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Grace

Jones

Topic/Them e: Lord of the Flies/ Dystopia

Time frame: 4 W eeks Class/Grade Level: 10 th grade, English State Content Standards: (What state standards will you be addressing in this unit?) 9-10 students will analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the -Grades course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. 9-10 students will write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and -Grades and sufficient evidence. relevant 9-10 students will analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is -Grades emphasized or absent in each treatment. What facts and basic concepts should students know What skills and/or abilities should students acquire by the end of this unit? by the end of the unit? Students will know Students will be able to independently use their learning to -Characterization -Dystopian themes in literature -Understand how to cite information from a given text -The social psychology present in Lord of the Flies and The -Build connections between novels and films Hunger Games -Detect and analyze characterization and themes within texts -Speak comfortably within a classroom setting

UbD Template Adapted from Wiggins and McTighe

Stage 1Desired Results (Meaning)

What Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas do you want students to take away from this unit? Grace Jones Students will understand that -Characterization is in all texts and in different text forms -Building connections within essays or journal entries is important as they develop within their academic career -Texts of different types and forms can/are interrelated

Stage 1Desired Results (Continued) (Meaning)

What are the Essential Questions will you use to guide the learning in this unit? Students will keep considering -Why do authors write their characters they way they do? -What is achieved through distinct characterization? -Why is dystopia such a common theme in literature and film? -What are the authors and filmmakers attempting to say about our society? -What are some common themes between these works?

Summative Assessment (Performance-based):

Grace Jones

Socratic Seminar: During our Socratic Seminar over the poem on dystopia students will actively engage in discussion on the topic and how it relates to the unit as a whole. All students will be expected to contribute to the conversation. This will be monitored both by me, the teacher, and the students in the outer circle who will evaluate the inner circle students conversations. This practice will encourage (1) student participation (2) student understanding of the text at hand and LOTF and (3) student ability to build connections between works. Dystopia short essay: This essay will serve as an introduction to the concept of dystopia and to the unit. Students will discuss as a group and then each write their own short (1-2 pages) essays on their concept of dystopia. They can use evidence from culture and from their class discussions within their essay. I will also use this essay as a way to introduce/review the idea of having an introduction, body paragraphs, conclusion, thesis, etc. within your essays. Once the students produce the work I will be able to evaluate their grasp on these concepts. Dystopian characters essay: This essay will build on the last one but will have students focus on the characters in LOTF and how these characters are affected within their dystopian world. Since a major theme of the unit is characterization, this will serve as a midway check point to see how students are understanding the characters in the novel and the characterization that Golding employs in order to change/enhance those characters. Film/Novel comparison essay: After we have viewed selected scenes from The Hunger Games movie, students will be expected to write a response in which they compare the dystopian ideas in each work and how they are alike, how they are different, and what these ideas serve within the works themselves. Final essay: In the final essay of the unit, students will examine the characterization within both LOTF and The Hunger Games movie clips. They will use citations and a 5-paragraph essay structure in order to display their understanding of characterization within dystopian works. Other Summative Assessments (selected-response, extended written response, personal communication, performance-based): Journaling: Students will journal three times a week on the previous nights readings. They will be asked specific questions in order to propel their entries into thought-provoking writings. Conferences: Students will be given in-class time to workshop for their final essay. During this time, I will sit down for 5-10 minutes with each student and question them on their understanding and help them with any questions they may have.

Stage 2Evidence of Desired Results

Grace Jones Pre-assessments Pre vocabulary test: Over words such as dystopia, characterization, theme, and voice. This will help me gauge students understanding of these concepts. Discussion over essay organization: I will do this as a discussion so as not to make students more comfortable. I will use this to evaluate what the overall understanding of essay organization/5 paragraph essays is. For students who already have a good understanding of these concepts and of essay organization, I will try and engage them in meaningful conversations that will help them go above and beyond in their writings. Introductory Lessons & Assessments I will introduce students to the Essential Questions, so that they are completely aware of where this unit is going and what its purpose is. On the first day of the Unit, we will have an introduction of dystopia which will get students interested and engaged in the topic. We will watch clips from various movies/shows that display both utopia and dystopia (to display the differences between the two concepts). I will also have students journal over what dystopia means to them and any examples they can think of, which will prep them for the next days class. The next day we will go to my First Lesson Plan (see attached), which will have students explore in their writing the concept of dystopia.

