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Title: Noveling 101 Name: Cate ODonnell Grade level: 8th Length of unit: 5 weeks (October 25th-December 1st)

Stage 1 Desired Results


Meaning Enduring Understandings: Students will Understand the purpose and function of a novel. Create a novel with attention to imagination and plot functions. Present and read aloud their own writing, as well as revise other student writing Essential Questions: Why is storytelling so important (both personally and in our culture)? What makes a novel or a story compelling? To what extent do literary conflicts relate to those in real life? What does it mean to be creative?

Knowledge & Skills Acquisition

Students will know


Novel structures (plot, character, setting) Expectations of good and bad novels Writing styles and techniques

Students will be able to


Read work aloud and present ideas in a group setting Write creatively and continuously by turning off the inner editor Construct and identify parts of fiction and literary techniques Identify literary techniques and plot structures

Established Goals: By the end of November, students will have completed a novella with identifiable plot structures and multi-faceted characters. During the month of noveling, students will reflect upon their writing by conferencing with their small fiction groups, and after National Novel Writing Month is complete, students will write a short essay explaining what theyve gained throughout the writing experience and what challenged them. Students will be able to write creatively and analytical, and they will also gain knowledge and appreciation of the novel as a literary form. Transfer: Students will be able to independently use their learning to Present and read in group settings and lead discussions with peers Write creatively and connect literary techniques in non-novel reading Communicate effectively, clearly and persuasively in written format Common Core Standards: Speaking and Listening: 1a. Initiate and engage actively in group discussions on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues being studied in class; prepare for discussions by completing reading or conducting research and explicitly draw on that material in discussions. Writing: 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. Writing 3. Analyze how elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how plot and setting are integral to one another; how the setting affects characters).Writing: 3a. Write narratives in which they engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view, and purposefully organize a progression of events or experiences; 3b. Write narratives in which they develop narrative elements (e.g., setting, plot, event sequence, complex characters) with well-chosen, relevant, and specific sensory details; 3e. Provide a satisfying conclusion that follows from the events, experiences, or ideas; 3d. Choose words and phrases to effectively develop the events, experiences, and ideas precisely and to create mood. Writing 4. Produce writing in which the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to task,

purpose, and audience. Writing 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and interact with others about writing, including presenting and citing information in a digital format; Writing: 5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach after rethinking how well questions of purpose and context have been addressed.

Stage 2 Evidence (Assessment)


Performance Tasks

Students will apply their understandings by


(techniques and styles) Journal entries discussing both creativity and what elements make a valuable novel- formative assessment on literary understanding (journal reflections checked each week) Prior to novel writing, students will create novel maps to prove understanding of plot structures and form (including inciting incident, character development, dialogue, and description). Novel maps are summative based on lessons of literary structures, but formative for novel writing. Writing novel to achieve word count goal- within classroom time and as homework, students write based on novel maps and conferences with peers. Assessment is summative in nature, but based on completion and effort, not error-free writing. At three separate intervals, students will bring in a short excerpt of their novel, along with a couple short sentences describing why they made this choice.

Other Types of Assessment (Selected Response, Short Answer, Extended Response, Personal Communication)

Students will additionally demonstrate their knowledge and skills by


Weekly group conferences to discuss challenges within novel writing, used both as summative and formative for group work and writing skills As-needed conferences with teacher to assess skill level and need of assistance in creative writing and meeting word count

Stage 3 Learning Plan


Pre-assessment: Stage 3Learning Plan To pre-assess, students will bring in their favorite novel and will briefly journal about what makes it a "good" story. The assignment will be informal, and after I have reviewed them, we will compile a list of elements that make a good story. Students in small groups will come up with examples of stories or movies that have these traits (i.e. for conflict, students might point to Katniss' involvement in the Hunger Games.) Through personal journals and group work, I can assess what their skill levels are and correct any large misconceptions about story development by giving strong counter-examples. Students will have prior experience learning about plot parts and other literary techniques necessary for writing their novels, but we will review this information and then apply in in their novel maps. This is a stepping stone for their later use within the novel, and its both a summative assessment of what they understand and a formative assessment for what they need more instruction on within novel writing. This will tie into the beginning of the unit by explicitly describing and creating pieces of good novels. In this section we will learn the importance of and practice dialogue, character development, descriptive writing styles and elements of plot.

