire districts.

A clause shall be inserted in all specifications or contracts made or awarded by a municipal corporation or any public department, agency or official thereof on or after the first day of July, nineteen hundred fifty-nine or by a district or any agency or official thereof on or after the first day of September, nineteen hundred sixty, for work or services performed or to be performed, or goods sold or to be sold, to provide that upon the refusal of a person, when called before a grand jury to testify concerning any transaction or contract had with the state, and any political subdivision thereof, a public authority or with any public department, agency or official of the state or of any political subdivision thereof or a public authority, to sign a waiver of immunity against subsequent criminal prosecution or to answer any relevant question concerning such transaction or contract. (a) Such person, and any firm, partnership or corporation of which he is a member, partner, director or officer shall be disqualified from thereafter selling to or submitting bids to or receiving awards from or entering into any contracts with any municipal corporation or fire district, or any public department agency or official thereof, for goods, work or services, for a period of five years after such refusal, and to provide also that (b) any and all contracts made with any municipal corporation or any public department, agency or official thereof on or after the first day of July, nineteen hundred fifty-nine or with any fire district or any agency or official thereof on or after the first day of September, nineteen hundred sixty, by such person, and by any firm, partnership or corporation of which he is a member, partner, director or officer may be cancelled or terminated by the municipal corporation or fire district without incurring any penalty or damages on account of such cancellation or termination, but any monies owing by the municipal corporation or fire district for goods delivered or work done prior to the cancellation or termination shall be paid. The provisions of this section as in force and effect prior to the first day of September, nineteen hundred sixty, shall apply to specifications or contracts made or awarded by a municipal corporation on or after the first day of July, nineteen hundred fifty-nine, but prior to the first day of September, nineteen hundred sixty.

S.

103-b.

Disqualification to contract with municipal corporations and fire districts.

Any person who, when called before a grand jury to testify concerning any transaction or contract had with the state, any political subdivision thereof, a public authority, or with a public department, agency or official of the state or of any political subdivision thereof or of a public authority, refuses to sign a waiver of immunity against subsequent criminal prosecution or to answer any relevant question concerning such transaction or contract, and any firm, partnership or corporation of which he is a member, partner, director or officer shall be disqualified from thereafter selling to or submitting bids to or receiving awards from or entering into any contracts with any municipal corporation or fire district, or with any public department, agency or official thereof, for goods, work or services, for a period of five years after such refusal or until a disqualification shall be removed pursuant to the provisions of section one hundred three-c of this article. It shall be the duty of the officer conducting the investigation before the grand jury before which the refusal occurs to send notice of such refusal, together with the names of any firm, partnership or corporation of which the person so refusing is known to be a member, partner, officer or director, to the superintendent of public works of the State of New York, and the appropriate departments, agencies and officials of the state, political subdivisions thereof or public authorities with whom the person so refusing and any firm, partnership or corporation of which he is a member, partner, director or officer, is known to have a contract. S. 103-c. Statement of non-collusion in contract with municipal corporations or fire districts.

Every contract hereafter made or awarded by a municipal corporation or any public department, agency or official thereof or by a fire district or any agency or official thereof, pursuant to bid, for work or services following statement by the bidder, under penalty of perjury: Non-collusive bidding certification. The bidder certifies that: (a) the bid has been arrived at the bidder independently and has been submitted without collusion with any other vendor of materials, supplies, or equipment of the type described in the invitation for bids, and (b) the contents of the bid have not been communicated by the bidder, nor, to its best knowledge and belief, by any of its employees or agents, to any person not an employee or agent of the bidder or its surety on any bond furnished herewith prior to the official opening of the bid. S. 103-d. to Statement of non-collusion in bids and proposals political subdivision of the state or fire district. Every bid or proposal hereafter made to a political subdivision of the state or any public department, agency or official thereof or by a fire district or any agency or official thereof, for work or services performed or to be performed o r goods sold or to be sold, shall contain the following statement subscribed by t he bidder and affirmed by such bidder as true under the penalties of perjury:

Non-collusion bidding certification. By submission of this bid or proposal, th e bidder certified that: (a) this bid or proposal has been independently arrived at without collusion with any other bidder or with any competitor or potential competitor; (b) this bid or proposal has not been knowingly disclosed and will not be knowingly disclosed, prior to the opening of bids or proposals for this project, to any other bidder, competitor or potential competitor; (c) no attempt has been or will be made to induce any other person, partnership or corporation to submit or not to submit a bid or proposal; (d) the person signing this accuracy of the statements contained in this certification, and under the penalties of perjury, affirms the truth thereof, such penalties being applicable to the bidder as well as to the person signing in its behalf; (e) that attached hereto (if a corporate bidder) is a certified copy of resolution authorizing the execution of this certificate by the signator of this bid or proposal in behalf of the corporate bidder. IN THE CASE OF CORPORATE BIDDERS A RESOLUTION IN THE FOLLOWING FORM MUST ACCOMPA NY THE BIDS. Resolved that.......................................................be (Name of Corporation) authorized to sign and submit the bid or proposal of this corporation for the following project............................................. ...................................................................... (Describe Project) and to include with such bid or proposal the certificate as to non-collusion required by section one hundred three-d of the General Municipal Law as the act and deed of such corporation, and for any inaccuracies or misstatements in such certificate this corporate bidder shall be liable under the penalties of perjur y. The foregoing is a true and correct copy of the resolution adopted by ....................................................... corporation ata meeting of its board of directors held on the ............... day of ................ 19 ..... (SEAL OF CORPORATION)

I, the undersigned, do herby certify that: (a) this bid or proposal has been independently arrived at without collusion with any other bidder or with any competitor or potential competitor; (b) this bid or proposal has not been knowingly disclosed and will not be knowingly disclosed, prior to the opening o f bids or proposals for this project, to any other bidder, competitor or potentia l competitor; (c) no attempt has been or will be made to induce any other person, partnership, or corporation to submit or not to submit a bid or proposal; (d) t he person signing this bid or proposal certified that he has fully informed himsel f

regarding the accuracy of the statements contained in this certification, and under the penalties of perjury, affirms the truth thereof, such penalties being applicable to the bidder as well as to the person signing in its behalf; (e) th at attached hereto (if a corporate bidder) is a certified copy of resolution authorizing the execution of this certificate by the signator of this bid or proposal in behalf of the corporate bidder.

________________________________________ Signature of Person ________________________________________ Name of Person ________________________________________ Title of Person ________________________________________ Date