Stage 3Learning Plan

Interm ediate Lessons & Assessments After coming up with an overall understanding of dystopia, we will delve into the novel Lord of the Flies. With this, I will have students begin to come up with character charts that discuss different characters, which will feed into a later essay on characterization. Further, during the 2nd week we will have our Socratic Seminar (see attached 2nd Lesson Plan), which will get students thinking about the connections between the two different works. This will help them develop not only communication but also get them thinking about the connections between works. Hopefully as we move further into the novel and watch clips from The Hunger Games, the students will begin to see how overarching of a theme dystopia is. This will feed into the novel/film comparison essay which will allow them to develop their ideas on dystopia within different works. Ending Lessons & Assessments As we end the third week, I will have students write their essays on dystopian characters. This will feed off of the character charts that they have been working on throughout the reading of the novel. During the fourth and final week, students will begin prepping for their final essay, which will focus on the overall theme of dystopia, and its presence within these works. Their film/novel comparison essay will feed into this and get them ready to go more in depth on the subject. After handing the assignment prompt out on Monday, we will spend Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday workshopping as a means of getting the students prepared tow rite their essay. Throughout these days I will sit down with each student for 5-10 minutes and confer with them on their ideas for the final essay. This will be a means of informally evaluating where students are and getting a grasp on their understanding on the topic.

Grace Jones

Unit: Lord of the Flies & Dystopia



Week 1 1 -Pre-Vocabulary test -Ppt on essay organization: this will lead to a discussion and then some partner work as they are given a wrongly formatted essay and must correct it Make changes for the next week based on the results Monday 2 -Introduction to LOTF and William Golding -Watch the trailer to the movie -Thing-Pair-Share: What is dystopia? What does this word mean to you? Turn in an exit slip Tuesday 3 -Begin discussion on dystopia -View clips from movies about dystopia and utopia -Journal Entry: How has your understanding of dystopia changed since yesterday? What is an example of one? Wednesday 4 Lesson Plan #1 -Think-Pair-Share on dystopiaturn into a Sharing Whip -Hand out and explain the Assignment prompt -Students get into pre- chosen groups to make a graphic organizer or list of their ideas on dystopia -Each group will read their MVP from their work -Students will be given time to ask questions about the short essay they need to write. 9 Thursday

Pacing Calendar
Friday 5 -Students will have 20 minutes computer time to finish up their essays from yesterday (and to ask questions) -Introduction of Socratic Seminar -We will have already done a seminar this semester, but we will review what will be expected of students on Monday -Hand out assignment sheet, have a student read the poem aloud 10

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Lesson Plan #2 -Divide students into groups, form inner and outer circle, begin Socratic Seminar -Assign first two chapters of LOTF

-Journal Entry: Opening thoughts on LOTF; what evidence so far of dystopia? -Analyze relation between poem on Dystopia and dystopia in book so far -Assign ch. 3-4 12 Essay Due -Begin more in-depth discussion of characterization -Think-Pair-Share: How has Jack changed through the novel? Ralph? -Assign ch 9-10

-Admit Slip: Favorite character of the book so far, and why -View clip of the Reaping in The Hunger Games -Discuss connection between works -Assign ch 5-6 13 Lesson Plan #3 -Think-Pair- Share: How is characterization important in this novel? -Sharing Whip of discussion -Discussion of Character Charts that weve been working on, further development -Hand out assignment prompt 18 -Essay Workshopping -Quick rundown of MLA, other

-View more clips from The Hunger Games movie -Split into groups and create a venn diagram comparing the two works -No reading assignment

-Introduce film/novel comparison essay -Discuss essay basics and expectations -Essay to be due next Tuesday -Assign Ch 7-8 15 Characterization Essay due -Journal Entry: relation between characterization and dystopia within the novel -This will feed into a class discussion of dystopian characterization, looking at both LOTF and The Hunger Games -Assign end of novel

11 -Journal Entry: The boys fake hunt of Robert gets out of hand quickly. What does this fake hunt say about their loss of humanity? The presence of dystopian content? Computer Lab time -Ask questions and work on essays -Quick review of MLA formatting basics

14 Computer Lab Time -Discussion of characterization -Answer questions

16 -Journal Entry: Reaction to the end of the novel -Class analysis of the -Essay Workshopping -Brainstorm ideas -Discuss with partner

17

19 -Essay Worshopping -Computer Lab time -Work on Rough Draft

20 -Essay Due -Review Essential Questions -Post Vocabulary Test

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end of the novel, what it means -Introduce final essay on LOTF and dystopia, can use other works that weve discussed as well

-Exit Slip on how youre feeling about this essay -Use to evaluate next days lesson

requirements -Computer Lab time -Should be done with a rough draft by now

with partner, begin to make final changes

-Introduction of next unit

Grace Jones

Your Name: Grace Jones Name of Unit: Lord of the Flies and Dystopia
Subject Area: English Language Arts Grade Level: 10th Instruction time: 45 minutes

Lesson Summary Description


This lesson will serve as our introduction to the Dystopia and Lord of the Flies unit. After a short presentation by my self on what dystopia is, students will be handed the assignment prompt for this lesson. This prompt outlines their first short writing assignment in which they will discuss dystopia and what it is according to our culture and according to them. After outlining this assignment for students, we will break off into groups of 3-4 and students will create a list or graphic organizer of their ideas/concepts of dystopia. My own PowerPoint will be left up so as to help them when they get stuck. Throughout this, I will circle and answer questions/guide the groups as they get off track. With the last 5-10 minutes of class, I will bring everyone back together and answer any questions, or if there are none, then students will share their different ideas of dystopia.