As we begin making story maps and (on November 1st) novel writing, we will leans to transfer our ideas about what makes a good story into the stories we are creating. Students are to evaluate their own skill level and set a word count goal they will work towards during the month, with an emphasis on continual writing rather than editing. Each week, students will journal briefly about what's happening in their novel and how they think it's creating a compelling story. They will also have time each week to meet with their literary groups and discuss their personal challenges or places in their story where they think they are stuck. During the month of November, roughly half of class time will be spent purely writing. The remainder will be spent using mini-lessons to reinforce the elements of fiction and brainstorming ideas to try and get a stuck plot moving again. During the time they conference with their groups, they will also bring in an excerpt of their work and read it aloud to give support to students who need peer encouragement as well as to work on fluency and read aloud skills. Each student will have an opportunity to conference with me where we will talk about their successes and challenges, and what they've discovered about the writing process. I will also closely monitor their journals and (if we are working on computers), weekly I want students to email their work to me both for word verification and so their work is backed up somewhere else.

Unit Sequencing: The noveling unit will last five weeks, with the first week forming a background on the novel form and creating novel maps, and the month of November will be mostly dedicated to writing furiously and meeting with groups to overcome challenges. To hook students, we will begin by discussing what it means to be creative and using students favorite novels as a jumping off point. To continually engage students, we will have a class word counter, occasional daily word count goals, and weekly dares of topics, characters or situations to include in your novel. To aid student direction and reflection within this unit, students will journal in response to questions that build on the ideas of creativity and value on novels. We will keep the essential questions, What does it mean to be creative? and What makes a story compelling? along with the ideas theyve put up at the beginning of the unit. Many of my initial lessons will involve direct instruction as I review the basics of novel writing and elements of fiction, but to keep student engagement, we will be doing both quick writes in journals and Think, Pair, Share activities. The book discussions and peer review sessions will follow many of the guidelines of interactive instruction- I will set time limits, subject boundaries and a few other guidelines to peer discussions, but the students are responsible for the rest to both learn from each other and help each others writing. Much of the writing time within novel writing will be independent instruction. While I will be available for help, and will continue to monitor student achievement, the students will be responsible for taking initiative and exploring their own writing styles and abilities.

Differentiating: (all novel writing will take place so that every student can set their own word count goals) Struggling readers and writers: for students with learning disabilities or struggling writing/reading skills, students will be able to set their own word count goals. Frontloading information about elements of fiction will

be especially essential for these students, and I will print out guided sheets for the plot rollercoaster, character development, and dialogues to help guide students who need additional help. If students are struggling with creating ideas, they may do a take off on a fairytale or another story. ELL: If students feel comfortable attempting the novel in English, I will support them in similar ways as listed above. If, however, the student does not feel comfortable and would rather write in their native language, I will fully support them. To help with their English language skills, I will request that they summarize every few days what is happening in their story.

Noveling 101
Monday Tuesday Wednesday 3 Creating Conflict Thursday 4 Elements of Plot Make a list of Define and identify examples of conflict inciting incident, rising action, climax, Ask students to falling action, discuss one of the resolution story examples if there was no conflict (boring) Have students brainstorm 3 creative conflicts their character might have to overcome- journal Discuss 4 places a story can begin Establish a sequence of events for their own novel, incorporate conflict- fill in plot roller-coaster Friday 5 1(Starting during last 2 week of October) Defining Novel Characters and Define creativity Setting -students list Intro to NaNoWriMo and inner editor Students write down qualities of good/bad novel based on book they brought in novels theyve read Students quickwrite/discuss characters theyve loved or hated Create character map for protagonist Set elements of setting Students list off important/interesting characteristics of a setting Model novels that students brought in- students create plot map and fill in Quickwrite about challenges/excitement character and setting info of NaNoWriMo in journal Students present info to small group/discuss what makes the book a novel

