You are on page 1of 653

My Course Overview

Urban Transportation Planning


MIT Course 1.252j/11.380j
Fall 2006
Mikel Murga, MIT Research Associate and Lecturer

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

First, a confession
I make a living selling ideas to design roads, to upgrade transit
systems or to rehabilitate cities and towns

Day 1

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

First, a confession
I make a living selling ideas to design roads, to upgrade transit systems or to rehabilitate cities and towns

Day 1

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport a Complex Organic System

The microscopic simulation shows pedestrians, cars,


buses, taxis We are trying to model individuals:

Predicting their collective behavior through models is


never easy. That is why we do not have to educate
them, but rather:

Day 1

Who appear to behave sometimes in irrational, chaotic or


emotional ways
Who are driven by habits (change takes time!)
Who learn and adapt (specially under worsening conditions)

Observe their behavior and search for their logic bubble


Ask their opinions and find out about their perceptions

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport a Complex Organic System

Many of us went into Engineering to deal with


predictable systems, but NOT WITH PEOPLE!

In Engineering Schools:
This is THE problem
We want THE solution

Day 1

Transport deals with people who appear to


behave: Irrationally, Intuitively, Unpredictably
5

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transportation:

Action and reaction:

Same dosage, different reaction


Learning and adapting
Space and time non-linearities
Latent demand

Facts and perceptions:

Day 1

A Complex System

Elected officials believe that voters


Voters believe that
6

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Systemic Thinking
Goals
Problem

Decision

Results

Situation

Decisions
Goals

Side Effects
Environment

From: Business Dynamics,


by John Sterman

Goals of
Other Agents
Day 1

Figure by MIT OCW.

Actions of Others

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Road Construction

ROAD CONGESTION SYSTEM


COMPLEXITY

Delay

+
Capacity
Expansion

Highway Capacity

Pressure to Reduce Congestion

+
Open the
Hinterlands

Delay

Travel Desire

Travel Time

Traffic
Volume

Size of Region
within desired
travel time
Move to
the Burbs

+ + +

Discretionary
Trips

Attractiveness
of Driving

Trips per Day

Average Trip Length

+
+

Cars per
Region

Public Transit Network

+
Delay

Choke off
Ridership

Public Transit
Fares

Public Transit
Ridership

Take the bus?


Cars in
Region

Route
Expansion

Extra Miles

PT Capacity
Expansion

Adequacy of
Public Transit

Delay

Delay

Population and
Economic Activity
of Region

Fare
Increase

Cost
Cutting
Public Transit
Deficit

Public Transit
Costs

Public Transit
Revenue

Can't get there on the buses

Figure by MIT OCW.

From: Business Dynamics, by John D. Sterman


8

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport a Complex Organic System

We need a holistic approach to transportation to


recognize and take advantage of all the interactions
among:

Day 1

Transportation modes
Land use
Quality of life of residents
Economic development

Just focusing for instance on transit will not do it!


9

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transportation
Transportation is a great field to be in!
simplistic solutions are proposed with sublime assurance,
as if the construction of some type of transportation used
in another city, would suddenly solve all problems
And these large matters are discussed without any
organized framework, without any consideration of goals,
mostly without any data ...
It is almost as if people delight in having an area in which
anybody can speculate because nobody knows anything
Roger L. Creighton, Urban Transportation Planning, 1970
Day 1

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A Quick Overview of Transport Issues

Day 1

The automobile
Transit: Past and Future
Transportation
And Land Use
Technological Fixes
Closing Thoughts

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile

Day 1

Convenience, comfort,
flexibility
Who is against the
American way of life?
It drives the economy!

Dont leave home


without it!
12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile

How much does it cost?

Day 1

To the driver
To the rest of society

Fixed and operating costs


What is the required infrastructure?
What do we mean by externalities?

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile

Day 1

Current urban development


trends increase car ownership
and use
Car operating costs are lower
than ownership costs. So once
you buy it
Drivers do not pay full costs
(despite lobby claims to the
contrary)
Main Threat:
IRREVERSIBILITIES
14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile

Some prevailing popular beliefs:


-car taxes exceed car induced costs
-car mobility is a right
-proper technology will solve the
problem

Day 1

which together with the lack of "quick


fixes", compound the problem
15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile
Suburban sprawl:

Day 1

A dream made true by the car

Have we locked ourselves into it?

What does it imply?

From city life to Edge Cities?

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Trends in Modal Split for Daily Travel in the United States (1969-2001)

Mode of Transportation

1977

1983

1990

1995

2001

81.8

83.7

82.0

87.1

86.5

86.4

Transit

3.2

2.6

2.2

2.0

1.8

1.6

Walk2

na

9.3

8.5

7.2

5.4

8.6

Bicycle

na

0.7

0.8

0.7

0.9

0.9

Other3

5.0

3.7

6.5

3.0

5.4

2.5

Auto2

1969

Source: Socioeconomics of Urban Travel: Evidence from the 2001 NHTS


by John Pucher and John L. Renne, . Transportation Quarterly, Vol. 57, No. 3, Summer 2003 (4977). Eno
Transportation Foundation, Inc., Washington, DC.
Federal Highway Administration, Nationwide Personal Transportation Surveys 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990, and
1995; and National Household Travel Survey, 2001.
Day 1

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

US Public Transport Today : Metropolitan Areas

Trends in the Modal Split of the Home-to-Work Journey (1990-2000)


Modal Split %
1990 - 2000

Transit

Non
Motorized

Work at
home

Car

Greater Boston

82.7 - 82.7

8.6 - 9.0

6.2 - 5.1

2.5 - 3.2

Chicago Counties

79.5 - 81.5

13.4 - 11.5

4.9 - 4.2

2.1 - 2.9

NY-NJ-CT-PA

65.8 - 65.7

24.8 - 24.9

7.0 - 6.4

2.4 - 3.0

San Francisco Oakland

81.3 - 81.0

9.3 - 9.5

5.9 - 5.5

3.5 - 4.1

Washington DCBaltimore

81.5 - 83.2

11.0 - 9.4

4.8 - 3.9

2.7 - 3.5

Source: Journey to Work Trends in the United States and its Major Metropolitan Areas 1960-2000

Day 1

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit to the rescue!

Day 1

We are all in favor!


But my case is
special
Choice and captive
riders
Levels-of-Service
(LOS) like the car?
Its about time!
19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit
Is it a panacea?
A tram with say 230
riders is equivalent to
177 automobiles
with an occupancy
ratio of 1.3...
provided they are
all choice riders

Day 1

Figure by MIT OCW.

20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit
Same menu for all

like the Ford T?

Figure by MIT OCW.


Day 1

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit

Day 1

Every major transit


project (as every road
scheme) is announced
as the solution
Sometimes hard to see
the opportunities which
open up if the right
process is engaged
22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit

How do we rate it a success?

Day 1

Total number of trips?


The % of patrons: captive vs
choice riders?
Total transit trips per capita?
Transit share of the overall
mobility market?
The level of city traffic?
The density of jobs?
The impact on the real estate
and retail markets?
The Bump Factor?
23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Competition from the Car Road System

Urban parking supply is relatively widely available and

often free

95% of car commuters enjoy free parking


380 parking spaces per 1000 central city workers in 10 largest
US cities

Highly developed urban road system


6.6 metres of road per capita in 10 largest US cities; 3 times
European levels

*Source: The Urban Transportation Crisis in Europe and North America, by John Pucher and
Christian LeFevre, 1996.
Day 1

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Arguments Supporting Public Transport

Equity:

Congestion:

Are car technology strategies effective?

Energy:

Day 1

Public transport is necessary, but not sufficient to change trends

Environmental:

The need for a high-quality alternative

Land use influence:

Access for those who cannot or do not choose to drive

Are car technology strategies effective?


25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit

Transit allows agglomeration of


economic activity in cities:

Day 1

New York, Boston, San Francisco, etc could


not have developed without transit
The current contribution of earlier
investments in heavy rail is not valued
today appropriately
New investments bound to have a lasting
impact thus the need for a long view
26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit

Transit is a most effective tool to


decrease external costs in cities:

These costs may exceed $1,000 per person


per year (Ref: External Costs Study for the

Basque Country, 2006)

Day 1

They correspond in order of importance to


accident-related costs, impacts on human
health, congestion, noise impacts and the
current market value of global warming
27

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit


4.0

Vehicles per Household

Persons per Household

3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5

0.0
1960
U.S. Census

Day 1

1970

1980

1990

2000

Business as usual
translates into annual
congestion cost today
of more than $ 60
billion/year (AASHTO)
Implications of the
number of automobiles
in USA exceeding the
number of licensed
drivers
28

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit

Transit reduces the auto ownership


need:

Day 1

This should be converted into a yearly


stream of net benefits, based on the
savings of capital and operating costs (the
hidden part of the iceberg - F.Salvucci)
This and the previous arguments underline
the need to define a new evaluation
framework for public transport
29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit

Transit is often associated to operating


inefficiencies, but:

Day 1

Most agencies have already improved


efficiency
Many of todays new technologies just
focus on the quality of service perceived by
users, not on efficiency
Similarly to other fields (Education,
Health) heavily dependent on local labor,
transit is subject to Baumols Disease.
30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit

The key is the


enhancement of the
quality of the urban space
Public Transport can be a
catalyst for this process:

Day 1

Melbourne is clearly one of


the new success stories as
described so well by Jan
Gehl (Places for People. Melbourne, 2004)
Seoul received an award
during last years TRB
31

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit


Improvement of Public
Transport often brings
enhancements of the quality
of the urban space

Day 1

32

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit


Improvement of Public Transport
often brings enhancements of the
quality of the urban space

Day 1

33

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit

Day 1

The Land Use Connection:


We tend to concentrate our
analysis on the disaggregate
behavior of individual
drivers to anticipate their
reaction to system changes
However a more relevant
question is who is shaping
the maze into which the
mice are constrained
34

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other Arguments Supporting Transit

Day 1

The lesson is that rail


transit needs to resume
its traditional role as
shaper of urban
development
By abandoning that
role, highways are the
ones guiding the
location of new
residential and job
centers developments
35

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit: The example from Bilbao

Metropolitan Bilbao, in
the Basque Country of
Spain, is a good
example of balanced
investments between
highways and transit
In the last decade, the
transit network added a
state-of-the-art new
subway, a new Light Rail
and new refurbishment
of the RENFE, FEVE and
ET rail networks

Day 1

LRT

Metro
RENFE
FEVE
500 mts

36

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit: The example from Bilbao

Day 1

In the last decade, the


transit network added a
state-of-the-art new
subway, a new Light Rail
and new refurbishment of
the RENFE, FEVE and ET
rail networks

37

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit: The example from Bilbao

Day 1

In parallel to the new infrastructure


projects, the quality of the urban
space has been improved
However experience shows that this
has not been enough to turn the
tide

38

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit: The example from Bilbao

In parallel, new
expressways
have attempted
to build their way
out of congestion
but have in fact
served to foster
new suburban
developments

Day 1

39

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit and Road Congestion


The reality modeled for 1985 and 2004
in Bilbao shows similar congestion levels
but with higher flows

Day 1

40

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit and Road Congestion


The home surveys from 1987 and 2002
describe a clear unsustainable trend
Distribucin
viajes por modos
en el in
Bilbao
Metropolitano
Modal Splitdeinlos
Metropolitan
Bilbao
1987
and in 2002
70%
62,4%
60%

1987
2002

50%
43,4%
40%
31,1%
30%

18,5%

20%

13,3%

11,2%11,8%
10%

5,5%
1,8%

0,4%

0,1% 0,1%

0%
A PieFoot
On

Day 1

Coche
Automobile

Bus
Bus

Modos

Tren
Train
Metro
Metro

Otros
Others

Bici

41

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit

Service quality is a
prerequisite, but transit is
part of a bigger whole

Day 1

Urban Density
Parking policy
Priority
Information
Pricing

42

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport and Land Use

Opening the new frontier


Who gains with a new expressway?

Day 1

New access opportunities?


Faster times for present users?
New development opportunities?
Induced demand to get back to square one?

43

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A simplified interaction model


Income

New Cars

Low

Menor

Transit
Users

Pedestrians

Aumento de

PARKING

Density

CONGESTION

car use

IMPACT

FACTORS
IMPACTS

TRANSIT

Source: Adaptation from l London Research Centre


Day 1

44

The Land Use-Transport Link


Bostons Public Transport System

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Buses in green
Subway in brown
Commuter Rail in blue
Day 1

Boston Public Transport System


0

.5

1.5

Miles

45

The Land Use-Transport Link


Bostons Commuter Trip at Residence End
Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Clay Pit Pond


Perch Pond
Pit Pond

Mystic River
Chelsea River

Jerrys Pond

Belle Isle Inlet

Island End River


Belle Isle I

Fresh Pond

Little Mystic Ch

Millers River
Millers River

Sawing Pond

Charles River
Charles River
Basin
Charles River

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond
Boston Harbor

Muddy River Pond

er Pond

Fort Point
Channel

2000 HBW Modal Split at ORIGI

Muddy River

Block Group Charts


Reserved Channel

Chestnut Hill
Reservoir

Fisher Hill
Reservoir
Brookline
Reservr

Leverett Pond
Old Harbor

Day 1
Sargent Pond

Wards Pond

3,000
1,500
750
Boston Harbor Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
Walked
0
.4
.8

46

1.2

The Land Use-Transport Link


Bostons Commuter Trip at Residence End
Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

38
93



128



129


95

28



107



3A



129





95



62

114





2

1A


99



126


60



2A



2000 HBW Modal Split at ORIGI


20

Block Group Charts


16



90F

1
2




90



27

90

30


9



Day 1

28





203

93

3,000
1,500
750
Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
Walked
1
2

47

The Land Use-Transport Link


Bostons Commuter Trip at Destination End
Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Clay Pit Pond

Mystic River
Chelsea River

Jerrys Pond

Belle Isle I

Island End River


Bel
d

Little Mystic Ch

Millers River

Charles River
Charles River
Basin
Charles River
Muddy River Pond

2000 HBW Modal Split at Destination


Block Group Charts

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond

75,000
Boston Harbor
37,500
18,750

Fort Point
Channel

Muddy River
Reserved Channel

Day Fisher
1 Hill
Reservoir

Leverett Pond

Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Commuter rail
Boston
Harbor
Walk
Taxi
0
.4
.8
Miles

1.2

48

The Land Use-Transport Link


Bostons Commuter Trip at Destination End
Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

129


95



28



38

93

114


128



62



107





3A

129



4


95

62





2

1A


99



126


60


20



27

2000 HBW Modal Split at Destination


Block Group Charts

2A



75,000
37,500
18,750

16





30

90

9





28



135

Day 1

90F

90

93

203 



3A

Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Commuter rail
Walk
Taxi
0
1
2
Miles

49

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Land Use-Transport Link

Day 1

As a chicken and egg problem, job


density and parking restrictions go hand
in hand
But parking restrictions do not impede
economic development
In fact, Boston development has been
very impressive, since its EPA led
parking freeze in 1973
50

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Land Use-Transport Link:


Bostons 1973 Parking Freeze and

Day 1

Photographs courtesy of Ken Kruckemeyer, MIT. Used with permission.

51

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport and Land Use

Suburban sprawl and the car

Day 1

Did we want to segregate society?


Downtown vs the Mall
Public vs private space, or
Public poverty vs private wealth

Transit and density


Infill development around stations

52

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Technological Fixes

New car technologies:

Day 1

Increased efficiency
Lower pollution levels
Safer operation (mainly for the driver)

ITS or how to get more mileage from


our present system

53

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Typical ITS priorities


Common Transport Vision
Common Strategic Approach
Reduction of Road Congestion
Improvement of Road Safety
Decreased Negative Environmental Impacts
Supply and Demand Systems Management
New Model for Institutional Cooperation

Day 1

55

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The long road to ITS Deployment

Day 1

ITS tools easy to buy but difficult to


integrate
They require organizational changes
and new networking schemes
Existing technological, political and
jurisdictional barriers have to be
addressed
ITS itself has to be integrated into
conventional planning
56

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transportation:

Old

New Trends
New

Independent Modes
Intermodal
Local Economies
Regional/Global Economies
Independent Jurisdictions
Coalitions/Seamlessness
Users
Customers
Build
Manage

Day 1

57

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transportation

Day 1

In a nutshell

First, well fix the access to the thruway, then


well fix the city
58

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transportation

In a nutshell

The clothes of the King


or dismantling an interchange in Montreal

Day 1

59

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transportation:

Means to an end, not an end by itself


Optimizing a sub-system?
What is then our goal?

Day 1

In a nutshell

The daily life of our citizens?


Who are the transport actors?
Is it the most tractable urban problem?
Is it a governance model for other areas?
60

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Future of Operations Research (OR) is Past


by Russell Ackoff 1979
1. First, there is a greater need for
decision-making systems that can
learn and adapt effectively than
there is for optimizing systems that
cannot.
2. Second, in decision making, account
should be taken of aesthetic valuesstylistic preferences and progress
towards ideals because they are
relevant to quality of life.
3. Third, problems are abstracted from
systems of problems, messes.
Messes require holistic treatment.
They cannot be treated effectively by
decomposing them analytically into
separate problems to which optimal
solutions are sought.
Day 1

4. Fourth, OR's analytic problemsolving paradigm, "predict and


prepare," involves internal
contradictions and should be
replaced by a synthesizing planning
paradigm such as "design a
desirable future and invent
ways of bringing it about.
5. Fifth, effective treatment of messes
requires interaction of a wide
variety of disciplines, a
requirement that OR no longer
meets.
6. Sixth and last, all those who can be
affected by the output of
decision making should either be
involved in it so they can bring their
interests to bear on it, or their
interests should be well
represented by researchers who
serve as their advocates.
61

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

This course: All lectures w/o numbers???

You will be asked to:

Day 1

Count traffic volumes and pax flows


Compare cities transport numbers
Analyze urban and suburban settings
Come up with improvement proposals
and during IAP, use several models

Big numbers versus little numbers


62

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transportation: In closing

RADICAL changes

Known
Solution

Unknown
Solution

Problems Typology
Adapted from a presentation
by Marc J. Roberts
Harvard School of Public Health
Day 1

SMALL changes
63

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Vision and Leadership


RADICAL changes

Known
Solution

Unknown
Solution

COACH

Coach:

Day 1

SMALL changes

He/she knows the rules of the game


People accept her/him as an expert
Leadership is easy

64

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Vision and Leadership


RADICAL changes

Known
Solution

Unknown
Solution

THERAPIST

Therapist:

Day 1

SMALL changes

He/she possesses certain expertise


Still it requires a joint search for the solution
As a leader, you delegate on the organization
65

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Vision and Leadership


RADICAL changes

PROPHET
Known
Solution

Prophet:

Day 1

Unknown
Solution

SMALL changes

I know what to do and I am convinced


Those who question me are heretics
A leader who does not accept interpretations
66

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Vision and Leadership


RADICAL changes

POET
Known
Solution

A Poet:

Day 1

Unknown
Solution

SMALL changes

Different people see the world differently


Most of our understanding is imperfect
Many options to accomplish a vision
Ambiguity and the embracing of contradictions

67

Transport Modes and Technologies

A Walking Tour on Capacity, LOS


Urban Transportation Planning
MIT Course 1.252j/11.380j
Fall 2006
Mikel Murga, MIT Research Associate

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport Modes and Technologies

Private Transport: The automobile


Collective Transport

Bus
Light Rail
Rapid Transit
Taxi, CarSharing

Non Motorized Modes

Walking
Biking
2

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile - Infrastructure

Road system:

Mobility

Hierarchical system:

From turnpike to local street


From unimpeded movement to
access to properties (Mobility

Collectors

vs Accessibility in their lingo)

Uninterrupted segments:

Arterials

Turnpike with access control

Interrupted segments:

Traffic signals, stops

Land Access

Locals

Figure by MIT OCW.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile Capacity

The capacity of a facility is


the maximum hourly rate
at which persons or
vehicles reasonably can be
expected to traverse a
point or a uniform section
of a lane or roadway
during a given time period
under prevailing roadway,
traffic, and control
conditions
Highway Capacity Manual
Transportation Research Board (TRB)
HCM2000
4

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Density Speed Relationship

Sf=Free flow speed


So=Optimum speed
Do=Optimum density
Dj= Jam density

Sf
Speed (mi/h)

So

Oversaturated
Flow

Do

Dj

Density (veh/mi/ln)
Speed-Density
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Speed-Flow Relationship

Sf=Free flow speed


So=Optimum speed
Do=Optimum density
Dj= Jam density

Sf
Speed (mi/h)

Do
So
Oversaturated
Flow
Dj

Vm= Maximum Flow


0

Flow (veh/h/ln)

Vm

Speed-Flow

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Flow-Density Relationship

Sf=Free flow speed


So=Optimum speed

Do=Optimum density
Dj= Jam density

Vm= Maximum Flow

So
Flow (veh/h/ln)

Vm

Sf
Oversaturated
Flow

Do

Dj

Density (veh/mi/ln)
Flow-Density
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Speed-Flow-Density Relationship

Sf=Free flow speed


So=Optimum speed
Do=Optimum density
Dj= Jam density
Vm= Maximum Flow

D=v/S

Do
So

So

Vm

Flow (veh/h/ln)

Vm

Flow (veh/h/ln)

Speed (mi/h)

Sf

Do

Dj

Density (veh/mi/ln)
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile Capacity


FFS = 120 km/h

120

Vehicle
throughput in
uninterrumpted
flow:

Speeddensity
curves

1300
1450

110

1600

100

100

1750

90
80

LOS A

Density = 7
pc/km/ln

60

11

40

16

22

28

20
0

Note:
FFS= Free-flow speed
0

400

800

1200

1600

2000

2400

Flow Rate, vp (pc/h/ln)


Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Speed-Flow Curves:
HCM speed-flow curve, before and after:
Human adaptation to driving in congested conditions
The original dream of ITS
BASE FREEWAY SEGMENT
Design Speed

80

4-Lanes
60 MPH

50

50 MPH
40

20

10

Unstable
Flow

*2000 pcphpi

30

*1900 pcphpi

Average Travel Speed (MPH)

120

70 MPH

0
2
(0.1)

4
(0.2)

6
(0.3)

8
(0.4)

10
(0.5)

12
(0.6)

14
(0.7)

16
(0.8)

18
(0.9)

20
(1.0)

Vol/ln (100 pcphpi)


v/c Ratio**
*capacity
**v/c ratio based on 2000 pcphpi valid only for 60- and 70-MPH design speeds

1300
1450
1600

60

1750
A

80

40
10

16

24

32

45 pcpmpl
40

20

0
0

400

800

1200

1600

2000

Average Passenger-Car Speed


(km/h)

8-Lanes

Average Passenger-Car Speed


(mph)

60

0
2400

Flow Rate (pcphpl)


Flow-Flow Speed
(mph)
> 70
65
60
55

Capacity
(pcphpl)
2400
2350
2300
2250

Note: Capacity varies by free-flow speed.

Figures by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

14

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Speed-Flow Curves
Unstable Flow
Stable Flow

Flows (Vehicles/hour/lane)

2500

2000
Shock Wave
Toll Range

1500

Flow at the bottleneck


1000
Undersaturated

500

Oversaturated
Density at Flow Capacity

0
0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Density (Vehicles/km/lane)
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From ideal capacity to

Different vehicles have


different power to
weight ratios,
therefore
Different gaps in front
or behind some vehicle
types
Plus:

Gradients
Widths
Weather

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From ideal capacity to

Even in
uninterrupted flow
sections, some
movements may
reduce the ideal
capacity, such as:

Merging
Diverging
Weaving
.
17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Capacity under interrupted conditions

Traffic signals,
roundabouts, all-stops
Automobiles and trucks
reaction times
Saturation, blocking
intersections (gridlock??)

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile Capacity


Urb

oad

Rur

oa d

Little nos
Vs
Fancy nos
li m

ho

es

ur

ign

al p

50-60
miles per
hour

it

{
ile

er m

als p

si g n
Th

ree

Thirty miles
per hour

Less than five


signals per mile

al R

Thr
ee
per signa
mil ls
e
Fo
ur
Tw -lane
roa
o-l
d
ane
roa
d
Fo
urlan
er
oad

s i gn
als
mi le
per

Fiv e

er m

Five or more
signals per mile

Exp

Two-lane road

On

ile

Five or more signals per mile

Travel time, minutes per mile

12

an R

ay
w
s
s
e
r

s6

i
m
0

le

e
sp

Figure by MIT OCW.

Forty miles per hour

400

800

1200

Vehicle volume, vehicles per hour per lane

1600

2000

From Mayer and Miller

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile Capacity

PEOPLE throughput :

Vehicle throughput times OCCUPANCY


Auto-occupancy (a non-technical issue)

HBW
1.1
HBO-shop 1.4
HBO-social 1.7
NHB
1.6

20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile Levels-Of-Service


www.bizkaimove.com

The power of A to F
From spot values to travel
times
Living under saturated
conditions

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile Costs

Fixed Costs:

Vehicle purchase
Insurance
A parking spot/garage
.

Variables Costs:

Gasoline
Oil and maintenance
Parking
Tolls
.

Ratio between Fixed and Variable Costs?

Why this is important?


22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Automobile Costs

Social costs:

Road construction, maintenance


Management of road system

Environmental costs:

Accidents
Health impacts
Noise (pedestrian areas)
Air pollution: cold-start, f(speed)
Land consumed
Energy
Segregation

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit - Capacity

People throughput:

Vehicle size
Headway (and fleet size)
Commercial speed

26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Buses - Capacity

Bus type and size:

No of seated spaces and no of standees

Access and ticketing:

No of doors
Easy access and egress
Access by the front door, other doors
Egress by one or two doors
Low floor
Ticket validation:

By the bus driver


On other machines on board
On the bus stops

27

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Buses - Capacity

Capacity (Contd):

Headway: Peak-hour and off-peak

Commercial speed:

Mixed traffic
Bus lanes
Signal priority

28

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Rail-based systems capacity


Speed profiles between
stations

7.0 2.0

113 70
Engine Governed Speed = 64 mph (103 km/h)

Speed (mph, km/h)

97 60

6.0 1.8

80 50

5.0 1.6

64 40

4.0 1.4

Speed-time

3.0 0.2

48 30
Distance-time

2.0 0.

32 20

Cruise at
55 mph
(88 km/h)

16 10

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

Decelerate at
2.5 mph/sec
(4 km/h/sec)
80

90

1.0 0.

100

Time (sec)
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Rail-based systems capacity


Time-Space
Diagrams

Path of front
of train
Path of rear
of train

Rate of change of slope


represents acceleration

Distance

Minimum safe
separation

Station
Train
=
platform length

Dwell time
(sec.)
Headway

Constant slope represents


balancing speed
Time
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit LOS

HBW represents > 50%


Peak hours
Peak directional flows

Easy to accept overcrowding at peak to justify


service during off-peak hours
31

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit - LOS
Originally, just density as for automobiles!!
BUS

RAIL

COMMENTS

LOS

ft2/p

p/seat*

>12.9

0.00-0.50

>19.9

0.00-0.50

No passenger need sit next


to another

8.6-12.9

0.51-0.75

14.0-19.9

0.51-0.75

Passengers can choose where


to sit

6.5-8.5

0.76-1.00

10.2-13.9

0.76-1.00

All passengers can sit

5.4-6.4

1.01-1.25

5.4-10.1

1.01-2.00

Comfortable standee load for


design

4.3-5.3

1.26-1.50

3.2-5.3

2.01-3.00

Maximum schedule load

<4.3

>1.50

<3.2

>3.00

Crush loads

ft2/p

p/seat*

*Approximate values for comparison LOS is based on area per passenger.

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

32

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit - LOS

AVAILABILITY

PASSENGER POINT OF VIEW


QUALITY OF SERVICE

1. Service coverage
2. Hours of service
3. Sidewalk condition
4. Park & Ride spacing

CONVENIENCE
1. Passenger loading
2. Transit/auto travel time
3. Amenities
4. Safety

Figure by MIT OCW.

33

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit - LOS
Service & Performance Measures
Category

Availability

Comfort and
Convenience

Transit Stop

Route Segment

Frequency*

Hours of service*

Service coverage

Passenger loads

Accessibility

% person-minutes served

Passenger loads*

Reliability*

Transit/auto travel time

Amenities

Travel speed

Travel time

Reliability

Transit/auto
travel time

Safety

System

Accessibility

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

34

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit - LOS
Different points of view to judge LOS:
TRANSIT/AUTO TRAVEL TIME LOS
LOS

Travel Time Difference (min)

Comments

<_ 0

Faster by transit than by automobile

1-15

About as fast by transit as by automobile

16-30

Tolerable for choice riders

31-45

Round-trip at least an hour longer by transit

46-60

Tedious for all riders; may be best possible in small cities

>60

Unacceptable to most riders

Open to many interpretations:


Times door-to-door?
Weight factors applied to the
different time segments?
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".

35

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit - Cost

Capital Costs:

>50-75 years horizon (infrastructure)


Usually not included in fare-box recovery ratio for
operating costs
12-40 years for vehicles (buses or trains)

Operating Costs:

Cop=Cd*veh-miles +Ct*veh-hr + Cs*fleet


(with variations for peak and off-peak)

Environmental Costs:

Accident rate
Noise, soot

36

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Buses

Flexibility for route adjustments


Closer stop spacing
In search of higher quality:

Low floor buses for an aging population


Bus stops:

Real time info on arrivals (and eventually downstream)


Maps, transfers, info on ticketing and validation

37

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006


Viajeros anuales/310


10000

5000

2500

sube

Metro 90,000 viajeros en 11 estaciones


Rail vs Bus

















































Viajeros 11/12/2000




3000




1500
750





suben


BilboBus 90,000 viajeros en >180 paradas

38

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Light Rail

From Rapid Rail Transit to Light


Rail:

Lower investments
But more exciting than buses
Mixed traffic segments
Easier to garner support for
priority
Attracts local development
39

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Light Rail

Full reserved ROW or mixed traffic

40

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Light Rail

Priority easily awarded

41

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From Public Transport

to Collective Transport

Rethinking transit:

Jitney service
Taxi-Bus
Dial-a-Ride
Taxi
Car Sharing
.??
42

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Some comparative little numbers

Car on city
streets

Car on
Freeway

Bus LRT
on Mixed
Traffic

1.2

1.2

40-300

40-600

140-2,200

Speed
(km/hr)

20-50

60-120

5-20

15-45

25-70

Veh/hr

600-800

1500-2200

60-80

40-90

10-40

720 to
1,050

1,800 to
2,600

2,400 to
20,000

4,000 to
20,000

10,000 to
72,000

Vehicle
occupancy

Capacity
(pers/hr)

Semi Rapid
Transit

Rapid
Transit

43

Walking See LOS C and E per HCM

Capacity and
LOS

Moving and
Waiting

Is it
enough??

Figure by MIT OCW.

45

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Walking How to define LOS?


What else should come into
the picture?
Comfort and safety
Protection from weather
Direct lines of sight
Direct routing
Live facades
Conviviality
???
The Tube Platforms
46

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Biking L.O.S.

The power of a can of paint


Safety first and foremost

47

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Biking- LOS

Again, LOS based on


throughput whether it is
one-way or two-way
Other concepts to be
included in LOS?

Inclines
safety issues
continuity
drainage
wet leaves
..?

48

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Biking: A process

49

The Planning Method


Urban Transportation Planning
MIT Course 1.252j/11.540j
Fall 2006
Frederick Salvucci, MIT Senior Lecturer

Transport Planning
Information on the
transportation system

Information on the
urban activity system

Diagnosis

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Information on the policy,


organizational, and fiscal
environment

Diagnosis and
Data Management

Identify feasible policies,


projects or strategies

Analysis

Analysis and Evaluation

Evaluation

Scheduling and budgeting

Scheduling and Budgeting


Project development and implementation

From textbook
By Meyer and Miller

Operations monitoring

Monitoring

Figure by MIT OCW.


Day 1

The Planning Method:


Why we need 12 Steps, not just 5?

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1. Scan the environment,

7. Consider operation and

2.

8. Evaluate alternatives
9. Choose course of

3.
4.
5.
6.
Day 1

review history, identify


trends, project future
conditions
Identify relevant
actors, institutions,
primary roles and
interests
Define problem(s)
Develop solution(s)
Consider
implementation
Predict outcomes,
benefits, costs, impacts

maintenance of
facilities, services

action

10.Build constituency,
consolidate allies,
convert enemies

11.Implement
12.Operate and maintain
3

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Alternative Interpretations: Planning as


1.
2.

3.
4.

5.
6.
7.
Day 1

predicting the future to accommodate demand


imagining a different future and developing an
strategy to get there
as infrastructure planning
a system of public infrastructure and mixture
of public and private vehicles
as service planning
as mobility planning
as accessibility planning
4

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Alternative Interpretations: Planning as


as providing choices for individuals
9. as providing information for individuals to
conform their plans to a master plan
10. as institutional planning
11. as financially constrained planning
12. as economic planning
13. as urban design
14. as environmental planning
8.

Day 1

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Alternative Interpretations: Planning as


15.
16.
17.
18.

19.
20.

21.
Day 1

advocacy planning
as implementation of legislation
as a bureaucratic process
as interactive process with the community
(Who is included? Who is excluded?)
as institutional negotiation
as decision support (Who are the decision
makers?)
as support for city planning
6

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Changing the Concept of Transportation Planning

1.
2.
3.
4.

Bottleneck modification
Highway system function; benefit/cost
Transportation system function; benefit/cost
Inclusion of external impacts; full
costs/benefits
5. Inclusion of external impacts with
mitigation
6. Land use impacts of transportation
Day 1

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Modes; Level of Service; Speed; Capacity

Day 1

(A)

System Impact

Capacity; travel time

(B)
view

Operators point of

Vehicle hours;
cost/vehicle hour

(C) Customers point of view

Mobility: travel time;


comfort; waiting time;
congestion
Accessibility: options within
given travel time

(D) Land developers point of


view

Accessibility
Cost of land
Parking
8

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Deficiencies of Models
A.

Fudge Factor
--Radial/circumferential
-- Schools
-- Crime

B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
Day 1

Miss 4&5
Will be inaccurate but seem real
Possible but unusual
Usually a mistake
Usually a mistake
Who evaluates?
Who considers feedback?
9

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Walk the Talk

Day 1

MIT Energy Forum, May 2006


Susan Hockfield
John Heywood

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Can We Be Realistic AND Positive?

Currently 750 million vehicles in world. By 2050, number


is projected to be 2 billion. [Factor of 3]

Is it feasible to reduce petroleum consumption per vehicle


by a factor of 4? Could we really change?

Day 1

Maybe. If we can implement a 20% fuel consumption


reduction in each of 6 different areas:
0.86 = 0.26
Will require changes in technology, vehicles, system
operation, and behavior. Technology is key, but not
enough.
From Prof. J Heywoods address at MIT Energy Forum, May 2006

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Ways to Impact Energy Use: Behavior


1.
2.

3.
4.
5.

6.

Day 1

Encourage less aggressive driver behavior


Increase vehicle occupancy on substantial
fraction of trips
Reduce mileage driven per person per year
Substitute bio-mass fuels for petroleum fuels
Manage existing transportation system more
effectively (ITS)
Increase public transit utilization
Adapted from Prof. J Heywoods address at MIT Energy Forum, May 2006

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Ways to Impact Energy Use: Technology


1.

2.

3.
4.

5.

6.

Day 1

Shift the vehicle performance/fuel economy tradeoff


towards lower fuel consumption
Improve vehicle maintenance, lubricants, tire pressure,
reduce parasitic loads
Lighter weight, less big vehicles
Implement more efficient engine, drivetrain, and vehicle
technologies
Develop and implement use of hydrogen as an energy
carrier with fuel cell powered vehicles
Use electricity with advanced battery technologies to
shift part of transportation energy demand away from
petroleum
Adapted from Prof. J Heywoods address at MIT Energy Forum, May 2006

13

Workshop:
Scenarios, Communication, Mindmaps

Urban Transportation Planning

MIT Course 1.252j/11.540j

Fall 2006

Mikel Murga, MIT Lecturer and Research Associate

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scope

Workshop 1

Introduction from Meyer and Miller


Forecasting and Scenarios
Demographics as an example
Communication tools
Working with Mindmaps

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Introduction from Meyer and Miller


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

The world moves into the future as a result of decisions (or


the lack of decisions), not as result of plans
All decisions involve the evaluation of alternative images of
the future, and the selection of the most highly valued of
feasible alternatives
Evaluation and decisions are influenced by the degree of
uncertainty associated with expected consequences
The products of planning should be designed to increase the
chance of making better decisions
The result of planning is some form of communication with
decision makers
Chapter 1, pages 2-3

Workshop 1

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Models and Forecasting

Forecasting:

Workshop 1

Short term
extrapolation:The future on
the basis of the past
Applicable to slow
incremental change
We tend to believe that
todays status quo will
continue for ever
We often ignore

Forecasting
Scenarios

uncertainty

predictability

Time into the future


4

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

And Scenarios

Workshop 1

A conceptual description of the future based on


cause and effect
Invent and analyze several stories of equally
plausible futures to bring forward surprises and
unexpected leaps of understanding
Goal is not to create a future, nor to choose the
most probable one, but to make strategic
decisions that will be sound (or robust)
under all plausible futures
5

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scenarios
"Scenarios transform information into
perceptions... It is a creative experience
that generates an 'Aha!' ... and leads to
strategic insights beyond the mind's
previous reach."
Pierre Wack GBN

Workshop 1

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Reading on Scenarios
The Art of the Long View by Peter
Schwartz
Scenarios: The Art of Strategic
Conversation by Kees van der Heijden

Both authors work for the Global Business


Network (www.gbn.com) and come from the
Shell Planning Group
Workshop 1

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scenarios: Why?

History is a continuum of pattern breaks


We react to uncertainty through denial
(that is why a quantitative model is so reassuring!)

Mental models, and myths, control what you do


and keep you from raising the right questions
We cannot predict the future with certainty
By providing alternative images of the future:

Workshop 1

We go from facts into perceptions, and,


Open multiple perspectives

Approach: Suspend disbelief in a story long

enough to appreciate its potential impact

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scenarios: How?

Workshop 1

Examine the environment in which your


actions will take place and see how those
actions will fit in the prevailing forces, trends,
attitudes and influences
Identify driving forces and critical
uncertainties
Challenge prevailing mental modes and be
creative about the future of critical variables
Rehearse the implications
9

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scenarios: Stages
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Workshop 1

Identify focal issue or decision (ie Global warming)


Identify driving forces in the local environment
Identify driving forces in the macro environment
Rank the importance and uncertainty of each
Select scenario logics (so as to tell a story)
Flesh-out the scenario in terms of driving forces
Analyze implications
Define leading indicators for monitoring
10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scenarios: Rules

Goal:

Required decisions under each scenario? Vulnerabilities?


Can we control the key driving forces?

Good scenarios should be plausible, but also


surprising by breaking old stereotypes
Do not assign probabilities to each scenario
But give a name to each scenario
A total of 3-4 scenarios: Not just two extremes
plus a probable one. Good to have a wildcard

Workshop 1

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Demographics as an example
CANADA

Fertility rate:

Birth rate:

Avg no. of children

born to women over

their lifetime

Total no of births

divided by the size of

the population

Canada claims a low

fertility rate (1.7) but

a high birth rate

Female

80

60
Age

Male

40

20

0
300

200

100

100

200

300

From:Boom, Bust and Echo by Prof Foot

12

Population in Thousands
Canada's Population Pyramids, 1996
Workshop 1

Figure by MIT OCW.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Demographics:

What do you make of this?