Standard(s) (taken from the Common Core)


-Grades 9-10 students will write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. -Grades 9-10 students will write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

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-Grades 9-10 students will introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s)


-Why is dystopia such a common theme in literature? -What are authors attempting to say or do when they use this theme? -How is dystopia relevant within our culture?

Objective(s)
At the end of this lesson (C), students (A) will be able to identify (B) the essential concepts behind dystopian works, and will be properly prepared to respond (C) to the prompt (D). After writing their essay from the prompt (C), students (A) will have integrated (B) their in class discussion with their own ideas and will have written a well-developed short essay (D).

Differentiation
Need: havent had a lot of essay writing experience Response: If Im already aware of students who struggle with writing, I will group those students together during the group time and give them specific information to use and a more detailed prompt that includes sentence prompts and a detailed outline on how to build an essay (process). If I decide its necessary, I will also shorten the essay length in order to accommodate them (content).

Grace Jones

Need: ESL Student Response: If I had an ESL student in my classroom, I would want to frontload them with as much information as possible so that they can understand the content better. Id give the student a supplemental handout defining dystopia and breaking the concepts that the essay require down enough so that they can understand it (content). I would do this so that they are properly prepared to succeed with this assignment (readiness. For the essay portion of this lesson, I will also shorten the essay length in order to accommodate their needs (content).

Resources & Materials


-Computer/projector for PowerPoint -Assignment prompts (see attached)

Student Assessment(s)
I will informally assess students during the group work portion of this lesson. As I circle the class, I will observe the groups to ensure that everyone is participating and contributing, and to check the levels of understanding that are present. I will formally assess students once they hand in their papers on dystopia. Since this is the first writing of the unit, I think I will need to grade it more lightly but I will check for (a) understanding of the concept of dystopia (b) ability to organize an essay into clearly defined parts and (c) development of the ideas from class to the paper.

Instructional strategies/methods
This lesson will feature both direct and indirect instruction. The direct portion will occur at the beginning of the class period during the PowerPoint. Since this is information that I need the kids to immediately see and process, I am presenting it in this way so that they will be better equipped to do their group work and, later, their essay. After this direct instruction, we will move on to the group work, which will be more of an indirect approach. Students will work together in order to come up with ideas on dystopia, but the PowerPoint will still be available to them, as will my a portion of my own list of dystopian concepts and ideas. I want this to be available to students so that they can reference it if need be and can access the information on their own.

Grace Jones

Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence


1. 10 minutes: PowerPoint over dystopia. This will serve as the introduction to this concept for many students. Therefore, it will outline the definition of dystopia, why its such a common theme, and where its popped up (including references that hopefully many students will know). 2. 10 minutes: From the PowerPoint, I will hand out the assignment prompt. I will have a student read it out loud for the class and then I myself will read it and add in necessary comments (in order to increase comprehension). From here, I will divide students into already chosen groups based off of differentiation. 3. 15 minutes: Students will be asked to make a list or graphic organizer (their choice) of the concept of dystopia. They can and should use their prompt as a guide and attempt to answer the questions on it together. This will allow them to create a better, overall understanding of what dystopia is and prepare them for their essay. 4. 10 minutes: One student from each group will present their MVP (most valuable point) of what they discussed, aka what they deem to be the most important. Students will be encouraged to write down things they find interesting or pertinent to their writing. The remaining time will be used to answer any questions about dystopia or about the prompt.

Grace Jones

Your Name: Grace Jones Name of Unit: Lord of the Flies and Dystopia
Subject Area: English Language Arts Grade Level: 10th Instruction time: 45 minutes

Lesson Summary Description


This lesson will come during the second week of my classs unit on Lord of the Flies and dystopia. Previously, students have written an essay on the concept of dystopia and began reading Goldings novel. By doing this at the beginning of the second week of the unit, I will be able to ensure that students already possess the base knowledge needed to analyze this poem and its commentary on dystopia fully. Students will also be able to more fully relate the poem to the novel, which will lead to a more fully developed analysis. A Socratic Seminar is a structured discussion in which the teacher merely observes. There are two circles, an outer and an inner, that switch places halfway through. The inner circle students are the only ones allowed to contribute to the conversation during their time. While the inner circle is discussing, the outer circle is listening and evaluating what is happening. After the allotted time, the outer circle can give advice or praise to the students in the inner circle. After this, the students switch places. The day before this lesson I would prepare students for the Socratic Seminar by going over the rubric (see attached) and explaining to them the process. Some students may have experience with this type of discussion and some wont, therefore it is important to be explicitly clear about what is expected.