6 (first day of November) Beginning day of writing- students start with openings (4 diff places)

7 Discussion as class- KWL about writing fiction (temp check) Mini-lesson: Dialogue

9 Free-write Friday 1-2-1 meetings with teacher to discuss progress Turn in journal for checking

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Students have 40 min Split up- students of in-class writing who want to freewrite vs. students who want some guidance.

Dialogue Dares (each week, FB chat example students get a dare to include in their Students come up with novel if theyre definition for dialogue stuck) Example dialogue tags and student practice within novels Free-write for 20 minutes Group meetingschallenges, celebrations, journal 13 Mini-lesson: Description Students write for 3 min. about mysterious item teacher brings in Discuss word choice and sensory choice Description dare: students incorporate the object and description into their story 14 Free-writing time Define constructive criticism- what does powerful feedback look like Meet with groupsbring in excerpt to read out loud Students listen to each other and give one glow and one grow for each

11 Sub-plotting lesson Journals passed back Secondary characters- students make a character map of 2 secondary characters Define sub-plotting and have students come up with examples in groups Students brainstorm

12 Journal bellringer: What challenges are you currently facing in your novel? What are your plans to overcome them? Students review their plot rollercoasters and add details and subplots Review storylines

15 Free-write Friday 1-2-1 meetings with teacher to discuss progress Turn in journals

for 10 minutes about possible sub-plots of secondary characters

with group 30 min free-write

Free-writing time

excerpt Students write a journal entry about what they learned from the feedback that they are going to implement

16 Word Count week! Students set (realistic) word-count goal for Wednesday and Friday, post on desk Free writing 1-2-1 meetings with teacher to discuss progress

17 Students bring in excerpt that they are struggling on for group feedback. Class comes up with dares individually, then posts on the board. Free-writing for 30 minutes

18 Mini-lesson: Plot twists

19 Free-write Friday 1-2-1 meetings with teacher to discuss progress Turn in journals

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Define Plot Twist

Show clip of Plot Twists from Excerpts (typed) YouTube and have are passed 1-2-1 meetings with students come up around, and group teacher to discuss with a surprising members write progress plot twist for a feedback at the fairytale. bottom answering Students who achieved mid-week word count Go back to plot questions goal get candy maps and have Journal reflectionstudents what makes your brainstorm in novel valuable? journals 2 different ways they could incorporate one Quickwrite plot

Students who meet end of week word count goals get cookies

twist

21 Mini-lesson: Climax Define climax and groups draw cartoon examples of climaxes in movies. Students discuss with partner and write draft of climax in journals Free-writing for 20 min

22 Journal- How will your story end? How close are you to staying on your word-count goal? Free-writing 1-2-1 meetings with teacher to discuss progress

23 Dare: Include a surprising character or object from the start of the novel into climax, falling action or resolution. Free-writing for 40 minutes Students share the writing they did in class as an excerpt with their partner. Partner gives 2 ideas of what could be written next. .Happily Ever After lesson

24 Free-write Friday 1-2-1 meetings with Students teacher to discuss quickwrite/compare progress how their favorite Turn in journals book ends and how their favorite movie ends. Explanation of 4 different resolutions with examples.