Pirmide de Poblacin 1981 - Poblacin Ocupada 1981 (C.A.V)


>=75
70-75

Mujer Ocupada

65-70

Pirmide de Poblacin 1996 - Poblacin Ocupada 1996 (C.A.V)

Hombre Ocupado

60-65

Mujer

55-60

Hombre

>=75
70-75

50-55
45-50

65-70

40-45

60-65

35-40
25-30

50-55

20-25

45-50

15-20
10-15

40-45

5-10

35-40

0-5
-80000

-60000

-40000

-20000

Hombre Ocupado
Mujer
Hombre

55-60

30-35

-100000

Mujer Ocupada

30-35
0

20000

40000

60000

80000

100000

25-30
20-25
15-20

Pirmide de Poblacin 1986 - Poblacin Ocupada 1986 (C.A.V)

10-15

>=75
70-75

5-10

Mujer Ocupada

65-70

0-5

Hombre Ocupado

60-65

Mujer
Hombre

55-60

-100000

-80000

-60000

-40000

-20000

20000

40000

60000

80000

100000

50-55
45-50
40-45
35-40
30-35

Pirmide de Poblacin 2001 - Poblacin Ocupada 2001 (C.A.V)

25-30
20-25

>=75

15-20
10-15

70-75

5-10

65-70

Mujer Ocupada
Hombre Ocupado

0-5
-100000

-80000

-60000

-40000

-20000

20000

40000

60000

80000

60-65

100000

Mujer
Hombre

55-60
50-55
45-50

Pirmide de Poblacin 1991 - Poblacin Ocupada 1991 (C.A.V)

40-45

>=75
70-75

35-40

Mujer Ocupada
Hombre Ocupado

65-70
60-65

30-35

Mujer
Hombre

55-60

25-30
20-25

50-55
45-50

15-20

40-45
35-40

10-15

30-35

5-10

25-30

0-5

20-25
15-20

-100000

10-15

-80000

-60000

-40000

-20000

20000

40000

60000

80000

100000

5-10

Workshop 1

0-5
-100000

-80000

-60000

-40000

-20000

20000

40000

60000

80000

100000

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Demographics

Is age a good predictor for:

Real estate?
Transit use?

2.50

Transit
Drive

2.00

1.50

Use of hard drugs?


1.00

If age is a good predictor,


then:

Establish number of

people in each age group

0.50

0.00
5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70+
Age
Note: Statistics are for 1986.

Define probability for

each age group, of participation in a


given behavior or activity

Workshop 1

Average Daily Trips per Person, Greater Toronto Area


Figure by MIT OCW.

A 19 yr old has little money but


plenty of time to wait for the bus

From:Boom, Bust and Echo by Prof Foot

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Demographics

According to Professor David K. Foot (Boom,


Bust and Echo), future scenarios entail some
certainty: In 10 yrs, we will all be 10 yrs older
Demographics, not only predictable, but
inevitable: The most powerful, yet underutilized

tool, to understand the past and foretell the


future

Age is a good predictor of behavior and


therefore, a good forecasting tool

Workshop 1

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Communication Tools

Transportation Policy depends to a great extent


on two-way communications:

But impact of a message is based on:

Workshop 1

Policy analysts elected officials

Elected officials other politicians

Elected officials mass media

Public at large elected officials

. .

words (7%),
how words are said (38%), and,
non verbal clues (55%)
16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Communication Tools
learned

Workshop 1

Listening

1st

Speaking

2nd

Reading

3rd

Writing

4th

used

taught

Most
Least
(45%)
Next most Next least
(30%)
Next least Next most
(16%)
Least (9%)
Most

Listening Courses? Toastmasters? Speed reading?

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Communication Tools
The Visual
Display of
Quantitative
Information by
Edward R. Tufte
plus the two
follow-up books
a must-read
reference
Workshop 1

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Communication Tools

How Do you Visualize Change???


Remember that simulations could be critical
Workshop 1

20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Other tools of the trade

Workshop 1

Creativity: Lateral thinking, to thinkout-of-the-box, thinkertoys

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Out-of-the-box thinkers

Edward de Bono:

Michael Michalko:

Thinking Tools
Six thinking hats
Lateral Thinking
Cracking Creativity
ThinkerToys

Many others

Workshop 1

The intelligence trap


The Everest effect
Plus.Minus.Interesting.
C.A.F. consider all factors
O.P.V. Other people view
To look for Alternatives
beyond the obvious
Analyze Consequences
Problem Solving and Lateral
Thinking
Provocations
22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mindmapping
See MindMapping by Tony Buzan et al

Workshop 1

23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mindmapping
You see what you
know and where the
gaps are
Clears your mind of
mental clutter
It works well for
group brainstorming

Workshop 1

26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mindmapping
A whole-brain
alternative to
linear thinking
Retain both
the overall
picture and the
details
Promote
associations

Workshop 1

25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mindmapping
You see what you
know and where the
gaps are
Clears your mind of
mental clutter
It works well for
group brainstorming

Workshop 1

26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mindmapping

Workshop 1

Let us do a joint MindMap

28

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mind-Mapping

Workshop 1

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mind-Mapping

Workshop 1

30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mind-Mapping

Workshop 1

www.mindjet.com

31

Transport as a Tool for Urban Design


Urban Transportation Planning
MIT Course 1.252j/11.380j
Fall 2006
Mikel Murga, MIT Research Associate and Lecturer

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport as a Tool for Urban Design

Day

Transport and Land Uses


Problems
Approaches
Best Practices

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport and Land Uses

Let us design a new freeway

Present traffic on existing roads?


Design speed? Desired LOS? Budget?
But

Day

How many new dwellings will be built nearby?


How many office bldgs? Technology parks?
How many parking places are needed?
What size for the new shopping center?
??

From road builders to urban planners!


Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Problems

Triggers:

Results:

Day

Housing density
Suburban job centers
Segregation of land
uses
Parking availability and
cost
Unbalanced modal split
Increased economic,
environmental and
social costs

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Problems
Let us use the 1990 Census Data
to observe very different
modal choices at different
cities for the home to work trip
Is it the result of the transport
system per se? Or is it due to
a more complex system where
many factors play a role:
economic conditions, housing
market, individual perceptions
and choices?
Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

CTPP 1990 Home-to-Work Modal Split: Boston


Little Mystic Ch

Millers River

Charles River

Sawing Pond

Charles River

?
Charles River
Basin

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond

Muddy River Pond

Fort Point
Channel

Modal Share at Origin


CTPP TAZ Charts

Muddy River

2000
1000
Reserved
Channel

tnut Hill
rvoir

Fisher Hill
Reservoir

Leverett Pond
Brookline
Reservr

500
Drove Alone
2 Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
WALK
Old Harbor
Work at Home
.4
.8

1.2

Wards Pond

Day

Sargent Pond

Miles

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

CTPP 1990 Home-to-Work Modal Split: Boston

Modal Share at Origin


CTPP TAZ Charts

Day

2000
1000
500
Drove Alone
2 Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
WALK
Work at Home
.7
1.4
2.1
Miles

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

CTPP 1990 Home-to-Work Modal Split: Chicago


South Pond

Chicago River N
Branch
Canal N Branch

Ogden Slip

Modal Share at Origin


CTPP TAZ Charts

Burnham Park
Harbor

Day

Mason Canal
Stetsons Canal

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

2000
1000
500
Drove Alone
2 Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
WALK
Work at Home
.4
.8
1.2
Miles

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

CTPP 1990 Home-to-Work Modal Split: Chicago

Modal Share at Origin


CTPP TAZ Charts

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

2000
1000
500
Drove Alone
2 Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
WALK
Work at Home
1
2
3
Miles

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

CTPP 1990 Home-to-Work Modal Split: Houston

Modal Share at Origin


CTPP TAZ Charts

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

2000
1000
500
Drove Alone
2 Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
WALK
Work at Home
1
2
3
Miles

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Better Processes

Transport projects opportunities:

Development (macro):

Rehabilitation (micro):

Day

Strategic and long-term


Examples like Curitiba, Toronto, Stockholm
Self-containment vs dispersal
Urban growth along axes through zoning and landuse incentives
Tactical, short term but also effective
In-fill development as demand management
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Better Processes

Development (macro):

Day

Curitiba as an example

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Better Processes

Rehabilitation (micro):

Day

It can be implemented rather quickly


Local actions spilling over the metropolitan scale
Zrichs per capita transit trips above Curitibas

Any transport project however minor


can be approached as an improvement
opportunity
Let us look at several examples
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A traffic-light regulated intersection

Town of Amorebieta, Basque Country, Spain


Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A new proposal for the traffic intersection


ESPACIOS PEATONALES

Espacios existentes

Day

Espacios peatonales ganados ( 1.600 M2 )

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

15

A new proposal for the traffic intersection:

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Plus rerouting most of the big trucks


ESPACIOS PEATONALES

Espacios existentes
Espacios peatonales ganados ( 1.600 M2 )

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Simulation and Visualization

Day

To guarantee functional outcome


To explore other alternatives and go beyond
the obvious

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Power of the before and after

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Power of the before and after

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Power of the before and after

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Power of the before and after

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Power of the before and after

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Power of the before and after

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From traffic to place making...

PLEN
TZIA

...Just by avoiding through traffic

F.

C.

GO
BE

Day

LA

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From traffic to place making...

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From traffic to place making...

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

26

From traffic to place making


.
Humanizing a few roundabouts
Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

27

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The power of a LRT project

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Zrich

A true success story, thanks to full priority, strict


parking policies and pedestrian schemes
Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

32

The power of a good transit system:


Public Spaces in Milano

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

33

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport Approaches

City Traffic Engineering Approach:

Traffic Calming a first step:

Other steps:

Day

It fosters more convivial public spaces


It triggers a new relationship between
pedestrians and cars
It facilitates biking
To divert through traffic
Priority for bus or LRT service
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

37

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport Approaches
Beyond car traffic:

Day

O-D pathing
Road crossings
Street furniture
Traffic calming
Balanced activities
throughout the day
Public activities

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

38

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport Approaches

Car Parking:

Day

Critical for modal split


On-site parking is critical to distinguish
between shoppers and commuters
To be seen in a wider context than just onsite provision
Complementary measures (pedestrian
improvements, transit) a must

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

39

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport Approaches

Public Transport:

Figure by MIT OCW.


Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

41

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transport Approaches

Park-Ride facilities:

Day

Visible, well signed and secure


Again to be seen in a larger context
It should not preclude high-density
development near rail stations
Price should be lower than downtown
Shuttle service of prime quality: frequent
service, priority to reach downtown faster
than by car (similar to an airport car rental shuttle)
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

42

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Best Practices

The Netherlands ABC location policy:

Locations:

Activities:

Day

A: main transit hub few parking - downtown


B: district center or small town bus junction
C: Not served by transit
A: People intensive land uses
B: Commercial and service activities with low
turnout (e.g..: car sales, furniture dealers)
C: Goods intensive uses
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

43

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Best practices

The priorities of the City of York Council, UK:

Day

Pedestrians
People with disabilities
Cyclists
Public Transport passengers
Commercial and business vehicles
Car-borne shoppers
Coach-borne visitors
Car-borne long-stay commuters

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

44

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Best practices

The resulting measures in the City of York:

Day

Strict parking policy


5 park-and-ride sites
Reallocation of road space among buses, cyclists
and pedestrians
Traffic calming measures: 30 mph on major radials
and 20 mph, elsewhere
Safe and continuous cycle network
Implementation of a pedestrian route network
throughout the city
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

45

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Best Practices: Beyond Transport


A recent example:

Durango a small ancient


semi-rural town of
26,000 people
experiencing growth

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

46

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Mobility Profile 1997 vs 2002


2.600

32.000

36.000

Interna

12.500
2.500

3.600

Externa
18.900

1.300

400

4.400
11.000
2.100

Atrada

Movilidad 1997

19.500

2.000

Problems?

2.700

25.500

30.400

Interna

20.300
2.400

4.900

Externa
26.800

1.400

6.000
10.600
3.700

Day

Atrada
22.000

Movilidad 2002

1.700

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

47

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Jobs Supply versus residents with jobs


Movilidad Laboral
12000
10000
8000
6000

2384

3955

Externos
3219

3335

4000
2000

4836
2783

Atraidos
Internos

4229

3614

3443

86

91

96

Does it explain
the unsustainable
mobility profile?

Day

Externos: residents working outside town


Internos: residents working in town
Atraidos: Non residents working in town
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

48

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Best Practices: Beyond Transport


Among our many other
recommendations, we had
to include the need to
attract service jobs to an
area which in the past
offered many industrial jobs

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

49

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

In a nutshell

Global Vision, Local Action

Dont let the global vision rob you from


opportunities for local change
Local change, however limited, is important:

Day

We need early winners to jumpstart a new process


Small changes may become showcases
Dont forget we need a new model

To start a process more effective


than relying only on end-state planning
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

52

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Upon starting a process (Jane Jacobs Systems of Survival)

Commercial Syndrome

Day

Guardian Syndrome

Shun trading
Shun force
Exert prowess
Come to voluntary agreements
Be obedient and disciplined
Be honest
Adhere to tradition
Collaborate easily with strangers and
Respect hierarchy
aliens
Be loyal
Compete
Take vengeance
Respect contracts
Deceive for the sake of the task
Use initiative and enterprise
Make rich use of leisure
Be open to inventiveness and novelty
Be ostentatious
Be efficient
Dispense largesse
Promote comfort and convenience
Be exclusive
Dissent for the sake of the task
Show fortitude
Invest for productive purposes
Be fatalistic
Be industrious
Treasure honor
Be thrifty
Be optimistic
53
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Traffic Calming
Urban Transportation Planning
MIT Course 1.252j/11.380j
Fall 2006
Mikel Murga, MIT Lecturer and Research Associate

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Table of Contents

Day

Why traffic calming?


Traffic calming, how?
Techniques
Design Criteria
The Process

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Why Traffic Calming?

The faster you go, the higher


the probability of an accident,
as:

Day

Your vision focus narrows with


speed
For a given reaction time,
distance covered is proportional
to speed
The faster you go, the longer
the stopping distance

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Why Traffic Calming?

The faster you go, the higher


the seriousness of an accident

For instance, the kinetic energy


of an automobile (1.2 tons at 35
mph) is at least 150 times higher
than the one of a pedestrian
(180 pounds at 3 mph)
Such a collision at:

Day

60
km/h
10% Survival Probability
45
km/h
60% Survival Probability
30
km/h
95% Survival Probability

20 mph, means bone fractures


and concussions
In the range 30-40 mph, high
probability of either death or
permanent disability

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Figure by MIT OCW.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Why Traffic Calming?

Day

To avoid segregation of public


spaces and maintain its
livability
Underpasses, skywalks and
other solutions, do not
provide eyes on the street

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Why Traffic Calming?

Day

When traffic is tamed, a good walking environment


results
Walkers enjoy a wide range of sensory experiences
When most people drive, the buildings end up lacking the
detail and relief that people need and enjoy
People attract more people
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Do you think this is


sufficient in spite of its
strict precision in
Km/hour?

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Day

When you drive at


30 mph, you tend
to focus your sight
far ahead
This means that
you narrow the
sight area
You fail to see the
surroundings
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Day

But if you drive


at 20 mph, you
start to see
what lies on
the sides

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Day

The basic idea is to


change the perceptions of
the driver through the
introduction of new
physical features
These self-enforcing
features tend to break
the infinite continuity that
encourages speed with or
without speed warnings

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Day

Raised crosswalks
Narrower pavement widths
Chicanes with urban furniture or parking
Changes in the pavement texture
Mini-roundabouts
Cul-de-sacs
Eliminating some movements
Civilized green waves
.
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Raised crosswalks

Double function: good for


pedestrians and cars
You accommodate to gradient:

Day

7% for 40-45 km/hr


10% for 30 km/hr
12% for 25 km/hr or less

Every 60-100 meters plus proper


warning
The top table needs a minimum
width, specially for buses
Automatic balancing of the carpedestrian relationship
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Raised crosswalks

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Raised intersections

Day

The automobile
finds itself in
neutral grounds

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Bulb-outs

Pros:

Decrease
exposure
Higher visibility
specially for
children
Easy
implementation

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Figure by MIT OCW.

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Narrower pavement widths

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Narrower pavement widths

0,15

2,5

0,3

1,7

0,15

0,15

0,2

2,5

0,6
1,7

0,8

0,15

5,5

4,80

0,3

2,5

1,7

0,9

1,7

1,7

0,6

0,3

5,5
4,80
Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Narrower pavement widths

Nothing like a
bucket of paint

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Narrowing the pavement

You could rearrange parking


Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Eliminating road lanes

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Eliminating road lanes

From cages to family outings


Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Mini-roundabouts

They work!
even for high flows
Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Or all of the above

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Eliminating some movements (i.e. in a roundabout)

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Civilized Green Waves

They need low cycles to avoid late-comers driving fast


(at night)
Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Civilized Green Waves

Plan de Semaforizacin en Avenida de


Los Chopos - Ciclo de 75 segundos

INSTITUTO1 (1)

UDABERRI (72)

AIBOA (32)

ACACIAS (39)

TILOS (39)

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

Segundos

26

240

210

180

150

120

90

60

30

AVANZADA(67)
0

They need low cycles


to avoid late-comers
driving fast (at night)

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Civilized Green Waves

Plus often changes


in horizontal
alignment, refuge
islands, narrowing
the road width

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

27

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Civilized Pedestrian signals

Day

Longer phase
times for
pedestrians
Lower total cycles
Green waves for
pedestrian
movement
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

28

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Narrowing the pavement

Beyond traffic calming to


improve public spaces:
New urban furniture,
including trees

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: How?

Day

Not an end by itself, just


the means to an end
It must be accompanied by
other measures to improve
the urban environment so as
to encourage more
pedestrians
Although the real goal is to
bring pedestrians to a stop

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Design Criteria

Other important issues:

Day

Location
Self-enforcement
Liability
Reversibility
Public participation
Overall traffic scheme
Traffic deviated to other
areas

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

31

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Location

Sensitive areas:

Day

Schools
Transit stations
Senior citizens
Areas with high
accident rates
High speeds eg.
transition areas from
the expressway into the
urban network

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

32

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Some Bibliography

Canadian Guide to
Neighbourhood Traffic Calming
TAC-ATC/ITE 1998
Civilised Streets Carmen
Hass-Klau et al ET&P, 1992
Guide Les ralentisseurs de
type dos dane et trapezoidal
CERTU, 1994

Day

Guide Zone 30 CETUR,


1992
Pedestrian and City Traffic
Carmen Hass-Klau, 1990
City Routes, City Rights
Conserv Law Found, 1998
Reduire la Vitesse en
Agglomeration CETUR 1989
Voirie Urbaine CETUR 1988
plus publications by Jan
Gehl, Jane Jacobs, Kevin
Lynch, George Whyte, etc..

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

33

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Calming: The Process

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

38

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Look for an easy winner...

Day

Nothing like a school


Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

39

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Once they try...

Day

Bulb-outs everywhere
Today a pedestrianized plaza
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

40

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

they will ask for more

Day

There is not enough


money to
accommodate all
the requests
The best result is
the change in
behavioral patterns
Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

41

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Always go easy at the beginning...

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

42

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Always go easy at the beginning...

Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

43

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

In a nutshell, ten rules


1. Every change is hard to implement
2. Start by the easiest job
3. You need allies
4. You have to minimize risks
5. Technical competence a must
6. Not isolated measures, but packages
7. Short term results, a must
8. But dont forget to plant a few seeds
9. Everyone sees things differently
10. Success is hard to measure

But if you want, you can!


Day

Frederick P. Salvucci and Mikel Murga

45

Thumbnail History of Boston


Urban Transportation Planning
MIT Course 1.252j/11.540j
Fall 2006
Frederick Salvucci, MIT Senior Lecturer

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

History of Boston Transportation and


Analysis of Historical Developments

Image by Alex Maclean. Used with permission. www.landslides.com


Day 2

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Pre 1620

Glaciers

Rivers
Codfish

Day 2

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1630
Charles River

Mosquitoes
Drinking Water
People (Religious Minority)
The Bible
Day 2

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Unusual Commitment to Education

1635
Latin School
1636
Harvard
1800s
Horace Mann
1865
MIT
Day 2

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1635-1776
N

1/2 Mile

1/2 Mile

Hog Island
Mill Dam

Charlestown

Noddles
Island

Charlestown
Cambridge
Apple Is.

Governors Is.

Ch

arl

iv
es R

er

Mill Dam

West Cove

Bird Is.

Shawmut
Peninsula

Mill Pd.
Boston

Town Cove
South Cove

Bird Is.

Back Bay
Neck
South
Bay

South Boston

Gravelly Pt.

Castle
Is.
Spectacle
Is.

1795

1630

Day 2

1995 water

Area filled after 1630

1995 water

Area filled after 1795

1630 land

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

1795 land

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

Figures by MIT OCW, adapted from Nancy S. Seasholes and Amy Turner, "Diagramming the Growth of Boston", in Mapping Boston.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1635-1776

Day 2

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1635-1776

Day 2

Trade
Fishing
Ship Building
Bad Soil
Cattle
Smuggling
Tax Evasion
Relations with Indians
Military Relations with England, French, & Indians
8

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1776 --> War of 1812 --> 1830s


0

1/2 Mile

East
Boston

East
Boston

Charlestown

Wood Is.

Basin

R.R.

Jeffries
Point

Boston

int

Ch

an

Boston

Mill Dam

1/2 Mile

Mystic
Wharf

Somerville
Millers Prison Charlestown
River Point Bay
East
Cambridge

ne

Fo

rt

Po

R.R.
R.R.

South
Bay

South Boston
Spectacle Is.

South Boston
Spectacle Is.

Calf Pasture

Commercial Pt.

1852

Day 2

1880

1995 water

Area filled after 1852

1995 water

Area filled after 1880

1852 land

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

1880 land

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

Figures by MIT OCW, adapted from Nancy S. Seasholes and Amy Turner, "Diagramming the Growth of Boston", in Mapping Boston.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1776 --> War of 1812 --> 1830s

Day 2

Trade
Ship Building
Slave Trade
Ice
Clipper Ships
Filling of Mill
Pond
War with Mexico
10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1830s - 1870

Day 2

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1830s - 1870

Day 2

Canals
Rail
Bicycles
Mills, Cloth
Civil War
Filling South End, Back Bay
Commuter Rail
Street Cars
Immigration (1848 Potato Famine)
12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1830s - 1870

Day 2

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1870 - 1900

Day 2

Sprague & Siemens


Streetcar Networking
Electric Power
1894 First Auto in Hemisphere
1897 First Subway in Hemisphere
Streetcar Suburbs & Downtown

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1900-1945
N

1/2 Mile

1/2 Mile

Mystic
Wharf
East
Boston

Charlestown

Charles
River

East
Boston
Charles
River

Charles
R. Dam

Airport

Boston

Boston
South
Boston
Flats

South

Apple
Is.

Governors
Is.

Dry Dock
Marine
Park

Orient
Heights

Reserved Channel

Castle Is.

Columbus
Park

Bay

Old Colony
Parkway

1934

1916

1995 water

Day 2

1916 land

Area filled after 1916

1995 water

Area filled after 1934

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

1934 land

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

Figures by MIT OCW, adapted from Nancy S. Seasholes and Amy Turner, "Diagramming the Growth of Boston", in Mapping Boston.

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1900-1945

Day 2

1914 World War I


1920s; Model T,
Auto Explosion,
Zoning
1930s; Depression
1940s; World War II
Subways and the
Survival of Rail
Transit
16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1900-1945

Day 2

1914 World War I


1920s; Model T, Auto Explosion, Zoning
1930s; Depression
1940s; World War II
Subways and the Survival of Rail Transit

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1945 - 1965 Postwar

Oil, Autos, Highways, Suburbs


1956 Interstate Highways
1959 Southeast Expressway opens; Old Colony Rail closes
1964 Expansion of MBTA
-- Riverside Green Line
-- Orange Line tunnel under river
-- Red Line extension to Quincy

Day 2

Transit and urban density


Prudential, British properties, John Hancock
Back Bay and Downtown
18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1965-1972

1960s Reaction to highways


Boston Transportation Planning Review
Enhance the City as the Priority
-----

Stop Destructive Highways


Promote and Improve Transit
Control Parking
Promote Environmentally Benign Highways:
The Big Dig

Economy, Equity, Environment


Day 2

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1972 - present
N

1/2 Mile

Orient
Heights

1/2 Mile

East
Boston
Charles
River

Airport

Airport

Boston

South Bay

Boston
Subaru
Pler

South
Boston
Flats

Spectacle Is.
Columbia
Point

Columbia
Point

1995

1950

1995 water

Day 2

1950 land

Area filled after 1950

1995 water

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

1950 land

1995 shoreline with no historic changes shown

Figures by MIT OCW, adapted from Nancy S. Seasholes and Amy Turner, "Diagramming the Growth of Boston", in Mapping Boston.

20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1972 - present

Day 2

Post-Office Square by
the Friends of Post
Office Square
Park rededicated in
1997 as the Norman
B. Leventhal Park at
Post Office Square
21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1972 - present

1973

Day 2

Interstate Transfer
Reorganize MBTA
1968-1990
Diversification of highway
construction industry
1991-present Big Dig; South Boston Transitway
Revise Mass Pike, MBTA
Continued commuter rail expansion

22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Where Next?

Day 2

Silver Line
Blue Line
North to South Station rail
Stuart Street
Urban Ring
Better bus service, transfers

23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Where Next?

Red Sox; Medical Complex; South Boston


Waterfront District; Cambridge-Somerville
Suburban sprawl

Day 2

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

How to pay for it all?

Federal context
Local taxes

Day 2

25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Summary

Day 2

Land use
Accessibility
Economic Activity
Equity
Environment
Sustainability
Evaluation of what to do
Effectiveness
Financing mechanisms
Efficiency
26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Day 2

27

Transportation and Land Use:


Which is the Chicken and which is the Egg?
Four-step process begins with current distribution of land use
But land use redistributes based on transportation
EIR of land use as a policy tool with unintended consequences
Tax code; location-efficient mortgage; university transit passes;
employer requirement
Elderly and disabled services, youth market, poverty
Accessibility as a right:
-- Access to facilities
-- Access to Society

Accessibility vs. mobility:


-- Individual or institutions at the center?

"Value-capture" Henry George


-- Different rules for highways and transit
F.P. Salvucci/
M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

September 29, 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REVOLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
I. Early History
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.

Tobin Bridge
Storrow Drive
Central Artery
West End
Turnpike
Prudential

F.P. Salvucci

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REVOLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
II. Early Battles
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Spy Pond, Arlington


Lexington
Memorial Drive - Sycamores
Jamaicaway
Leverett Circle Bridge

F.P. Salvucci

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REV OLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
III.

Neighborhood vs. City of Cambridge


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.
M.
N.

F.P. Salvucci

Father McManus
Cambridge Committee on the Inner Belt
MIT vs. Neighborhoods
McCormack vs. Volpe
Kennedy (Gifford)
DPW Restudy
Casa Grande
Killian
Junior faculty petition
City of Cambridge revised position, Justin Gray
Galbraith vs. Moynihan
Kevin White elected, Barney Frank Chief of Staff
Task A vs. Task B
McCormack
1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REVOLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
IV.

Municipal Coalition vs. the State


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.

F.P. Salvucci

Nixon victory, Volpe to D.C.; Sargent becomes governor


White vs. Sargent
Civil rights
Demonstration on Boston Common
Moratorium
I-93 in Somerville
Task Force, Altshuler and Jack Wofford
Study Design
Sargent beats White

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REVOLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
V.

Boston Transportation Planning Review


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

F.P. Salvucci

Participation in study
Technically multi-modal
Study Element II
Sargent decision; downtown progress
NEPA

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REVOLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
VI.

Implementation
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J

F.P. Salvucci

Constitutional change concerning gas tax


Interstate transfer
Operating subsidies for transit
Re-organized T
Affirmative Action in construction
Legislature blocks Third Harbor Tunnel
Sargent vs. Dukakis vs. Quinn
EIS, Southwest Corridor, Red Line, Commuter Rail
Blue Line, Revere Beach Connector, Peabody-Salem
Connector
King beats Dukakis

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REVOLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
VI.

Implementation (contd)
K.
L.
M.
N.
O.
P.
Q.
R.
S.
T.

F.P. Salvucci

Transit chaos, reform legislature on T


Construction of Red Line and Southwest Corridor
Dukakis beats King
Central Artery and Tunnel
Southeast Expressway reconstruction
1987 Surface Transportation Act
MBTA Customers
Weld becomes Governor
1991 ISTEA
Central Artery/Tunnel construction

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

HIGHWAY REVOLT REBELLION OR REVOLUTION?


Anatomy of a Pattern Break
VII.

Rashamon
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.

F.P. Salvucci

Community action and advocacy


Municipal politics
Legislature and Congressional electoral politics
Electoral executive politics
American style separation of executive from legislative
branch
National Environmental Policy Act; Clean Air Act,
Section 4(f)
Concept of the city: physical, social
Economy of region

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

Quantitative Methods
Urban Transportation Planning
MIT Course 1.252j/11.380j
Fall 2006
Mikel Murga, MIT Research Associate and Lecturer

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Quantitative Methods

From road counts to


The 4-Step Model
Critique
Integration of the analytical chain
New Trends

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From road counts to a Light Rail

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From road counts

to origin-destination matrices:

By using heuristic methods to obtain an o-d matrix


Or by conducting surveys among drivers
Or even by updating an old o-d matrix

Why an o-d matrix?

To assign that o-d matrix under what if

To test closing a street or other tactical short term measures


To analyze the impact of a New Light Rail

Then why use a 4-step model?


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From vehicle counts to traffic models

Highway Capacity Manual:

Macroscopic Models:

Hand-calculations HCS
Representation of Platoons

Microscopic Models

Individual vehicles are analyzed

Data availability + Computer power


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

We could use Lafayette counts

Saturation flows anyone??


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Using Lafayette counts

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Screenshots courtesy of McTrans, used with permission.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Using Lafayette counts.

Screenshots courtesy of McTrans, used with permission.


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Using Lafayette counts Oops!

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Screenshots courtesy of McTrans, used with permission.

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Microscopic Traffic Models

From research tools (MITSIM for the Big Dig)


towards daily practice
Commercial packages:

VISSIM
Aimsun
CORSIM Traf-Netsim
Paramics
TransModeller
Dynasim
And many others
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Microscopic models

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Example of Reqd Data

Microscopic Simulation:
100
95
90
85
80
75
70
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

6.6

6.8

>7

4.8

>5

6.4

4.6

6.2

5.8

5.6

5.4

5.2

4.8

4.6

4.4

4.2

3.8

3.6

3.4

3.2

2.8

2.6

2.4

Huecos aceptados

2.2

Frecuencias acumuladas en (%)

Acceptable Gaps (from Pte.Deusto)

tiem pos (seg)

100
95
90
85
80
75
70
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

tiem pos (seg)

4.4

4.2

3.8

3.6

3.4

3.2

2.8

2.6

2.4

2.2

1.8

1.6

1.4

1.2

0.8

0.6

0.4

Huecos rechazados

0.2

Frecuencias acumuladas en (%)

Unaccpetable Gaps (from Pte.Deusto)

13

Propuesta Viaria

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Microscopic Simulation: Assignment plus Visualization

Using street assignments to save a plaza


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Models: The 4 Basic Questions


1. How many trips are generated and
attracted at any given location?
Land-Use Scenarios:
eg. Newdevelopments

Transport Scenarios:
eg. Newtransit line

Socio-economic data
Generation
Distribution
Modal Split
Assignment

Policy Scenarios: eg.


Newparking scheme

2. How many trips go from a given


location to all other locations?
3. Which transport mode will be
chosen to go from that location to
each destination?
4. Which road will be taken for car
trips and which train line for
transit trips?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model


Land-Use Scenarios:
eg. New developments

Transport Scenarios:
eg. New transit line

Policy Scenarios: eg.


New parking scheme

Socio-economic data
Generation
Distribution

Started in the 50s


to build the Interstate
Then,

Modal Split
Assignment
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

predict and accommodate

The basic approach


remains unchanged today
16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Models: Three Building Blocks


1.

Land-Use Scenarios:
eg. Newdevelopments

Transport Scenarios:
eg. Newtransit line

Policy Scenarios: eg.


Newparking scheme

2.

Socio-economic data
Generation
Distribution
Modal Split
Assignment

3.

Travel Network : road network,


transit system, with all its
parameters (speeds, frequencies,
costs)
Socio-economic data: number of
dwellings, jobs, shops, household
profiles: age, size, income ..
Logic of Behavioral Patterns:
Observed or revealed behavior from
travel home surveys, road counts,
transit passenger surveys, in terms
of trip purpose, time of day, choices
made, travelers reactions to system
changes, etc.
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: Network Model:

Millers River

$ $

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$

$
$

$ $

$$
$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$$ $
$$

$
$

$
$
$



$$
$
$$$

Bowdoin

$
$

$ $$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Charles River
Basin

$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$$

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$

$
$ $

Copley I


$
$
$

$
$ $

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

South Station O
South Station O


$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Fort Point
Channel
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$$

$
$

$
$

$
$$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

US Courthouse

$
$

$
$

$
$ $

$$
$

$$

$
$

$$
$

$$

$
$ $

$
$

$
$

$ $

$ $

$
$

$ $ $

$
$
$

Rowes Wharf

$ $
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $
$

$
$


$$$$$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$$

$
$

$$

$
$
$ $ $

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$

$$$

$
$

$
$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

ddy River Pond

$
$$
$

$
$

Boylston O




$
$

$
$

$
$$

Arlington I
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$$
$
$

$
$

$
$



Aquarium I



$
$
$

$ $

$
$





$ $

Long Wharf

$
$ $



Downtown Crossin

Public Garden
Pond

$
$

$$$

$$

$
$

$ $

$ $

$$ $

$ $

Park St O



Frog Pond

$$
$
$
$$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $



$
$

$
$

$$

$ $
$
$

$$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$
$

$ $

$
$$
$$

$
$
$

Gov't Center I
State O


$
$

Data of the road system:


posted speed, speeds
during peak hours,
capacity, traffic
regulation

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$

$
$ $
$

$
$
$

$
$

$ $




$
$
$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$ $ $
$

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $ $
$

Haymarket O

$$
$$

$
$

Charles/MGH I

$ $$$

$
$
$

$
$

$$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$$$
$
$

$
$

$
$$

$
$
$$
$

$
$

Kendall/MIT I






$
$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$$
$

$
$

North Station I

$ $

$
$

$ $
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$



$
$

North Station I

$
$$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Science Park O
$

$
$
$$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Lovejoy Wharf

$
$

$
$

Charles River

$
$

$
$

$ $
$

$
$

$
$
$

$ $
$
$

$
$$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$


$$

Little Mystic Ch

$ $

$$

$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$$

$
$

$
$
$ $
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$

$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$

Lechmere

$
$$
$$

$
$

$
$
$

$$

$
$

$$
$

$
$

$$$
$

Community Colleg

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$$$

Roads, Streets, Transit

$
$

WT

$
$


$

$
$

$
$

Data of the transit


system: Routes, stops,
commercial speeds,
service frequencies

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1:Network Model: Roads, Streets, Transit


$

$
$

Millers River

$ $

$
$

Lovejoy Wharf

$
$
$

North Station I
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $$$

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$
$

$
$

$$ $
$$

$
$

$
$

$ $$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Charles River
Basin

$
$

$$

$
$

$$$

$ $

$$$

Public Garden
Pond




$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $

Copley I


$
$
$

$
$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

South Station O
South Station O


$

$
$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Fort Point
Channel

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$

$
$

$
$$

$$

$
$

$
$
$
$

US Courthouse

$$

$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$

$ $

$
$

$ $

$$

$
$

$ $ $

$ $

$
$ $

$
$

$ $

$
$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$$ $$$

$
$
$

$
$

Rowes Wharf

$
$

$
$

$
$
$$



$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$ $ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$

$
$$
$

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

$$

$
$

$ $

$$$

$
$

$
$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $

ddy River Pond

$
$

$
$

$
$

Boylston O




$
$$

Arlington I

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Aquarium I



$
$
$

$ $

$
$

$$
$
$


$



$ $

$
$ $

Downtown Crossin

$ $

$
$

$$

Long Wharf

$
$ $

$ $

$$$

Frog Pond

$
$

Park St O



$$
$
$
$$$
$

$
$



$
$
$

$
$

$$

$ $
$
$

$
$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Gov't Center I
State O

$$
$
$$

$
$
$
$

$ $

$
$

$ $
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$




$
$$
$

Bowdoin

$ $

$
$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$

Charles/MGH I

$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$
$$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$$

$
$

$
$

$
$ $ $
$

$
$

Haymarket O



$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

Kendall/MIT I

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$

$ $ $

$$$
$
$

$
$
$$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$
$

$
$






$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

North Station I

$ $
$
$

$
$ $

$$

$ $
$

$
$



$
$

$
$

$
$$
$

Science Park O

$
$

$
$
$$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$
$

Charles River

$
$

$ $

$
$

$
$

$$



$
$$$

$
$

Little Mystic Ch

$ $

$$

$ $

$$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$ $
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$$

$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$$

$
$
$

Lechmere

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$
$$

$
$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$$

$
$

Community Colleg

$
$

$$$

$
$

$
$


19
$

$
$

WT

$
$

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: the road network


Mystic River

h Pond

Millers River

Charles River
Basin
Charles River

Little Mystic Ch

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond

Muddy River Pond

Fort Point
Channel

Muddy River
Reserved Channel

CTPS 2002 am peak volumes


amVol
Fisher Hill
Reservoir

Leverett Pond

Brookline
Reservr

Old Harbor

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

2500
1250
625
amVol
.4
.8

1.2

Miles

20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: Network Model: Using the road

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1:

Walking Isochrones from North Station

Suffolk Downs
Island End River$$$$$ $
$$$$$ $ $
$ $$$$
$ $$
$$$
$
$$ $$
$$ $ $
$$
$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$$$$
$$ $$
$$ $
$
$$ $$$
$
$ $$
$$$$ $$
$
$$$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$$$$$$
$$ $
$$$$$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$$ $ Mystic River
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$$$
$$$$ $$ $

$$
$
$$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Porter
Square
O
$$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$$ $$ $
$
$
$$$ $$$
$
$$$
$$$ $
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$

$$$$
$$
$
$
$$ $$$$
$
$$$
$ $ $$$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$$$$$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$$$$
$ $
$$ $$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$$$
$
$$
Orient$Heights
$
$$$$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$ $
$
$
$$$$$ $
$$
$
$$$ $$$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
Sullivan
Square
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$
$$$$$$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$$
 $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $$
$
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$$$ $
$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
Belle Isle Inlet
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$$$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $
$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$ $$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$
$ $
$$$
$ $
$$$$
$$ $$ $$$
$
$
$ $$$
$$
$$$$
$
$$$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$ $
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$$
$$$$ $ $ $
$
$ $
$
$$$$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$$$
$$
$ $$$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $$$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wood
Island
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$$$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$ $$$
$$
$$ $ $ $ $
$ $$$$$ $
$$
$
$$ $ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $$
$$
$$
$$ $$ $$$ $
$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$$$ $
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$$
$$
$$ $
$$$$
$
$
$$$$$$$$
$$
$
$
$ $$ $$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$$$ $ $
$ $$$
$$
$$$$
$$
$$$
$$ $
$ $
$$
$$$$
$
$ $$$ $
$$$$
$$$ $$ $$
$$
$$
$$$$
$$
$$
$
$
$I$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$$Harvard
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Airport
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$Colleg
$$
$$$$
$$$ $ $$$$
$$$$
$
$ $ $$$
$$ $ $
$$
$$$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$ Millers River $Community
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$$
$$
$
$ $$ $$$
$$
$$ $$$$

$ $$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
Little Mystic
$$$$
$
$$ $$
$
$$
$$$$
 $
$
$$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$$$$
$$$
$
$ $$$
$
$$
$$
Lechmere
 Ch
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$ $$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$$ $ $
$
$$$$ $
$ 
$$ $$$$
$
$$$$
$
$ $$$
$$
$
$$$$$$$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$$ $$$ $$$
$$$$ $ $
$$$$
$$
$$$$
$
Lovejoy Wharf
$$
$ $$$$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$Maverick
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$ $$$$$
$$
$
$$$$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$ $$$$ $$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $$I

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$ $$$$$
$
$$$
$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$$
$ $
$$$ $$
$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$Station
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
North
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$$$
$
$ $ $
$$
$ $
$$$$
$
$$$$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$Station
$
$$$ $
$$$
$$Square
$$
$$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
North
I
$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$I $ $ $ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$Central
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$$$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$$ $ $$
$ $$$Haymarket
$$
$$
$$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
O
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$$
$
$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $ $
$
$ $$ $
$$
$$
$$ $$

I
$
$
$
$$$$$$$
$$
$
$ $$ Kendall/MIT
$
$
$
$$$
$
$ $$ $
$$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $$$ $
$$
Charles/MGH
I$Bowdoin
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Long
Wharf
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$ $ $ $$
$$
$$
$$
 Gov't
$$
$
$$$
$
$ Center I $

$$$$$ $$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$$ $$ $$$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$ 
$
$$$$$
$$$ $$$$$$ $$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$$
$$$$$$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$$
$ $$
$
$$
$$$$$$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$$
$Rowes Wharf
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
Park
St$$O
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Frog
Pond
$
$
$
$$

$
Downtown
Crossin
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$$$
Charles River
$$$ $ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$$$$ US Courthouse
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
Basin
$
$
Public
Garden
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $Pond
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$$ $$ O $
$
Boylston
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $River
$ $$ $$ $
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Charles
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
 $$
$ $
$
$
$$
South
Station
O
$$

$
$
$
$
$West O
$$
$$
Boston Harbor
$$$$
$$$$
$$ $
$ $$ $$ $
 $
$$$$$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$
I $
$
$
 $ BU$$
$ $ Copley
$$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
WTC
$
$
$
$
Fort
Point
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
Muddy
River
Pond
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
BU
East
O

$
$$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$

Channel
$
$$$
$ $$
$
$ $$
Back
Bay
O
$
$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $$$$$ $ $$ $
$ $$
$
$
$$$
$$ $ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ I $ Hynes
$I $
$  $
$ $
$Kenmore
$ $
$$$$
$
$$
$
$
Prudential
$$$
$I $
$$
$$
$
$$$ $
$
Walking Times from North Station
$
Herald St O $ $$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$ $$$
$$ $$
$$$$$$$
$
Hawes
St$$$
I$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$$$ $
$$
$ $$ $$  $
$ I $$ $
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
St
ISOCHRONES
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$Kent
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $$ St Paul
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$ River
$
$$$
$$$ East Berkeley
I$
$$
$
St

$$$
 $$
Muddy
$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$
$$$$$$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$
$
1 to 5 mins
$
$$$$$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$
 $ $$
$ $$$I $ $$
$ $
$
$ $ Symphony
$$ $$$
$
$$
$$$
$
$ $$ $$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$ $$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $
$
 $Ave
$$$$
$$ $$
$ $$$ $$$$ $$
$
$$
$Summit
$$
$$
$
$
$
5 to 10
$$I $
$$$Union
$
$
$
$Park
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
St
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
 $ $ $$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$$$$$$$
$$
$$
$
$$ $ $$$$
$
$$
$
Reserved Channel
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$$$
$
$
Northeastern
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$
$$
$
$ 15 to 20
$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$
$ $$
$$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$$$
$
$ $ $ $ $$$$$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$ $
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$
 $ $
W
Newton
St O
$
$$ $
$
$ $$$ $ $$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ 20 to 25
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$$ Museum
$
$$ St O
$
A$$ $
$
$ $
$ $ $$ $ $
$
 $$
Worcester
$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$$$ $
$$$ of Fine
$$
$
$$$$$
$$$
$$
$$ Av
$$$$ $$
$ $$ $ $
$$$
$
$$ $$$$$$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 25 to 30
Massachusetts
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
Ruggles
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$$$
$$
Longwood
$Massachusetts
$$$
$
$I
$$
$$$$$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$$$$$$
$$ Av
$

$
$ $$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$
$

$
$
$
$$$$ $$
$
$
$ 30 to 35
$
$
$
$

$$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$ $$ $
$$$ $$
$ $
$
$$$
$$
$ $$$ $$ $ $Brigham
$
$$
$
$
Circle
$$ $$$$$$$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$ I $$ $ $
$ $$$$ $$$$ $$
$$ $
$$$$
$$
$ $$
$ $$
$$$$$
$$$$
$$$$
$$$
$$
$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 35 to 40
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
St$
O $ $$$$
$$
$$$$
$Villag
$$
$ $$$$$
$$
$$
Brookline
 $ $$$$$$ $$
$$ $$$
$$$ $Lenox
$$$$$$ $$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$$
$$
$$$
$$$ $$

$
$$
$$$ $$
$
$
$$$$ $$
$
$$
$ $
$$$
$
$$
$$$
$$$
$$$$$$
$
$
$$$$$$Roxbury
$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$$$$
$$$$ $$
$
Crossing
$
$ GT 40 mins
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$Back
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$$$$ $$
$$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $
of$
the
$$$$$
$$$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$$$
$
$$ $
$$$$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$Hill
$$$$
$$$$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Andrew
O $$ $$ $$
$ $$$ $ $$$ $$$$ $$ $$$$$ $$$
Other
$$
$$
$$ $$$$
$ $$ $$$
 $$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$$
$ $ $ $$$
$
$$$
$
$ $$
$
$$$$$
$
$$
$$$$$$$ $
$ $$
$$$ I $$
Duddley
$
$
$$
$$$
$$Square
$$
$$$$
$$$
$$

$$
$$$
$$
$$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$$
$
$$$$$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$$$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$$$$$
$$ $ $
$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ Pond
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$

Leverett
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0
.6
1.2
1.8
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$ $ $$$$$
$$
$
$ $$
$ $
$$$
$
$$$ $$ $$ $$$$$$$
$$ $$
$
$$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$$$
$$
$$$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$$$$$ $$
$$
$
$$
$$$
$$$$$$$$ $$
$
$
Old Harbor
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$$$ $$$$
$$$$ $$
$ $$$
Kilometers
$$$$ $ $$$$$
$$$$ $$$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$
$$$$
$$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$$$$$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$$$$$Jackson
$$
$$ $
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
I$
$$
$$ Square
$$$
$
JFK/UMass
O
$
$$$ $$
$
$
$
and
M.Murga
$$$ $ $$
$
$F.Salvucci
$$$$$
$$
$ $ $$$$
$$$$
$$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $
$ $$$$
$ $
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$ $$
 $$
$
$ $ $$$
$ $ $
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$$$$$$$$$ $$$$$$ $
$ $$$$
$ $$ $$ $
$$
$$$$ $
$ $$$
$$ $
$$
$

$
$

22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: Driving Times from North Station




$$ $
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$ $$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$$$ $$$
$
$
$
$
Greenwood
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
Swampscott
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Melrose
Highland
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Lynn
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Melrose/Cedar
Pa
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Concord
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Winchester
Ctr$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wyoming
Hill
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wedgemere
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Oak
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$Grove
$ $$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Malden
Center
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
West
Medford
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$Wonderland $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Lincoln
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Revere
Beach
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wellington
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ Beachmont
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Belmont
O
$
$$
$
$
Chelsea
I$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Silver
Hill
O
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Alewife
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Suffolk
Downs
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$
$$ $$ $$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$Sullivan
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$


$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Square
$
$
$
$
$
Belmont
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Waverly
O
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Orient
Heights
I

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$ $
$
$$$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$

$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $$Kendal
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$$
$
$
$
Green
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wood
Island
I$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Waltham
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ O $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Airport
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Harvard
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Lechmere
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$I$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
Lovejoy
Wharf $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Brandeis/Roberts
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Haymarket
O
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$
$
$
$
Downtown
Crossin
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Newtonville
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$

$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Medical
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
West
Newton
Harvard
Ave
O
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
NE
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$$$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ CtrStO
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Hawes
St
I$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
East
Berkeley
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Riverside
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
Boston
College
I$
$
$
W
Newton
St
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$O
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
Woodland
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Brookline
Villag


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$

$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$

$
$$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Duddley
Square
I$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Chesnut
Hill
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
Waban
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Jackson
Square
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wellesley
Frm
O
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$$

$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Eliot
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Stony
Brook
I$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$Savin Hill
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wellesley
Hills
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Green
Street
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
Pemberton Point
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $Corner O
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Forest
Hills
$
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
Needham
Heights
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
Fields
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wellesley
Square
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
Driving
Times
North
Station
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$from
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Shawmut
O
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$Natick
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Roslindale
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
DrivingTimes
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Ashmont
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
West
Roxbury
West
Natick
O
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Needham
Center
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0
to
5
mins
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
Morton
Street
I$$

$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$

$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
Framingham
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Hersey
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
North
Quincy
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Hull
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Needham
Jct
I
$
$
$
$
$ 5 to 10 $$$
$
Milton
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Mattapan
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wollaston
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 10 to 15
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$

$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 15 to 20
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Fairmount
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Quincy
Center
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 20 to 25
$
$
$ Hingham Shipyard
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ 
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 25 to 30
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
Readville
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Endicott
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
Quincy
Adams
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
0
2
4
6
$
$
$
$$Ctr$$$ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Dedham
Corp
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$Islington
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$$$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Kilometers
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Route
128
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
Braintree
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
and M.Murga
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$F.Salvucci
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
Braintree
I$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$ $$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$$ $
$
$

$
$
$
$$$
$
$$$$$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$$$ $$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$$ $
$





 









 








 








 








 






 




23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: Transit and Parking Supply


Sullivan Square

$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$ <
$$
$$
$
$
< $
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
<$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
<
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ <
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
< $
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$ $
<
$$ $
<
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$$
<
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$ $ < $$
$
$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
<
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $ $$
<
$
$
$<
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $ $$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$< $
$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
<$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ < $<
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
< <
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$$
$
$
<
$
$
< $$ $$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$ $ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$$
<
<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<$
$
$
<$ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$<
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
<
<
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$$$ $
$ $ $ $
$
$
<
$
$
$ $$ $
$< $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$$ $ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$ $
$ $ $
$
$< $
$
$
$ <$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$$<
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$$
<
$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
<
<
<
<
< $ $$
$
$<
$$
$
$
$<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$ <
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$ <
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
<
$ $$ $
$
$ $
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $ < $$
$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
< $
<
<
$$ $
$$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$
<
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$< $$
$$ $ $
$ $
$$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$< $
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
<
$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $ $ $$ $
$ < $
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$
<
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
<
$ <<
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$
<
< $
$$
<
$
<
$$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $
$ $ $$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
< $
<
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
$ $
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ <
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$ <
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$ < $ $
$
$
$ $ $
$$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $ $
<
$$
$$
$$
$
<
$ $
<
$ $
$
$
$ $
<
$
$< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
<
$
<
$
$
$ $
$ $
<
$
$
$
$ <
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$< $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
<
$
$ $ $
$ $$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
<
$
$$$
$
$ $ $<
$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$$
$$
$$
$ $ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$ $ $ $
$
<
$
$
$$
$ $<$
$ <
$$
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$ <$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
< <
< $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $ $
<
<
$$
$
$
$ $ <
$ $
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$
$ $$
$$ <$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$ $
$
$<
<$
$ $$ $
< $ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ <
$ $
$
$
<
$$ $
$ $ $$$
$
$ $ $
$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
<
< <
$ $
$
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$ $$ <
$<
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$ $$
$
$
$$< $$
$
$ <
$$
<$
< $ < << <
$
$
$
< $$
$ $
$ <
<
<
<$
<$
<
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$<
$
$ $
< $< $ $ $
$ $
$
<
$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $$
$ $ $
<
<$
$
$$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$
<
<
<
<$ $ $
$ $
$
$
< $
$
$ $$ $
<
$
$ <
$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
< <
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ <
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
<$
<$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
< $
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
<
$
$
<
$ $<$
<
$$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$ $$$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$ <$
$
<
$
<
<
$
<$ <
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$<
<
<
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
<
< $
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$$$ $ $
$
$ <<
$
$
$< $
<<
$ $
$
$
$
< < $
$
$
$
$
$
$< $ $
$$
<$
$
$
$
<
<
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$ $
$$
<
$
< <
<
$
$
$
$ <$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ < < $
$
<$
$
$< $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $<
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
<
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
< $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$
<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
< <
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$<
$ $
$ $$
$$
<
$ $
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$< <
< $
<
$
$
$
$
< <
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
<$
$
$
$ $
< $
< <$
$
$
$
$
$< $
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ < $
$
$
<
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
<
< $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<< $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$< $
$ $$$
<
$ $$ $
< <
< $
<$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$ <
<$$
< <
<
<
$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$<
$
$
<
$$ <
$$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <$
$
< <
$
$< $
$ $ $ $<
$ $ $ $
<
<
$$
$
$ < $ $$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$$$
<
$
$$
< $< < $ < <
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $
$
<
<
<
<
$
$
$
$$$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$ <$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
$<
$
<
<
$
$ <
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
< <$$
<
<
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$
$$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $$
$$ $ $
$
<
$
$ $ $
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
<
<
<
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
<
< $<
< $
$
$ $
$ $ $$$ $
$
$
<$ $
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$ $
<
<
$ << $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
<
<
<
$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
<<
< $
$
<$<
<
$
$
$
$< <
$
$
$$ $
< $ $ $ $ <$ $ $ $ < $
$ $ $
$ $$
$ $ $ $ $
$$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$< $
$<
$
<
$
< <
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$ <$
$ $
$
$
<
$
<$
<
$
$
<
< $
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$ $<$ <
<
$<
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$$
$ $
$
<
< $ $
<
<<
<
$ $$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$ $ < $< $
$
$ $<
$
$
$
$
<<
$$
$$
$
$
$
<
< < $<$ $ <
<
< $
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ <$
$
<
$$
< $
$
$ $ $
$
$
<
$
$
< $ $ $$ $$$
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ <$
$$
$ <$
<
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$
<
$ $ <$
$
$
<
<
<
<
$$$
$
$ $$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
$
< <$ $
<
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <$
$$ $
$
<
$$
$ <$
$$
$ $
< $
<
<
$$
<
< $$$ $ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $
<
$
<
<
$
$
$ $
$
$ <$
$
$
$ $
<
<
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
$$
$<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
<
$
$
<
$
<$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
<
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $<$ $$$$
<$< $
<$
< $ $$ < $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $<
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
<
$ $
$
$ $
$$
$$
$ <$ <
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$$$
<
$ $
$< $ $ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$<
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
<$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
<
$$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
<
<
$$$
$
$
$
$<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$ $ $$ $ $$ $ $$
$$
$ <
$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$ $
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$ <
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<$ <
$ $
$
$
$ $
$$$ $ $ $ $
$
<
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
< $$
< $$
$
$
<$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$< $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ <$
$
$$
$
$
<
$
<
<
$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
<
<
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$ $ $
<
<
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
<
<<
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
<
$
<$<<
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
<<<
$
<$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
<
$ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
<
$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<$$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$<$ $
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
< $ $
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $
$
<
$$
$ $<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
< $
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
<
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$ $ $ $ $< $ $
$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$ $<
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $$
$ $$ $$$
$
$
$
<
<$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
<
$
$$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
<
$$
$
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$
<
$ <
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
< <
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$ $ $
<
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$ $ $$
$ $
$
< <$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
< <
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$ $
<
<
$$
$$ $
<
$
$
$ $
$
< <$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$< $
$ $$ $ $ <
$
<<
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$<
$$
$
< $
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $$$$ $ $ $$
$$
<
<
$ $
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
<<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
<
<
<
<
<
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $
< $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$<
$
$ <
$ $< $
$
$$ $$ $ <
$$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $<$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$ $ $ <
$
$
$$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
<
$
$
< $ $$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $
<
$$ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
<
< <
$
$ $
$$ <
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$ <$ $$ $
<
$$
$$
$
< $
$
$ $
$
$
$<
$
$
$
<
<
$
$ <
$ $
$
$$ $$$
$
$
$< $ $
$$
$
< <
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$$
<
<
< $
$
< $
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
< $
$
$
$$
$ $
$
<
$
$< $
<
< $
<
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$ <
$
$
<$ <
$
$
<
$
<$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$ <
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$$
$
$ $
$
$< $ $
$
$
$<
< $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$$
$
$ <$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ <
< $ < $<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $<
$
$
$
$
$ $ <<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ < $
<
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$ $ <
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
< $
$$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ <<
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$<
$ $
<
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
<
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$<
$
$
< <
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$$
$$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
<$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$<
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$<
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
< $
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
< $ $
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$< $
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
< $$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ <$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< < $$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
<$
<
$
$
<$$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$<
$
$
<
< $
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
< $ $
<
$
<
< <
$
$
$ $
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$$
<
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
< $
$
<$
$
$
$
$ <
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$<
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$<
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$ <
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$<
$
$$ $ $
<$
<
$
$
$
<
$ $$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $
$ $ <
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
$$
$
$
$
$
< $
$$
<
$
$<
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
<
$
$
<
<$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$
$<
$
<
<
<
$<
$ $$ $ <
$
$$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$$$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$ <
$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<$
<
<
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
<
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
< $
<
<
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
<
<
$< $
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$<
$$
<
<$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
<
<
<$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
<
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
< <
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<$ $ <
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$ <
$
$$
<
<
$ $
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
<
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
<
< <
<
<
<
<
<
<
$ $$ $
$
$ < $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
$
$
$
$$ $
<
<
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
$$ $$
$
$
$
$<
$ <
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
< $
$
<
$ $ $ $ < $
$ $$
$
$ $$
$
<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
<
$ $
$$ <
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $
< $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
<
<
$$
<
<
$
$ $$ $
$$
$$
$
$
<$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
<
<
<
<$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
<$ $ $
<
<
< $
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $$
$
$ < $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
<$
<
$
<
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$<
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$ $
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
< $
$
<
$< $ $ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$<
$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ <
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
<
<$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
< $
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ <$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ <$
$
$$
$
<
<
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $<
$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
< $
<$ $
$
<
<
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$ < $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$< $
$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
<
$ <
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$ < $
$ $
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$< $
$
$<
$
$ $
$
$$$
<
$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$<
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
<$< $ < < $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
<
$ $
< $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $
< <
$
<
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$< $ $
$
<
$
$<
$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$
< $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$ $$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ < $<
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$
<
$ $$ $
$
<$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $$ $ $$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
<
<
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $ <$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$$ < < <$ <$$
$
$
<
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $ $
<
<
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $ <
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ < $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
<
$ $$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $
<$
<
$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$$ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$ <
$
$
$
$ <
$ $
$$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
<
$$ $
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$ $
$
$$ $ $
$ $
< $ $
$ $
$
$
$$ $
< $ $$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $$ $$
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$< $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$ <
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $
<
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $
$
$$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$ $
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$$$$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $
$$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$

Pond

<

<

<

<

<

$
$

$$



$

$
$

$$

$
$

$$

$
$

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Wood Island I

<




<

<

<

<

<

CAMBRIDGE

<

<

<

<

Harvard<I

<< 
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<< <

<

<<<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<
<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<
<

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

< 



<

<<Rowes Wharf
<
Park St O<

<Crossin
<
Frog
Pond
Downtown
<

Charles River
<
<
US Courthouse
<
<

< <
< <
Basin
Public Garden
 <
<
< <
Boylston
< < O<<
Pond
<<
< Charles River
<< < <
<
<

<

South Station
O
< <

< <
BU West O<
Harvard AveO  < 
<
<
Copley I

<<
<
<

<


<
WTC

Fort
Point

< <
<
Warren St O

BU East
O Muddy River Pond
<
<
<
< 
Channel
<
Back
Bay
O
<
  
<

<
<
Kenmore
I
Hynes I Prudential
Herald St O
<
 I
<
<
Summit Ave O
<
Hawes<St
I <
<
< <<
 <<

<
<
I

KentSt I Fenway

 St
<
<
<
<
<
East
Berkeley
St Paul
Washington St O

 I
Muddy River
< <
<
<
<
<<
<
Symphony I

<

Mt Hood Rd O
<
<
Summit
 Ave I
<
<
Sutherland
Rd
O
Massachusetts
Av
Union Park St I

 St I
Fairbanks
Reserved<Channel



<

Northeastern
I
<

Washington
Squar
< <<<<
W Newton St O

<
<
<


<
<
<
Dean
Worcester
<
<Museum of Fine A
<O <
 < < St
<
<
<
 Rd I
<
<
Massachusetts
Av <


<
Beaconsfield
Ruggles
I

<
Longwood
I
<
 
<
<
Massachusetts
Av

<


< <


<

<
Circle I
<

< Brigham
<
Lenox St
Parkings
<
<O
BrooklineVillag
<
<
Roxbury Crossing
NSPAC BrooklineHills  Back of the Hill


SUFFOLK
Andrew O

Duddley Square I
Fisher Hill

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<<




<

<


Charles/MGH
<
<<<< < << I Bowdoin
<
<
Long Wharf
<
< 
< <Gov't Center I

<<

<

<

Maverick I

 <

<

<<

<

<

<

I
<<North Station
<
North Station I


<
Haymarket O

<

<

< <

<
Kendall/MIT
I

<

< < <<


<

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<

<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<
Central Square
I
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Lovejoy Wharf

<

<

<

<


<

<


<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Airport<
I <

Colleg
<
Millers River Community
<
Little Mystic

 Ch
Lechmere
<
<

<

<

<

<<

<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Boston H

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Reservoir

<<

Brookline
5000 2500
Reservr

.6

BROOKLINE

Leverett Pond

<

<

<

<

<

Old Harbor

<

1.8

Jackson Square I

Kilometers

Sargent Pond
No de Plazas

<

<

<

1250
1.2

<

Wards Pond

JFK/UMass O

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

JFK/UMass O

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: Network Model:The Bus system