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26 Show students how to Final day of submit work to the typing-

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28 (First day of 29 30 December) Thank Goodness Work-shopping Students self-edit its Over Party As a class, set ground

word-counter

Have students Free-writing time finish up projects with two short breaks (unless they are to move around finishing at home tonight) Free-write time and as students finish, they may begin to re-read through to edit.

work

Identify 3 areas for editing: conventions, Picture slide-show organization/structure, of process ideas/content Students create Have students read book-covers through story to edit 2x if time permits

Student excerpt readings

rules for constructive criticism Review 3 areas for editing: conventions, organization/structure, ideas/content Groups read work in partners and then discuss/take notes

Noveling 101 Intro Lesson


Your Name: Cate ODonnell Subject Area: Language Arts Grade Level: 8th Grade Instruction time: 55 minutes per day, 5 week unit Lesson Summary Description This lesson is the introductory class for a unit on creative novel writing. The goal of this lesson is to introduce students to the concepts of creative writing and define what makes a novel good based on their experience. We will begin with the essential question, What does it mean to be creative? to which the students will write a brief journal response and then discuss in small groups. As a class, we will then put the ideas up on the board, and the

teacher will introduce National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). We will discuss, using the example of the creativity prompt, what the inner editor is. The students have brought in a favorite novel from home, and in the same small groups, will come up with a definition of a novel, as well as the most important things a good novel needs. Standard(s) Writing: 4. Produce writing in which the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s) What makes a novel or a story compelling? What does it mean to be creative?

Students will understand the purpose and function of a novel. Objective(s) At the end of this lesson (C), students (A) will be able to list 4-10 (D) positive and negative traits of a specific novel (B). At the end of this lesson (C) in small group discussions (D), students (A) will be able to define the inner editor (B) and challenge its functions within the constraints of NaNoWriMo (D). By the end of the lesson (C), students (A) will be able to write a 1 paragraph (D) response about the NaNoWiMo project and its basic mission (B).

Differentiation Struggling readers and writers: This lesson plan is written so that students of varying levels of reading and writing can all work at their own pace (using bulleted notes or short paragraphs). The journal space at the end also allows them to express concerns they have about NaNoWriMo based on their difficulties with writing, and will be addressed individually as need be. ELL students: ELL students will be able to write their papers in either English with a shorter word count or the language they feel most comfortable with, and in accordance with this, most of their preparation may also be done in their native language if they so choose. For this lesson, ELL students will be placed in groups with students that will work with them to understand the questions. Because a lot of the work not in groups is individual, the teacher will walk around and clarify privately when they have an opportunity. Resources & Materials KWL worksheets Posted Rules for NaNoWriMo Student Assessment(s) Written paragraph in journal on their response to the NaNoWriMo project and what they believe will be their strength and their greatest challenge. Teacher will come around and check for completion and level of understanding (a comprehensive response would include reference to creativity, word count, novel, fiction and inner editor) A written list of 4-10 good or bad qualities of a novel based on the novels students brought in. List will be compiled into a classroom list on the board. Teacher walks around and listens during small group discussion about the inner editor and temperature checks for how this applies to NaNoWriMo. Instructional strategies/methods A combination of direct and indirect instruction, this lesson plan uses quick writes, TPS, KWL and group discussions in order to help students achieve understanding.

Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence 1. As a bell-ringer, students will come in and begin journaling in response to the question on the board, What does it mean to be creative? (5 min) 2. Teacher asks students to pair and share their ideas with a partner. (2 min) 3. As a class, students give their ideas about what it means to be creative. Teacher writes ideas on large piece of paper to be posted on the wall for the next month as motivation. (5 min) 4. Introduce National Novel Writing Month like this, Rather than spending a month just learning about how other people are creative, were about to embark on a writing adventure that defines creativity. National Novel Writing Month is thirty days and thirty nights of exploring our imaginations to create novels, and there are three main rules. (1 min) 5. Unveil posted rules: No writing before November 1st or after November 30th, write for quantity of words over quality (until December editing), respect this writing space and each other. Answer questions (3 min) 6. Explain that we will be setting up story maps (based on different elements of novels) on the days leading up to November, and that this is a program people all over the country will be doing during the month. Tell them they will get to set themselves a realistic but challenging word count goal for the end of the month, and that the goal of NaNoWriMo is to get them writing. (3 min) 7. Ask students about responding to the creativity prompt at the beginning of class. Students show via raised hands, Who had trouble thinking of the right words? Who ended up erasing something because it didnt seem good enough? Who just went with the first thing that came to mind? Tell those students who raised hands for the first two questions that the one at fault is their inner editor, something the students who raised their hand for the final question found easier to ignore. (3 min) 8. Have students TPS about what they think the teacher means by the inner editor. Walk around and listen to a few responses, and then bring class back together to explain that usually, the inner editor is a good thing. (5 min) 9. Students take out books theyve brought in and silently journal write 4-10 things they think make the book bad or good. (3 minutes) 10. Small group discussion comparison of lists- each group compiles a master list of the most common/important positive and negative book traits, then presents top 5 from the positive list to the class. (10 min)