g








Oak
Grove



































































Malden










Center



































West
Medford





































































Wonderland































































































































































Wellington






















































































Beachmont












































Alewife























Suffolk
Downs



































Orient






Heights









Sullivan Square





















































































Kendal












Green

































Waltham




























































Lechmere
































































































Brandeis/Roberts





























































































































Newtonville













West Newton






































































































Riverside













































Beaconsfield
































Villag



Woodland
Brookline





























































































Chesnut
Hill



Waban






























Wellesley Farms


























































Eliot

























Savin Hill
































































Wellesley Hills















































































Forest
Hills



Heights








Needham

























































































Roslindale











































Ashmont



Highland














































West
Roxbury




























Needham Center



















































North Quincy






Hersey






















































Milton














Mattapan



























































Wollaston










































































































































Fairmount
















Quincy
Center




















F.Salvucci and M.Murga
































































































$
$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $ $$ $ $ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $$
$ $ $$ $
$ $
$
$$$ $ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$$ $$$
$ $$$ $ $ $$$
$$ $ $
$$$ $
$$
$
$ $ $
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$ $
$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $ $ $
$$
$
$$$$$$$
$
$ $
$$ $ $ $ $$$ $$$
$
$ $
$$ $ $ $
$ $ $ $ $$ $$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$
$
$$$$$ $
$ $
$$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $
$$$ $$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $$$
$ $$
$$$ $
$$
$ $$ $
$ $$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$$ $
$ $$$ $$ $ $ $
$$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $
$ $
$$ $
$$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$$$ $$$ $$ $ $
$ $$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$ $ $$ $
$ $
$$$ $
$ $ $$
$ $ $$ $$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$$$$ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$ $$$
$$ $$
$
$$
$$$$ $$
$$ $ $
$ $$ $$ $
$ $$ $$
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$
$$
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$$
$ $$
$
$ $
$$ $ $
$ $ $$$
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $$$ $
$
$ $
$$
$ $ $ $$$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$ $
$ $$ $$$$
$
$$ $ $ $$ $
$ $ $$$$
$$ $ $$
$ $
$
$
$$ $ $$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $ $$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$ $$$ $$$
$$$$$ $ $
$$
$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$
$ $$$ $$
$$
$
$$$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$ $
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$ $$$
$ $$ $
$ $
$$ $ $ $$ $$ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $$
$$
$$ $ $ $$$ $ $$$ $$$ $ $
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$$ $$
$
$$$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$ $ $$$ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$$$$ $
$$$ $$
$ $
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $$ $ $ $ $
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$$
$$$
$$$ $$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $$
$$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $$$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$$ $ $$$$
$$ $ $
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$$ $ $$ $
$ $$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $
$$
$$ $ $ $ $$ $ $$$
$$ $
$ $
$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$ $$ $$$$ $$$ $
$ $
$
$ $$
$$ $$
$ $ $$$ $
$ $$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$ $
$$
$$$ $$
$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$$ $$ $$ $ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $$$$ $$ $ $ $ $$$$
$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$$ $
$$
$
$$
$
$ $$$ $
$$
$$ $ $ $$$
$$ $
$ $$
$$$$
$ $$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $$
$ $ $$$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$$$$ $
$ $ $ $ $ $$ $
$$ $$$
$
$
$ $$ $$ $$
$ $
$$ $
$
$$$ $$$ $$
$ $ $
$$
$ $
$ $ $$$
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $$$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $$$$
$$ $$ $
$$
$ $
$$ $ $$$
$ $
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$ $ $$$
$$$ $ $$$ $ $
$$
$
$$
$ $
$ $ $ $$$$$
$ $$$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$$
$$$$ $$
$ $
$
$$$$
$$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $$$ $$$ $
$ $ $
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$$$ $$$
$ $ $ $$ $
$$ $$
$ $$$$
$$
$$ $$
$ $ $$
$ $$$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$ $ $
$ $$ $$
$
$ $$ $ $$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $
$$ $ $ $
$ $$
$
$$$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$ $$$$ $
$$ $ $ $$$$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$
$ $$
$$$$ $ $$$ $$$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$
$ $$
$ $$$
$ $ $ $$ $$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $$ $$$$
$ $ $$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$ $ $$
$$$ $ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $$ $$$$
$$ $$ $$
$
$$
$$$ $$$ $$$
$$$ $$
$ $
$ $ $$
$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$ $$$$ $$ $$
$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $$
$
$ $$ $$ $$$ $ $ $$$ $$
$$
$$$ $ $$ $
$
$$$
$ $ $$$ $ $$
$$
$ $$
$ $ $$
$$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$$ $$ $
$$
$
$ $ $$$$$ $$$
$ $$ $ $
$ $$
$$ $$$$
$$
$
$ $ $$ $$ $
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$ $$$
$ $$$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$ $$$$$$$$
$$ $
$$ $ $$
$$ $$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $$ $
$$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $
$$$ $$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $ $$$ $
$ $
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$ $$$$
$ $ $
$
$$ $ $$$$
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$$$
$$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$$
$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $$$
$ $$ $
$$
$$$$
$$ $ $
$$$$
$ $ $ $ $$$$$$ $$ $$ $
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$
$ $$$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$$$$ $ $ $ $
$ $$ $
$
$$$$ $ $$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$$$
$
$$
$ $$$
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$ $$
$$$$
$$$
$$ $
$$$
$
$
$$$$$ $$$ $$$ $$$ $$ $ $ $ $ $ $$$$$ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $ $$$
$ $$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $ $$ $
$ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$$$
$ $$
$ $$ $$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$ $ $$$ $ $$ $
$
$$$
$$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $
$
$$ $$ $$$ $
$ $ $
$$
$
$
$$$$$$$$$
$ $
$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $$
$$$ $ $$ $
$$ $
$$$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$ $$ $$ $ $ $
$$$ $ $$ $
$ $$$ $ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $$$
$$
$$
$$ $$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $$ $ $$
$$ $ $
$$ $$$$$
$
$$
$ $
$$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$ $$$ $ $
$ $$
$$$ $$ $
$$
$$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$ $ $
$ $ $$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $$$$$$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$$$$$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$$$
$ $ $$$ $ $$ $$ $
$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$ $
$$
$ $$ $
$ $$$$$$
$ $ $$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $$
$$ $$$$
$ $
$$
$ $
$ $$ $
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$$ $$
$ $ $$$$ $
$ $
$ $$$$
$
$ $$$ $ $$
$
$$$ $$ $$
$
$$ $ $ $
$ $ $$$ $ $$ $ $ $$
$
$ $ $$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$$$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $$
$ $$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $$
$ $$
$ $$$$
$
$ $ $$ $$
$ $$ $$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$ $$ $$ $ $
$ $ $
$
$$$ $ $ $ $$
$
$ $
$$
$ $$$
$ $ $$
$$ $$ $$ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $$$$ $ $ $$$$$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$ $ $
$ $ $ $ $$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $$ $
$ $$ $$ $ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $
$$$$$ $$$ $
$ $
$
$$ $$$
$$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$$$$
$$ $ $ $$ $$ $$$ $ $$ $$ $$ $$$
$ $ $$$
$$
$ $$$$$ $$
$
$ $$ $
$$$ $
$$$$$ $$ $$ $$$
$$ $$$ $
$ $$ $
$$$ $$$$
$$ $
$$ $
$ $
$ $$$$ $ $ $$$
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$$
$$
$ $ $$ $
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$ $$ $$
$
$ $$ $
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$$$$
$$
$ $ $ $$$$
$ $$$$
$ $ $ $ $ $$$ $$ $
$
$ $$
$$$$
$
$
$$$$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$ $ $$ $ $$$$
$$ $ $
$ $ $$ $$$$
$
$
$ $$$$$
$
$$
$$
$$ $
$
$$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $ $$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$$$$$$ $$$
$$ $$ $$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$ $$ $ $$$ $ $ $
$$ $ $
$$$$ $
$$
$
$$ $ $ $$ $
$
$$
$ $
$$ $$
$
$ $$ $$$ $$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$$$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$ $ $
$ $$ $
$$
$$$ $ $$
$ $ $ $$
$
$ $ $
$$ $
$
$$ $ $$
$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$$ $$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$$$
$ $$$
$ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$ $$$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$ $$
$ $$$$$ $
$$
$$$
$ $$$$ $ $
$ $$ $$
$$
$
$ $
$$
$ $ $
$ $$$ $
$ $
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $
$ $$$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$$$$ $
$$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$$ $ $ $$
$$
$$$$$$$$$$
$ $ $ $$
$$$$
$$
$ $$$$
$$$
$ $
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $$$
$$ $ $
$ $$$$ $$$$ $$ $$$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $$$
$$
$$ $$
$ $
$ $$ $
$$$$
$
$$$
$
$$ $
$ $
$$$
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$ $$$ $$ $
$
$$$
$$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $
$ $$$$ $$ $$
$
$
$$ $$$$
$$ $$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $$$$ $ $ $$ $$$$$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$ $$$$ $$ $ $ $ $$
$$ $ $ $
$
$$$ $
$$
$ $$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $$
$$$
$ $$ $$ $
$ $ $$ $
$$ $$ $$ $$
$$ $$$
$ $
$$ $$ $ $$ $ $
$ $ $ $$$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$ $$
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$$ $$$ $
$
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$ $$$$ $
$
$$$ $$ $$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$ $$ $ $$ $ $ $$ $
$ $$$ $ $$
$$
$
$$$$$$$$
$
$$
$$$$$ $
$$$$$ $$$$
$$ $
$$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $ $
$$$ $$ $
$ $ $ $$$ $$$$$$
$$ $$ $$$ $$
$
$$$ $ $ $$ $ $$$ $ $ $
$ $$$
$ $$ $ $$ $$
$$$$
$$
$$ $
$$ $$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$ $$
$$$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $$$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $
$$
$
$$ $ $ $$$$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $$
$$
$$$ $$$
$$$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$ $ $ $
$
$$
$$$ $$$ $ $ $$$$$$$ $$
$$ $ $
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$$$ $$
$$$ $
$ $
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$$
$$
$
$ $$ $$ $ $ $$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $$$$$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $$
$$
$$$$$ $ $$
$
$$ $ $$ $ $
$$$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$$ $$
$
$
$ $
$ $$$
$ $$$$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$ $$ $$ $$$ $
$
$ $ $$$
$ $
$$$ $$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $ $
$
$$
$
$$$
$ $
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$ $ $$
$$$$
$$$$$$
$$
$ $ $ $$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $$$
$$ $$ $$$ $
$ $$$ $ $$$$ $$
$
$$ $
$$
$ $
$$
$$
$$$$$ $$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$$
$$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$$ $$$
$ $
$$
$ $$$
$
$$
$$ $ $$ $$
$ $
$
$
$$$$$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$$ $ $$$$$
$$ $$ $$
$$$$$$$
$ $
$ $$
$$ $$$$$$$ $$
$
$ $ $$$$
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$ $
$$$
$$ $ $ $ $
$ $
$$$ $ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $ $ $
$$
$ $ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $ $ $$$$$$$ $$ $$
$
$$
$ $$
$ $$$ $$$
$ $$ $ $$
$$$
$ $$$$ $
$ $$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$$
$ $$$
$$$ $ $$$ $ $
$
$$ $$ $$ $$
$$ $
$$ $
$$
$$
$ $ $$ $$ $$ $ $
$$$$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $$$$ $$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $$
$
$$$$
$ $ $$$$ $ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$ $
$ $ $
$$$$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$$ $ $$
$
$ $
$$
$$ $$
$
$$
$
$ $$$$
$$
$ $$ $$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$$$$$$$$$$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$$
$
$$$ $ $
$$ $$
$ $$$
$ $
$$ $
$$
$$$$
$ $$$
$$
$$$
$
$$$$$ $ $
$$
$ $$
$$ $
$$ $$ $ $ $$$$$ $ $
$$$$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$ $
$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $$$$$$
$ $
$ $$$$$$$$ $$
$ $
$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $ $$$$ $$
$$$
$ $
$
$$$$
$ $$ $$
$$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$ $
$$$$ $ $
$$ $
$$$ $$
$$ $ $$
$ $
$
$$
$$$
$$$ $ $ $ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$$$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$$ $$$$
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$$ $$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$ $ $
$ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$ $ $$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$$ $$ $ $$$$ $$$ $$$ $$
$$
$$$$ $$ $$
$ $ $ $$ $$$$ $ $ $$
$$
$ $$ $ $$$
$ $
$$$
$
$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $$$
$ $ $ $
$$ $$ $
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $
$ $$$
$ $$
$ $$$ $
$$ $$ $ $
$
$$$
$$ $$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$ $ $
$$
$ $
$ $
$$ $
$
$ $$
$$
$ $$
$$$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$$ $
$$ $$$$$$ $
$
$$ $$ $$$ $$
$$ $
$
$$
$ $ $$ $$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$
$$ $ $$ $$$
$$
$ $ $
$$$
$$ $$$ $ $
$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$ $$
$
$$
$$$$$$$
$$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$$$$$ $ $ $$$
$$$$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$ $
$$$$$$$
$$ $ $
$
$$
$ $$ $ $$$
$$ $$
$ $
$$
$ $$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$ $ $ $ $ $$
$$$$$$ $$ $$
$
$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $ $
$$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $ $$ $
$$$$$$ $ $ $ $
$
$$$$$ $
$
$$$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$$
$ $$ $$ $$$ $$ $
$$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $$$ $$
$ $ $$ $$$ $$ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $$ $$$
$ $
$$ $ $
$$ $
$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$$ $$
$ $$
$$$
$ $ $$
$$
$ $
$ $$
$ $
$$$$$
$
$
$$ $$ $$
$$$ $$ $$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$ $
$$ $$ $$ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $$ $ $$ $ $ $$$ $ $ $$ $
$ $
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $$$
$$ $ $
$$ $
$$ $
$ $$
$ $
$$ $ $$ $
$$
$
$ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $ $
$$$$ $ $$$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$ $$$$
$ $ $
$ $ $ $ $ $$ $$$$ $ $ $$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $ $$ $$$
$$$
$$$$
$$ $$ $
$$ $
$$
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$$
$
$
$$$ $$ $
$ $ $$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $$$ $$
$ $
$
$ $$$ $ $ $ $$
$ $$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$$$
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$ $
$$ $$$
$$ $ $
$
$$$ $$ $
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$ $ $$ $$ $
$$
$$
$$ $ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$$
$ $$ $$ $
$$
$$$$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$ $
$$$$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$$
$$$
$
$$$
$ $ $$$
$ $
$ $
$$
$$
$ $$ $ $$ $
$ $$$ $ $
$ $ $$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$$
$$ $$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$
$$$ $ $$$ $$ $
$ $$$$$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$ $ $$$$$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$ $$$
$
$$$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $
$
$$ $$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$$$ $$$
$ $
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$ $$ $
$$
$$ $$ $$ $ $ $
$ $ $$ $
$$ $ $$ $ $ $$
$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$$$
$
$ $$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$ $$
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $ $$$ $
$ $$$
$$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$
$ $$$$$$ $$ $$$ $ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$$$$$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$$
$$$
$ $$
$
$$$$
$
$ $$ $$ $ $
$
$ $$$$$
$$$ $
$$$
$ $ $
$
$ $ $$$$
$
$$$ $$ $
$
$$ $
$ $
$$ $
$ $ $
$ $$
$$ $ $$$
$$ $$ $$$ $$
$$$ $ $ $$$$$
$$
$ $ $$$ $$$
$
$ $$ $$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$$$ $ $ $$
$ $
$$ $
$
$ $ $$ $
$ $
$ $$ $
$ $$
$$ $$ $$ $
$ $$ $
$$$ $ $ $$$
$ $ $
$$ $$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$ $$$ $$
$ $$
$$$$$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$ $$
$
$$$ $$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$ $$
$
$
$$$$ $ $ $
$$$$
$ $$$$$$$$$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $$$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $$
$$ $
$
$$$$ $
$$ $
$
$$$$$$ $ $$$
$$
$$ $ $$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$$ $
$$
$$$$$ $$
$ $
$$ $ $$$
$ $$ $$ $$$ $$ $$$ $$$$ $ $$
$$
$ $$
$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$$$$ $
$
$
$ $$ $$$ $ $$ $
$$$
$$ $$$$$ $
$
$ $$ $ $
$$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $$$$$ $
$ $$ $ $
$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$ $$ $ $
$$$$$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$$$$
$$
$$$$$$ $
$$$ $$ $
$ $
$ $
$$ $ $
$
$$
$$
$ $$$ $$
$$
$$
$$
$ $$$$$
$$$
$
$$ $
$
$$$ $ $$$ $
$ $$
$$$$$
$ $ $ $$$
$$ $ $
$$
$$ $ $ $$
$$ $ $$
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$$
$$
$ $
$ $ $ $$ $$
$ $ $$
$ $$
$
$
$$$$$$ $$ $
$
$$$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $ $ $$$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$$ $$
$ $
$
$ $$$
$
$ $$$ $ $
$$ $
$ $$$$
$$$ $$
$ $$$ $$ $ $
$$$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $$$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $$$$$$ $
$$$
$$ $$$$$$ $ $$$ $ $$$
$$
$$$$$
$$ $$ $$$
$ $
$ $
$$$
$$$$$$$
$$ $$$ $ $$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$$$$$$$ $ $$$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$$
$ $
$
$$$$ $ $
$
$$
$ $$$$$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $$ $ $$$ $ $$
$ $$$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$$ $ $$
$
$$$$$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $$$ $ $
$ $ $$ $$$$
$ $ $$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $$$
$
$$ $$ $
$ $$$
$
$$
$ $ $$$
$$$$
$ $$ $ $$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$
$ $
$$
$$$
$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $$
$ $
$ $
$$$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $$
$$
$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$ $$$$ $
$
$$$$ $ $
$
$ $$ $$$$ $$$$
$
$
$$
$
$$$ $$$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $$$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$ $
$$
$
$$ $$ $
$$ $ $
$$
$$
$
$$$$$
$ $
$$ $$ $
$
$ $$$$ $ $
$$$ $$ $
$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$ $$$$$$$$
$ $ $$$
$ $$ $$$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$ $$$ $ $ $ $
$ $
$ $$$$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$$ $$ $ $ $$$ $$ $$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$$$
$
$
$$ $ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$$ $$$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$ $ $
$
$$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $$$ $
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$$$ $$ $$
$ $ $$ $ $$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$$ $ $$ $$ $$$ $
$$ $ $ $
$$
$ $$ $$$$$
$
$ $$
$
$$$$ $$ $
$
$$
$
$$$$$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $$$
$ $$
$ $$
$$$
$$
$$$ $$ $$ $ $$$ $ $$ $$
$
$ $$$ $
$
$$$$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$ $$ $$
$
$ $$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$
$
$$ $$$$
$$
$$$ $$ $$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $ $$ $$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$$$ $ $ $
$
$$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$$$$$
$$
$$ $ $
$$
$$$$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $
$$$
$
$$
$ $ $
$ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$ $
$
$
$$ $$
$$ $ $
$$$$$$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $
$$$
$ $ $$$ $$$$
$ $$ $ $ $$$
$$
$ $
$ $
$ $ $ $$$ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $$$
$
$ $$$ $$$$$ $ $ $ $$$$$ $$ $$ $ $
$ $
$$
$$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$$$ $$$ $
$$$
$
$$
$$ $$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$$ $$
$
$$ $ $ $
$ $$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $
$$ $
$$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$ $ $$$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $$$ $$ $$$
$$
$
$$$
$$$
$ $
$$$$ $
$ $ $$
$ $ $$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$
$$$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$$
$$ $ $
$ $$$ $ $$$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$$ $$$
$$
$$$$ $ $$$ $$$ $$$
$$
$
$$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$$$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$ $ $ $$
$ $ $
$$$$
$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $ $ $
$
$ $ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$$ $$ $
$$
$$$$
$
$$$$ $$$ $$$ $$
$$$
$$ $ $ $ $$
$$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $
$ $
$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $ $ $$ $$
$
$ $
$ $
$ $$ $$$$ $$
$
$ $ $$ $
$ $ $$$ $ $ $$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$$
$$
$ $ $$$$$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$$$
$$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $$ $$$$
$ $ $$ $
$ $$
$ $
$
$$$$$$ $$
$
$
$$ $$
$ $$$$ $ $$ $
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$$ $$
$$$$
$
$$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $$
$$
$$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $$
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$$$$$ $ $
$$$ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $$ $ $
$$ $$$$
$$ $$
$ $
$
$
$$$ $ $
$$$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$$
$ $$$$$$ $
$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $$$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$$$$ $
$ $$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$$$ $
$
$$$
$
$$
$ $$$$
$$$
$
$
$ $$
$ $
$ $
$$ $ $$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$$$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$ $$
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$ $
$$ $$
$$$$$
$$$$ $
$$ $
$ $ $
$$ $$
$
$ $ $ $
$$
$$ $$$$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$$$$
$$ $
$
$$ $$$ $
$$ $$ $
$
$ $
$ $ $$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$$ $$ $
$ $$$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$$$ $ $$ $$
$ $ $$$ $ $ $
$$$$$$$
$
$
$$$ $ $$ $$ $ $$$$
$ $$$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $$$$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$$ $$
$ $$ $$$
$
$
$ $ $
$$$$$ $ $ $$
$$$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$$$
$$ $$ $ $ $ $$
$
$$
$
$ $$$$$ $$$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$
$$ $$
$$$ $$
$$$
$$ $$$
$$
$ $$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $$$
$ $$ $$$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$$
$ $ $
$ $
$$$
$$$
$
$$ $
$
$$$$ $$
$ $ $$ $$
$
$$
$ $ $
$ $ $$
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$$
$ $$
$ $ $$$
$ $$$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$$ $ $$ $$ $ $
$$
$$$$
$$$$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$$$ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $
$$
$$$$$ $$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$$$$
$$ $$
$$ $$$$$
$$$$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$ $$ $$$$
$$
$ $ $ $
$ $$
$$
$ $$$$
$ $$ $$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$ $$ $$
$
$$ $
$$$ $$$ $$$$$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$$ $ $
$$$$
$ $$
$
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$$
$ $
$ $
$$ $
$$$ $$$
$$$ $$ $$ $ $$$$$$ $$ $
$ $$ $ $
$ $$ $
$
$$$$$$$$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $$$$$$$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$$$$
$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$ $$ $$ $ $$ $$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$ $
$
$ $$$$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $$
$$ $$
$
$ $$$
$$$ $
$ $ $$$ $ $$$ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $$$ $ $$ $$$$$ $
$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $ $$$
$$ $ $$
$
$$$ $$ $$ $
$
$$
$$$
$
$$ $$$
$$$$$$$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$ $
$$ $$ $
$ $ $$
$ $
$ $
$$ $$$ $ $ $ $$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $ $$$$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $$$ $$
$
$$ $
$$ $
$$$ $ $$
$$$
$ $$$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$$$ $$ $
$$$ $ $$ $ $$$$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$ $
$$$$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $$$$$$$
$
$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$ $
$$$$$ $$
$
$$$$ $ $$
$$$ $
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $$ $$$ $ $$$$
$$$$ $ $$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$$ $$$
$$
$ $$$ $$
$$
$ $ $ $ $
$ $
$ $$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $$
$$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$$
$ $ $ $$$$ $ $$$$$ $ $
$$
$$ $
$ $ $$$$ $$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$ $ $$
$$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $$$ $$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$$ $$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$$$$ $
$$$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$ $ $$$
$ $ $ $$$ $
$
$$$ $$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$$$ $ $ $$$ $ $ $ $
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$$$$$$ $
$$
$ $$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$$ $$ $$$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $$$$ $$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$$$ $$$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$ $$ $$$$$ $ $$$ $$$
$
$$$ $ $
$$
$ $$$ $$ $ $$$ $$ $$$$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$$$
$ $$
$ $$$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$$ $$ $ $
$ $$ $
$
$$$$
$$
$$$
$$$$
$
$
$$
$$$$
$ $$$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$ $$ $ $$$$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$$$$ $ $$ $$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $ $$ $$$ $$$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$$ $ $ $$ $ $ $
$ $$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$ $ $
$ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $$ $ $
$$$$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$$$
$ $$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$$
$ $
$ $$ $
$$ $$ $ $$$$$
$$ $ $
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $$$ $$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $$$
$
$$ $$ $$$
$$ $
$ $$
$$$$
$
$ $ $$$ $$
$$$ $
$
$$ $$$$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$$$ $$
$ $$$$ $
$ $$
$$$ $
$ $
$
$$$$$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$ $$$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$$
$$
$ $$$ $ $ $$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $$
$$
$$ $
$$
$ $ $$
$$ $$
$ $$ $$$ $$
$ $$$$$$$$
$ $$
$ $$ $$
$ $$
$ $ $
$ $
$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$
$ $$
$$ $ $ $ $$
$ $$$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$$$$$
$
$
$$
$$$$
$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$$$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$
$
$$$$ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $$$ $
$$$$ $ $$ $ $$ $$$$ $ $
$$$$ $$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$$
$ $$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $ $$$
$$$
$
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $ $$
$$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$$$$$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$$ $$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$ $$$ $$$ $
$ $ $$$$
$$ $$
$
$$$$$$$$
$$
$ $
$ $$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $ $ $$$ $$$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$$ $$$ $ $ $$
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$$ $ $ $
$ $
$ $$
$$ $ $$ $
$$
$
$ $ $
$$$ $
$
$$$
$$ $$$$ $
$
$$
$
$$$
$$$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$ $$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$$ $
$
$ $ $$
$$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$$$ $$
$$
$$$
$
$ $
$$ $ $$
$ $$
$$ $ $$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$ $$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$$ $
$$ $ $$$$$$
$
$$$
$$ $$ $$$$ $ $$$$$$$$$$$ $
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$$$ $$$$$ $$ $$$ $$
$$ $$$$
$ $ $$
$ $ $$ $ $$
$
$$$
$ $$$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$$$ $ $ $ $$$
$$
$ $$ $$
$$$
$ $$ $$$$$$$ $
$$$$$ $$$ $$ $$
$
$$ $ $ $ $$ $ $$$$$$$$$ $$ $
$$
$ $ $ $$$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $$$ $$$
$ $
$$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$$$$ $$$$$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$$ $
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $$ $
$
$$ $ $$$
$$ $$$$ $ $ $
$$ $
$ $ $ $ $$$
$$
$ $ $$ $$$
$$$ $
$$
$
$ $ $ $$$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$
$ $$
$$$$$
$ $$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$$$
$$ $$ $ $$$ $
$$
$ $$
$$
$$$
$$$
$
$$
$$$$$$$$$$
$$ $$$
$$$ $ $ $
$$$$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$$$
$$$ $$$$$$
$
$$ $$ $$
$$
$ $ $$$
$$
$$
$$ $$
$ $
$ $$
$
$ $$ $$
$$$
$
$ $$$ $$$ $
$
$$
$$
$ $ $$
$$$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$$ $ $ $$$ $
$$
$
$$ $$ $ $$$ $ $
$ $
$$$$$$$
$
$ $ $$$$$
$
$$$$
$$$$ $ $$ $$$
$$$$
$$$$
$ $$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$$
$$$$$$
$$ $
$$ $
$
$$$$$ $ $ $
$ $$ $ $$$ $$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $$ $ $$ $
$$
$
$$
$$
$$$$
$ $
$$ $$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$$ $$$ $ $ $
$ $$$$$$$ $$$ $ $
$ $$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $ $
$
$$$ $$
$$$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $
$
$$$
$$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$$ $
$$
$$$
$$ $ $$
$$$ $
$ $
$ $ $$ $
$$$ $$$
$
$$ $
$ $$$$$$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$$ $$$ $
$$
$$ $$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$$ $$$
$$
$ $$
$$$
$ $$$$ $
$ $ $ $ $$$$$$ $$ $
$ $ $$ $ $$
$$$
$ $$
$$$ $ $$
$$
$
$$$
$ $
$ $ $$$
$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$ $ $ $$$$ $$$$ $ $$ $ $ $$$$$
$$$ $$ $$
$ $$
$ $$$ $$ $ $ $$
$$$ $$$
$ $
$$$
$ $
$$
$$
$$ $$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $$
$ $$$ $$ $$
$$$ $
$$$ $ $$ $$
$
$$ $
$ $$$ $ $ $$ $
$ $$
$
$
$$$ $$$$
$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$ $ $ $ $$$$$$ $ $
$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$$
$
$$$ $ $$
$
$$ $$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$$$ $ $
$ $
$
$ $$
$$
$$
$ $$
$$ $$ $
$$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$ $$
$ $ $ $$$ $
$$
$ $$$ $$
$ $
$
$ $$$
$$ $ $
$ $ $$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$ $
$ $ $ $$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$ $ $$$
$ $$ $
$$$ $
$$ $ $$
$
$ $ $
$$ $$
$$$
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $$ $
$$$$
$ $
$$ $ $$$$ $$$$ $ $$$$$ $
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$$ $ $$ $
$$
$$ $
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$$$ $ $
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $$$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$ $$$$ $ $ $$
$
$$ $$ $ $
$ $
$ $$
$$
$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$ $$ $
$$
$$
$$$
$
$$$ $ $$ $
$ $
$ $$ $
$$$
$$$$ $ $ $$$$$ $$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $ $
$$ $
$
$$ $ $ $
$$ $ $
$ $$
$$
$ $$$$$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$$$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $$$ $
$
$
$$$$$
$$
$$
$$ $$$
$$ $ $$ $
$$ $
$
$$ $ $$$ $$$ $
$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$$ $$ $$ $ $$ $$
$ $ $ $ $ $$$
$ $
$$
$$$$
$ $$$$$$
$ $ $ $$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $$$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $ $
$$$
$ $
$$ $$
$$$$
$$ $$$ $$
$ $
$ $$ $$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$$$ $
$$
$
$$ $$
$
$ $
$$$$$
$ $$
$$$$$$$
$ $$
$$
$$
$
$
$$$ $$
$
$$ $ $
$
$ $$$$
$$$$
$
$ $
$$$
$
$$
$$$ $ $ $ $$$ $$
$$$
$$$$$
$
$ $$$$
$$$
$
$ $$$ $ $ $ $ $ $$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$$ $$$
$ $ $ $$$$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $ $$
$$$$ $
$$ $$$$$ $$ $$
$ $$$ $$
$
$$ $$
$
$$$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$$ $$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $$$ $ $$
$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $ $ $$$$ $$ $$$ $$$
$$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$$$
$$$
$ $$$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$$ $$
$$
$
$$$ $$ $$
$ $
$ $$$
$$ $
$$ $
$ $ $
$ $
$$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$ $ $$
$$ $$$ $
$ $ $ $$ $$
$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$$ $$$
$
$$
$$$
$ $ $$
$$$
$
$
$$ $ $$$
$$$$
$$ $
$$
$ $$$$
$ $$$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$$ $$ $$ $ $$$$$$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$$
$$$
$
$ $ $
$$ $$$
$
$$$$ $
$$
$ $ $$
$$
$$ $ $
$ $$$$ $$ $ $$$ $
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$$$$$
$
$$
$ $ $ $$$$$$ $$$$$
$$
$ $ $$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$$$
$ $ $$$$
$ $ $
$$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$ $
$ $$ $ $$ $$$ $
$$$ $$ $ $ $ $
$ $ $$$
$$ $ $
$$$
$ $$ $
$
$$ $ $$ $
$$ $ $$
$$
$$$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$$
$$$$ $
$$
$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$ $ $$ $ $$ $$ $$$$$$$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $$
$$ $$ $$ $$ $
$$ $ $
$ $$ $$$ $ $$ $
$ $ $$
$$
$$
$ $$ $
$
$$$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$$$$$$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$$ $
$ $
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$$ $$
$
$ $$$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$$$
$$$$
$ $ $ $
$$ $ $ $$
$ $
$
$$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$$$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $
$ $
$ $
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$$$$
$ $
$$ $
$
$$$ $$$ $ $ $$ $
$ $ $ $ $$
$ $$$ $
$ $$ $ $ $ $$ $
$$$ $ $ $ $$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $$$$
$$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$ $$$ $$$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$$ $$
$
$$ $$$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$$$$ $$$ $ $ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$ $$$
$$$$ $$
$
$
$ $ $
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$ $ $$$
$$$
$$
$$$$
$$
$$
$$
$ $$ $$
$$$$$
$ $$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$
$$ $$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$$
$
$$
$ $
$$$
$
$$
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$$$ $$$$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $$$$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$ $ $$
$$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $$
$$
$$
$ $
$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$$ $$ $
$$ $$
$ $
$$
$$$
$
$
$ $
$ $$$$$
$$$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$ $$$$$$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $ $$$$$ $$$
$$ $
$$$$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $
$$ $$ $$$
$$
$$
$ $
$ $$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$$$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$ $$$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$$$$$$ $ $
$
$$$$$$
$$ $$$$
$$$$$ $$$ $
$
$$$ $$
$$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $
$$$
$$
$
$$$
$$$
$
$$$ $ $
$$ $
$$ $ $$
$$
$ $
$$$
$ $
$$ $
$ $
$
$ $$$ $ $ $
$ $
$$ $
$$ $$
$
$
$$$$$ $$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$$$$$$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $ $
$
$$ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $ $$$$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $$
$$ $$$$
$$$ $ $$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$$
$ $ $$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$ $ $$ $$$$$
$
$
$$$
$ $$$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$$
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$ $ $ $ $$$ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $
$ $ $$$ $$$$$
$
$$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $$
$$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$$
$
$ $$
$ $$$$ $$ $$$ $
$
$$
$$$
$
$$$$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $
$$
$ $$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$
$$ $ $$
$
$
$$$ $$$
$ $ $$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $$$ $
$$
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$ $
$$ $$$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $$$$
$
$
$$$
$$ $$$ $
$$ $ $$$$$$
$$ $
$$
$$$$$$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$$$ $ $
$ $ $
$$$$
$$$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$$$
$$ $$$$$$
$ $ $$$ $$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $ $$ $$ $$ $ $$ $ $ $
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $$$
$$$
$$
$$
$$ $$
$
$
$$ $
$$ $
$ $ $$
$$$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$$
$ $ $$$$$
$
$$
$$$$$
$
$$$
$
$$$$$
$$
$
$ $$$ $ $$
$$ $$ $
$$ $$$
$$
$$$$ $$$ $$ $$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $
$$
$$$ $
$$$ $$
$$
$$$
$ $$
$ $$
$$$ $ $$
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $$ $
$$
$ $
$ $$$$$$ $
$$
$$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$$$
$ $ $
$$
$
$$
$$$ $$ $ $
$
$$$ $
$$ $$ $ $ $$$ $$
$ $$$ $$ $ $ $
$$ $
$ $$$$
$
$ $$$$ $$ $$$$ $$ $$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$$
$$ $$$$
$$
$$
$$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$ $ $$$$
$$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$ $ $ $
$$$$$$ $
$ $ $$ $ $ $
$$ $$$
$$$
$
$$$ $ $$$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$ $$
$ $$$$ $$ $$
$
$
$$
$$$ $ $$$$ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $$ $
$ $$ $ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$$$$$$
$$$$$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$$$
$ $
$$
$$$$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$ $
$$
$$ $
$ $$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$$$$ $
$$
$
$ $ $$
$ $
$$
$$
$$ $$
$$ $$
$$$ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $$$
$
$ $$$
$$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$$
$
$$
$ $$
$$$$$$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$ $ $ $$$
$$
$ $$
$$
$$$ $$$$ $
$$ $ $
$ $$ $$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$$
$$
$ $$
$
$ $$ $ $
$ $ $ $$$$
$ $$$$
$$
$
$ $ $
$$ $$$$
$$ $ $ $$$$
$
$$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$$$
$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$$ $$ $
$
$$$$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$ $$$
$ $ $$$$ $$ $$$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$$ $$ $$ $
$ $
$ $
$ $$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$$$$ $
$
$$$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$ $$$$$ $
$ $
$
$$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$$
$$ $$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $
$$$
$$$$ $ $
$ $
$$ $$$$$$ $$$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$$ $ $ $ $
$$ $$ $$$ $ $$ $$$ $ $$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$$$$$$ $$
$ $$ $$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$ $ $ $$ $$$$$
$$
$$ $
$ $$$ $ $
$ $
$ $
$$$$ $$
$$
$
$
$$$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$$$
$$ $ $$$$ $
$$ $
$$ $$$$$$$
$ $$ $
$$ $
$$
$$$ $
$$
$$
$$$
$ $$$$$
$
$$$ $ $ $ $ $$$
$
$$ $
$$$ $$$
$ $ $
$$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $$$
$$
$$$$
$
$$
$$$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $$ $$$$$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$
$ $
$ $ $$$
$$
$$$ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $$
$$$
$
$
$$ $ $$$$$ $ $$
$$$ $$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$ $$$$ $
$
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $$
$$$ $
$$ $$$$$
$ $$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $
$
$ $
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $ $$
$ $
$$$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$ $ $ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $ $$
$
$ $ $
$
$$ $
$ $ $ $
$$ $ $$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$ $$ $$ $ $ $$ $$
$$
$$$ $$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$$$$$$
$ $$ $$ $$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $
$ $ $$ $
$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $ $ $$ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $
$
$$$ $$ $$ $
$
$$ $
$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $$ $$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$$$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$$
$ $
$ $ $ $$$$$ $ $$ $$$$
$ $$$$
$
$
$$ $$$$
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $$
$$ $$$
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$$$$$$
$
$
$$$ $ $ $
$ $
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$$
$ $$
$ $ $$$ $ $ $ $$$$ $$
$$$$$$$
$
$ $$
$$$$
$$$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$$ $
$$
$$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$ $$$ $$ $$ $
$$
$$$ $$
$$ $$
$ $$$
$$
$$
$ $
$$$
$ $ $ $$$$
$$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$ $$
$ $$
$$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $
$ $ $ $$$$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$ $$$$$$
$$
$$$$$$$$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$ $
$$ $ $ $$$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $ $ $ $ $$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $$$ $ $$ $
$
$
$$$ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $
$ $$
$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $$$ $$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$$ $
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$ $
$
$$ $ $$$
$$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$ $ $$
$$$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$ $$$$
$$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$$$
$$$
$ $ $$$ $ $$$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $$ $$ $$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$$
$ $$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$$
$ $
$$ $$ $ $
$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $$$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$$ $
$$ $
$
$ $$
$$
$ $$ $$$$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $$$ $ $
$ $$$ $ $$$$ $$$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$ $$
$$$ $ $$$$ $
$ $ $$$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $$ $
$$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$$$
$$ $
$
$$$
$ $$$$$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$ $
$ $ $
$ $
$$$ $$$
$ $ $ $ $$$
$$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$ $$
$$
$ $ $ $$$$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$$ $$$ $ $$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $$$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$
$$ $$ $$$$ $ $
$ $
$$$$$ $$$$$$$ $$$$ $$$$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $$ $ $ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $$$$$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $
$$
$$
$
$$ $
$$ $
$$ $$ $$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$ $
$ $$$
$$$ $$ $$$
$ $
$$$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $$$
$ $
$$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$ $$ $
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$$$ $
$
$ $ $$
$ $$$ $$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$ $$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$ $$$ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$$$$
$
$$$$ $$$
$$
$$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$
$$$ $$ $$$$
$$$ $ $
$
$$
$ $$ $ $$$ $
$$$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$ $$$$ $ $$
$
$$
$$ $ $$ $ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$$ $
$$ $ $$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$ $$
$$$
$
$ $ $ $ $$
$$ $$
$$
$ $ $$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $ $$$$$
$ $
$$ $
$$$$$$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $ $
$$
$ $$$$ $ $$$$ $$ $$$$$$
$$
$ $
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$$$
$$$
$$ $$$
$
$$
$ $$
$$$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$ $$
$$$$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$$$$
$
$ $$
$ $$
$$ $$ $ $$ $
$ $$ $$$$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$$
$$ $$$$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$$ $$
$$ $ $
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$ $
$ $$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$ $$$$$
$ $ $$$ $
$ $ $$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$ $
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$$$$ $$$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$$$$ $
$$ $$
$ $ $ $ $$ $$
$$ $
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$ $
$ $$ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $
$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$$$$$ $
$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $$
$$ $ $
$ $
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$
$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$$ $
$$$ $$$
$
$$$$$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $$ $ $ $ $
$ $ $
$$ $
$$ $
$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$$$
$$$
$
$$$
$$ $ $$$
$
$ $ $
$$$$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$ $$$
$ $ $$
$ $$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$
$$ $$
$ $$ $$
$ $ $
$ $$
$ $
$$
$
$ $$$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $$$
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$
$ $ $$$$ $ $ $ $$
$ $$ $$ $$ $ $
$$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$
$ $$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$$$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$$ $
$
$ $$
$$ $$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $$$
$ $
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$$$
$$
$$$ $$$$$ $
$$$$
$$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $$ $
$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$$$ $$$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$ $
$ $$
$ $
$ $ $$ $ $ $
$ $ $
$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $
$
$ $$ $ $ $$
$$
$$
$ $$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$$$$ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$$ $$$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $$ $ $$ $
$
$ $$$ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$ $$$
$$
$ $
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$$
$$$$
$$
$$$
$$$
$ $
$
$$
$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $$
$$$$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$$$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$$$$ $$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$$$$
$$$
$ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$$ $$$$
$$$$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $ $
$$
$ $ $ $$
$$$ $ $$$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$$$$$
$$ $
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $$ $$$$$$$$ $$$$
$$
$ $$
$
$ $$ $ $ $$
$$ $$
$ $ $$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $$ $
$$$$$
$ $ $
$$
$
$$$
$$
$$$ $ $ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$ $ $ $
$ $$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$
$
$ $$ $$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$$
$$
$
$ $ $
$ $$$$$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$$$$
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$$ $
$ $
$$$
$
$ $
$ $$$
$
$ $$$ $
$$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$$
$$ $$ $$$ $ $
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$$ $ $$$$ $$$
$$ $
$ $$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $
$ $
$ $$
$ $
$ $$$$ $ $$$$ $ $$$$ $ $
$$ $ $$$$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$
$$$$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$ $
$ $
$ $ $ $
$$ $
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $$
$$ $ $ $$$
$
$$ $
$$$ $$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $$ $$ $ $
$$ $
$$$$ $$$$$$ $ $ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$$$
$
$$$ $
$$ $$$ $$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $$$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $$$ $
$$ $
$$ $$
$
$
$$ $
$$$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $$ $
$$$$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $
$$ $
$$$$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$$$$$$
$$ $$$$$ $$$$$
$
$$ $ $$ $$ $
$ $ $$$ $
$ $ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$ $$$
$ $
$$
$ $$$ $ $
$$
$
$ $$$ $$ $$ $ $ $$$ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$$
$$$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $$$
$$ $
$$$$
$$
$
$ $$
$$$ $$ $$$$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$$$
$
$ $ $ $$
$$
$
$ $ $$ $
$$$ $ $
$$ $$$$$ $
$$ $$ $$ $$$$ $
$$ $$
$ $
$$ $$ $ $ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$$ $$
$$
$$$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $
$$
$$ $
$ $
$ $$
$ $ $
$ $$ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$$ $$$$
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $ $ $ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $
$
$$
$$$$
$$$$$$ $ $
$ $$ $
$ $ $ $$
$$$
$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$$ $ $$$ $ $ $$
$ $$
$$ $
$$ $$
$$ $$
$
$ $$ $$$ $ $
$
$
$$$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$$$
$$$ $$$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$ $$$$$ $ $ $$$$ $$$$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$$$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$$
$$$$ $$
$
$$$$ $
$$$
$$
$
$$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$$
$$ $
$
$$$$ $ $$
$
$ $$$ $$$
$ $$ $$ $
$$
$
$ $ $
$$ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $$$$ $$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $ $ $$
$ $ $ $$$$ $ $ $ $$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$$ $$$
$$$
$
$$$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$ $ $$$ $$$ $ $$ $
$$ $
$$$$$$
$
$ $ $$ $
$$
$$
$$$ $$$$ $$ $$$
$$ $ $$ $
$$
$
$ $$ $$$$
$$$ $$
$$$$$$
$$$$ $$$
$ $$$$ $
$ $$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $$ $ $$ $$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $
$ $$ $$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$$ $ $ $$
$ $ $
$$$$ $$ $$$ $$ $$$ $$$ $ $$
$ $$
$$ $$$$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $$$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$ $$$ $$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$$$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$ $
$$$$ $
$$$
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$$ $$
$ $ $ $$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$$ $$$$
$$ $ $$$$
$$
$$$
$
$ $$
$ $$$
$ $$$
$ $
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$$$ $$$ $
$ $$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$$ $$ $
$$ $$
$ $$
$
$ $$ $$
$$ $$$ $ $
$ $$$ $
$ $ $$ $ $$ $$ $$$$ $ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$ $
$ $ $$
$$
$ $$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$$ $
$$ $$$
$$ $ $$$$
$
$ $
$$
$$$ $$
$$ $$ $
$ $ $
$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$ $
$$ $ $ $
$ $ $$
$$$
$$$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $$$
$$ $
$$ $ $
$
$
$$ $$
$$$$
$
$$ $
$$$ $
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$$$$$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$$ $$$$$
$$ $
$
$
$$$$$$$ $
$ $$
$
$
$$$$$
$$ $ $ $$$
$
$$
$ $$$ $ $$
$
$$ $
$ $$$$ $
$ $
$
$$ $$$
$$
$ $$$
$
$ $$$
$$$ $
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$$ $$
$
$
$$$$$$$
$$$ $
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$ $ $$
$
$$$$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$$
$$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$$ $$$ $ $
$ $ $$ $
$$$ $ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $$ $
$ $
$
$$ $
$$$$$$
$
$$
$$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$ $$$$$
$$ $$ $ $ $
$$ $ $ $
$$$ $ $$ $$
$ $$$$$
$$ $$$ $$$
$
$
$$ $$$
$
$$ $$$$
$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $$ $$$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $$ $$
$ $ $ $$ $$$ $
$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$ $ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$
$$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$$ $ $$ $ $
$
$ $$$$
$$$$
$$
$ $$
$ $ $
$
$ $$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$$ $$$$
$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$$ $
$
$$$$$
$
$$ $ $$
$
$
$ $$$ $ $
$$$ $
$ $$$ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $$
$$
$$
$
$
$$$$$ $ $$ $$$$
$$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$$$ $$
$ $$
$$ $$ $ $
$ $$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$ $$ $$$$ $
$$$$$$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$$ $
$
$$$$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $$ $
$$$$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$ $
$$$$$
$
$$$$$$$
$ $$ $$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$ $$$$$
$
$$ $
$
$$$$
$$
$ $$$$$$$$$$$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$$ $ $
$$
$$
$ $$$ $
$$$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$ $$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $
$ $
$ $ $ $
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $$
$$$$$
$
$$
$$ $ $$ $$$$$
$ $ $ $$
$
$ $ $
$$
$$ $$$ $
$$ $$
$
$$
$
$$ $$$$$$ $
$ $
$ $
$ $$
$$ $$ $$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$ $$$$ $$$
$
$ $$$$$$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$$$
$
$
$$$ $ $$
$$
$$
$ $ $$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$
$$$ $
$ $
$ $
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $$
$ $
$
$$
$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$$ $
$
$$$$$ $$ $ $ $
$$$ $$ $$$$$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $$
$ $
$
$$$ $$
$
$
$$ $ $
$$$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$ $ $$$$$ $$$
$$$$$ $ $ $$
$$
$$
$$
$ $$ $$ $$$ $$$ $ $
$$$ $
$$
$ $
$$ $
$ $
$ $$$
$ $ $ $
$$ $
$$$$ $$$
$$ $ $ $
$$ $ $
$$$
$ $$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$$
$
$ $
$ $$$
$ $$$
$ $$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $$$ $
$$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$$$$$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $$$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$
$
$$$ $
$$ $
$ $
$$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$$$ $ $$$$ $
$ $ $$$
$
$$
$
$$$
$ $$
$ $$$ $$$
$$
$$ $ $ $$$
$$ $
$
$ $$$$ $$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$$ $
$$$$
$$ $ $
$ $
$
$$ $ $$$ $ $$
$$ $
$$$$$ $$ $$ $
$$
$$$ $ $
$ $ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $$
$
$$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $$$ $
$
$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$ $ $ $
$
$ $
$$$ $
$$ $
$ $$$$$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$
$$$$$
$
$$$$
$$$$
$ $
$ $
$ $
$$ $$$
$
$$$$$$$$$$
$$ $$ $ $
$$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$$$ $ $$$ $
$ $$$$ $ $
$$
$ $
$$
$
$ $$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $ $$$ $$
$
$ $ $ $ $$
$$$$$$$
$
$
$$$ $
$ $ $$ $ $ $
$
$$$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $ $
$$$
$ $$$$$$$$$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$ $
$
$ $ $$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$$ $ $ $$$
$ $ $
$ $$$
$ $$$$ $ $ $$$$ $ $$$$ $
$$$
$$$$
$
$$$
$ $ $
$ $ $ $ $$$ $
$$$ $$ $
$
$$$
$ $
$$
$
$ $$$
$$ $ $ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$$$$
$$$
$$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$$ $$$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$$ $ $$$ $$
$
$$$$
$$ $$$$$$ $$$
$ $ $
$$
$
$$$
$
$ $$$
$$$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $$ $
$
$$$ $
$
$$ $$ $$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $$
$
$ $
$$ $ $$ $
$$$ $ $
$$
$
$ $$$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$$ $$
$ $ $
$ $$$$$
$ $$ $$ $$ $
$$ $$
$$
$ $$$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$$$$
$ $$
$ $ $
$$
$$ $
$
$$$ $$
$$$
$ $$$
$ $
$$$ $
$$$$$$ $$
$ $$$ $
$
$$ $
$$$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$ $$$$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$$$$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $ $$$$$$ $
$ $
$$ $$$$$$$
$
$
$$
$ $$$
$$ $
$
$$$$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $$$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $$$ $$$$$
$$ $ $ $$$$
$ $$ $
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$$ $$
$ $$$$$$$$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$ $ $ $
$
$ $
$
$$$$
$ $$
$$
$$ $$
$ $$
$$ $
$$
$$$ $$$$ $$$$$
$
$$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$$ $$ $$$ $ $$$
$$
$
$$$$ $ $ $ $$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$ $$
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$
$$$ $$$$$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$$$ $ $$
$
$ $$ $$ $
$$$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$$$
$$$
$$$ $$$$$ $
$
$$
$$
$ $
$$
$
$$ $$$
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$$ $$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$
$ $
$$
$$ $
$ $$$
$$$
$
$ $$$ $
$ $$ $ $$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$ $$ $ $ $$ $
$$$
$$$$ $$$$$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$ $$$
$ $$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$ $ $$ $ $$$$$
$ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$$ $
$ $
$$ $$ $$$
$
$$
$ $ $ $$$ $
$$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$$$$
$ $$
$$$
$$
$
$ $$$
$$
$ $
$$
$ $$$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$ $$$$$$$$$
$
$$
$$
$ $
$
$ $ $
$$$ $ $ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$
$$
$$$ $$$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $ $$$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $$$
$
$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$ $ $ $ $$
$$$$
$$$
$ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$ $$
$$$
$$$ $$$$
$$
$ $
$$$$
$
$$$$
$
$$
$
$$$ $
$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$$$$ $$ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$$$
$ $
$ $$$
$
$ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$
$ $
$$$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $$ $ $$ $$ $$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $ $$ $ $$
$ $ $ $$
$ $$$
$
$ $$$ $
$$$
$
$ $$
$ $ $$ $ $$
$$$$
$ $$ $$$$ $$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$$$ $ $$$$$
$$ $
$
$ $$$ $$
$$
$ $ $
$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$$
$
$$ $
$ $$ $
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$
$$ $
$ $
$
$$$$$ $$$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $
$$ $$$
$$$$
$$$$$ $ $
$$$$$
$$ $ $
$$ $ $$$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $$
$ $
$$$ $$$$$
$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$$
$$ $$ $$
$
$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$
$
$$$$ $$ $$$ $$ $ $$ $
$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$$ $$$$
$$
$ $$
$
$$$ $$$$ $$ $
$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $$$ $$ $$$$ $ $
$ $$
$$
$ $
$
$ $
$$ $
$$ $$
$$
$ $$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$$ $
$ $$ $$$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$
$ $
$$$ $ $$ $ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$$$ $
$$
$$$ $
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$ $ $$$$$ $$
$$$ $$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$$$ $ $
$ $
$ $ $ $$
$$
$$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $$
$$ $$$ $$
$ $ $
$ $$$$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$$$
$
$ $ $$$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $$ $
$
$ $$ $
$ $
$$
$
$$ $$
$ $$
$$$ $ $
$$
$
$ $ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$ $$$
$ $$$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $$$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $ $$
$ $
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$ $ $$$ $ $ $
$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$
$ $ $ $$$$
$ $$ $ $ $ $$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$$$$
$ $
$ $$$ $$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$ $ $ $$
$$ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $$ $
$ $ $$
$$$ $
$ $ $$ $$
$$$$$$$$$$ $
$$$$$$$$
$
$
$ $$$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $ $
$
$ $$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$ $ $$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $ $$ $
$ $
$
$$
$$$$$
$ $$ $ $ $
$$ $
$
$$ $
$
$$$
$
$$ $
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$ $ $$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $$
$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $
$ $
$
$$ $$$
$$
$ $
$
$$$$ $$
$$ $ $$ $$ $
$$
$ $$$
$$
$ $ $$$$ $$ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$$ $ $
$ $ $$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$$ $$$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$ $$$$ $
$$ $
$$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$$
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$$ $
$$
$$$
$ $ $
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$ $
$ $ $
$ $
$$
$ $$
$
$$ $ $$ $ $$ $ $ $$$$$ $$$ $ $$ $$$
$
$ $$$ $
$
$ $$ $ $
$$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$$ $
$ $ $$ $$ $$$ $$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$$$$ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $$$ $
$
$$
$
$$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$ $$ $
$ $ $$$$$
$$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$$$ $$$ $$
$ $
$
$$ $$$
$ $$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$$ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$
$
$ $$ $$ $$$
$$ $
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $$$
$ $
$ $$$
$ $$
$$$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$$$ $
$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$ $$
$
$ $$ $$
$ $ $
$ $$
$
$$
$ $
$ $$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$$ $$ $ $$ $ $ $$ $$$$$
$$
$ $ $
$
$$$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$$$$ $$
$$
$ $$ $$
$
$ $ $$$$$$$
$ $$$ $$ $$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $$$
$$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$$ $$$$ $
$ $$ $$ $ $$
$$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$$
$ $$$$$$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$ $ $$ $ $$ $$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$ $
$$
$ $$ $$$$ $$$ $$
$$$$ $
$$
$$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $ $$$$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$
$$$$ $$ $$$
$$ $ $
$ $$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $$ $ $
$
$$ $$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$ $$ $
$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$$ $
$$ $ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$$
$$
$
$ $ $$ $$ $ $ $$
$$ $
$$
$
$$$$ $$
$ $$
$$$$$$
$$
$
$$
$$ $
$ $
$ $$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $$
$
$$
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$$ $$ $ $$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $ $
$
$
$$$$
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$$$ $ $
$ $$$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$ $$$$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$ $
$$ $$ $$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $$$ $$$ $$$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$ $ $ $$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$ $$$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$ $$$$$
$ $$
$$
$$$ $ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $$$
$$
$$ $
$ $
$
$$$ $$
$
$$
$
$$$
$$ $
$
$$ $ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$ $$$$ $$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$ $$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $
$$ $$ $$
$$
$ $$$ $ $$
$
$ $$$$
$$$
$$$$ $ $$$
$$$ $ $ $ $$$ $$ $$ $
$$$$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$$$ $$ $ $ $
$$$
$$$$
$$$$$$$
$ $$
$ $$
$$
$ $$ $$$$ $$
$ $$ $
$$
$$
$$ $ $$$ $
$ $ $$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$
$ $
$$ $
$$$
$
$ $$
$$$ $ $ $$ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$$$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$$$$ $$ $ $
$$ $ $$$ $
$ $ $$
$ $
$$$ $
$
$ $$
$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$$ $
$ $$$$
$$ $ $ $ $$
$$$$$
$$ $ $$$
$ $ $
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$$
$ $ $$
$ $
$$$$$$$ $
$
$
$
$$$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$$
$ $
$$
$ $ $$$ $
$$
$ $
$$$$$$$ $ $ $$ $$
$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$$$
$$
$ $$
$$
$$$$$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $
$ $$ $ $ $$
$ $$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $
$ $
$
$$ $$$ $$ $$ $$
$
$ $$$
$ $ $$$$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$$ $
$
$$ $
$ $ $ $$$$$ $
$$ $ $
$$ $ $ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$$ $$$ $ $ $
$$
$$ $
$ $$ $ $
$$$$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$ $$$
$ $$ $
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$ $
$ $$$$$
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$$ $
$$ $$ $
$ $ $$ $$ $$$
$$$
$ $ $$$ $ $$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$$ $$ $$$$
$
$ $ $$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$$ $
$
$$$ $$$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$$
$ $
$$$$$$$
$
$$$$ $$$ $
$$
$ $
$$ $
$$$$ $
$$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$$$$$ $$ $
$$
$ $$$
$ $ $$
$$
$ $
$ $
$ $ $ $$$ $ $ $
$
$ $$ $
$$$
$ $ $
$ $$ $$
$
$$
$
$$$ $$ $
$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $ $
$$
$
$$$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $$$ $$
$$
$$$$
$$$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$ $$$$ $$$
$ $ $ $ $ $$$ $$ $$ $
$ $ $
$ $$ $$ $$ $ $$$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$
$$
$$ $$ $ $$ $
$$$ $ $ $$
$$
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $ $$$
$
$$
$ $$ $$$$ $
$
$$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$$$
$ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$
$ $$
$$
$$ $ $$$$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $
$$ $$ $$$$
$$ $
$ $
$ $$$ $
$$
$$$
$ $ $$$
$
$$
$
$$$ $$
$$
$$
$
$ $$$
$ $
$
$ $$$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $$ $$
$$
$$$$$$ $$ $ $$ $$ $ $$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$
$ $$
$ $$
$$$
$
$ $
$ $
$$ $$$
$$$$
$ $ $ $ $$ $ $$$$ $ $
$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$$$ $
$ $ $$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$$ $$
$
$$
$ $$$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$ $$$ $ $ $$$$$ $
$$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $ $ $
$$
$
$ $$$ $ $$$
$ $ $$ $
$ $
$$$
$ $$$
$$$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$ $$ $
$$
$ $ $
$ $$$ $ $$$ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $ $
$$
$ $$ $ $$$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$$$$
$
$ $ $
$$$ $ $$ $
$ $ $ $$
$
$$
$ $
$ $ $$$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $$$ $$$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
$ $$ $
$$ $$$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$ $$
$$$ $$ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $ $ $ $$$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$ $$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $$ $ $ $
$
$$
$
$$$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$$$$ $
$$ $ $
$ $$$$ $$ $$ $
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$$
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $ $$
$
$$
$$ $
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $ $$ $
$
$$$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$ $$$
$$
$$$ $$$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$ $$$$ $ $ $$ $$ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $ $$ $$ $$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $$$$$$$$
$ $
$ $$$$ $ $$$
$$ $ $ $ $
$ $$$ $
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$ $ $ $ $ $$$
$ $
$ $$ $ $$ $ $ $$ $ $$ $ $ $
$$ $
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$$ $
$
$$ $$$ $ $$ $$$$
$
$ $$
$ $$$$ $
$$$
$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $$
$$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$$$ $$
$
$$ $ $$ $ $ $$ $ $
$ $$$$$ $ $ $ $
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $$ $$$ $ $ $$ $
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$$ $
$ $
$$ $$$$
$ $
$ $ $ $$ $$$$
$
$ $ $$$ $$ $
$ $
$
$ $$
$ $$$ $$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$$$ $
$ $ $$$$
$
$ $
$ $ $$
$$
$ $ $$$$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$ $$$
$$$ $$ $$ $ $$$$$
$$$$ $
$ $$$ $
$
$ $$$ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $
$$$$$$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $$
$$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $$$ $
$$
$
$$ $$ $
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $ $
$ $$$ $
$ $
$
$ $$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$$$
$$
$ $ $
$ $ $$ $$ $$ $
$$$
$ $$
$ $$$$ $ $$$ $ $$$$
$ $
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$$ $
$$ $$ $
$$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$ $ $$$$$$$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$
$
$$ $ $
$$$ $ $$$$ $$$ $$
$$
$ $ $$ $
$ $ $$$ $ $ $$$$$$$$ $$$
$ $
$ $$
$$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $$$$$ $ $$ $$$$ $ $
$
$ $$$
$$
$ $$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$ $$
$
$$ $$
$
$ $$
$$$
$ $ $$$$$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$ $$ $ $ $ $$
$ $ $$
$ $$$$ $ $ $$$$$
$ $
$ $$$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$ $$ $
$ $$$$ $$ $ $ $ $ $$$ $$ $$ $$$$ $ $
$$ $$
$ $ $
$
$ $ $
$$ $
$$ $ $ $$
$$$$$
$$
$
$ $
$$
$$ $$$
$$$ $$
$$ $ $ $
$$$
$$
$ $ $
$$
$
$$ $ $$
$$
$
$ $
$$ $ $
$$
$$ $$
$ $ $$$ $
$ $$
$$ $ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $
$ $ $ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$ $$$$ $ $ $ $ $$$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$
$
$ $$$$$
$$$ $ $$ $ $
$$$ $$ $$$ $ $ $
$
$ $$ $ $$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$
$$
$
$$$
$ $$$
$ $$$
$$ $ $ $ $$$ $ $$
$ $
$
$ $$ $
$$$ $$ $
$$$$$
$
$
$$$
$$ $$
$$ $$$
$ $ $ $$$
$ $ $
$ $$
$ $ $$ $
$$ $
$$$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $$$ $$$ $$ $$
$ $ $$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $
$
$$
$ $$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$ $ $$ $$$
$ $
$ $$$$$$$$
$ $$
$ $
$$$ $ $$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $
$$
$$
$ $$$$
$ $
$ $
$$ $ $
$ $$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$$$$
$
$$$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$ $
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$$ $$ $
$ $$$
$ $$ $$
$ $$
$ $$ $$ $$$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$$
$$ $ $ $$$
$ $ $$$ $ $
$ $
$ $$ $ $ $$
$
$ $$$ $
$$ $ $ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$$
$ $$$ $
$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$
$$ $$$
$$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$$
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$$$ $
$ $$
$ $$ $$
$ $$ $$$
$ $$$
$$
$$$ $ $
$$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$ $ $
$$
$$
$$$$ $
$$ $ $$
$
$$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $
$$$
$$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$$$$$ $$ $$
$$ $
$ $$
$$$
$$$ $ $
$ $$$ $ $$$
$$$ $
$$$
$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $$$ $
$ $$$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $$
$$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$$ $ $$ $$
$ $
$
$ $ $$$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$
$ $ $$
$$
$ $$$$ $$
$ $ $
$
$$$
$
$$ $
$$$
$ $ $$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $$$$ $ $
$$
$ $
$ $$ $
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$ $ $
$ $
$$$$
$
$$$ $ $$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$$$$ $
$$ $ $$$
$ $
$
$ $$
$$$ $$ $
$
$ $ $$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$ $$$$$ $$ $$$
$
$ $
$ $$ $ $$$$ $$ $ $ $$
$
$$ $$$ $$$
$$$
$$ $
$ $$$$ $
$
$ $
$ $$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$$$ $$
$$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $$
$ $
$$ $$ $ $$ $
$
$ $$ $
$
$$$
$ $ $$ $ $
$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$$$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$ $$$ $$ $$$ $$$$ $$
$
$$$$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$ $$ $$$$ $ $
$$$
$
$$$ $$ $ $ $
$$$
$ $ $ $$$
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$ $$ $$$$$
$$
$ $$$$$
$$
$$ $$$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $$$$ $ $ $ $
$
$$ $ $$$$
$$ $$ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$ $$$ $$ $ $$ $ $
$$
$ $ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$$$$ $$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$$ $$$$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$ $$$$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $
$ $ $ $ $$
$ $$$ $
$ $$$ $ $ $
$
$$$ $ $$ $ $$$ $$$
$
$$$
$ $ $
$
$$$ $$$$ $ $
$ $ $$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$$$
$$ $$$$ $$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$$ $$ $ $$
$$ $ $ $$
$
$ $ $$$ $$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$$ $$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$ $$$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$$ $
$$
$
$$
$$ $
$ $$ $$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$ $ $ $
$$
$$ $
$ $$ $ $$$ $
$$$$ $ $
$$$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$ $$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$ $$
$ $ $ $$$ $ $$$ $$$ $$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$
$$
$ $$
$ $$ $$ $
$$ $$ $$ $$$ $$
$ $$ $$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$$$ $$
$ $$
$$$ $ $ $
$$$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$ $$
$$
$ $
$$ $
$ $$
$$
$ $
$$ $
$$$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $$
$ $ $$ $$ $$$ $
$ $
$$ $ $$$$$$ $$$ $$ $ $
$$ $$$ $$ $$ $ $
$ $$$
$
$$$
$ $
$$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$ $$$ $
$ $ $$$$$$$ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$
$ $ $$ $$$$ $
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$$ $$ $ $ $
$ $ $ $$ $$ $$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $
$$ $
$ $
$ $
$
$ $$$$ $ $
$ $ $$ $ $$
$$
$
$ $ $$$$ $
$ $
$ $ $
$ $ $$$ $$$$ $
$ $
$
$$
$$$$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$$
$$$$ $$ $$ $$ $ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$$
$ $
$ $$$$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$
$ $
$ $ $
$$$
$
$ $$
$$
$$
$ $
$
$ $$$ $$ $
$ $$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$$$$$$ $$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$$
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$$$ $ $ $
$$ $
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$ $$$ $$
$$
$$$$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$
$
$ $$ $$
$$ $$$$ $
$
$$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $
$ $$ $ $$$ $ $
$$ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$$
$
$ $$$ $$ $ $ $ $ $$$
$
$ $
$ $
$ $$ $$ $ $$ $ $$
$ $ $ $$ $$$
$ $ $$$$ $$ $$$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$ $$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$$
$$ $ $$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$ $ $ $$
$ $$ $ $$$
$ $
$ $$ $$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$ $
$ $ $$$ $ $$$ $
$ $
$$$ $$
$
$
$ $
$ $$$ $
$$$
$
$$$ $ $$ $$ $$ $$$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$ $ $
$ $
$$
$$$$ $$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$$$$ $ $
$$$
$$$ $$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$$$$$$$
$ $ $$ $$ $$
$ $ $$$$$$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$$
$ $ $ $$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$$ $
$$ $ $ $ $$$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$$$$$ $ $
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$ $$$
$ $$$
$$ $$
$
$
$ $
$$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $
$ $$ $
$$$ $$$$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$$$$$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$ $
$ $$
$$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $$ $$$$$$ $$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$ $ $$$$
$ $$$ $$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$ $ $$$
$
$$ $
$ $$$ $ $
$$
$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $$ $$ $
$ $
$ $$ $
$$
$ $$
$
$
$$$ $ $
$
$ $
$$$
$$
$ $
$ $$ $ $$$$$ $ $ $$$ $
$$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$ $$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$$ $ $$
$$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $$$
$$
$ $$ $ $$$
$
$ $$$
$
$ $$ $$ $
$$$ $
$$
$
$ $ $$$
$ $$ $
$
$$
$
$ $ $$ $$$$ $
$
$ $ $$ $ $$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$$
$ $
$$$$
$ $$ $$$$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$ $$$$$$$$ $$ $
$
$$
$$$
$
$$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$$$ $ $$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $$ $$ $ $ $$$$$
$
$$$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$$$$$
$ $
$
$
$$$$$ $ $ $ $ $
$ $ $ $
$$ $$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $
$ $
$ $$$ $$ $$$$$$$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$$ $
$$
$$
$$$$ $$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$$ $$$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $
$ $ $ $ $$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $$$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $$$ $$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$
$$ $ $$$$$$$
$ $ $$
$$ $ $$ $$ $ $
$ $ $ $$ $
$$$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $$ $
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$$$ $$ $ $
$$
$
$ $
$$$$ $$
$ $ $$
$ $
$$
$$$$$$
$$ $ $$
$
$$
$$$ $$ $$ $
$$$ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$$$ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$ $ $$$$
$$
$ $$ $ $ $
$$
$$$
$$$$
$$ $$ $ $ $$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$$ $$ $ $
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$$$ $ $$
$
$$$ $$
$$ $$ $$ $ $
$$ $ $$ $
$$
$ $
$
$ $ $$$
$
$ $$$$ $ $$$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $ $$$$$$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $$ $$$
$
$ $$$ $$$$$ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$$ $ $
$$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $$
$ $ $ $$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $$ $$ $$$
$ $ $$ $ $
$ $$ $$
$
$
$$
$$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $$$ $ $
$$
$$ $
$ $
$$
$ $$$$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $$
$ $ $ $$
$ $ $ $$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
$ $ $$$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$$$$$$ $$$ $$
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $ $$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $$ $ $$ $$ $$$$$$ $ $
$ $$
$
$ $ $ $ $$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$ $$
$$$$
$
$$
$$$$$$ $
$
$
$$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$$$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $$$$
$
$$ $$$$ $$ $$
$$
$ $ $$$ $$$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $ $$$$$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$ $ $ $ $
$$
$ $
$$ $ $
$ $ $ $ $
$ $ $$
$ $
$
$$$ $$ $$$ $
$ $
$
$ $
$ $$$ $$$$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$ $$$
$
$ $ $ $$$
$ $
$ $$ $ $
$
$$ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $$
$
$ $$$ $ $
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$ $ $$$ $
$$
$ $
$

$$

$
$
$ $
$ $
$$
$$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$ $
$ $
$$ $$
$$$
$$
$
$$$
$$ $
$

$
$$
$$
$$$ $$ $ $ $
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$ $ $$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$ $$ $ $$$
$$ $ $
$$ $$$$
$ $$ $$
$
$
$
$$$$$$
$ $
$
$$
$$$ $ $$
$$ $ $$ $
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$$$
$$$
$$
$$$
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$$ $
$ $ $$
$$
$$$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$
$$$ $ $
$$ $ $
$$ $
$
$$$$$ $
$$$
$
$
$$
$$ $$
$$
$$
$$ $





 



$$




$$

 






$
$
$
$

$
$$

$$$

$
$
$
$
$$
$




$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$ $ $$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$$$$$$
$
$ $$$$$$
$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$$$$
$ $
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$$$$
$

$
$

$
$
$ $ $ $
$ $ $
$
$ $
$$ $
$ $
$$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$ $$
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$$$$$
$ $$$$$
$
$$
$ $
$ $$$
$
$
$$
$ $$$
$$
$ $$
$$
$ $$
$$
$ $$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $$ $$$ $
$
$ $
$ $ $$ $$
$
$$
$ $
$
$ $ $$$ $$$
$ $$ $ $
$$
$
$ $
$$$
$ $ $ $$ $ $$
$ $
$$
$$$ $ $$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $$ $$$ $
$ $ $ $$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$$$ $$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$ $ $$$$$$$$$ $
$
$$$ $ $ $$$$$$
$ $
$ $ $$
$$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $$$ $ $$$$
$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$$ $$$
$ $
$ $ $ $$
$

$
$$$$
$
$$$ $ $
$$ $$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$$
$$$ $
$
$
$$ $$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$$$
$$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$ $$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $$
$
$$
$ $$ $$
$$
$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$
$

$$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$$ $ $
$ $$ $$$$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$$$ $$$
$$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$
$
$ $$$ $ $$ $
$
$
$$
$$$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $
$$
$ $ $$ $
$$
$
$$
$ $
$$
$$
$

$
$$
$ $

$$$ $
$$$$
$ $$
$$$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$$$$ $ $ $
$$ $ $
$ $ $$ $
$$ $
$ $$ $
$ $
$
$$

$$

$
$

$$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$ $

25
$

$
$

$
$
$
$ $$
$ $
$$$ $
$

$$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: Network Model: Using Transit

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 1: Transit Times from North Station


$
$$

$ Wellington

$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
 $$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$$
Beachmont
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$
$
$
$$
$$ I
Davis I
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
Belmont
O
$
$
Chelsea
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$

$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$$$$$
$
$
Alewife
$
$$$$
$$
$$$ $$
$
$$
$
$$$$$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Suffolk Downs
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ Square O $
$$
Porter
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
Heights
Waverly O
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$$$$$$
$
Square
$$$Orient
$$
$

$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$ Sullivan
$
$
$$$
$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$ $$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Wood
Island
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$$
$$ $
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$

$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$Harvard I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
Navy
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ Charlestown
Lechmere
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$

$
$
$$$$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
Lovejoy
Wharf
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$$ 
$$
$$$$
$$
$$ $$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$
$
$$North
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$Station
$
O$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$

$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$

$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
Central
Square
I$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
North
Station
I$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
Haymarket
O $$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$

$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Kendall/MIT
I$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$$
$
$$$
$$$$
$$
$$
$ $$$$$
$
$
$$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ Long Wharf
$
$
 $$
$
$
$Bowdoin
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

State
$
$
$
$
$$ O
$
$
$
$
$
$

$$$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$Downtown
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
 Crossin
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$


$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$

$$
$
Boylston
O
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Newtonville
$

$
Packards Corner
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
South
Station O
$
$
$
$ Ave
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$Copley

$$$$$$
$$
$ O$
$
$
$
$$
Harvard
$
$
$

$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
I$
$

$$
$

$
$
$
$
$$
$
$

O
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ O WTC
$$
$
$
$
$BU$Central
$
$
$
$
$$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Warren
St
O
$
$
NE
Medical
Ctr
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$ $$$ $$$
$

$
$
I$$
$Hynes
$St$O
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
  Ave O
$$
$$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$

Herald

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
Summit
Hawes
I$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$St
$

$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$


$
$
$ $St
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
East
Berkeley
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$

$


$
$
St
Paul
I
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$

$
$$
$$
Symphony
I$
$
$$
$
$$
$
Mt
$$
$$$
$$$$$
$$$
$
$
$$$$$$$
$$$$$
$$ $
$I
$
$
$$$$
$
Summit
Ave
I$$$$
$
$$$
$
$
 Hood Rd O
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$
Union
Park
St
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$$
 $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$

$
$St
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
Fairbanks
$I$ $$
$
$$$$
$$$$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$$
$
$

$$
$
$$
$$$
$
$$
$$$
$$
$$$
$$
$
Northeastern
I$
$
$
$$$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
Boston College 
I
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
 I $$$$$$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
Tappan
St
$
$
$$ $$$$
$
$
$

$
$$$
$
$
$$$$
$ $$
$
$
$
 $$
 
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$ St$
$$$$
Worcester
O
$
$
$

$
$
$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Beaconsfield
$$$$
$$
$$
$$
$
$$$$$$
$$$$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$$
$$
$

$
$$$
$$
$
Longwood
I$
$
$
  I
$$$$
$
$
$$$ $$
$

$
$
$
Massachusetts
Av
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
 $
Reservoir
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$Brookline

$
$
$$
$
$ $Villag
$
$$ $
 $$
$


$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Lenox
St
O
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$

$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$

$
$$$$
$
$$$
$$ 
$
$
$
Transit Times from North Station (Only Rail)
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$$
$Brookline
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
Hills
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
TransitGC
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Andrew
O
$
$$ $
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Newton Center I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$


$$$$$
$$
$
$
Duddley
Square
I $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$$$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$

$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
Chesnut Hill

$
$
$ $$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0 to 5
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$$
$ $$
$
$$
$
$$
$$$ $
$$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

5 to 10
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Jackson
Square
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$ $
$$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$$$ $JFK/UMass O
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
Newton Highlands
10 to 15
$
$$
$
JFK/UMass
O
$
$


$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$$

$$
$ I
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

$
Uphams
Corner
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 15 to 20
$
$$$
Eliot
$$
$$ $
$ $$$
$
$Stony
$
$$ I
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$$$
$
$
$$Brook
$$

$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Savin
Hill
$
$
$
$
$ 20 to 25
$
$
$
$
$

$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$

$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 25 to 30
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$
$
$$

$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Green
Street
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$$$$$$
$$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$$$

0
1
2
3
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$$
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
$$
Kilometers
$$
$$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
Generalized
Cost
w/o Weight Factors
$
Forest
Hills
$
$
Fields
Corner
O
$$$
$
$$$$$$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
F.Salvucci and M.Murga Shawmut O
$

 

27

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 2: Data, data, data

What do you know about the area


beyond a quick 3-D tour with Google
Earth?

What is the density of residences?

What about jobs?

Have you checked the Census data?

Do they have lots of parking?


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

28

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 2: Residential Density




11542

23708

6941

22876

32

24194


59226




55765

56340

Residential Density

D
0 to 2489 (158)
2490 to 4899 (42)
4900 to 6999 (8)
7000 to 9599 (9)
9600 to 11899 (3)
11900 to 13999 (1)

14000 to 16999
(3)

17000
to 100000 (1)
2
4
6

6768

47283
38037
35080










   
 

   







    




 







    
  
 
   
 
 SUFFOLK








57107


589141


28911







Kilometers

2216

18303








  

11050


F.Salvucci
and M.Murga


People per Square Mile





83829


26613

3632


 77478



101355


32986

14412




26078


27134

20810

42389

89050




30355

20377

22219


40407

24804


37258

DLESEX

48129

88025

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 2:

Distribution of jobs, hospitals, airports, etc.



129

95

38
93


28




114


128



107





3A

4


95

62





2

1A


99



126


60


20

27



2A



16



90

30



90

9





28



135

90F

93

3A
203 




F.Salvucci and M.Murga

30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 3: Behavioral Patterns

How many trips per person per day?


Which are the most important trip
purposes?
How do they vary along the day?
Why some people choose transit?
Why others are captive to the car?
How do they react to price increases of
transit fares, parking, tolls?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

31

Block 3: Behavioral Patterns


Modal Split at the Residential End

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

128





129

38
93



95

28



107



3A



129





95



62

114





2

1A


99



126


60



2A



2000 HBW Modal Split at ORIGI


20

Block Group Charts


16



90F

1
2




90



27

90

30


9



28


93


 and M.Murga
F.Salvucci
203

3,000
1,500
750
Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
Walked
1
2

32

Block 3: Behavioral Patterns


Modal Split at the Residential End

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Clay Pit Pond


Perch Pond
Pit Pond

Mystic River
Chelsea River

Jerrys Pond

Belle Isle Inlet

Island End River


Belle Isle I

Fresh Pond

Little Mystic Ch

Millers River
Millers River

Sawing Pond

Charles River
Charles River
Basin
Charles River

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond
Boston Harbor

Muddy River Pond

er Pond

Fort Point
Channel

2000 HBW Modal Split at ORIGI

Muddy River

Block Group Charts


Reserved Channel

Chestnut Hill
Reservoir

Fisher Hill
Reservoir
Brookline
Reservr

Leverett Pond
Old Harbor

Sargent Pond

Wards Pond

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

3,000
1,500
750
Boston Harbor Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Railroad
Walked
0
.4
.8

33

1.2

Block 3: Behavioral Patterns


Modal Split at the Work Center End

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Clay Pit Pond

Mystic River
Chelsea River

Jerrys Pond

Belle Isle I

Island End River


Bel
d

Little Mystic Ch

Millers River

Charles River
Charles River
Basin
Charles River

2000 HBW Modal Split at Destination


Block Group Charts

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond

75,000
Boston Harbor
37,500
18,750

Fort Point
Channel

Muddy River Pond

Muddy River
Reserved Channel

Fisher Hill
Reservoir

Leverett Pond

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Commuter rail
Boston
Harbor
Walk
Taxi
0
.4
.8
Miles

1.2

34

Block 3: Behavioral Patterns


Modal Split at the Work Center End

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006



128


114

129


95



28



38

93

62



107





3A

129



4


95

62





2

1A


99



126


60



20



27

2000 HBW Modal Split at Destination


Block Group Charts

2A



75,000
37,500
18,750

16



90F

90



30

90

9





28



135

93



3A


F.Salvucci and
M.Murga
203

Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Commuter rail
Walk
Taxi
0
1
2
Miles

35

Block 3: Behavioral Patterns


Commuting Time from Residence

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Millers River
Millers River

Charles River

CTPP 2000 HBW Travel Time


Block Group Charts
750
Charles River

375
188

LT. 5
5-10
10-15
15-20
20-25
25-30
30-35
35-40
40-45
45-50
50-55
55-60
60-75
75-90
GT.90
.4

Charles River
Basin

Charles River
Basin

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond

Charles River

Fort Point
Channel

Muddy River Pond

Muddy River

Reserved Chann

.8

1.2

Kilometers

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

36

Block 3: Behavioral Patterns


Commuting Time from Residence

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Malden River
Malden River
Spy Pond
Mystic River

CTPP 2000 HBW Travel Time


Block Group Charts
750
Clay Pit Pond

Mystic River

375
Pond

Jerrys Pond

188
LT. 5
5-10
10-15
15-20
20-25
25-30
30-35
35-40
40-45
Fresh Pond
45-50
50-55
55-60
60-75
75-90
GT.90
.4

.8

1.2

Kilometers
Charles River

F.Salvucci and M.Murga


Millers River

37

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 3:

Behavioral Patterns turned into a program

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

38

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 3:

Behavioral Patterns turned into a program

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

39

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Block 3:

Behavioral Patterns turned into a program

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

40

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Are we ready for the 4 Step Model?

Sullivan Square




<

$
$
$$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$ $$ <
$$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
< $
$
$$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$ $
$
<
<
$
$
<$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
<
$$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
< $
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
<
$$ $
< $
$ $
$
$
$ $$ $$ $
$
< $<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$<
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$
$ $$
$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$$ $
$
$ $ < $$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
<
$
$$
$$ $
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
<
$$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$ $$ $$
<
$<
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
<$
$
<
$ $ $$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
$< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
<
<$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$$$ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$$ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$$$ $
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$$
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
< $$ $$
<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$$$ $$$ $
<
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $$$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$$
< $
$
$
<$ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$<
$
$ $$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
<
<
<
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $$$$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$< $
$$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ <
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$< $
$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ <$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
<
$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $
$$<
$
$
$
$ $
<
$
$ $ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
<
<
<
<
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$<
$<
$
< $ $$
$
$ $
$ $
$ <
$$
$
$
<$
$
$
$ $
$
$ <
$
$ $
$ $$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $ $$$ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$$
<
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$ $
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
<
$$
$
$
$ $ <
$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$<
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$ $
$$
<
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$< $$
$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
<
$
$
$<
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$$$ $ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
<
< $
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $ $$$
$
$
$$
$
<
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
<
$ << $
$
$$
$
$$
$ $$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$
<
< $
$$
$
<
<
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$<
$$
$
$$
<
$ $
$
$
$ $$$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
< $
<
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ <
$
<
<
$ $ $
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ <$ $ $
<
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
<
<
<
$$
$$
$
$ $
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$< $
$
$
$
$$$$$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$<
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$$
<
$
$
$ $
$ $
<
$
$
$
$ <
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$< $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $ $
$
$ $$$
<
$$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$ $
$$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$$ $ $ <
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$
$$
$ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$ $$$ $ $ $
$
$
<
$$
$
$
$ $<$
$$
$ <
$
$$
$
$
<
$ <$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
< <
< $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$$
$$
<
<
$$
$ $ <$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$$
$
$ $ $$$
$$ <$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$ $
$
$<
<$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
< $ $
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$ <
$ $
$
$$ $
$$ $
$ $ $$$
<
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
<
$ $
< <
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$$
$ $$ <
$ $$
$
$ $
$<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $$
$$< $$
$
$$
$ <
<$
< $ < << <
$
$
$
< $$
$ $
$
$ $
$ <
<
<
<$
<$
$
$
$
$$
$$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$<
$
<
$ $
$
<
<
$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$ $ $
<
<$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
$$$
$
<
$
$ <
$
$$ $
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $$
<
<< $
<
$ $
$
$ $ $ $
$ $$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
< $<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
<$
<
<$
$ $
$
$
$
$
< $
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$ $<$
<
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$<
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
$
<$ <
<
$
$
$< <
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$ $$
$$$$
$<
<
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
<
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$$$ $ $
$<
$
$< $
<<
$
$ $
$
$
< < $
$
$
$
$
$< $ $
$
$$ <
$
<$
$
$
<
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$$
<
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
< <
<
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ < < $
<$
$
$
$
$ < $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
<
$$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<<
$ $
$ $
$$
$ < < $
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
< $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
< <
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
<
$
$<
$$
$ $ $ $$
$ $$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
<
$ $$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$< <
< $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< <
$ $
$
<
<$
$
$ $
$
< $
< <$
$
$
$
$
$<
$< $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$ < $
$ $$
$
$ $ $
$<
$$ $
$$ $
$
<
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
<
$
<
<
<
<
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
<
<< $
<
$
$
$$
$$
$< $
$$
$
<
$ $$$
< $
<$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$$
$ <
$$
$$ $
$$
<$$
< <
<
<
$$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$ $$<
$
$
<
$$$
$$ <
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ <$
$
$< $
$
$
$
< <
$
$ $ $ $<
$ $ $ $
<
<
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ < $ $$
$$$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $
< $< < $ < <
$
<
<
<
$
$
<
$
$$$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$ <$ $
$
$<
$
<
<
$
$ <
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
< <$$
<
<
$$ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$$ $ $$$ $ $$
$$ $ $
$ $
$$ $ $
$$
<
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
<
<
<
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$
<
< $<
< $
<$ $
$ $ $$$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $ $ $
$
$ $
<
$ < < $
$$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $$ $
$
$$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
<
$
<
<
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
$
$$ $ $
<
<<
$
< $$
<<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$< <
$$ $
< $ $ $ $ <$ $ $ $ < $
$ $ $
$ $ $ $ $
$ $$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $$< $
$
$
$ $
$<
$
<
$
<
< <
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ <$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
<
<$
<
$
$
<
< $<
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $<$ <
$<
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
<
$ $ $
< $ $
<
<<
<
$ $$
<
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$$
<
$
$$
$ $ $< $$$$ $ $ < $< $
$ $ <
$
$
$
<
<
<
< $
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$$
$
$
<$
<
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$ <$
$
$$
$
<
<
$
$
$$ $$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $ <$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
<
<
<
<
$$$ $
$ $$$ $
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
< <$ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$
<
<
$
$
$
<
$ <$
$$ <$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$ <$
$$
< $
<
$ $
<
<
$$
$ $$ $$
$$
$
<
$
$$ $
$
$
<
$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ <$
$ $
$
$ $ $
<
<
$
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$<
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$ $
<
< $
$
$
<
$
<$< $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
<
<
$$ $$$$
$
$
$ $
$$
$$
$
<$
<$< $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $<
$
$
$
$$$ $$
$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$
$$$ $$
$$
$ <$ <
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
<
$ $
$< $ $ $
$$
$
$
$$
$
< $$ $ <
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
<
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $
<
$
<
$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$
$ $$$ $ $$ $ $$
$
$$
$
$ <$ $
$ $$ $$ $
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$$$ $ $ $ $
<$ <
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
< $$
< $$
$
<$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$$< $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ <$
<
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $$
$
$$
$ $
<$$
<
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$ $ $
<
<
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
<
<<
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$ $
$
$
<
<$<
$$
$$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$< <
$
$
<
< $
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<$
<
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$$ $ $ $$
<
$
$
$ $ $$$ $
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$$
<
$ $ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
<$$$
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$<$ $
$
$
<
$
$<
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
<
< $ $
$ $$
$$ $$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$$
$ $<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$ $
<$ $
$
$
$ < $$
$
$$$
$
$
$ $
$ $
<
$
$ $ $ $ $< $$ $
$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$$ $
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $ $$
$
<
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$ $<
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ < $$
$$ $
$
$$
$ $
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$$ $$ $
$
$
$
<
<$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$< $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
<
$$
$
$$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
<
<
<
$< <
$
$
$$ $$
$
$
$
$$ $
<
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$ $ $
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
<
$
< <$
$ $ $$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
< <
$$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
<
$$
<
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
< <$
<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $
$ $ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$< $
<<
$ $<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$<
< $
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$
$$
<
<
$ $
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
<<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
<
<
<
<
<
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$$$
< $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $$ $ <
$ $<$$$ $ $< $
$
$ <
<
<
$
$
$
$ $ $$$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $$$
<
$
<
$
$ $ $ <
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
< $
<
$
$
$$
$
$
<
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$ $ $
$<
$ $$
<
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
< <
<
$$ <
$ $
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$$$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
< $
<
$ <$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$<
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$ <
$
$ $
$< $ $
$
$$ $$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
< < << <
< $
$
< $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$ $< $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$ $
<
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ <
<
$
$
$
$
<$ <
$
$
$
<
$
<
<$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
<
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$$
$
$
$< $ $
$
< $
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$
$$
$ <$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ <
< $ < $< $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $<
$
$
$
$ $ <<
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$ < $
<
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$ $ <
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
<
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
$ $
<
$
$<
$
$
< <
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ <
$
$
$ $<
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$$$
$$ $ $$ $ $ $$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $
$
$
$$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
<$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$ $$
<
<
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$<
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$<
$
$$
$<
$
$ $
$
$
$
< $
$$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$ $
$$
$$
$$$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
< $ $
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $$ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$< $
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
< $$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
<
$ <$$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< < $$
$$
$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$$
<
$$
<
<$$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$$
<
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
<
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$ $
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$<
$
$
<
<
< $
<
$
$
$
$$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$$$
< $ $$
<
$
<
< <
$
$ $
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
<
<
$$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
< $ $
<$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$$
$$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$ <
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
<
$
$
$
$$
<
$$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$<
$
$
$$ $ $
$ $
<$
<
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$ $
$ $$
$
$ $ <
$ $$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
<
$
$
<
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
< <
$$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
<
<$$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$<
$
$
<
<
$$
$ $
<
$
$<
$
$ $$ $ <
$
$$
$$$
$ <
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$$ <<
$ $ $ $
$
$$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<$
$ $
<
<
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
< $
<
<
$< $
$$
$$
$
$$
$$<
$
$$
$
<$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$$
$
$
<
<
<$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
<
$ $
$
$$
$
$ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
<$ $ <
$
$
$
$$
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
$
$
<
$
$
$ <
$
$$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$ <
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$$
$<
$
$ $$$$
$
< <
<
<
<
<
<
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ < $
$
$
< $
<
$
$$ $
$
$
<
<
$
$$
<
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
< $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$ <
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
< $
$ $ $ $ < $
<
$ $ $$
$
$ $$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$<
$
$
$ $
$
$$ <
<
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$ $$
$
< $$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$$
$
<
<
$ $$ $
$$
$$
$
$
<$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
<
<$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
<$ $ $
<
<
< $
$
$$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $$
$
$
$ < $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<$
<
$
$
$
$$<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
<
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$ $
$ $ $
$$ $ $
$
$ $
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
$
$$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$<
<
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
< $$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
<
$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$ <
$
$ $
<
$
$
< $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
< $
<
$< $ $ $
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$<
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
<
<
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$ <
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
<
$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
<
<
$
<
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
< $
$$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$ <$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$
$ <$
$
<
<
$
<
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $<
$
$
$
<
< $
$
$$
$
<$ $
$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
<
$ $ $ $
$
$
$$
$ < $
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$ <
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$$
<
$$
$
$
$ <$
$
$
$
$
$$
$< <
<
$ $$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<
<
<
<
$
$
<
$ <
$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$ $
$
$
$
<
<
<
$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$< $
$
$ $
$$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$< $
$
$<
$
$
$ $
$$$
<
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
<
$ $
$<
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
<$ $ < < $ $ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$
<
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
<
<
$
<
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$
< <
<
$
$ $
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
<
$$
$
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$< $ $
$
$<
$$$
$
$
< $
$ $
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
<
$
$
$
$$
$$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$$$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $$ $
$
$
$
$ < $<
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $$ $
$ $
$
<
$$
$ $
$
$
<$ $
$
$$
$
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$$
$
$$
$
$
$ $ $$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $ $ $ $ $$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$< $
$
$ <
< $$ $
<
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ <$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$$$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
<$$ < < <$ <$$
$$
$
<
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$ <
$$ $
$ $ $
< $$
$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $
$ $
<
<
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $ <
<
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ < $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$
$
$
$<
$
$
<
$ $
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$<
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $
<
<$
$
$
$ $
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$$ $ $
$$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$ $$ <
$$ <
$
$ $
$
$ $ $$ $$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$$ $$
<
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$ $
$$ $ $
$ $
< $ $
$ $
$ $
$$ $
$
< $ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $$ $$
$ $$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$$$
$
$
$< $
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
<
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
<
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $ $ $ $
$$
$
$
$ <
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$$
$ $
$
<
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ <
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $
<
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$
$$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$ $$
$$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $
$ <
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
$
$
$ $$$ $
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$ $ $
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$
$$
$$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $ $
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$ $
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$$$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $ $$
$
$
$ $$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$$ $
$
$ $
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $ $
$
$ $
$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $ $ $
$
$
$$ $ $$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$$$$$ $
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$ $
$$ $
$$
$
$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$
$$
$$
$
$$
$$ $$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$
$
$
$
$
$$ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $
$
$ $$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $$
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$

$
$

$$

$
$ $

$
$

Pond

$
$

$ $
$ $
$

$$

$$

<

<

<

<

$
$

$$



$

$
$

$$

$
$

$$

$
$

<

$$

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Wood Island I

<

<

<

<

CAMBRIDGE

<

<

<

Harvard<I

<

<< 
<

<

<

Millers River

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<< <

<

<<

<

<

<

<

<
Central Square
I

<

<

<

<

<

<

<
<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<<Rowes Wharf

<
Park St O<

< < <Crossin
Downtown

<

<

Charles River
Basin

<

<

<

<

<


<

Public Garden
Pond
<

<

<
<

<

<

<

<

Harvard AveO  < 



Warren St O

Charles River

<

<

<

<

US Courthouse

 <

<

<

<

<

Generation

<

Boylston
< < O<
<<
<< < <
<
< < < South Station
O
< 

BU West O<
<< <<
<
Copley I

<<
<

WTC
Fort Point
 < <
< <
<

BU East
O Muddy River Pond
<
<
<
< 
Channel
<
Back Bay O
<
<
  

<
Kenmore
I< Hynes
I Prudential


<
<

I
< <
Herald
St
O
<
<
Summit Ave O
<
Hawes St <I
< <
 <<

<
<
I

KentSt I Fenway

 St
<
<
<<
East Berkeley
St Paul
Washington St O

 I
Muddy River<
< <
<
<
<
<

<
<<
<Symphony I
Mt Hood Rd O
<
Summit
 Ave I
<
Massachusetts AvUnion Park St I <
Sutherland
Rd O

 St I
Fairbanks
Reserved<Channel



<

Northeastern I
<

Washington
Squar
< < <<
W
Newton
St
O

<
<
<
<


<
<
Dean
Worcester
<<
<Museum of Fine A
<O <
 < < St
<
 Rd I
<<<
<
Massachusetts
Av <
 Beaconsfield

<

<
<
Longwood
I Ruggles I
 
<
<
Massachusetts
Av

<

< <
< Circle

Brigham
I <
<

<
<
Lenox St
Parkings
<

<O
BrooklineVillag
<
<
Roxbury Crossing
NSPAC BrooklineHills  Back of the Hill


SUFFOLK
Andrew O

Duddley Square I
Fisher Hill

<

<
<

<

Frog Pond


<

<

<

< 



<<

<

<

<

<

<

Socio-economic data

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<


Charles/MGH
<
<<<< < << I Bowdoin
<
<
Long Wharf
<
< 
< <Gov't Center I

<<
<

<

<

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<

<

<

< <

<
Kendall/MIT
I

<<

<

< <

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Maverick I

 <

I
<<North Station
<
North Station I


<
Haymarket O

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<

<

<

Boston H

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Distribution

<

<

<

<

<

Policy Scenarios: eg.


Newparking scheme

<

<

<

Lovejoy Wharf

<

<

<<

<

< < <<


<

<

<

<
<

<

<

<

<



<
<

<
<

<

<

<

<

<

Transport Scenarios:
eg. Newtransit line

<

Airport<
I <


Community
Colleg
<
Little Mystic
 <
 Ch
Lechmere
<

<

<

<

<<

<

<

<

Land-Use Scenarios:
eg. Newdevelopments

<

<

<

<

<

<

<

Reservoir

<<

Brookline
5000 2500
Reservr

.6

BROOKLINE

<

1250
1.2

Leverett Pond

<

<

<

<

<

<

Jackson Square I

W ards Pond

Modal Split

Old Harbor

<

1.8

Kilometers

Sargent Pond
No de Plazas

<

<

JFK/UMass O

JFK/UMass O

Assignment

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

41

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Use of Planning models

Traditionally:
Demand estimates per mode
Explore impact of future alternative land use-transport
scenarios
More and more:
Short term policies: Detours, parking policies, street
closings, modal split
Environmental impacts
Impacts of ITS technologies
Operational studies for non-regular days
Adapting to todays needs: congestion & demand
management, plus, air-quality issues
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

42

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Why planning models are important?

Land-Use Scenarios:
eg. Newdevelopments

Transport Scenarios:
eg. Newtransit line

Policy Scenarios: eg.