11. Teacher passes out worksheets with KWL format. Teacher models one K and one W and then students fill it out individually (without the L for now). When done, students are to write a paragraph in their journal about what they are most excited about NaNoWriMo, and what their biggest challenge will be. (10 min) 12. For an exit slip, students write their most burning W on a sticky note and stick it on the door while they leave. (1 min)

Noveling 101 Dialogue Lesson


Your Name: Cate ODonnell Subject Area: Language Arts Grade Level: 8th Grade Instruction time: 55 minutes per day, 5 week unit Lesson Summary Description This lesson occurs shortly after the students have begun writing their novels. The mini-lesson on dialogue will begin with students identifying an example of dialogue in their novel and reading it aloud to a partner. In groups, students will come up with definitions for dialogue. They will then be shown an example of a descriptive vs. nondescriptive Facebook chat and identify with their partners exactly what makes one more interesting than the other. Then, given one brief dialogue interlude, students will come up with their own dialogue tags in a group and share with rest of class. Class will have an opportunity to write more of their novel at the end of class. Standard(s) Writing: 3d. Choose words and phrases to effectively develop the events, experiences, and ideas precisely and to create mood.

Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s) Create a novel with attention to imagination and plot functions. Present and read aloud their own writing, as well as revise other student writing

Objective(s) By the end of the lesson (C), students (A) will be able to define and identify effective dialogue and dialogue tags (B) in a group setting(C). By the end of the lesson (C), students (A) will be able to develop the characters and events in their group novel by adding effective dialogue (B) that includes precise words and phrases (D). Differentiation ELL: students who are writing their novels in another language may, if their limited English skills call for it, be given example dialogues in their native language for part of the lesson, in English for another part. BD students: individuals who struggle to pay attention will always have the opportunity to write standing up at music stands at the back of the room. In this lesson, students will have brief and interesting dialogues to respond to, and therefore it will be easier to keep students focused. Resources & Materials Overhead/Facebook Dialogue slides Dialogue tag handouts Student Assessment(s) Students definitions of dialogue and application of dialogue tags within groups provide a good temperature check as to whether or not they understand what dialogue is.

Students will write effective dialogue into the next section of their novel that the teacher will walk around and check. Instructional strategies/methods The strategies predominately used will be TPS and group work, along with concrete examples of dialogue so students have something modeling good writing. There will be a limited amount of direct instruction- students will mostly use peer knowledge and guided questions. Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence 1. Students enter room and find a question on the board, So why dialogue? Teacher begins class by asking students the question, Why is dialogue important? and writing the answers on the board. (3 min) 2. Students find an example in their novel where they have used dialogue and read it aloud to their partner. (3 min) 3. In small groups, students come up with a definition of dialogue and write it down on a large piece of paper. Once students have their definition down, one individual from the group will bring it up to the front of the room, read the definition to the class, and past the piece of paper on the front board. (5 min) 4. Teacher will put up on overhead an example of a Facebook chat. Two students will read aloud the different parts. (2 min) 5. Teacher will put up the second (more descriptive example) up on the overhead, and two students will read it aloud. Teacher will ask, If these were in books, which one seems like you would want to keep reading? (3 min) 6. Students TPS reasons why they think the later is more interesting to read than the first one. (1 min) 7. Teacher passes out a handout which defines Dialogue tags and has two examples of different ways to use the same phrase. Students in groups then read these aloud and come up with a different dialogue tag for the same dialogue. (10 min) 8. Students read aloud their new dialogue and tags for the class. (8 min) 9. For the remainder of class, students will continue writing their novels individually. The teacher will come around to check what theyre working on, and they must be prepared to show them dialogue theyve written during class today. (20 min)