Newparking scheme

Socio-economic data
Generation
Distribution

Modal Split
Assignment

Forecasts numbers can be


easily used to kill a project or
to keep it alive, even if it has
no real merits
Models often used as black
boxes
They can be manipulated to
produce results fitting clients
wishes
As few post-mortems are
conducted, many are happy
to predict the future
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

43

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model

I dont believe in models!


but everyone has a model
in his mind. Modeling just a
mental abstraction. Often a
very simple one!
Dont be afraid to model a
particular behavior, even if it
is not in the books
Models (and simulations) may
become self-educating tools
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

44

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model Software

Commercial packages:
TransCAD
Cube Voyager
Emme2
Vissum
Trips
Tranplan
MinUTP

From black boxes to script


languages with open
subroutines
User-friendliness versus
flexibility to model your own

thing

Bugs galore -> Direct link with


programmers

When using mathematics in modeling, if one cannot interpret the outcome in good,
plain English then the paper should be burnt and one should start again
Alfred Marshal, 19th century UK economist
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

45

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model


$

$$ $
$$ $
$$ $ $
$$
$$
$
$ $$ $$
$
$$ $$ $
$$ $
$
$$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$
$

$
$
$
$ $
$$
$ $$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $$$$
$
$
$
$$ $$$ $
$ $$ $
$ $$ $
$$ $$
$ $
$ $ $
$$ $$
$ $$
$ $
$$
$ $ $$$
$ $ $
$$
$
$
$ $ $
$ $
$
$
$
$
$

$
$

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

$
$

Initial considerations:

$
$
$

$ $
$ $$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
$$$
$ $
$
$
$$
$
$$
$
$ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$ $$$ $ $ $
$$
$ $$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$ $$ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $ $ $$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$ $ $
$
$
$ $
$
$

Modeling objective
Area to be modeled
Level of detail
Availability and quality of data
Trip purposes to be represented
Transport modes to include
Treatment of heavy vehicles
..

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

46

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Generation

Generated trips:

Household as basic unit for home survey analysis


Cross-classification of households as a function of
number of people, no of workers, no of cars (or
income), age groups
Most important parameter: Number of members
per dwelling unit

Attracted trips: (See ITE Trip Generation)

Job centers number of employees


Shopping areas footage area
Airport passengers

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

47

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: 1.Generation

Generation:

How many trips per family?1


Home Surveys to establish:

No of trips as a function of number of people per household,


income, number of cars, type of dwelling, residential area
Distribution among trip purposes: Usually HBW (Home-BasedWork), HBO (Home-Based-Other) and NHB (Not-Home-Based)
Distribution between motorized and non-motorized
Distribution between chained and un-chained trips
Number of captive public transport users: e.g.: f (No of people

per household vs no of automobiles in household)


1

Number of trips per person a quasi-constant


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

48

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Generation


Some basic questions:

Is trip generation sensitive to policy changes?:

If we improve the transport system, will we


experience more trips per family?
Just the total number of trips or only those at a
given time?
Or perhaps, just the trips made on a given mode?
What is the influence of land use?

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

49

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: 2.Distribution

Probably the most important of


the 4 steps
An analytical description of where
people choose to locate their
residence and where do they
choose to work, to shop, to
socialize
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

50

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: 2.Distribution

What is it needed?

Trips generated at household level


Attractions points (shops, job
centers, other residences, special
generators: airports, hospitals..)
defined in quantitative terms
Balance between trips generated
and trips attracted
Time (and cost) matrices by car and
by transit to travel from generation
points to attraction points
Measured peoples aversion against
traveling longer distances, times..
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

51

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Distribution

Where will the generated trips go to?


Generation Attraction (jobs, shops,
schools, residences)
Travel impedance as a restraint:

Travel impedance elements: time,


distance, tolls, ramps, scenic value
Friction curves or peoples aversion to
travel, expressed as f (time, distance,
tolls)
Times during peak hour??
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

52

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Distribution


Homes

Shops
Work Centers

B
A

We have obtained skimmed matrices (time&cost to go from A to B)


We know how reluctant people are to travel far (friction curves)
For above situation, how critical is it going to be the postulated friction
function for the estimation of the Trip Distribution?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

53

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Distribution


Homes

Shops
Work Centers

Ai Bj

What about now, how critical is now the postulated friction


function for the estimation of the Trip Distribution?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

54

The 4-Step Model: Distribution

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

We start with

A time (or impedance) matrix


between each i-j zone pair
A time distribution for each zone
(ie Census or survey data) on
their aversion to travel
The estimated trips generated
and/or attracted at each zone
OUR GOAL is to estimate a P-A
matrix (easily turned into an
O-D matrix) for each trip
purpose

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

55

The 4-Step Model: Distribution

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

We proceed by

Adopting a gravity model algorithm (or other similar


approach), so that we estimate the trips between any
two pairs by:
Tij = Pi * (Aj Fij /Sum (AkFik)) with k=1 to all zones
and Fij being the friction function corresponding to
the time (or impedance) between zones i and j
Note that this is an iterative process, where we
change the friction factors and at the same time we
have to guarantee that the sum of production trips is
equal to the total number of attracted trips
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

56

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Friction functions for distribution

Postulate a friction function (or look up table)


for each trip purpose. You can choose for
example between: Exponential

f(tij)= exp -c(tij)


Inverse power f(tij)= tij -b
Or, Gamma f(tij)= a tij b exp -c(tij)
tij being the time (or impedance) between zones i and j

Visualize NCHRP 365s gamma functions:

HBW a= 28,507
HBO
139,173
NHB
219,113

b=-0.02 c= -0.123
-1.285
-0.94
-1.332
-0.100

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

57

The 4-Step Model: Distribution

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

We continue by

Estimating the P-A (Production-Attraction) matrix


and then calculating the trip time distribution for
all zones (or just some zones)
Comparing those distributions with the observed
distributions
Iterating and modifying the friction functions until
we converge

Finally, we validate the model by comparing the full


estimated P-A matrix with the census or survey P-A
(or O-D matrix)
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

58

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

You compare the trip time distributions which result from the
generated P-A matrix with the observed distributions

TLD Comparison
40.00

35.00

30.00

Frequency

25.00

20.00

15.00

10.00

5.00

0.00
0-05

05-10

10-15

15-20

20-25

25-30

30-35

35-40

40-45

Travel Time (minutes)


Actual W ork Distribution

TransCAD Gamma

Caliper Friction Table

Functional Gamma (Pos)

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Functional Gamma (Neg)

59

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

You need to generate P-A matrices for each trip


purpose: HBW, HBO and NHB trips

HBW: Home-based work trips


HBO: schools, leisure, medical,
social, shopping, etc.
NHB: those which do not begin
nor end at home (a crude
attempt to chained trips)
Many others depending on
requirements, plus special
generators: hospitals, airports..
Plus taxis, freight movement,
etc.
See the National Home Travel
Survey
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

NHB

Office

Restaurant

HBW

HOME

60

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

NHB balanced holding attractions constant

NHB

Office

Restaurant

HBW

HOME

For NHB trips, attractions


are taken as the reference
(square feet of GLA) See
ITE Trip Generation
The same can be said for
special generators:

Hospitals
Airports
(These latter ones may require
a very different friction
function as they may be
regional in nature)

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

61

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: 3. Modal Split

Modal Split: Which transport mode will they


choose? How do we divide the total o-d matrix?

Motorized vs Non-motorized trips


Motorized:

Automobile vs Transit
Automobile: auto drivers vs auto passengers
Transit: bus vs rail

Exceptions from the idealized analytical flow:

Captive riders case:

They are inelastic versus transit improvements


Their distribution stage is not necessarily the same as car drivers
- Some destinations may become off-limits

Non-motorized trips: walk and bike trips


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

62

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Modal Split

A Single Occ. Vehicle


B Car/Van Pool
80

C Public Transit
D Bike

Percent

60

40

Walk

Other

A
CITY OF CAMBRIDGE
E

20

Community Development Dept


Community Planning Division

A
C

A
0

Live in Cambridge

Live in Abutting Towns

Live in Rest of the World

Cambridge Employees Means of Commuting


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Figure by MIT OCW.

63

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Modal Split

A Utility Function per mode:

Ui= ai+bi*IVTTi+ci*OVTTi+ di*COSTi


ai= modal constant
bi = In-Vehicle-Travel Time coefficient
ci = Out-Vehicle-Travel Time coefficient
di = Cost (or ticket) coefficient
relationships among coefficients??

For each modal option and for every


o-d pair, there will be a utility function
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

64

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Modal Split

Modal Split:

Revealed and Stated-Preferences


Calibrated utility functions with
weight factors: value of time1,
penalty for waiting time

The modal constant

Logit curves (or S curves):

P(k) = e Uk / sum( eUx)


Sequential split or nested logit

Value of time Analysis and Evaluation?


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

65

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: 4. Assignment

Assignment Which route will they take?

The shortest? The fastest? The least costly route? The


more scenic route?
As more cars choose a route, what happens?
How do we represent mounting congestion?

Analytical options:

All or Nothing (AOL) Winner gets it all


Capacity restraint How to incorporate mounting congestion
Equilibrium A very rational universe out there
Stochastic User Equilibrium: Different folks, different tunes
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

66

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Assignment

Volume-Delay curves or how to represent


growing congestion:
The BPR story: Nothing like a good and simple

formula to explain it all


BASE FREEWAY SEGMENT

60

8-Lanes

Design Speed

60 MPH

50

alpha

(i/C))beta

50 MPH

Even for intersection delay?

40

20

10
0

Unstable
Flow
2
(0.1)

4
(0.2)

6
(0.3)

8
(0.4)

10
(0.5)

12
(0.6)

Vol/ln (100 pcphpi)

14
(0.7)

16
(0.8)

18
(0.9)

*2000 pcphpi

30

*1900 pcphpi

Average Travel Speed (MPH)

Tc= Tff (1 +

70 MPH

4-Lanes

20
(1.0)

v/c Ratio**
*capacity
**v/c ratio based on 2000 pcphpi valid only for 60- and 70-MPH design speeds

F.Salvucci and M.Murga


Figure by MIT OCW.

67

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Assignment

Assignment:

Critical pathing:

Capacity restraint
User Equilibrium, etc.

but were dealing with human nature:

Stochastic User Equilibrium, plus

Volume-delay curves
V/C versus peak spreading
Tolls
Time segment of the O-D matrix to assign
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

68

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: Assignment


Assignment period:

24 hour assignment as
ADT (Average Daily
Traffic)
Morning and evening
rush-hour, off-peak
Time variations
associated to each trip
purpose

Total trips
200
Person-trips (000)

Social

150

School
Eat meal

100

Shop
Personal
business

50
Work
Home
0

6 am

10

12

6 pm

Hour beginning
Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

69

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model: The Fifth Step

Feedback Loops:

Speed vs Volumes
Transit vs Road
How far or how long?
Trip generation sensitive
to ease of travel?

Land-Use Scenarios:
eg. Newdevelopments

Transport Scenarios:
eg. Newtransit line

Policy Scenarios: eg.


Newparking scheme

Socio-economic data

Convergence criteria
Coherence with basic
land use- transport
scenarios?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Generation
Distribution
Modal Split
Assignment

70

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-Step Model

To know more about the analytical process:

Modelling Transport by Ortuzar, J. de D. and


Willumsen, L.G., John Wiley, NY, 3rd Edition,2001
Travel Estimation Techniques for Urban
Planning NCHRP Report 365, 1998
User manuals of most commercial packages

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

71

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model: Examples

Road flows in the


Basque Country for
a particular scenario

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

72

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model

Road flows in the


Basque Country for
a particular scenario
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

73

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model

Road flows in the


Basque Country for
a particular scenario
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

74

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model

View in downtown Bilbao:


volumes, I/C, speeds
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

75

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model


Pedestrians
Transit
Car

Modal share among Walk, Car and PT


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

76

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model






















Sube-Baja





2500


1250
625




suben
bajan

Lnea 48
5000

2500

1250

On-off counts perF.Salvucci


bus and
stop
M.Murgafor all routes

77

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model

Viajeros por Ejes Viarios en BilboBus


15000

7500

Aggregated bus
flows
along corridors
F.Salvucci
and M.Murga

78

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model


1

8
6

3
5

7
9
Viajeros entre Distritos
5000

2500

1250

Nota: El Distrito 5 se ha dividido en dos (5 y 9) para separar el Casco Viejo de barrios ms perifricos como San Adrin y La Pea

The Overall View:F.Salvucci


A simplified
O-D matrix
and M.Murga

79

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

4-Step Planning Model


In a nutshell: every settlement, every dwelling, job center,
road, no of lanes, posted speeds, signals, transit lines,
stops, headways, commercial speeds






















Sube-Baja





2500


1250
625




suben
bajan

Lnea 48
5000

2500

1250

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

80

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Critique of the 4-step Method

A tool created for a different goal: a new road


infrastructure. Today, focus on system management

New issues such as peak spreading, induced demand

Trip substitution? Impact of Information technologies?

Description of average, ideal conditions

Forecasting: Will basic parameters remain constant in the


future? Should we use back-casting?
Underlying theme: Individual choices of the user

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

81

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Questions to ask
As a user of 4-step models results, you
may want to raise questions such as:

Right scale? Discretized enough?


Calibration? For every step??
Validation? Backcasting before forecasting
Sensitivity analyses of results?
Modes considered?
Is it sensitive to policies being discussed?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

82

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Do not forget that the 4-step model describes


final equilibrium and new habits!
$
Red modelizada

$
$

Red viaria
Costa y lmites

Lneas de BilboBus y Metro

$$
$

Lnea 10 (intervalo= 12 min.)


Metro (intervalo= 5min.)

Paradas de BilboBus y Metro

$$

Lnea 10
Metro
0
.2

.4

.6

Kilometers

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

viajeros anuales

10 San Ignacio - Arriaga


3.000.000

$
$

2.500.000
2.000.000
1.500.000

1.000.000
500.000
0
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

$$$

$
$

$
$
$

$
83

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From the 4-step back to traffic models

Verify and incorporate (and even


feedback) the output from the 4-step
planning model into traffic models
Often the 4-Step model entails a rather
crude approximation of

road or urban streets capacity


Interaction, such as queues blocking an
intersection
Traffic speed (and resulting impacts)
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

84

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Example: AM peak at a roundabout


with V/C greater than 1.0

827

433

445

99

1
63

743

1295

11 1 5

113

57
27

1134
608

312

18

27

504

477

13

4 46

1205

1 33 8

968

124

31

1396

9
37

1933

12

6
14

17

77

37

2 6 66

28

39

48

52

32

69
4
77

446

35

36

bilbamu1.dat

12

85

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

85

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Roundabout microscopic simulation

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

86

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Integration of the Analytical Chain

An automatic chain of events


Sequence:

GIS Planning Model Traffic Models GIS


Postprocessors (environmental studies)

Or any combination of the above

Critical analysis and judgment at every


stage of the process
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

87

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Back-Casting and Forecasting

To calibrate a model is different than to


validate a model
If you want to forecast, you have to
remember Soren Kierkegaard!
To back-cast is to embark into a
learning adventure. And probably the
best way to validate the dynamics of
the model
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

88

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Back-Casting and Forecasting

Forecasting needs other models, such


as:

Why families buy cars? What are the main


drivers of that decision?
What is the influence of demographics?
What is the mobility of senior citizens?

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

89

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Back-Casting and Forecasting


Hombres

Piramide de Poblacion Bizkaia 1986

Mujeres

75
70 - 74
65 - 69
60 - 64
55 - 59
50 - 54
45 - 49
40 - 44
35 - 39
30 - 34
25 - 29
20 - 24
15 - 19
10 - 14
5-9
0-4
60000

40000

20000

20000

40000

60000

Mujeres

40000

20000

20000

40000

Hombres

Piramide de Poblacion Bizkaia 2025 A


95
90 - 94
85 - 89
80 - 84
75 - 79
70 - 74
65 - 69
60 - 64
55 - 59
50 - 54
45 - 49
40 - 44
35 - 39
30 - 34
25 - 29
20 - 24
15 - 19
10 - 14
5-9
0-4
60000

Mujeres

95
90 - 94
85 - 89
80 - 84
75 - 79
70 - 74
65 - 69
60 - 64
55 - 59
50 - 54
45 - 49
40 - 44
35 - 39
30 - 34
25 - 29
20 - 24
15 - 19
10 - 14
5-9
0-4
60000

40000

60000

20000

20000

40000

60000

Hombres

Piramide de Poblacion Bizkaia 2025 C

Mujeres

95
90 - 94
85 - 89
80 - 84
75 - 79
70 - 74
65 - 69
60 - 64
55 - 59
50 - 54
45 - 49
40 - 44
35 - 39
30 - 34
25 - 29
20 - 24
15 - 19
10 - 14
5-9
0-4
60000

Miles

Hombres

Piramide de Poblacion Bizkaia 2004

40000

20000

20000

40000

60000

Total
0-4
5-9
10 - 14
15 - 19
20 - 24
25 - 29
30 - 34
35 - 39
40 - 44
45 - 49
50 - 54
55 - 59
60 - 64
65 - 69
70 - 74
75 - 79
80 - 84
85 - 89
90 - 94
95

Escenarios A
Total

999
29
37
45
47
41
39
41
48
62
81
86
82
82
77
64
55
40
25
14
4

Escenarios C

HombresMujeres Total

475
15
19
23
24
21
20
21
24
31
40
43
40
39
36
28
23
15
8
4
1

524
14
18
22
23
20
19
20
24
31
40
43
42
43
41
35
32
25
17
10
3

1076
34
39
45
47
50
53
56
62
72
86
89
84
81
74
62
54
41
26
16
6

HombresMujeres

510
17
20
23
24
25
27
28
31
36
42
44
41
38
34
27
23
15
9
5
1

566
16
19
22
23
25
26
28
31
36
43
45
43
43
40
34
32
25
18
12
5

Scenario Planning a must


See example of two alternative age pyramids for 2025 in Bilbao
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

90

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

New Trends

Operational Studies: Life under congestion

From real-time vehicle counts to refined o-d


matrices for incident management The
TRANSCOM example
Drivers with better information: Does the
system behave differently?
What role for Intelligent Transport Systems?
Tactical tools or strategic approaches?

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

91

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

New Trends

Operational Studies: Life under congestion

The higher the saturation, the higher the


probability of an incident
The higher the saturation, the longer it will
take to bring the system back to normal
conditions, after an incident
But the 4-step planning model describes
average un-eventful days out there!
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

92

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 4-step planning model results

Red, V/C >.9


Yellow, V/C=.7-.9
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

93

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Planning vs Operational Studies

Not all red colors are created equal


The planning red: proximity to capacity
The field red: actual operational instabilities
The challenge is how to predict their relationship
and take them into account for planning purposes
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

95

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

New Trends
Operational Studies: Life under

congestion

The IDAS approach


How do we measure ITS costs and
benefits?
Should we incorporate ITS into
standard planning procedures?
Or, should we resign ourselves to
see ITS tools as a last minute
tactical solution to be implemented
by practical men, not planners?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

96

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

IDAS: A new analytical approach

It starts from the results of traditional


4-step planning packages
It attempts to reproduce some of the
algorithms contained in conventional
planning packages
Its essence is an evolving database on
ITS costs and benefits
It focuses on problem days not on
the idyllic average days depicted by
regular planning packages
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

97

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

IDAS approach

IDAS as a new approach:

A must to analyze future scenarios which show


growing saturation, as:

Operational improvements become critical


Integrated planning AND operational policies become
compulsory
Global indicators become essential

A unique approach to deal with the main threat:

Road incidents a harsh everyday reality far away


from the ideal average planning day
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

98

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Traffic Models and Real-Time Data

Real time traffic data is useful not


only for travelers, but to calibrate
microscopic models under road
incident scenarios
See for instance
www.bizkaimove.com (requiring
Flash 7) which provides:

Speed maps, running times, live


cameras
Short Messaging Systems (SMS) sent
free to those who have registered

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

99

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

New Trends

From trip-based modeling towards an


activity-based approach:

Travel decisions are activity based


Understanding activity behavior is
fundamental, rather than travel behavior
Focus on household dynamics, spatial and
temporal interrelationships between trips

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

101

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

New Trends

Activity-based approach:

Travel is derived from the demand for activity


participation
Sequences of patterns of behavior
Scheduling of household activities in time and space

TRANSIMS (Los Alamos National Lab):

The goal is to replace current transport paradigm


Already applied in Portland, Or (See Bowman and BenAkiva 1997 paper on Activity-based forecasting)

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

102

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A Closing Thought
The McNamara fallacy1:

The first step is to measure whatever can be easily measured.


This is OK as far as it goes
The second step is to disregard that which can't be easily
measured or to give it an arbitrary quantitative value. This is
artificial and misleading
The third step is to presume that what can't be measured
easily really isn't important. This is blindness
The fourth step is to say that what can't be easily measured
really doesn't exist. This is suicide

1 by Charles Handy The Empty Raincoat


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

103

Public Spaces as a Critical

Policy Element

Cities for People video by Prof Jan Gehl

(Life between Buildings)

Mikel Murga

Fall 2006

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Point of departure

In a world being steadily privatized, in


some cities public spaces are gaining in
importance People respond enthusiastically
to these new opportunities for walking and
participating in public life in public spaces
People are invited to reposses their cities
and restrictions are being made to reduce
parking and traffic in city areas in order to
make room for more people oriented
activities
Jan Gehl

Bilbao-Copenhagen

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Jan Gehl

Architect and Head of the Urban Design Dept


School of Architecture, Royal Danish Academy
of Fine Arts in Copenhagen
Author: Life Between Buildings Using
Public Space, Public Spaces Public Life,
Copenhagen 1996 and New City Spaces
Sir Patrick Abercrombie prize for exemplary
contributions to town planning by the
International Union of Architects
Consultant in Copenhagen, Vejle, Odense,
Oslo, Latvia, Stockholm, Edinburgh, Aberdeen,
Perth, Melbourne
www.GehlArchitects.dk

Bilbao-Copenhagen

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Jan Gehl

Strget as a pedestrian street?

Bilbao-Copenhagen

But, why? We Scandinavians stay indoors, not


like those in Southern Europe!
After all our weather is lousy

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Characteristics of a Good Place

Good to walk in and to stay for a while

Good for social and cultural exchanges

Comfortable, climate protected, benches, steps, cafes


Pleasant facades, pedestrian continuity, lack of barriers
Space for cultural activities, The Commons

Good for talking, watching and experiencing

Low level of noise, intimate public spaces


Fine views, window shops, exhibits, good details

Lively, diverse and safe to move around with


a wide variety of uses both day and night
Bilbao-Copenhagen

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

13

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Activities in Public Spaces

Necessary activities

Optional activities

Urban recreation when quality is high (park


benches, trees, concerts..) Acid test is how long
do they stay

Social activities

Bilbao-Copenhagen

Going to school, waiting for the bus to go to work,


shopping, seeking medical attention

Watching, listening, experiencing other people,


playing, talking to others, showing off
F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

14

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Actors of Public Life

Tourists 65,000

Visitors 140,000

Every day users

Visitors/customers

Workers 136,000

Shoppers, seekers of services,


suppliers

Recreational visitors

Residents 2100

Residents, office workers, street


vendors

Outdoor caf clients, park users,


runners, bikers, sun bathers, readers

Event attendants

Concerts, festivals, cultural events

Students 30,000
Figure by MIT OCW.
Bilbao-Copenhagen

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

15

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Data Gathering

M oy a: Pe ato ne s/H o ra se g n S e m fo ros (A M )

3000
2500

1500
1000
500
0
1

10

11

Pa so s o Se m fo ros
3

C A
LL
E

Peatones por Hora AM


3

CO
LO
N
36

41
34

A
E
LL

34

PLAZA

39

JAD O
C
EL
O

46

AN

250

31

26

IPA
R R
AG
UIR
RE

LA
RR
EA
TE
GU
I

1.250

20

de Vizcaya

45

1
22

11
22

bis

;10

LL

IL

#
#

LA

35

17

E
19

21

42

37

36

Gobierno C ivil
44

33

18

30

10

32

DE
5

2.500

21

s
Bi

M oyua

PLAZA
16,91

FEDERIC O

40 Bis

M OYU A

40

en obras

38

2
C. D

OC
TO
R A
CH
UC
AR
R O

36

G R
AN

39

1
24

C
16

DE
L

;9

PU
ER
TO

43

29

Most cities have excellent


statistics about traffic flows
and parking patterns.
However, information is
sorely lacking about city
quality as experienced by a

pedestrian and about how

public spaces function

CA
LL
E

2000

LL

IL

LA
3

H acienda

Tributaria
23

26

Moyu

VIA
a

37

Moyua

35
33

31

14

29
25

27

Bilbao-Copenhagen

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

DE

10

NO
CA
EL

11

10

23

12

B. G A R A I Z A R

M A
RQ
UE
S

PARR OC O

42

27

E
LL
CA

PLAZA
27

16

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Field Work

Motorized transport flows:

Pedestrians flows:

Street hierarchy, transit network, parking


Test walks, wait at traffic lights push buttons,
crossing times, footpath interruptions, safety

Facades and ground level activity

Bilbao-Copenhagen

Quality, duration of stays, sunshine and shade areas,


weather protection, trees, outdoor seating, cafes, day
and night activities

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

17

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Generic Recommendations

Upgrade Squares
and Plazas
Rehabilitate wide
streets
Develop transit
Reduce through
traffic
Enhance Park Lands
Create pedestrian
and bike networks

Bilbao-Copenhagen

Mixed uses for day and


night livability
Attract residents
Foster markets, cafes
and educational
institutions
Improve ground floor
frontage
Organize public activities
and events

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

18

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Some ideas from the video

Human dimension in city and site planning:

People as walkers:

Bilbao-Copenhagen

Size and quality of public spaces, types of public


activities, the city as cultural birthplace
Sensory experience
Distance for public, social, private exchanges
Public and private spheres, and its transition

People, dressed with cars, moving at 50-60


km/hr, change the cityscape as they lack both
the sensory experience and the interaction
with others
F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

20

Urban Transp Planning 2006

Hope you enjoy the video this

comingTuesday!

(in Danish!)

and please do send me an email with just

three ideas that caught your attention

Bilbao-Copenhagen

F. Salvucci, and M.Murga

21

Transit and Parking Policy


Urban Transportation Planning
MIT Course 1.252j/11.380j
Fall 2006
Mikel Murga, MIT Lecturer and Research Associate

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Contents

A Parking Tour
Parking Policy
Parking Management

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking: Is it in the eye of the beholder?

Is it indeed that bad?

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The lesson from EPA parking freeze in Boston

Photographs courtesy of Ken Kruckemeyer, MIT. Used with permission.

Parking freeze at 1973 levels plus 10% with exceptions for off-street
parking based on need (ie. hotels) and residential parking.

And in spite of it, the skyline changed dramatically!


F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Parking and Modal Split


The Example from MIT Campus

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Millers River

ver
Charles River
Basin
arles River
Muddy River Pond

2000 HBW Modal Split at Destination


Block Group Charts

Frog Pond
Public Garden
Pond

75,000
Boston Harbor
37,500
18,750

Fort Point
Channel

Muddy River
Reserved Channel

Drove alone
Carpool
Bus
Streetcar
Subway
Commuter rail
Boston
Harbor
Walk
Taxi
0
.4
.8

1.2

Miles

Pond

Can we explain modal split at MIT (35-40% auto


share) based on MITs parking supply and cost??
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

MIT Population vs. Parking


MIT Population
1981-2003

20,000

18,000

16,000

14,000

12,000

10,000

8,000

6,000

4,000

2,000

0
1981

1982

1983

1984

Employees

1985

1986

1987

1988

Graduate Students

1989

1990

1991

1992

Undergraduate Students

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Subsidized Tpass Sales

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

Parking Spaces for commuters

Some facts from MIT from John M. McDonald, Director


F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking MIT Inventory


Inventory Allowed:
Commuter
Residential
Spaces in Use
Commuter
Residential

3,711
1,103
4,814
3,500
900
4,400

Some facts from MIT from John M. McDonald, Director


F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking External Constraints


Federal Clean Air Act 1973
Limits parking to 36% of commuters
Cambridge Determination of Exclusion
Parking inventory capped at 4,814
Massachusetts Rideshare Reporting
Required reporting and PTDM penalty

Some facts from MIT from John M. McDonald, Director


F.Salvucci & M.Murga

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Tour: Manhattan

If you come,
dont drive or
youll pay for
the tunnels and
the bridges
If you drive,
park only once
and dont
bother us!
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Tour: Manhattan


If you park in the
wrong place, you might
get a $205 ticket

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Tour: Getxo

Parking Goals:

To enhance the economic and social vitality


of Getxos downtown areas by improving
access to local shops and services
To discourage home-to-work trips by
automobile to Getxos downtown
To encourage use of public transport and
non motorized trips
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

13

Parking Tour: Getxo


New On-Street Parking Scheme

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Specifications:

Low price for short stays


(shopping) and expensive
for long stays
Flexibility to cater for a wide
range of needs
User friendly
It avoids meter feeding by
computer-controlled plate
number registration
It provides feedback on
performance
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

14

Parking Tour: Getxo

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Areas with controlled on-street parking

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

15

Parking Tour: Getxo

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Computer control of meters at Las Arenas

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

16

Parking Tour: Getxo


Panel, Smart Card and Non Linear Cost
Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Sistema Tarifario. OTA de Getxo


800

730

700
600

real
ptas

500

440

400
300
200

150

lineal

80

100

30

0
0

30

60

90

120 150 180 210 240 270 300

minutos

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

18

Parking Tour: Getxo


Occupancy, income, plate numbers...

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Tour: Getxo

Residence location of those parked at Algorta

Kantarepe

Portu Zaharra

KANTAURI

ITSASOA

Ereagako Hondartza

Contramuelle

de
Algorta
Contramu

elle

de Algorta

Arriluzeko Portua

ob

el

as

EL ABRA

Residentes
por portal

10
5
1
GO
BE

RIA

LA
S

IBA
I

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Policy: A Moving Target

In Getxo, the real goal was


to attract shopping trips by
car in order to protect the
local shops
The reason was that a
nearby municipality chose
to build a new regional
shopping center with ample
supply of free parking

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

22

Parking Tour:
New Bilbao Exhibition Center

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

For the new Bilbao


Exhibition Center, we
managed to convince the
property to reduce the
plans for an underground
parking from 10,000 to
3,000 (+1,000) spaces
The reason being simply
that road congestion
would not allow to
release 10,000 cars in
less than an hour into the
road system

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

23

Parking Tour:
New Bilbao Exhibition Center

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The argument was


supported on a new
subway station planned
by the new Exhibition
Center main entrance
And they accepted that
with every entry ticket,
people would also get a
subway ticket

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

24

Parking Tour:
New Bilbao Exhibition Center

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

However, the parking


demand was probably
close to 10,000!
The challenge was
therefore how to
discourage drivers from
creating a waiting queue
in the expressway
The recommendation
called for phone/internet
reservation of a parking
space based on a credit
card and the vehicle plate
numbers

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

25

Parking Tour:
New Master Plan in Bilbao by Zaha Hadid
Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The new master plan


for Zorrotzaurre in
Bilbao by a world class
architect is so
constrained by zoning
regulations related to
density and parking
supply, that the
successful Bilbao
downtown could not
be replicated!

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

26

Parking Tour:
The Zrich Experience

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Limiting parking for commuters in the


downtown area

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

27

Parking Tour:
Three Messages from Zrich

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

1.- If you ask the residents which transport policy to


adopt, they will not choose the car. They are far more
intelligent than what politicians and opinion leaders believe
2.- The future lies not in expansion but in a more
intelligent use of the existing system, using new telecoms
3.- Economy and Ecology are not contradictory. Zrich as
an example of promotion of public transport, at the
expense of private transport, to achieve a high degree of
economic development
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

28

Parking Policy:
Every trip ends in a parking maneuver

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Then while debating Congestion Pricing,


why is parking policy not being used to
achieve the same goal?? Even though
Mayor Livingstone has the power to tax
work-centers parking!
TCRP Report 40 Strategies to Attract
Auto Users to Public Transportation, TRBNRC 1998 Parking Policy
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Policy

Strategies to Attract Auto Users to Public Transportation

Cities with restrictive


parking practices tend
to have better transit
service and higher
transit ridership rates.
Factors related to
parking price have a
stronger effect on mode
choice than do factors
related to transit service

Transit Share

Number of Bus Lines


Serving Resident
1
3

0.30

5
0.20

0.10

0.00
$30

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

$50

$80

$100

$120

$150

Monthly Downtown Parking Price


Figure by MIT OCW.

30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Policy:

Probably The Most Critical Transport Issue

Parking policy may influence:

Mode choice
Transit supply
Destination
Frequency
Car occupancy
Development types
Development costs
Traffic Congestion
Urban Quality

Parking Mgt Programs:

Caps in CBD
Max rates, not min
Parking tax on off street
parking
Max hourly rates
Supply and cost of on street
parking
Parking controls
Residential permits

Two basic types:

Commuter
Shoppers
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

31

Parking Policy:
Resulting parking criteria

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking policies which discriminate against


long-stay parking in favor of short-stay
shopping and business users
Maximum (Not MINIMUN!) parking standards
at trip attractors specified during the
development planning processes.
Note that the ITE standards are minimum
parking requirements according to current US
practice
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

32

Parking Policy:
Maximum (not minimum) parking ratios

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Portland, OR policies have reduced the


number of parking spaces per 1,000 square
feet of office/commercial space from 3.4 in
1973 to 1.5 in 1990
San Francisco limited to 7% the floor area
devoted to parking resulting in only 17%
driving alone to work
By contrast suburban office and business
parks offer from 3 to 4 parking spaces per
1,000 square feet
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

33

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

It might take time to go from minimum to


maximum parking ratios

Commercial off-street parking facilities may be traced to


Los Angeles in 1917

City of Los Angeles banned parking on downtown streets


in 1919 to relieve traffic congestion

By 1935, Los Angeles requested through zoning, a covered


garage for all new two-family houses and multi-family
units

By 1946 off-street parking requirements extended to


hotels, clubs, churches..

By 1954, there were 311 communities with off-street


parking requirements in their local ordinances
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

34

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Policy:

The Dutch A-B-C policy in terms of parking

The Dutch Ministry of Land Use and Transportation


tried to regulate the location of new employment
based on the quality of the transit network
Location type A (high quality transit) for type A
centers (high no of employees): parking 10 spaces
per 100 employees
Location type B: 20 spaces per 100 employees
Location type C (no transit but near expressway
interchanges) for type C Centers (goods movement):
40 spaces per 100 employees

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

35

Parking Management:
A Moving Target

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

One of the main obstacles is that


ratios are not enough to describe
the system
The real issue is the total supply of
parking spaces

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

36

Parking Management:
Where??

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

In areas :

With overall clear attraction potential

With high quality transit service

Where it is not easy to move employment


centers elsewhere

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

37

Parking Management:
Parking supply and pricing

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

They go hand in hand as the Boston


experience clearly shows
Hard to establish which one is more
influential
In dense areas, supply is limited thus
forcing up the price

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

38

Aparcamiento

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Management: Based on parking behavior,

you can estimate total number of car trips

Parkings de R otacin en Bilbao

Parking
Supply
0

1.200

600
120

80

450

80

#
1.200

Parking supply and


average stay define
the resulting
incoming and
outgoing traffic flow!

180

351
#

50

568

183

300

534
#

63

#
162

20

414

20

300

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Very different
figures for
commuter and
shoppers trips
39

Aparcamiento

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Management:

If you record the plate numbers of


cars going into a parking lot, you can learn a lot

Residencias de los bilbanos que


utilizaron el parking del Ensanche el da
de muestreo (6-6-2002)

500m.

FRANJA
REPRESENTAN ESTANCIA MEDIA
Hasta 500 m.
11%
4.8 h.
de 500 a 1000 m.
18%
1.9 h.
de 1000 a 1500 m.
27%
2.9 h.
de 1500 a 2000 m.
23%
2.2 h.
de 2000 a 2500 m.
10%
3.2 h.
de 2500 a 3000 m.
7%
1.4 h.
ms de 3000 m.
4%
2.2 h.
Total bilbanos
100%
2.7 h.

1Km.

2 Km.

3 Km.
N TURISMOS
por portal
5
2
1

Nota: Los bilbanos suponen el 19% del total de clientes del parking.
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

40

Parking Management:
Shared-parking

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Sometimes, the difference in usage of


two facilities may be complementary:

A shopping center parking near a rail


station, thus working as P&R for
commuters who may become shoppers
upon their return

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

41

Parking Management:
Convenient walking from parking

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Size of
urbanized
area

Work

Shopping

Personal
business

Other

10,000 to
100,000

360

280

240

220

100,000 to
250,000

500

470

390

340

250,000 to
500,000

670

570

450

380

500,000 to
1,000,000

650

560

590

500

Boston

972

800

844

985

Distances in feet
Sources: Committee on Parking (1971), Weant and Levinson (1990), TDA inc (1988)
and Wilbur Smith (1974) as from TCRP Report 95 Chapter 18
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

42

Aparcamiento

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Management:
You can explain to a shopkeeper that
Parkings de R otacin en Bilbao

Parking
Supply
0

1.200

600
120

10 parking spots can


be used for:

80

450

80

#
1.200

180

351
#

50

568

183

300

534
#

63

#
162

20

414

20

300

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

10 commuters who
stay for 10 hours, or
for
100 shoppers who
stay one hour each
from 9 am till 7 pm

43

Parking Management:
Spill-over effects

When regulating on-street parking, spill


over effects may force you to:

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Extend gradually the area subjected to


parking fees, or to
Create a buffer only for residents

The South End has a working mix of


arterials with free parking and local
streets with residents only signs
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

44

Tranquilizacin de Trfico

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Management:

Parking can be used as a traffic calming technique

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

45

Parking Management:
Modeling will help to..

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

estimate the consequences of


new parking policies, since they
may involve:

new types of parking


new locations of parking
new duration for parking
new mode of travel
different car occupancy
new destination
new frequency of trip making
new time for travel
new route

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

You will even find


microscopic models
such as PARKSIM to
simulate the search for
a parking spot, based
on experience, available
information, etc.

46

PARKING

TRIP GENERATION
COMPETITIVE PRESSURE: ACCESS VS COST

Retail
Office
Manufacturing
Household

DENSITY, ZONING
MINIMUM REQUIREMENT

Protect consumer

Protect street from parking use (vs. buffer pedestrian from


moving traffic)

MAXIMUM REQUIREMENT

Protect road network from over-use and congestion


(Singapore vehicle infrastructure balance analogy)

High dentity, transit and walk access allows extra use and land
value

SHOUP MARKET SOLUTION


Best available thinking, but

Ignores externalities

Ignores regulatory approach

Revenue can become a problem

WHY NOT BASE ROAD TAXES ON PARKING?

But remember Port Authority problem

PHYSICAL ISSUES

Street parking
Open lot
Garage
Roof
Below grade

Government as Smart Buyer


Benefits - Costs
Costs
Externalities
Changing factor prices
Political opportunity
Levels of government
Politics of short- and long-term
Planning is about change and niche opportunities

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


1

NEPA 1969
1)

Define the problem

2)

Consider alternatives

3)

Project consequences

4)

Share information with public and receive feedback


"Draft" and "Final"

5)

Choose action and mitigation

6)

Citizen right of action

Balance and process vs. outcome


Section 4f; 404
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


2

Transportation and Air Quality


1)

Fuel consumption =

2)

Pollution = FN (energy consumed)

3)

Fix the system; fix the vehicle

4)

Air quality problem as


lead
CO
HC, NOx
CO2

5)

Fad, or long-term driver of policy?


Cancer; cigarettes; war & famine

6)

Clean Air Act:

1970

1990

Conformity

vehicles (population) VMT Fuel


population
vehicle VMT

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


3

Urban Transportation and the


Metropolitan Area Economy
1

GRASP OF IDEAS
A) Multiplier effect
Alternate ways to achieve
level of government
only "valid" with unemployment
declining?
B)

Co-Production
auto, petroleum, suburban development

C)

Goods movement
Small part of highway, smaller part of transit
declines or cancelled by congestion
declining with knowledge economy
"just in time" strategies

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


4

Urban Transportation and the


Metropolitan Area Economy
1

GRASP OF IDEAS (continued)


D)

Personal transportation
consumption or investment
sprawl congestion cancels timesaving
access expansion; disabled, poor, geographical areas
shorter trips, not fatter roads; land use
transit also causes sprawl
transit costs more if it's made more comfortable
inner belt not built/but it would have been congested

E)

Economy of scale
growth in market size and efficiency
redistribution vs. growth
Route 128 as accident
airport analogy

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


5

Urban Transportation and the


Metropolitan Area Economy
1 GRASP OF IDEAS (continued)
F) Land value
growth vs. redistribution
double counting issue

G) Congestion

dead weight loss


form of price
consequence of low price
consequence of growth
driver of relocation

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


6

Urban Transportation and the Metropolitan


Area Economy
1

GRASP OF IDEAS (continued)


H) Environment
market failure in present
market failure with future generation
political will, aesthetics, health
equity and politics of spotted owl
I)

Equity

distribution of services, pricing


gentrification
Mafia and water supply
value of household work
multi-lane highway vs. 2-lane road

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


7

Urban Transportation and the Metropolitan


Area Economy
1

GRASP OF IDEAS (continued)


J) Political calculation vs. economic argument
double-counting is fine; travel time, congestion, real estate value
inflation is fine with key constituencies
redistribution is fine for some constituencies
short-term/long-term issues
level of government
reduce congestion in good times, stimulate economy in bad times
multi-level effect; acceptable method, identifiable benefits. Surrogate customers
cargo cults
availability of money to invest, political will , taxation feasibility, level of
government
government as a smart buyer

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


8

Urban Transportation and the


Metropolitan Area Economy
2)

CITE SOURCES

3)

HOW WOULD YOU STRUCTURE


ANALYSIS?

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

October 27, 2006


9

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Assignment no 4

Let us begin by a world tour


thanks to J.Kenworthy and F.
Laube The Millennium
Cities. Data base for
Sustainable Transport
sponsored by the UITP
A follow-up to the 1989
Cities and Automobile
Dependence by P.Newman
and J.Kenworthy

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

And it is complemented by its follow-up

A set of 50 cities with evolution of

performance between 1995 and 2001,

plus mobility policies in 2006

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Urban Density is critical


200

URBAN DENSITY

160

Persons/Ha

120

80

40

0
Western Eastern North
Latin
Middle
Europe Europe America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(55.1)

(101.67)

(134.36)

(71.36)

(18.67)

(89.66)

(76.79)

(189.75)

Ocean A
(15.02)

World Regions
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The higher the density, the higher

Modal Choice (% Public TransportCycling-Walking)

Density (Inhabitants/Hectare) vs Modal Choice (% Public Transport


+ Cycling + Walking)
100
All Cities

80
60
40

U.S.A.

Western Europe

20
0

20

40
80
160
320
Density (Inhabitants/Hectare)

the percentage of sustainable modes


Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Job density is also a critical parameter


30
Proportion of Jobs in CBD

25

20

Percent

As Joel Garreau says


(The Edge Cities),
when the president
moves to the
suburbs, he takes
the office along

15

10

0
Western Eastern North
Latin
Middle
Europe Europe America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(18.29)

(14.03)

(20.08)

(17.03)

(11.34)

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

(22.6)

(13.32)

World Regions

(25.53)

Ocean A
(15.06)

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Number of trips, nearly a constant


The number of
trips result from
the activities
profile
But be aware that
non-motorized
trips may go
unaccounted for,
in some surveys

Total Daily Trips per Capita

Trips/Person

0
Latin
Western Eastern North
Middle
Europe Europe America America East
(2.89)

(2.81)

(3.5)

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

(1.71)

(2.34)

Africa
(1.59)

World Regions

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian
(2.66)

(2.13)

Ocean A
(3.86)

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Percentage of non-motorized trips


* Percentage of Non Motorised
Modes Over all Trips

40

30

Is this a surprise?
Percent

20

10

0
Latin
Middle
Western Eastern North
Europe Europe America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(31.04)

(42.17)

(29.05)

(26.22)

(8.86)

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

(24.65)

(14.96)

World Regions

(39.9)

Ocean A

(15.8)

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

not to be taken lightly

From Mean
Streets 2000 by
the Surface
Transportation
Project Policy
(STPP)

Percent of People who are


Overweight

0.50

0.40

0.30

0.20
0

0.05

0.10

0.15

(one-tenth of a mile)

0.20

0.25

0.30

(quarter mile)

Fewer People are Overweight in Places where People Walk More


Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Road building

m/1000 Persons

Notice that the


U.S. ratio

doubles the

one of

Western

Europe

8000

Length of Road per 1000 People

6000

4000

2000

0
Latin
Middle
Western Eastern North
Europe Europe America America East
(2997.88) (1373.68) (6080.07)

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(1464.06) (1640.14) (1425.53) (2424.76)

(591.06)

Ocean A
(8059.89)

World Regions
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Automobile ownership
600

Passenger Cars per 1000 People

500

is congestion in
Western Europe
higher than in the
States?

400
Units/1000 People

As the difference is
not as big as the
supply of roads

300

200

100

0
Latin
Middle
Western Eastern North
Europe Europe America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(411.86)

(102.12)

(217.33)

(279.23)

(567.95)

(188.53)

(185.26)

World Regions
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

(88.3)

10

Ocean A
(575.36)

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Trip length by car


20000

Passenger Car Kilometers per Car


14000

If the number of trips

are comparable

Km/Unit

Does the average car


trip length increase
inversely
proportional to the
metropolitan
density?

12000

8000

4000

0
Latin
Western Eastern North
Middle
Europe Europe America America East
(11324.44) (7576.85) (18460.33) (9883.8)

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(14887.83) (11834.34) (12195)

Ocean A

(9963.11) (12904.22)

World Regions
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Transit coverage

Total Length of Public Transport Lines per 1000 People


4000

3000
m/1000 Persons

Notice that the


Western
Europe ratio
more than
doubles the
US ratio

2000

1000

0
Western Eastern North
Latin
Middle
Europe Europe America America East
(3634.16)

(1684.41) (1590.66)

(4227.79)

(690.9)

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(3940.63) (1127.85)

Ocean A

(1327.23) (3204.86)

World Regions
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking supply in downtown


800

600

Spaces/1000 Jobs

Again the U.S.


leads clearly
over Western
Europe

Parking Spaces per 1000


CBD Jobs

400

200

0
Western Eastern
Europe Europe

North
Latin
Middle
America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(270)

(500.15)

(195.57)

(120.59)

(74.04)

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

(71.38)

(790.93)

World Regions

(91.25)

Ocean A
(505.24)

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The role of the automobile


* Percentage of Motorised Private Modes Over all Trips

80

Again, this should


come as no
surprise
Percent

60

40

20

0
Latin
Western Eastern North
Middle
Europe Europe America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(50.24)

(32.88)

(38.62)

(27.96)

(85.83)

(35.51)

(72.93)

Ocean A

(31.95)

(79.12)

14
World Regions
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Economic efficiency

The arguments
go well beyond
environmental
concerns,
quality of life
issues, moral
grounds
Clear economic
consequences

25

Total Passenger Transport Cost


as Percentage of Metropolitan GDP

20

15
Percent

10

0
Latin
Middle
Western Eastern North
Europe Europe America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(8.29)

(21.68)

(5.4)

(14.77)

(12.44)

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

(13.97)

(9.27)

(13.65)

Ocean A
(13.46)

World Regions

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The cost of a balanced system


Modal Choice (% Public Transport + Cycling + Walking) vs
Transport Cost (% GDP)

Transport Cost (% GDP)

20,0
Developed Cities

16,0
12,0
8,0

U.S.A.

4,0
0,0

Western Europe
0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Modal Choice (% Public Transport - Cycling - Walking)

Economic sustainability
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

CO emissions per capita


200
* Emissions of CO per Capita
160

The Environmental cost

Kg/Person

120

80

40

0
Latin
Middle
Western Eastern North
Europe Europe America America East

Africa

Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(70.9)

(73.46)

(18.06)

(71.64)

(183.01)

(70.71)

(181.4)

(53)

Ocean A
(146.19)

World Regions
Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The high price of road fatalities


Modal Choice (% Public Transport + Cycling + Walking) vs Fatalities

Fatalities (Per Million Inhabitants)

250
Developed Cities
200
150
100
50
0

U.S.A.
Western Europe
0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Modal Choice (% Public Transport - Cycling - Walking)


Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A congestion index

In spite of the
differences, a similar
congestion ratio

2500000

One reason the


higher trip length in
the States
Is traffic like an
expanding gas?

Total Private Passenger Vehicle Kilometers per Kilometer of Road

2000000

1500000
V.km/km

1000000

500000

0
Latin
Middle
Western Eastern North
Europe Europe America America East

Africa Asian
Other
Affluent Asian

(1793686.45) (1783284.03) (1840224.45) (1972405.23) (2060896.34) (849220.9)

Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the UITP Millennium Cities Database.

World Regions

Ocean A

(1420566.31) (1684813.84) (938709.62)

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Some Lessons by the Database Authors

1. Transit is the least cost option when density


is higher than 20 people per hectare
2. Growth and income does not necessarily

imply sprawl and automobile reliance

3. In fact, sharp growth in automobile traffic in


cities in developing countries may
compromise economic development
4. In sprawling affluent cities where the auto
dominates, speeds may be high but so are
the total travel times ( while no-car
households may lack accessibility)
20

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Lessons by the Database Authors

5. Car ownership while usually has an impact

on transit ridership, may be balanced

through mobility management policies

6. Parking policies are critical to curb the auto


and provide transit priority
7. Transit supply and demand are clearly
correlated
8. Rail modes are more attractive and
competitive, and most cost efficient in
major cities
9. The ratio of transit to automobile speed is
most critical to explain modal split
21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Lessons by the Database Authors

10. Low transit fares, while necessary in social


terms, are not critical to capture motorists
11. Sustainable policy = urban planning +
traffic and parking controls + public
transport with traffic priority
12. In developing countries, transit supply

shortage and high operator profits

See Millennium Cities Database for Sustainable


Mobility. Analyses and Recommendations
by Jean Vivier, UITP
22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Our suggestions and lessons


Main issue is quality of life
Not auto vs. transit, rather auto versus
transit + non-motorized trips
The virtuous cycle: low fares  higher
ridership  higher frequencies
Accessibility varies greatly within a
metropolitan area (walk trips in Beacon
Hill and auto trips in Framingham)

23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Our suggestions and lessons


Cost based on local GDP obscures the fact


that some costs are local (ie driver wages)
with multiplier effects, while others are
international (ie. fuel, automobiles)
If you substract the transportations costs
from the average GDP in a city, you may find
that many such cities have a higher GDP than
equivalent US cities
Metropolitan area as an archipelago of
transport arrangements
Let us continue the discussion on how to deal
with the ocean of red circles
24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A few tips

Frustration while interpreting someone else


data (or sometimes even yours)
Work in pairs with complementary skills
We are dealing with a complex problem (with
social, economic and technical issues), simple
hypotheses will not suffice (no magic bullets)
Simple linear regression or multi-regression?
We love our cars in the US (and in Rome,
Nairobi, New Delhi, Copenhagen ..)
The myth about income and transit use
Do work with this database in the future
25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Good luck and enjoy

26

Spending Other Peoples Money:


What are the Rules?

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 1

Economics
What?

How?

For Who?
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 2

Capitalism allows complex system of production


and consumption
Accommodates different individual taste
with at least some choice
Applies discipline regarding quality and
cost through destructive competition
Accommodates investment, technology,
and change over time

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 3

Capitalism assumes:

Selfish behavior
Rule of law, reliable enforcement
Distribution of wealth and income
acceptable
Reasonable full employment
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 4

What does market NOT deal with?


Public goods (difficult to exclude free
riders)
External costs and benefits
Equity
Structural unemployment
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 5

Role of Government
Tax and spend
Regulate
Redistribute wealth and income
Provide universal opportunity
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 6

Institutional Structure
National (federal)
Regional (state)
Local (city, town, county)

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 7

Annual Appropriation

Administration and finance; OMB /


Ways and Means
Same as last year plus inflation

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 8

Capital Investment
Bond authorization; legislative and
referendum
Theory
Practical politics

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 9

Need for Competency


Agency structure
Legislative committee

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 10

Changing Need for Resources


Increase revenue within budget vs.
increase tax
Introduce technology; reduce cost;
reduce labor
Contract out; lower labor cost
No destructive competition; low
innovation; low investment
Constituency building process costs
are benefits; surrogate customers =
producers
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 11

Taxes

51/49 vs. Civic enterprise government


(.9)6 < .5
Aesops fable of the body
Joseph and the Pharaoh's Dream
US Revolution/Shays Rebellion; Whiskey Rebellion
Political will
Louisiana Purchase
Sewards Icebox
Vision vs. White Elephant
Dedicated fund
Externality vs. distrust

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 12

Taxes continued
Progressive tax
Progressive
Regressive
Proportional
Sales tax
Loaf of bread

Business improvement district


Museums
Fare recovery ratio
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 13

Program Development
Political will
Short term benefits
Long term benefits

New has few supporters


Requires different look at silos
Generate new structure
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 14

Program Implementation
Maintain political will
Use mix of technical and distributive
criteria

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 15

Silos
Highway categories
Highway vs. transit (public $)
Capital vs. operating
Private payments - good and bad
Highway transit apples/oranges
Public / private (auto cost)
Highway transit
F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 16

Rules within silos


Rules across silos

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 17

Socio-Economics Evaluation
Trade and economic efficiency
Equity, access to opportunity
Industrial policy

rail network
interstate highway & trucking
suburbanization and land availability
job generation (costs and benefits)
project evaluation
benefit/cost
NEPA
cost effectiveness

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 18

Financial Evaluation
Ways and means
Bonding
Federal grants
Loans
User finance
Land use contributions
EIR and infrastructure adequacy

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 19

Federal Role
Philosophical, trade, etc.
Job policy, constituencies
Peanut butter (Nutella, Marmite, Dulce de leche)
Peanut butter avoidance
Categories
Flexibility

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 20

Project Purposes and Origins


Capacity for service quality
Capacity for quantity, growth
Access to intermodal facilities, ports
Access to land use
Investments to reduce operations costs
Patronage (municipal, other)

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 21

Operations & Maintenance


vs. Capital
Reasons to fund capital differently
Distortions from funding capital differently

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 22

Use of Models
CTPS
Conservation Law Foundation

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 23

Programming
Bridges across the Nile
Interstate highway system
MPO and flexibility

long-range plan

transportation improvement plan

annual element

Fiscal constraint

over-programming

batching

instructions

NEPA and lead time


F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 24

Project Purposes and Origins


Local match: who decides?
metropolitan planning organization: who really
decides?
surrogate customers
municipalities
land owners, developers, builders
Jack Sprat & wife
CTPS: model doesnt matter
CLF: model does matter

F.P. Salvucci/M. Murga

1.252J/11.540J
Fall 2006

November 3, 2006 25

FTA Section 5309 New Starts Program


Evaluation Process

presented by

Laurie Hussey and Tom Rossi


Cambridge Systematics, Inc.

November 17, 2006

Transportation leadership you can trust.

What is a New Start?


Any fixed guide-way system which utilizes and occupies a
separate right-of-way, or rail line, for the exclusive use of mass
transportation and other high occupancy vehicles, or uses a
fixed catenary system and a right-of-way usable by other forms
of transportation

Rapid rail
Light rail
Commuter rail
Automated guide-way transit
People movers
Exclusive facilities for buses (such as bus rapid transit)
or other HOVs

New Starts Process Overview


Systems Planning
Identification of Regional Travel Patterns and Priority Transportation Problems

Alternatives Analysis
Analysis of Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of Alternative Solution Strategies
Select LPA,
MPO Action, Develop
Criteria, PMP

Major Development Stage


Decision Point

Project Management Oversight

FTA Decision on
Entry into PE
Preliminary Engineering
Complete NEPA Process Refinement of Financial Plan
FTA Decision
on Entry into Final
Design

Final Design
Commitment of Non-Federal Funding, Construction Plans, ROW Acquisition,
Before-After Data Collection Plan, FTA Evaluation for FFGA, Begin Negotiations

Construction
2

Full Funding
Grant Agreement

FTA New Starts Policy


Discretionary Federal program
New Starts caseload
Criteria needed for FTA recommendations to Congress
Small and Very Small Starts projects defined under
SAFETEA-LU exempted

Evolution of FTAs New Starts Policy


1976 Alternatives analysis
Projects must be cost effectiveness
TSM alternative

1978 Policy toward rail transit


Local financial commitment
Full funding grant agreement

1980 Link toward EIS requirements


1984 Policy on major investments
Ratings and cost per new rider criteria

1987 Surface Transportation and Uniform Relocation


Assistance Act
Statutory criteria cost effectiveness and financial
Section 3(j) Report to Congress
4

Evolution of FTAs New Starts Policy (continued)


1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act
(ISTEA)
Revised justification criteria
Additional considerations
Leveled playing field for transit investments

1993 FTA/FHWA planning regulations


Major Investment Study requirement

1994 Executive order 12893 on infrastructure investment


Government-wide standards for investments based on costs
and benefits

1994 Policy discussion draft


1996 Revised New Starts policy
5

Multiple measure approach for justification


TSM as base

Evolution of FTAs New Starts Policy (continued)


1998 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century
(TEA-21)
Eliminated MIS requirement
Requirement for overall New Starts rating
Publication of regulations on New Starts evaluation process

2000 Major transit capital investment projects final rule


New measure of cost effectiveness user benefits
Baseline alternative (no longer TSM)
Before and after studies

2002
Reduction of New Starts share to 60 percent
Additional revisions to criteria
6

Evolution of FTAs New Starts Policy (continued)


2005 Dear Colleague Letter
2006
Advanced notice of proposed rulemaking, January
Procedural changes, May
Interim Small Starts Guidance, July

2007 (anticipated) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

Evaluation Criteria
Project justification
Mobility improvements
Environmental benefits
Operating efficiencies
Cost effectiveness
Existing land use, transit-supportive land use policies,
and future patterns

Local financial commitment


Nonsection 5309 share
Capital finance plan
Operating finance plan
8

FTA Rating Process


Summary Rating

Project Justification Rating

Financial Rating
Other
Factors
Capital
Finances

Mobility
Improvements

Environmental
Benefits

Operating
Efficiencies

Cost
Efficiencies

User
Benefits

Low Income
Households

Capital
Cost

Employment

O&M
Cost

Land
Use

Non-Section
5309 Share

Operating
Finances

User
Benefits

Minimum Project Development Requirements


Metropolitan Planning and
Programming Requirements
9

Project Management
Technical Capacity

NEPA
Approvals

Other
Considerations

FTA Rating Process (continued)


Summary project justification ratings and finance ratings
are in turn used to determine overall project ratings to the
following decision rule
High projects must be rated at least medium-high for both
finance and project justification
Medium projects must be rated at least medium for both
finance and project justification
Low projects not rated at least medium in both finance and
project justification will be rated as not recommended
Not rated indicates that FTA has serious concerns about the
information submitted for the mobility improvements and cost
effectiveness criteria because the underlying assumptions
used by the project sponsor may have inaccurately
represented the benefits of the project
Not available given to projects that did not submit complete
data to FTA for evaluation
10

FTA Definition of User Benefits

User benefits are the changes in mobility for


individual travelers that are caused by a project
or policy change, measured in hours of travel
time, and summed over all travelers.

11

User Benefits are Computed from Local Mode


Choice Models
The use of the logit model is assumed

U1 = B0 + B11 X1 + B21X2 + + Bn1Xn

exp(U1)
Prob(1) =

12

exp(Uj)

Mode Choice Model Variables


In-vehicle time

Income

Wait time

Auto ownership

Walk access time

Area type

Auto access time

Pedestrian environment

Fare
Parking cost
Transfers
13

Logsum Variable
Log of denominator of the logit function
Logsum = ln exp(Uj)
Represents the composite utility of all alternatives,
including all variables
Increase in the utility of any alternative results in an
increase in the logsum value

14

FTA User Benefits Calculation


Logsum value expressed in units of time
ln exp(U1)
User benefits =
in-veh. time coeff.

15

The FTA SUMMIT Program


Computes user benefits as defined
Two parts
Code added to mode choice model script to save logsum
values
Post processor to save and report user benefits results

Provides a variety of reports, maps, and graphics


showing the magnitude and locations of user benefits

16

Example of User Benefits Output

17

SUMMIT Program Use as Diagnostic


Previously unknown problems with models
Problems with highway time savings
Inconsistencies with other models
Problems in definitions of the alternatives

18

FTA Proposed Guidelines for Models


No cliffs in level of service variables
Maximum travel or wait times
Maximum access distances or times
Minimum times by submode

Restrictions on model coefficients


Compelling evidence if Civt < -0.03 or Civt > -0.02
Compelling evidence if using mode-specific Civt
Compelling evidence if 2.0 < Covt/Civt < 3.0
No bizarre constants

19

Mobility Improvements
Travel time savings
User benefit calculation expressed in time equivalent units
(hours)
Produces multimodal measure of traveler utility for all users
of the transportation system

Number of low income households served


GIS analysis using Census data, one-half mile radius around
stations

Number of jobs near stations


GIS analysis using best available local data sources
20

Environmental Benefits
Change in criteria pollutant and precursor emissions and
greenhouse gas emissions
Annual regional VMT by vehicle classification
Local emissions factors derived from Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) MOBILE emissions model

Change in regional energy consumption in the forecast


year
Calculated in BTUs, using regional VMT

Current regional air quality designation by EPA

21

Operating Efficiencies
Change in systemwide operating cost per passenger mile
Calculated using forecast annual passenger miles and
operating costs
Changes greater than 5 cents need to be explained

22

Cost Effectiveness
Incremental cost divided by transportation system
user benefits
Generated using SUMMIT software and annual systemwide
capital and operating costs

Incremental cost per incremental rider


Generated by dividing change in annual capital/operating
costs by change in annual linked trips

23

Existing Land Use, Transit Supportive Land


Use, and Future Patterns
I. Existing Land Use
a. Existing

II. Transit Supportive Plans


and Policies
a. Growth Management
b. Transit Supportive
c. Supportive Corridor
Policies
d. Tools to Implement
Land Use Policies

24

III. Performance and Impacts


of Policies
a. Performance of Land Use
Policies
b. Potential Impact of Transit
Project on Regional Land Use
IV. Other Land Use
Considerations
Exceptional examples, e.g.:
Historic
Environmental
Community preservation
Brownfields redevelopment
Designated Federal Enterprise
Zone/Empowerment Community

Other Factors
The degree that institutions (local transportation
initiatives, parking policies, etc.) are in place as assumed
in the forecasts
Multimodal emphasis of the locally preferred investment
strategy, including the Section 5309 New Starts project as
one element
Environmental justice considerations and equity issues
Opportunities for increased access to employment for low
income persons, and welfare to work initiatives

25

Other Factors (continued)


Outstanding or unique public involvement program
activities, including private sector and institutional
involvement
Livable communities initiatives and local economic
development initiatives
Consideration of alternative land use development
scenarios in local evaluation and decision-making for the
locally preferred transit investment decision
Consideration of innovative financing, procurement, and
construction techniques, including design-build turnkey
applications
26

Local Financial Commitment


The proposed share of total project costs from sources
other than the New Starts portion of Section 5309, including
Federal formula and flexible funds, the local match required
by Federal law, and any additional capital funding
The strength of the proposed capital funding plan
The ability of the sponsoring agency to fund operation and
maintenance of the entire transit system as planned once
the guide-way is built

27

GAO Report to Congressional Committees


FTA New Starts Program is in a period of transition

Incorporation of economic development into evaluation


process
Implementation of Small Starts

28

Recent Procedural Changes


Overall project rating to be low, medium, or high
replacing the previous three-point rating scale of not
recommended, recommended, or highly recommended
New FTA documentation review requirements during
alternatives analysis
Scope of work
Problem statement, goals, and objectives
Definition of alternatives
Study assumptions and methodologies
Study results

29

Recent Procedural Changes (continued)


Project must have progressed beyond the NEPA scoping
phase before entering PE
Final EIS must present the New Starts rating for its LPA
Before- and after-study data must be prepared and
reported to FTA during AA and project development
Cap to be placed on FFGA New Starts funding amount at
the point of approval to enter into final design

30

Projects Proposed for FFGAs and Other Funding


Fiscal Year 2007
Dollars in Millions*

Ratings
Total
Capital
Cost

New Starts
Share of
Capital
Costs

Project Name

Location

New
Starts
Category

West Corridor LRT

Denver,
CO

New
FFGA

$593.0

South Corridor
I-205/Portland
Mall LRT

Portland,
OR

New
FFGA

Wilsonville to
Beaverton
Commuter Rail

Washington
County, OR

Northwest/
Southeast LRT
MOS

Financial

Land Use

Cost
Effectiveness

49%

MediumHigh

Medium

$21.17

$557.4

60%

Medium

MediumHigh

$15.69

New
FFGA

$117.3

50%

Medium

MediumHigh

$25.26

Dallas,
TX

New
FFGA

$1,406.2

50%

MediumHigh

Medium

$18.60

Weber County to
Salt Lake City
Commuter Rail

Salt Lake
City, UT

New
FFGA

$611.7

80%

MediumHigh

Medium

$22.78

Long Island Rail


Road East Side
Access

New York,
NY

Pending
FFGA

$7,779.3

34%

Medium

High

$18.43

LRT = Light Rail Transit


MOS = Minimum Operable Segment

High
Medium-High

31

* The numbers included in this table are what was recommended by FTA in
the New Starts annual report but the actual total capital cost and percent of
New Starts share is subject to change at the time FTA executes the FFGA.

Medium
Medium-Low
Low

Source: GAO summary of information in the New Starts annual report.

Projects Proposed for FFGAs and Other Funding


Fiscal Year 2007 (continued)
Dollars in Millions*

Ratings

Location

New
Starts
Category

Total
Capital
Cost

New Starts
Share of
Capital
Costs

Financial

Land Use

North Shore LRT


Connector

Pittsburgh,
PA

Pending
FFGA

$393.0

55%

Medium

MediumHigh

$21.89

Second Avenue
Subway MOS

New York,
NY

Other

$4,947.8

26%

Medium

High

$14.10

Norfolk,
VA

Other

$203.7

49%

Medium

Medium

$21.66

Northern VA

Other

$1,840.1

50%

Medium

Medium

$23.63

University Link
LRT Extension

Seattle,
WA

Other

$1,720.0

41%

MediumHigh

MediumHigh

$19.93

Largo Metrorail
Extension

Washington
D.C.

Other

$433.87

60%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Project Name

Norfolk LRT
Dulles Corridor
Metrorail Project
Extension to
Wiehle Avenue

LRT = Light Rail Transit


MOS = Minimum Operable Segment

High

* The numbers included in this table are what was recommended by FTA in
the New Starts annual report but the actual total capital cost and percent of
New Starts share is subject to change at the time FTA executes the FFGA.

Medium

Medium-High

Medium-Low
Low

32

Source: GAO summary of information in the New Starts annual report.

Cost
Effectiveness

Web Sites
FTA New Starts web site http://www.fta.dot.gov/index5221.html
New Starts Criteria guidance
http://www.fta.dot.gov/planning/newstarts/planningenvironment-213.html
New Starts Report to Congress
http://www.fta.dot.gov/planning/newstarts/planningenvironment-2618.html
GAO Report
Cambridge Systematics, Inc.
http://www.camsys.com/
33

Federal Transit Administration (FTA)

New Starts Criteria

Urban Transportation Planning

MIT Course 1.252j/11.540j

Fall 2005

Mikel Murga, MIT Research Associate and Lecturer

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Historical Development


Day 10

First Policy Statement (1976)


Policy on Rail Transit (1978)
Statement of Policy on Major Urban Mass Transportation Capital
Investments (1984)
Surface Transportation and Uniform Relocation Assistance Act of
1987 (STURAA)
Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA)
Executive Order 12893 (1994)
Policy Discussion Paper (1994)
The 1996 Statement of Policy
Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21)

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Historical Development

First Policy Statement (1976)

Policy on Rail Transit (1978)

Day 10

A process-oriented approach
A new start project subjected to alternatives
analyses, including Transportation System
Management (TSM)
Projects had to be cost-effective
Local financial commitment
Local Govt supporting local land use actions
Environmental Impact Statement
F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Historical Development

Statement of Policy on Major Urban


MassTransportation Capital Investments
(1984)

Comparisons between competing projects:

Minimum threshold values for funding

Surface Transportation and Uniform


Relocation Assistance Act of 1987 (STURAA)

Day 10

Cost effectiveness index of forecast incremental cost per


incremental rider for the build alternative

Regulated the Cost per New Rider index and


threshold values
F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Historical Development

Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of


1991 (ISTEA)
Cost effectiveness project justified on
comprehensive review of mobility improvements,
environmental benefits, cost-effectiveness and
operating efficiencies
Executive Order 12893 (1994)
Systematic analysis of costs and benefits

Efficient management of infrastructure:

Day 10

Quantifiable and qualitative measures of benefits


Operation and management of facilities
Use of pricing to manage demand
F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Historical Development

Policy Discussion Paper (1994)

The 1996 Statement of Policy

Multiple-measure method of project evaluation

Transportation Equity Act for the 21st


Century (TEA-21):

Day 10

Various approaches for project evaluation

www.fta.dot.gov in the New Starts section

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Historical Development

Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century


(TEA-21) - June 1998

Integration of Major Investment Study (MIS) into the


FTA/FHWA planning regulations
Overall FTA project ratings: highly recommended,
recommended and not recommended

FTA approval prior to project development

Other considerations:

Day 10

Cost of sprawl and infrastructure savings due to compact land use


Population density and current transit ridership
Technical capacity of grantee to undertake the project

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Alternatives Analysis

FTA New Starts


Planning and Project
Development Process

Select LPA, MPO Action, PE


application, PMP

FTA Evaluation to Enter PE

SYSTEM PLANNING

- FTA review of alternatives

- FTA approves New Starts


Baseline alternative

Preliminary Engineering
Complete NEPA Process
Record of Decision/FONSI
Refinement of Financial Plan, PMP

Project Management Oversight


Quality Control
Technical Oversight
Financial Capacity Assessment

PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING

FTA Evaluation to Enter Final


Design

Final Design
Commitment of Non-Federal Funds
Construction Plans, ROW
Acquisition

FINAL DESIGN
- Before and after data
collection plan

KEY

FTA Evaluation for FFGA


FTA Action
Full Funding Grant Agreement

Complete Final Design

Decision Point

CONSTRUCTION

Begin Construction
Construction Management
Start-up
Day 10

Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

TEA-21: Criteria

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Project Recommendation

Financial Rating

Project Justification
Low Income
Households

Other Factors
Non-Section 5309 Share

Mobility
Improvements
Transportation System
User Benefits

Capital Finance Plan

Operating Finance Plan

Employment

Environmental
Benefits
Operating Efficiencies
Cost Effectiveness

Transportation
System User Benefits

Land Use

Day 10

Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Project Justification Criteria

FTA descriptive criteria


low-medium or low) on:

Mobility Improvements (20-year horizon):

Time savings (annualize properly working day figures)


Captives mobility:

Air and noise pollution annual tons (CO,NOx,VOC and PM)


Energy consumption in BTUs
Current regional air quality designation by EPA

Operating Efficiencies:

Day 10

No of low income households within miles radius from station


Plus no of jobs within a mile radius from stations

Environmental Benefits (VMT-Vehicle miles traveled):

(high, medium-high, medium,

Operating cost per passenger-mile. Favor crowding?


F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Project Justification Criteria

FTA descriptive criteria


low-medium or low) on:

Transport System User Benefits (Cost Effectiveness):

Goal: To reduce the travel time and out-of-pocket costs


Measure changes on capital and operating costs and travel time
changes to users of transit, highway and other travel modes
It replaces the cost per new rider so as:

To show benefits to existing users using different modes


To avoid bias against existing systems improving travel times
and/or crowding

Incremental Cost per Incremental Passenger:

Day 10

(high, medium-high, medium,

It utilizes linked trips (from origin to final destination) which may


be composed of several unlinked trips.
F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Project Justification Criteria

FTA descriptive criteria


low-medium or low) on:

Existing land use, transit supportive land use policies


and future patterns:

Growth management policies:

Concentration of development. Land conservation

Transit supportive corridor policies:

Day 10

(high, medium-high, medium,

Transit-friendly character. Pedestrians. Parking. Mixed-uses

Supportive zoning regulations near stations


Facilities to enhance pedestrian mobility
Tools to implement land use policies

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Project Justification Criteria


FTA descriptive criteria

(high, medium-high,

medium, low-medium or low)

Financial Criteria:

Proposed share of project capital costs:

Innovative financing techniques

Stability and reliability of proposed capital financing


plan:

Day 10

on:

Provisions for cost overruns


Capital needs for the entire system as planned
Operating funding over a 20-year horizon
F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Project Justification Criteria

FTA descriptive criteria (high, medium-high,


medium, low-medium or low) on:

Other factors (an open-ended approach):

Day 10

Degree to which policies and programs are in place as


assumed in forecasts (ie parking)
Project management capability
Innovative financial schemes
Additional factors relevant to local and national priorities and
to the success of the project
Equity issues
Quality of life issues

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Final considerations

The project No-Build Alternative

Not necessarily a do nothing scenario


It is hard to accept that no improvement will occur if the
proposed new start does not go ahead
A single baseline alternative:

Transit improvements lower in cost than the new start:

Day 10

Traffic engineering measures, reserved lanes, enhanced bus service

The best you can do w/o the new start investment


It may include highway improvements
Same policy measures as for the new start (i.e. parking, land use
patterns, transit fares) Will they be possible??
F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Final considerations

Travel Demand Forecasting Assumptions:

Day 10

Same assumptions on socio-economic variables


and land use
Consistency among alternatives on speeds and
out-of-vehicle times (access, wait, transfers)
Transit speeds must reflect congestion
Consistent highway volume-time functions
Identical factors among alternatives (tolls,
parking)

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Final considerations


Item:

Day 10

Useful life

Annualization
Factor

Right-of-way

100

0.07

Structures

30

0.081

Trackwork

30

0.081

Signals,
electrificacion

30

0.081

Rail Vehicles

25

0.086

Buses

12

0.126

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

TEA-21: Final considerations

Follow-up studies:

Two years after revenue operation


Before-and-after data to evaluate project:

Day 10

Capital costs
Operation and maintenance costs
System utilization (ridership, O-D, trip purpose,
LOS, user profile, demographics)
External factors relevant to the project: gas
prices, employment trends

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2005

Closing Thought
FHWA does not have to follow an
equivalent procedure to that of FTA
Even UKs DETR induced demand
procedure has not become very popular
Any transit project is scrutinized to a
point far deeper than any highway
project

Day 10

F.Salvucci, C.Zegras and M.Murga

19

P with toll, no
congestion

P with
economist toll

B
G

D
M
L

C
N

Q5 MAX
Q4 Unstable
P = $ per mile plus inconvenience
(assumes inconvenience is class neutral
(theoretical and political reasons)

Q1 Equilibrium without toll


Q2 Equilibrium with economists toll
Q3 Without congestion

Tolled = Q2
Tolled off = Q2 - Q1

Economist Case

P with toll, no
congestion

P with
economist toll

Toll Revenue

M
L

Congestion Cost
G

Lost
Consumer
Surplus

C
N

Q5 MAX
Q4 Unstable
P = $ per mile plus inconvenience
(assumes inconvenience is class neutral
(theoretical and political reasons)

Q1 Equilibrium without toll


Q2 Equilibrium with economists toll
Q3 Without congestion

Tolled = Q3
Tolled off = Q1 - Q3
Increment tolled off = Q2 - Q3

Toll too high (no congestion)

P with toll, no
congestion

P with
economist toll

Toll Revenue

B
G

Lost
Consumer
Surplus

D
M
L

C
N

Q5 MAX
Q4 Unstable
P = $ per mile plus inconvenience
(assumes inconvenience is class neutral
(theoretical and political reasons)

Q1 Equilibrium without toll


Q2 Equilibrium with economists toll
Q3 Without congestion

Note:

Toll revenue KIGH is larger than


Toll revenue ABCD but less than
Toll revenue ABCD plus consumer surplus ILDC

Problem: Surplus FCE and LHC are not real because congestion
destroys it
Note: Toll authority has temptation to overtoll
But assume technology, such as
-Transit or
-Larger aircraft or
-Off-peak discounted tolls and or
-Assume toll recovery helps to buy the technology transit expansion

Intelligent Transport Services (ITS)

Urban Transportation Planning

MIT Course 1.252j/11.540j

Fall 2006

Mikel Murga, MIT Lecturer and Research Associate

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scope

Summary

TeleComs:

ITS:

Enabling Technologies
Concept and Goals
Automobile Oriented
Transit Oriented

Policy Arena:

From deployment of new technologies towards


organizational changes
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Summary: ITS in a nutshell

Objectives:

Originally to address road congestion


Later, transit, safety, logistics, demand
management , security
Intermodal perspective

Technology:

TeleComs as the starting point


Technical compatibility and integration
Market driven
Promises and realities
Often, solutions in search of problems
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Summary: ITS in a nutshell

Policy Arena:

Need to share and exchange information


Institutional cooperation
From a tactical tool towards a strategic
approach
Recent boost on behalf of road safety

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Summary: ITS in a nutshell


Main applications in the US:

ATIS:

AVCS

Commercial Vehicle Operations

APTS:

Advanced Vehicle Control Systems

CVO:

Advanced Traveler Information Systems

Advanced Public Transportation Systems

ARTS:

Advanced Rural Transportation Systems

Ref: Perspectives on Intelligent Transportation Systems


by Joseph M. Sussman, Springer 2005
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

TeleComs:

Fastest growing sector in Europe


5% GDP: 4 million employed
300,000 new jobs (95 - 97)
More to come:

Telecommunications + Computing sectors

Audio visual (3G video services)

New mobile services, as.

More cellular phones than computers!

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

400

160

300

120
Subscribers
Jobs

200

80

100

40

Mio. subscribers

Thousands jobs

Telecom jobs are booming

0
1992

1997

2002

Mobile Telephony
Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Projected E-commerce growth


1200
1000
1000
OECD

$bn

800
600
400

Activmedia
OECD

200

300

200

Forrester

30
0

7
1996 1997

1998

Sources: various forcasts as indicated

1999

2000

2001

2002

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

2003

2004

2005

Figure by MIT OCW.

2006
8

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Technology evolution

IMT-2000

Capable Systems

Functionality and Capabilities

WCDMA
2 Mbps

EDGE/EGPRS
384 kbps

GPRS

115 kbps

HSCSD

Packet Switched

38.4 kbps / 57.6 kbps

Circuit data

Circuit Switched

<9.6 kbps

Speech
1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Time

Figure by MIT OCW.

11

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Technology evolution

z SMS
z SIM

Toolkit
z WAP
z GPRS
z Bluetooth
z Terminals
z Smartcards
z E-commerce
z Security
z Positioning
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The challenges of telecom providers...


z

Mobility
taking services from the
desktop to the pocket for
the ultimate in
convenience

Towards ubiquitous
computing

Security, payment,
browsing and devices are
key technology
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Secure electronic financial transactions:

Business-to-business, retail and


administrative transactions
Billing, payment, accounting
Anonymous small payments .. ( Credit card
usage at Newbury St for parkmeters)
Reliable, tamper-proof smart cards and
personal tokens (using phones to pay for
transit in Japan)
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Europe Today

Leads in:

Mobile communications
Digital television
Digital local access
Electronic payments and smart cards

Lags in:

Corporate IT investment
Use of the Internet
Electronic commerce
PC industrial and technology development
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

What sort of Information Society?