Noveling 101 Editing Lesson


Your Name: Cate ODonnell Subject Area: Language Arts Grade Level: 8th Grade Instruction time: 55 minutes per day, 5 week unit Lesson Summary Description The class will begin with some brief free writing time. After that, the teacher will give examples of effective and ineffective constructive criticism, and then the class will make a list of ground rules for giving feedback on each others work. Students will meet in their small groups and will read a pre-selected excerpt from their novels. While they read aloud their work, students in their circle will write down feedback in a couple different areas, and will offer both positive and constructive feedback. Once students have received feedback, they will have the opportunity to ask other questions about their work. After all group members have read, students will write a journal entry about how they will incorporate the feedback into their novel as they move forward. Standard(s) Writing: 4. Produce writing in which the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience 5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach after rethinking how well questions of purpose and context have been addressed. Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s)

Present and read aloud their own writing, as well as revise other student writing

Objective(s) By the end of the lesson (C), students (A) will be able to give meaningful feedback on peers writing (B) by addressing three different parts of feedback (D). By the end of the lesson (C), students (A) will be able to reflect on and apply constructive criticism from peers into their own writing (B).

Differentiation ELL students/struggling readers: for students who struggle to read aloud, they will have the opportunity to pick a shorter excerpt to read aloud. They will also have a chance to go in the hallway to practice reading their piece aloud during free-write time at the beginning of class. BD students: These students may choose to write standing up, as always, and in groups, they may choose to move to a different part of the room or stand in order to pay attention. The teachers constant watching will keep the students on task, but their responsibility to the rest of the group and the class pledge will also hold them accountable for paying attention and behaving appropriately. Resources & Materials NA Student Assessment(s) During peer feedback sessions, students will write down and then verbally give constructive criticism based on three questions: what is the author doing that works well and should be continued; what was challenging to understand or did not make sense; and what descriptions, dialogue, or plot changes would make the story more engaging?

Journal entries will require students to explore and reflect on the feedback they received from their peers and explain how they will incorporate the constructive criticism in the future. Instructional strategies/methods This lesson will be predominately group work as they learn how to give and receive meaningful feedback. In addition to cooperative learning, they will also spend some time reflecting on what work theyve done and how to apply what theyve learned to it. Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence 1. Students come in and have time to free write in their novels. If they did not previously select an excerpt of their novels to read in groups, then they may use this time to do so. (15 min) 2. Teacher gives an example of effective vs. ineffective criticism for students based on their behavior during free write time, i.e. Good job during free write time! vs. You were very focused and quiet for the last few minutes of writing- keep it up next time! (2 min) 3. Students will TPS with a partner about what makes constructive criticism helpful or not. (1 min) 4. As a class, students supply ideas for class ground rules for constructive criticism to write on board. Ideas include respect for others ideas, honest feedback, active listening. Students do cheesy I-Vow-To-Uphold pledge. (5 min) 5. Students are instructed on the three questions to answer for each participant: what is the author doing that works well and should be continued; what was challenging to understand or did not make sense; and what descriptions, dialogue, or plot changes would make the story more engaging? (1 min) 6. Students break off into small groups and each student reads their excerpt aloud. Once the group members have answered the questions and added any additional feedback, the author may ask questions or clarify things in the story. During the peer feedback session, the teacher is walking around and surveying student participation or helping students give appropriate feedback (15 min). 7. Once students have completed feedback, they will journal for a few minutes about how they will specifically apply the information they were given during feedback. (5 min)