EU Desideratum:

Employment rich

Socially inclusive

Economically stable

Culturally diverse

Environmentally sustainable

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From TeleComs to:

New ways to work

Flexibility in time and place


Better use of skills
Reduced investment for
new job creation
Reduced overhead costs
Financial viability for more
new kinds of work
Greater responsiveness
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A Rapidly Flattening World


The result is the creation
of a global network, Webenabled playing field that
allows for multiple forms of
collaboration sharing
knowledge and work in
real time, without regard to
geography, distance, or in
the future, even language
Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat,
NY 2005

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From TeleComs to:Teamwork

and tele-work:

Teamwork across borders and timezones

Real-time and asynchronous

Linking different types of workplaces

Intra-company and inter-company

New tools and standards

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

20

ITS: Intelligent Transport Services

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

(As Part of the Information Society)

ITS: Control, management and information tools


aimed to improve the efficiency, safety and
quality of service of the transportation system
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

eEurope: Main Targets

Key challenge is to meet the growing demand for


mobility within the finite transport networks
Congestion in road transport

Speed up the development and deployment of


Intelligent Transport Systems

Safety of road, rail, air and maritime transport

Active safety systems in vehicles


Enhanced 112 with location information (equiv to US 911)

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

eEurope Targets: ITS Deployment

Timely and reliable information and guidance


services (in real time, pre-trip/on trip)
Effective congestion and demand management
strategies (to reduce delays and to improve the
environment, safety and intermodality)
Efficient incident and emergency management
(detection, verification, response)

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

eEurope Targets: Road Safety

Safety of road:

New emphasis on account of 42,000 yearly deaths


All new cars sold in Europe equipped with more
efficient active safety enhancing systems

All citizens on the move throughout Europe


should have access to:

call localization and


emergency services through the 112 number,
recognizing the language challenge
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

27

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Intelligent Transport Services (ITS)


Urban Traffic:

Traffic Signals
Monitoring throughput:

Recommended speeds
Ramp metering

Incident Management
Signal priority for:

Emergency vehicles
Public transport

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

28

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Intelligent Transport Services (ITS)


Real-time Information:

Automobile traffic
Public transport
Parking
Airport arrivals/departures
Points of interest (POI)
News, banking, stocks

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Intelligent Transport Services (ITS)


Payment sytems:

Tolls
Transit fares
Parking
Electronic purse
Mobile-business

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Intelligent Transport Services (ITS)


Urban Goods
distribution:

Fleet Management
Real-time location
Load consolidation
Hazmat management

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

31

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Intelligent Transport Services (ITS)


Sectors involved:

Transport
Automobile industry
Telecoms
Banking
Consumer electronics
Tourism
Mass Media
...............................

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

32

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Automobile


Traffic Information
Systems
Route Guidance and
Navigation
Location-based
Services
Parking Information
Safety

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

33

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Traffic Information Systems


RTI center

on-trip:
- deviations from
indicated travel times
- new travel times and
routes

pre-trip:
- trip request
at departure
- trip recommendation

location

Car
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

34

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Traffic Information Systems

Traffic Information

User Data

Map Information

Content
Positioning Data

City Information

Close
"The next pharmacy..."

My Program
"My nicest day..."

City Navigation
"The fastest route..."
My Profile
"Do not forget the birthday
of your mother-in-law..."

Watchdog
"My flight is delayed..."

Refined Content

City Highlights
"Which club is still open..."

Figure by MIT OCW.

35

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ls
ne
Pa

Services

an

ia
ed
M

In

fo

rm

at

io

or

/P
PC
et
rn
In

te

Client access
to Services

D
A
G
SM
M ,G
ob P
ile R
Ph S/W
on A
es P
Ph
on
e,
Fa
x

From Data to Information

Services

3 Platforms

e
or

er

th
M

an

ts

W
ea

en
Ev

TM

C
oa
ti
D ng
at C
a ar
Ro
ad
D Wo
at rk
a
s

Public Transport

Fl

S/
RD

et

ec

in

tio

Individual Traffic

rk

Pa

Data Source,
Subsystems

Tr Pub
an lic
sp
or
t

Content

Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

36

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Traffic Information Systems


Variable Message
Signs
SMS messages and
WAP
Digital Audio
Broadcasting (DAB)
Traffic Message

Channel (TMC)

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

37

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Parking Information
Information on
availability
Reservation and ID

Guidance to:

Available facility
Actual spot

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

40

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

From Traffic Control Centers (TCC) to

Traffic Management Centers (TMC)

Just a name change?


F.Salvucci and M.Murga

41

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Seattle

Real time
information on
the Web
Updated every minute

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

42

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Seattle

From color coded


maps to actual
photographs of the
traffic stream

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

44

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Seattle

You can check


in real time an
incident

Even choosing
to see
upstream
impact
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

46

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Paris.
Color coded maps, time estimates and times by transit

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

49

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Route Guidance and Navigation

Human Machine Interface


(HMI)

Speech Recognition

Related to safety

Hands free speaking and


listening

Location-Based Services

Accident location
Advanced Driver Assistance
Systems (ADAS) Collision
Avoidance
GPS and Galileo

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

50

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Last Mile Services

Based on Pre-Trip download

Route indication

Services
3D visualization of last mile
Remote POI selection

Ref: TeleAtlas

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

51

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Last Mile Services

Auto

Tele Atlas
Geocoded
Mobile
Mapping
data

Web

Object
Recognition
Tools

Tele Atlas
Building
Components
Library

Tele Atlas DB
-Standard DB
-2D city maps

Building
texture
Information
In TA DB

Destination

Ref: TeleAtlas
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

53

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Road Safety (Last but not the least)

Emergency Calls
Passive (airbags) and
Active (collision
avoidance) Safety
Advanced Driver
Assistance Systems
(ADAS):

Driver monitoring
Vision enhancement
Collision warning and
avoidance
Speed alert
Elderly and people with
disabilities
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

58

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and the Car:

Road Safety (Last but not the least)

Speed control in
urban environments
People driving
through red lights

Speed on urban environments


Drivers through red lights
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

59

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and Public Transport

Real-time information for:

Operators:

Fleet management
Travel time reliability

Users:

Waiting anxiety
Real-time information anytime
anywhere
Route Planners
Universal smart cards
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

60

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS and Public Transport

Operations

Automatic Vehicle
Location (AVL)
Automatic Passenger
Counters (APC)
Automatic Fare Payment
(AFP)
Bus Priority Systems
Advanced Ticketing
Fleet Management

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

61

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS The organizational constraint

Easy to deploy within each turf, but

hard to integrate across operators and modes

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

68

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS Integration: A bumpy road

ITS:
Information
+
Communication +
Integration

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

69

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS Deployment

ITS Deployment
requires:

Important organizational
changes
A new path from control
to sharing information
A transition from
hierarchical systems to
networks
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

70

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS Integration: A bumpy road


Lets share information:
The public needs a single source of multimodal information
The operators can benefit by sharing real
time info
Lets decide with others in mind:
Impacts or synergies on third parties?
Modularity of equipment and architecture?
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

71

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS Integration: A bumpy road


ITS is not a technical
issue but a new frame
for:
>
>
>

>

Voluntary cooperation
Seeing the big picture
Bringing others into
the decision process

Adopting necessary
new policies

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

72

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS Deployment
In short, ITS other than short-term mitigation

tools, may serve :


9
9
9
9

To become catalysts for change


To establish new two-way relationships
To create new spaces for collaboration
To provide a global vision of the transport
system

But, ITS involves a long complex and

difficult path (the road less traveled)

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

73

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

ITS as a Tool - Main Objectives?

To increase road capacity at low cost?


Or, just an opportunity to promote a more

efficient and diversified transport system?

Should it be used to enhance mobility -

Or to improve accessibility? Or perhaps, just


to substitute some trips on certain days?

F.Salvucci and M.Murga

74

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Final thought

We have to:
master the technology
envisage new applications from the existing
technology, and
retain a proper global perspective
What do you think
Is ITS good or bad?
What is its main contribution?
Is technology in general good or bad?
(See the Sept 2002 issue of the Atlantic Monthly on Home Security)
F.Salvucci and M.Murga

75

Parting Thoughts

Urban Transportation Planning

MIT Course 1.252j/11.540j

Fall 2006

Mikel Murga, MIT Lecturer and Research Associate

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Scope

Systemic Approach
Little Numbers
Transport and Beyond
Focus on
The Future and the Past
Critical Challenges
Your Contribution!
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Systemic Thinking: an infinite game


Goals
Problem

Decision

Results

Situation

Decisions

Goals

Side Effects

Environment

Goals of
Other Agents

Actions of Others
From: Business Dynamics, by John Sterman

Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Processes take time to reach a new equilibrium and then

The Learning is always found in the past!


$

Red modelizada

$
$

Red viaria
Costa y lmites

Lneas de BilboBus y Metro

$$
$

Lnea 10 (intervalo= 12 min.)


Metro (intervalo= 5min.)

Paradas de BilboBus y Metro

$$

Lnea 10
Metro
0
.2

.4

.6

Kilometers

$
$
$

$
$

$
$

viajeros anuales

10 San Ignacio -A rriaga


3.000.000

2.500.000
2.000.000

1.500.000

$
$

1.000.000
500.000
0
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

$
$

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

$$$

$
$

$
$

$
4

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The 12 Steps Planning Method: Checklist

1. Scan the environment,


2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

review history, identify


trends, project future
conditions
Define problem(s)
Develop solution(s)
Identify relevant
actors, institutions,
primary roles and
interests
Consider
implementation
Predict outcomes,
benefits, costs, impacts

before Take-Off

7. Consider operation and


maintenance of
facilities, services

8. Evaluate alternatives
9. Choose course of
action

10.Build constituency,

consolidate allies,

convert enemies

11.Implement
12.Operate and maintain

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Little Numbers are essential!


1300
120

Vehicle
throughput in
uninterrumpted
flow:

Speeddensity
curves

FFS = 120 km/h

1450

110

1600

100

100

1750

90
80

LOS A

Density = 7
pc/km/ln

60

11

16

22

28

40

20
Note:
FFS= Free-flow speed
0
0

400

800

1200

1600

2000

2400

Flow Rate, vp (pc/h/ln)


Figure by MIT OCW, adapted from the Transportation Research Board, "Highway Capacity Manual 2000".
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Little Numbers are essential!


Unstable Flow
Stable Flow

Flows (Vehicles/hour/lane)

2500

2000
Shock Wave
Toll Range

1500

Flow at the bottleneck


1000
Undersaturated

500

Oversaturated
Density at Flow Capacity

0
0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Density (Vehicles/km/lane)
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Figure by MIT OCW.

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Little Numbers are essential!


Urb

Two-lane road
s
Rur

al R

oa d

it

li m

er m

ho

es

ign

al p

50-60
miles per
hour

ur

ile

Thr
ee
per signa
mil ls
e
Fo
ur
Tw -lane
roa
o-l
d
ane
roa
d
Fo
urlan
er
oad

s i gn
als
mi le
per

Fiv e

als p

si g n

ree

Thirty miles
per hour

Th

er m

Five or more
signals per mile

Less than five


signals per mile

oad

On

ile

Five or more signals per mile

Travel time, minutes per mile

12

an R

Ex

wa
press

ys

i
m
0

le

e
sp

Forty miles per hour

0
0

400

800

1200

1600

Vehicle volume, vehicles per hour per lane


F.Salvucci & M.Murga

2000
Figure by MIT OCW.

From Meyer and Miller

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Little Numbers are essential!


Land-Use Scenarios:
eg. New developments

Transport Scenarios:
eg. New transit line

Policy Scenarios: eg.


New parking scheme

Socio-economic data
Generation
Distribution
Modal Split

Can you do it by hand?

Assignment
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Little numbers even if you use models!

How many trips per person?


How long is the average trip?
What is the modal split?
How many cars per hour per lane?
How many miles per automobile?
How many traffic deaths?

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

10

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Little numbers even if you use models!

40.00%

20.00%

10.00%

0.00%
5 minutes or less
6-10
11-15
16-20
21-25
26-30
31-35
36-40
41-45
46-50
51-55
56-60
61-65
66-70
71-75
76-80
81-85
86-90
91-95
96-100
101-105
106-110
111-115
116-120
More than 2 hours

Percent of Mode

30.00%

Only drove/carpool/vanpool
Any public transport
Bicycled
Walked
All modes

2006 MIT Commuter


Survey By David
Block-Schachter

minutes

Commute Time

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Figure by MIT OCW.

11

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Some comparative little numbers

Car on city
streets

Car on
Freeway

Bus LRT
on Mixed
Traffic

1.2

1.2

40-300

40-600

140-2,200

Speed
(km/hr)

20-50

60-120

5-20

15-45

25-70

Veh/hr

600-800

1500-2200

60-80

40-90

10-40

720 to
1,050

1,800 to
2,600

2,400 to
20,000

4,000 to
20,000

10,000 to
72,000

Vehicle
occupancy

Capacity
(pers/hr)

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Semi Rapid
Transit

Rapid
Transit

12

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

By the way,

GIS information also qualifies as Little Numbers

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

13

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Beyond Transport: Activities

Transport
100,0

80,0

Chores

60,0

40,0

Sleeping, eating
Work

20,0

0,0
0:00

2:00

4:00

6:00

8:00 10:00 12:00 14:00 16:00 18:00 20:00 22:00


Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

14

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

The Future of Operations Research (OR) is Past


by Russell Ackoff 1979
1. First, there is a greater need for
decision-making systems that can
learn and adapt effectively than
there is for optimizing systems that
cannot.
2. Second, in decision making, account
should be taken of aesthetic valuesstylistic preferences and progress
towards ideals because they are
relevant to quality of life.
3. Third, problems are abstracted from
systems of problems, messes.
Messes require holistic treatment.
They cannot be treated effectively by
decomposing them analytically into
separate problems to which optimal
solutions are sought.

4. Fourth, OR's analytic problemsolving paradigm, "predict and


prepare," involves internal
contradictions and should be
replaced by a synthesizing planning
paradigm such as "design a
desirable future and invent
ways of bringing it about.
5. Fifth, effective treatment of messes
requires interaction of a wide
variety of disciplines, a
requirement that OR no longer
meets.
6. Sixth and last, all those who can be
affected by the output of
decision making should either be
involved in it so they can bring their
interests to bear on it, or their
interests should be well
represented by researchers who
serve as their advocates.

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

15

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Where to focus on?


Transportation solutions to current


problems like congestion, a bitter pill
The systems view aligns transportation
proposals with higher goals
You will have to be creative in the use
of your tools and approaches
Search for a higher goal beyond
transport symptoms
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

16

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Focus on .
Economic development

Look at American and European cities

with subways

When were those systems built?


Have they shaped those cities?
How should we then evaluate their
contribution???
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

17

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Focus on Quality of Life

When traffic is tamed, a good walking environment


results
Walkers enjoy a wide range of sensory experiences
When most people drive, the buildings end up lacking the
detail and relief that people need and enjoy
People attract more people
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

18

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Quality of Life: Generic Recommendations

Upgrade Squares
and Plazas
Rehabilitate wide
streets
Develop transit
Reduce through
traffic
Enhance Park Lands
Create pedestrian
and bike networks

Mixed uses for day and


night livability
Attract residents
Foster markets, cafes
and educational
institutions
Improve ground floor
frontage
Organize public activities
and events

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

19

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

But if you only fix the transportation


A beautification
program -- without
people as in Troy, NY

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

20

People attract People!


Public Spaces = leveling the playing field

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Stadt luft macht frei!

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

21

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Be comfortable with an uncertain future

Forecasting:
Short term
extrapolation:The future on
the basis of the past
Applicable to slow
incremental change

Forecasting

People believe that todays


status quo will remain
Scenarios, to accept pattern
breaks, and to improve our
decisions!
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Scenarios

uncertainty

predictability

Time into the future


22

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Be comfortable with

Scenario Planning a must

the Future and with the Past

Test several futures for robustness of


decisions
Identify key variables YOU can influence

Back-casting equally a must

All lessons are in the past


A humbling experience before you
predict the future
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

23

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Future Trends and Challenges

Globalized (or Flattening) World


Climate Change
Road Safety
Road Congestion
Aging of society
Increasing income gaps
Physical separation based on income
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

24

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Future Trends and Challenges

We need new sustainable models of development other than


letting the automobile shape the future of our lives
It cannot be based on do as I tell you, instead do as I do
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

25

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Road Congestion as a Transportation Challenge

The latest word from Anthony Downs

You need the


thousand cuts
approach or a
package with a
myriad of
proposals feeding
on each other

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

26

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Road Congestion as the Policy Driver


Cost pt

Costauto

A represents an
assumed equilibrium
point between auto
and transit

Vol pt

Vol auto

Adapted from Transport in Santiago presentation by Dr. Diaz-Jara at MIT

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

Point A is really a
policy trigger point,
rather than an
equilibrium point,
as it leads to build
extra highway
capacity
27

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Road Congestion as the Policy Driver

Highway Capacity Expansion Strategy


Cost pt

Costauto
C

Vol pt

As the fight against


congestion translates into
extra highway capacity
as shown by the dotted
brown line-, this process
ends up in a new
congestion point at C

Vol auto

Adapted from Transport in Santiago presentation by Dr. Diaz-Jara at MIT

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

This point C may become


again another policy
trigger point under
economic growth
conditions

28

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Road Congestion as the Policy Driver

Highway Capacity Expansion Strategy

Cost pt

Costauto
C

The way from point A to


point C spans a few years
during which induced
demand and further
development causes a new
congestion point at C.

Vol pt

Vol auto

Adapted from Transport in Santiago presentation by Dr. Diaz-Jara at MIT

The path from A to C goes


initially through point B,
which often encourages
higher automobile
ownership ratios given the
improved highway LOS.

This process ends at C as a no-win situation, because not only

transit loses part of its market share, but costs increase for

both transit and the automobile

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

29

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Road Congestion as the Policy Driver

Transit Capacity Expansion Strategy

Cost pt

Costauto
An alternative process to
the A-B-C path implies a
more aggressive role for
transit, by responding to
congestion with a
dramatic increase in
transit capacity as
represented by the blue
dotted line.

A
D

Vol pt

Vol auto

Adapted from Transport in Santiago presentation by Dr. Diaz-Jara at MIT

The new path from A to D in green, assisted by other policy measures, results in a
more desirable and sustainable outcome with lower costs for all. At the same time,
point D is an equilibrium point given its more acceptable level of congestion
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

30

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

New Indicators for Transit



Transit makes high density central city possible


Even in the US with transit serving only 2% of all person
trips, it is critically important in shaping the big cities
The home to work commute in Boston (and in other
American cities like Chicago, New York, San Francisco..)
shows the critical role of transit in its downtown
The downtown job density makes it impossible to rely
solely on the automobile
Bostons Bump Factor

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

31

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

External Costs: 1.95 bill in the Basque Country

en Mill. EUR

1.953 MILL (short term cost)

900
781

800

Ferrocarril
Carretera

700
600
518
500

This translates to roughly


930 /person/year or
2,600 /family/year

400

300

264

200

157

149

118
100

91

74

65

59

'
Costes por cambio climatico

Costes ambientales

Large plazo

Corto plazo

'
Costes de congestion

'
Costes en areas
urbanas

Costes de naturaleza
y paisaje

'
Costes por contaminacion
del aire

Costes por ruido

Costes por accidentes

Corto plazo. - Aprox.


Nacional/sector del
transporte
Large plazo'
aproximacion
internacional

Corto plazo'
aproximacion
internacional

28

Costes por processos


indirectos

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

32

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

External Costs: Unit Costs for C-B Evaluation

250
Peak
Off-Peak

206.7

200

ct./vkm

150

This means that a parking spot used by


someone who drove 15 kms into it plus
another 15 kms back, turns that parking
spot into a 12 euros commodity

151.9

100

50

36.8
20.2

41.3
10.7 8.6

12.1 10

24.7
12.1 10

14 11.9

27.6 24.7
23.2 20.3

0
Urban Interurban Motorway Urban Interurban Motorway Urban Interurban Motorway
Passenger Cars Petrol

Passenger Cars Diesel

Trucks
Figure by MIT OCW.

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

33

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Your contribution
Of all the kinds of work I can imagine the hardest
work of all is thinking -- and that's why most
people just don't do it.

Henry Ford in his highly original


"My Philosophy of Industry" published in 1929

You will be surprised how often you can

make meaningful proposals with a bit of

thinking plus some creativity

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

34

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Your contribution

Planning and processes

The 12-step process


Reality checks between expectations and realities

Short term and long term

Observe, observe
You do not need to serve as Secretary of
Transportation to change the world around you
although it will help

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

35

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Big Projects and Little Projects

Even a small improvement


in a light-regulated traffic
intersection may become
a beacon for the
needed change

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

36

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Demonstrate and visualize!

See: The Boston Globe Nov 2004

Use before and after case studies, databases like the


Millenium Database, locate the area in a trend line
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

37

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Your contribution

RADICAL changes

PROPHET
Known
Solution

POET

Unknown
Solution

SMALL changes
changes

It is easy to end up
sounding like a Prophet
when just selling one
single measure: ie.
parking policy
You will need to behave as
a Poet by embracing
contradictions and
ambiguity, but focusing on
higher goals like urban
quality, economic
development

F.Salvucci & M.Murga

42

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

When contributing, remember that


1. Every change is hard to implement
2. You should start with the easiest job
3. You need allies
4. You have to minimize risks
5. Technical competence is a must
6. Do not propose isolated measures, but packages
7. Focus on short term results to jumpstart the process

8. But dont forget to plant a few seeds


9. Everyone sees things differently, and that
10. Success is hard to measure
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

43

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

A thought by Ortega y Gasset for solo flying


El menesteroso de una ciencia, el que siente la profunda
necesidad de la verdad, se acercar cauteloso al saber ya
hecho, lleno de suspicacia, sometindolo a crtica; ms
bin con el perjuicio de que no es verdad lo que el libro
sostiene
Sobre el estudiar y el estudiante (Primera leccin de un curso)
Ortega y Gasset, 1933

Once you are faced with an immediate problem, you


will ponder, challenge and enrich our findings and
solutions, as that is the only way to learn!
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

44

Urban Transportation Planning Fall 2006

Final thoughts

Be on the lookout for all the lessons from


the past
Do measurements and keep those records
for future reference, and updates
Come up with new metrics for the actual

contribution of transportation projects

You can manage only what you measure

Do challenge the status quo and dare to


be creative!

Good luck!
F.Salvucci & M.Murga

45

11.540J/1.252J Urban Transportation Planning Assignment #1

Gateway Project

Assignment 1: Gateways to MIT


The purpose of this assignment is to give you a feel for how people, vehicles, and infrastructure
interact in a real-life site. We will assign you to teams of roughly five people, and each team will
submit one final report on a site around the campus which is a major gateway to and from MIT, and
where different transport needs and modes converge. The assignment involves visiting the site
and counting passengers, cars, bikes, etc. in each of the gateways transportation corridors at
different times of day, day of the week, etc. to get a sense for the current and potential travel
patterns, capacity, and characteristics of different modes, etc. Once your data has been collected
and tabulated, loosely use the Planning Method introduced in class to write the final report and
answer the questions below.
Each person on the team might contribute one or two paragraphs about their observations during
peak and off-peak of the particular element they monitor, as well as contribute to the overall report.
While the final report should answer all of the questions below, the format and organization of the
document is up to you. Teams and sites will be assigned depending on the number of students
participating, and each team member should count, observe, and write up at least one element.
Your team should get together and coordinate data collection and the report over the next two
weeks. The site visit should preferably be conducted prior to the second class meeting, to
support class discussion, but in any event the team visit must be completed, written up and
submitted by the third week of the semester September 22, 2006.
A. Instruction:

Count traffic, transit vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, at the MIT site to which you were assigned

Try to especially use planning method step 1 & 2

Observe and count gateway traffic

Briefly research history of site

Who are the stakeholders at this site? Who owns what?

What major travel patterns do you observe?

What data needs do you see?

How would you project future continuity?

What existing and emerging problems do you identify?

B. Method:

Observe and Count

AM Peak (8:00-9:00am)

PM Off-peak (~ 9:00pm)

Weekend off-peak, Sunday 2:00 pm

Define Method to Assess History

Map resources: http://www.mapjunction.com, maps.google.com, www.mass.gov/mgis, etc.

Page 1 of 3

11.540J/1.252J Urban Transportation Planning Assignment #1

Gateway Project

C. Gateway Sites, and Elements to be Observed:


1) Kendall Square

Red Line both station entrances


Lobby of Marriott (pedestrian pass-through to Broadway)
Intersection of Main St. and Broadway (including loop-around)
Third Street

Buses: MBTA, CambridgeSide Galleria shuttle, EZ-Ride blue bus


Cars
Bicycles
Trucks
Red Line passengers
Pedestrians

2) Memorial Drive and Mass. Ave.

Memorial Drive and Mass. Ave., south side and north side, including off/on ramps and
turn lanes

Memorial Drive loop-around to the west


Bike lanes and Memorial Drive river path

Buses: M2, 1, CT1, MIT Shuttles, tour buses, other


Cars
Bicycles
Pedestrians
Trucks

3) Mass. Ave. at Vassar and Albany Streets

Mass. Ave. at Vassar, both directions, including turn counts


Mass. Ave. at Albany, both directions, including turn counts
Railroad (if applicable)

Buses

Trucks
Cars
Bicycles
Pedestrians

Page 2 of 3

11.540J/1.252J Urban Transportation Planning Assignment #1

Gateway Project

4) Vassar St. and Main St.

Vassar Street
Main Street
Galileo Galilei Way
Technology Square entrance
Railroad (if applicable)

Buses
Trucks
Cars
Bicycles
Pedestrians

5) Allston Landing (could require 6-person team)

River St. / Cambridge St. / Western Ave. and turn lanes


Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90) ramps
Storrow Drive
B.U. Bridge
Commonwealth Ave
BU; Harvard; Rail / Truck Freight interface

Green Line C Branch


MBTA Commuter Rail
Freight Trains and Yard
Buses
Trucks
Bicycles
Pedestrians

Page 3 of 3

1.252J/11.540J Urban Transportation Planning


Assignment #2: Massachusetts Avenue Redesign
Due date: 10/6/06, 2:00pm
Background
For the purpose of this exercise, you are working on the staff of Andrew Gottleib, the
head of the Office of Commonwealth Development for the state and Governor Romneys czar
of land use and transportation responsible for implementing a new Smart Growth agenda.
Central Square in Cambridge was re-landscaped several years ago to provide wider
sidewalks, better bus shelters, cleaner pavement markings, bicycle lanes, as well as street trees
and brick sidewalks. Prior to these improvements, the Central Square section of Mass Avenue
looked pretty much like Mass Avenue between Lafayette Square and MIT. At right angles to
Mass Avenue, River Street used to join Mass Avenue at an angle in the area, which is now a
small park. (The revision of bus routes was required to facilitate the park.)
The city has plans to redevelop Lafayette Square (corner of Mass Ave/Main
Street/Columbia Street) and redesign the stretch of Mass Ave between Central Square and
Memorial Drive, which includes the sections adjacent to MIT. The design plans for Lafayette
Square and Mass. Ave. can be found on the City of Cambridge website (links below). Mass.
Ave, however, is a state road and the roadway portions of this reconstruction project are funded
by the Massachusetts Highway Department (also called MassHighway or MHD). Most parts of
this project are already under construction, as you have probably seen.
In addition, the City of Cambridge has recently proposed some revisions to their original
plans for how the pavement markings, with the support of some advocacy bicycle and
pedestrian groups and some within MIT. Their proposed plans are detailed in two files. The
City of Cambridge hopes MassHighway will agree to their proposal, and Gottleib appears
inclined to side with Cambridge.

This project, happening right outside MITs front door, highlights the institutional and
political complexities involved in urban transportation planning.
Tasks
The first part of the assignment involves looking at the improvements at Central
Square and observing what works and what does not work. No formal traffic counts are
required here; just give your impression based on recent lectures and readings.
The second part of the assignment is to evaluate Mass. Ave corridor between Central
Square and Memorial Drive, review the Lafayette Square plans and make recommendations for
redesigning it, drawing on lessons learned from Central Square. To do so, go and make
observations of traffic in the area during two periods: peak hour (either AM or PM) and an offpeak period (preferably between noon and 2 PM) measuring cars, trucks, buses, bicycles,
pedestrians crossing the street, and pedestrians boarding/alighting buses. Use the same
methodology as Assignment #1. The key location for traffic counts is the 3-way intersection of
Columbia Street, Main Street, and Mass. Ave. Traffic counts and observations can be done in
groups.
You may discuss your observations within the group, but write your memo individually.
Try to apply the planning framework presented in class to the issues you see at Mass Ave
between Lafayette Square and Memorial Drive.
The intent of this assignment is to go beyond the observations about throughput and
capacity of Assignment #1, and consider the physical street design as well as the broader
political and institutional context of Mass Ave. State and federal funds that pass through the
state are financing the reconstruction, and the responsible state agency (MassHighway) has
strongly influenced the design of the plan, as has the City of Cambridge with support from MIT.

Your memo should advise Gottleib on whether to intervene and how.

What are the central problem(s) the redesign is addressing?

Who are the major institutions and constituencies?

How would you involve the "community" and who is that?

Imagine that the current construction activity does not preclude a change in plans. Is the
plan for Lafayette Square reasonable, or should it be modified?

How do you assess the current location of bus stops? Which of the alternative paint
markings and parking plans would best fit with bus circulation?

Develop recommendations for redesigning Mass Ave. drawing on your observations at


Lafayette Square the Central Square redesign.

Your paper should be approximately 5 pages single-spaced (or 10 pages doublespaced) including any charts or images, and is due October 6 by 2:00pm.

http://www.cambridgema.gov/cdd/et/infra/lsq/lsq.html
http://www.cambridgema.gov/TheWorks/projects/southmass.htm#

1.252J/11.540J Urban Transportation Planning


Assignment #3: South Boston Waterfront District Assignment
Due date: 10/27/06
The South Boston Waterfront District is seen as a major opportunity for "smart growth." But
different constituencies define "smart" in many different ways.
Some argue that this area should contain a mix of office, residential, hotel and cultural attractions,
with very high densities.
Some argue that very high density will attract more cars.
Some say without more rail transit, high density cant be supported.
Some say without high density, transit wont work.
Some say the Silver Line cant work unless its rail.
Some say the South Boston Transitway needs a grade separation at D Street in order to be
reliable and provide adequate capacity.
Some say the grade separation isnt necessary, and there are better places to spend transit
funds.
You are an analyst reporting to the General Manager of the MBTA. The MBTA must make a
decision on whether or not to invest $50 million in a grade separation at D Street, and has the option of
weighing in as an advocate for land use policy, or abstaining from that debate.
Go visit the site. Take the Red Line to South Station, and walk across the Fort Point Channel
along Summer Street to D Street. Proceed east on D Street (you can see the completed Silver Line
construction, on your left as you walk down D Street) to Northern Avenue. Then walk towards downtown
on Northern Avenue to get a feel for the area, and ride the Silver Line back to South Station from
Courthouse station.
Read the report prepared by Professor Wilson at MIT which looks primarily at the question of
vehicle technology, but also raises some operational and capacity issues.
Write a 3-5 page paper to the General Manager with your recommendations. You can
recommend action or more study, but base your recommendation on an understanding of the planning
process, the four-step process, criteria for priority and programming, and the role of transportation in
economic development.
Student presentations will take place on Tuesday, 10/31/06.

Assignment 4: Millennium Database


The Millennium Database assignment is an open-ended exercise that requires data mining and
interpretation of findings. The database contains transportation related statistics from cities
around the world for the year 2000. Develop hypotheses that could explain the current modal
shares of Chicago, London and Zurich based on their basic parameters, plus those of any other
city such as Paris, Frankfurt, or non-European city such as Hong Kong, Sao Paulo, etc.
Remember that raising the right questions can be more challenging than answering them
properly. As Fred suggested in class, generate policy recommendations based on your findings,
with special attention to energy use.
The amount of data available to you is large so we encourage you to work in groups or pairs
for data mining and processing, but the final report should be an individual effort.
The Mobility in Cities Database can be purchased at this URL:
<http://www.uitp.com/publications/index2.cfm?id=5>
There are at least two possible methodological approaches to this: compare statistics across many
cities for one time point (the data in the database is for 2000), or compare trends in data for a
small number of cities over time. Historical time-series data is available in a book on reserve in
Rotch Library, called An International Sourcebook of Automobile Dependence In Cities 19601990. Standardized data sheets for the cities mentioned above are on MIT server , and many
other cities are in the book itself, which is on course reserve at Rotch Library. NOTE: You are
under no obligation or expectations to use this historical data. We provide it to you only if it
helps your analysis.
Present your findings in a compelling way in a paper of approximately five single-spaced pages
(or 10 pages double-spaced), not including graphs or charts. There is no strict rule about paper
length, but try to be concise enough for a busy reader yet analytical enough to make a compelling
argument. The assignment is due on 11/17/06 by 2pm. Please be sure to include page numbers.

FINAL ASSIGNMENT
In the Millennium Database assignment, each of you grappled with the problems
of identifying the characteristics that lead to more suitable land use/transportation
systems, by comparing characteristics across different metropolitan areas. However,
none of you looked at the longitudinal or time series opportunity to try to understand
how Zurich, London, Hong Kong, or Chicago metropolitan areas have evolved over the
past several decades, as population, economic activity, and personal income have
grown. We are providing each of you with copies of all of the papers, so you have
access to each others ideas from the last assignment.
The first step of the final assignment is to look at some key indicators to
understand how the four cities have changed over the past 20 or 25 years. Second, we
want you to provide advice to three different important leaders on how they can
contribute to moving the Boston region into a more sustainable growth pattern from
both economic and environmental standpoints. The three leaders are:
(1)

Susan Hockfield, President of MIT

(2)

Daniel Grabauskas, MBTA General Manager, and

(3)

Deval Patrick, Governor-elect of Massachusetts.

(1)

MIT President Susan Hockfield can strongly affect the direction of MITs

physical development and accessibility for students, faculty, and staff over the
next decade. She has publicly committed herself to lead by example in the area
of energy, but she has been told that energy consumption by commuting
represents only 7% of the energy consumption generated by MITs total campus
activity. That low estimate does not consider that because of MITs urban
location in a transit-accessible area, and existing MIT transit incentives, non-auto
mode shares are much higher, and auto mode shares much lower than they
might otherwise be. In addition, that low estimate does not consider the
possibility that the mode choice to access MIT strongly influences the mode
choice for other trip purposes by MIT-affiliated personnel. If an MIT employee
uses an auto to access MIT, he or she will generate substantial vehicle miles of

travel for other trip purposes, so the mode choice to MIT impacts much more
than the 7% identified as access to MIT.
For these two reasons, MITs physical development and the
student/faculty/staff access, policies may have much more importance than the
7% measure suggests.
Of course, there are other considerations directly related to MITs mission
that President Hockfield must consider. Building underground parking spaces
under new buildings is likely to cost over $100,000 per space, and use space that
might otherwise be used for laboratories or other activity. Easy access to MIT
from suburban communities with high amenities and good school systems is
important to attract and retain good faculty, etc.
In addition to MITs direct control of its own activity, if it provides
converging ideas in its leadership by example, MIT can influence other
universities, other major employers, and the policies of the state and MBTA, so a
compelling example and advocacy of MIT could have major impact.

(2)

MBTA General Manager Grabauskas is an appointee of Governor

Romney, but he has a contract, and the majority of the MBTA board of directors
will continue to be Romney appointees for some time, so he may continue to be
General Manager for at least the next two years. His decisions on service policy,
fares, and capital investment will strongly affect the quality and reliability of
transit service for the entire MBTA district. He is known for tough yet competent
public administration.

(3)

Governor-elect Deval Patrick is organizing his transition. He has asked

his transportation transition team to prepare 4 to 6 measurable goals to be tested


with the public over the next six weeks, and then be used to guide and monitor
transportation priorities. He needs to decide to work with Grabauskas, or use his
political capital to change the law and put in his own people. As Astrid Glynn
pointed out, he needs to recognize that he has a window of about 1.5 years for
new initiatives. The rest of the time he will be immersed in implementation or

reacting to new events. Assume that he wants to make a serious shift towards
sustainable smart growth and transportation strategies. What 6 initiatives do
you suggest?

Use the 12-stepprocesstoorganizeyourthinkingonthis.Usetheinsightsfrom


yourpriorpapers;inparticular,theMillenniumDatabaseandatimeseriesreview.
YouarebeingprovidedwithseveralsetsofdatapertainingtoBostonandits
comparisontootherUSCities.Thedataisbothinabsoluteandpercentageterms.In
return,weareaskingyoutousethatdatatosupportinquantitativetermsbothyour
viewsonthecurrentsystemandyourrecommendations.

Yourpapershouldblendpublicpolicywithdataanalysis.Whileitisimportantto
groundyourpolicyrecommendationsindataandstatistics,itisequallyimportantto
stepbackfromthenumbers,andgivedecisionmakerswhateverlessonsyoucandraw
inaclear,succinctmemo.

Hereisasuggestionforthepapersformatandlength,foranabsolutemaximumlength
of15pages(singlespaced),excludinganyappendices:
1. Internationallongitudinalanalysis(3pagesmaximum)
2. ObservationsandgeneralthinkingonBostoninparticular(46pagesmaximum)
3. Recommendationstothethreedecisionmakers,(12pageseach=36pages
maximum)
Notethesearemaximumpagelimitsonly.

ThispaperisdueFriday,December8,by2pm.Pleasenotethisisanextensionofseveral
daysfromthedateoriginallypostedonthecoursecalendar.Wewillhavenosessionon
Tuesday,December5.

Severalnewsourcesofinformationyoumightreview:
1. TimeseriesdataonBostonfromKenworthy+Laube(fromAnInternational
SourcebookofAutomobileDependenceInCities19601990)
2. Mass.CommutingreportonstatetrendsfromMassInc,anonprofit
<http://www.massinc.org/index.php?id=453>
3. TheTexasTransportationInstitutereportoncongestion,whichprovides
annualdataoncongestioninbothU.S.metropolitanareas,goingbackover
abouttwodecades
<http://mobility.tamu.edu/ums/congestion_data/tables/boston.pdf>
4. NationalTransitDatabaseprofilesontheMBTAsfinancialandoperating
statisticseveryyearsince1999
<http://www.ntdprogram.com/ntdprogram/pubs/top_profiles/2005/agency
_profiles/1003.pdf>
5. MITTransportationSurveyhighlevelsummarystatisticsonthetwomost
recentMITtravelsurveys,2002and2004
<http://web.mit.edu/ir/surveys/oth_2002_transportation_survey.pdf>
< http://web.mit.edu/ir/surveys/oth_2004_transportation_survey.pdf>
6.

EnergyUseandGreenhouseGasesfromMITthesisfromTiffanyGroode
andJohnHeywood,sourceofthe7%figure.Transportationsection
beginsp.37.

7. JourneytoWorkTrendsintheU.S.anditsMajorMetropolitanAreas1960
2000FHWAnationalstatisticsthatallowyoutoseehowBostoncompares
tootherU.S.cities.
a. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ctpp/jtw/contents.htmSpecifictablesto
focuson:2.6,2.8,2.14,3.5,3.6,4.10,4.11,4.12,4.13,5.4,5.4,5.5
b. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ctpp/jtw/jtw8.htm#bosNotehowthis
reportdefinestheboundariesofBoston.

8. CommutinginAmericaIIIAlanPisarskyreportonnationalcommuting
trends.Specificpagestonote:Part1Page3;Part3Pages94,95,100,and
106.< http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/nchrp/CIAIII.pdf>
9. BostonTransportationFactBookreportontheCityofBostononly,pages
115.
<http://www.cityofboston.gov/transportation/accessboston/pdfs/front.pdf>

We will discuss clarifications and questions in our next class (Friday, December 1).
Be sure to begin working so you can ask good questions and contribute to the class
discussion on December 1.

Have a good Thanksgiving!