Standard(s)
1. Grades 9-10 students will initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 910 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing

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their own clearly and persuasively. A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. B. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s)


-What are some common themes between this poem and Goldings novel, so far? -Why is dystopia such a common theme in literature? -What is the relationship between the narrator of this poem and the society that hes a part of?

Objective(s)
At the end of the Socratic Seminar, students (A) will be able to identify (B) the dystopian ideas present within the poem, which will be evident through their annotations of the poem and their discussion (D). At the end of the Socratic Seminar, students (A) will be able to determine (B) the relationship between this poem and Lord of the Flies, which will be evident through the quality of their discussion (D).

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Affective Objective: At the end of the Socratic Seminar, students (A) will be able to understand (B) the relationship between annotation and discussion, which will be evident through their annotation and the quality of their discussion (D).

Differentiation
Need: Shyness/unwillingness to talk in class Response: Within a Socratic Seminar, students are encouraged to question each other and do their best to give every student a chance to talk. Despite this, there are still those students who are unwilling to talk. While students who dont talk still may be docked a point or two, I would encourage them to do even MORE annotation on the poem in order to show me that they do in fact comprehend the text and I would weigh these ideas into consideration when grading them (product).

Resources & Materials


-Copies of Dystopia by Josh Gibbens -Copies of rubric

Student Assessment(s)
The structure of the Socratic Seminar calls for mostly informal assessment. As the instructor, my role will just be to call time and keep track of who is speaking and who isnt (also, to keep things in line if things get out of control). Through keeping track of how many times students speak, I will be able to tell their understanding of the relationship between their annotations and the discussions. Further, after looking over their annotations of the poem, I will be able to assess if they can identify the dystopian ideas present within the poem. This, and their discussion, will also help me understand if they have made the connections between the poem and their reading of Lord of the Flies.

Grace Jones

Instructional strategies/methods
A Socratic Seminar is an instructional strategy in and of itself. This strategy calls for a different approach to understanding a given piece of literature or text and allows for more students to comment and give their thoughts on the topic at hand. This also allows students to make the text their own; they can guide the discussion (so long as it is productive) and answer the questions they want answered. This is a form of indirect instruction, as it calls for the students to make the lesson their own, to manipulate the texts in whatever way they see fit. Give one glow/one grow is a strategy which calls for students to prepare one good thing about the discussion that occurred in the inner circle (a glow) and then one thing that could use improvement for next time (a grow). By having them think of something that could use improvement, it makes the comments less negative in nature and allows them to be more helpful.

Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence


1. 5 minutes: Organization and review of the process of a Socratic Seminar. This will serve to make sure all the students are prepared for the activity. We will also number off to decide who will be in each circle. 2. 18 minutes: Group 1 Inner Circle. Students will be responsible for guiding the discussion during this time. They will bounce ideas off each other and attempt to answer the questions provided with the poem. The students in the outer circle will make notes on their rubrics on who is doing well and who could speak more. They should prepare themselves to give commentary once Group 1 is done. Group 1 will discuss for 15 minutes and in the final 3 minutes, Group 2 will need to provide their commentary on the quality of the discussion. 3. 18 minutes: Group 2 Inner Circle. Students will be responsible for guiding the discussion during this time. They will bounce ideas off each other and attempt to answer the questions provided with the poem. The students in the outer circle will make notes on their rubrics on who is doing well and who could speak more. They should prepare themselves to give commentary once Group 2 is done. Group 1 will discuss for 15 minutes and in the final 3 minutes, Group 1 will need to provide their commentary on the quality of the discussion. 4. 4 minutes: With the remaining time, we will discuss the pros and cons of evaluating the text in this manner. Students will then be expected to hand in their assignment sheet (attached) which shows their annotations and their comments on the other group.

Grace Jones

Socratic Seminar (Assignment Sheet for Lesson #2)


While you read this poem, you will want to make your thinking visible. This is called annotation. Circle, underline, highlight the words and concepts you find important. Write down questions as you think of them. Let us see what you were thinking as you read the poem. Attempt to come up with answer for the following questions that will be discussed during tomorrows Seminar: What are some common themes between this poem and Goldings novel? Why is dystopia such a common theme in literature? What is the relationship between the narrator and the society that hes discussing.
Morbidly cold to the touch, Mere machines Blackness permeating everywhere, Flesh providing no warmth I dream of what the world could have been like, Full of colour and life, full of creativity and uniqueness No place to voice my ideas, Dangerous ideas crushed by those in control Part of one collective mind, Merely a subjugated citizen!

Dystopia
Smoke pumping into the sky, A Gothic Skyline filled with black Black architecture, Dominating a brooding landscape Clanking cogs grinding, Making an inhuman scream People walking silently, In black uniform lines No individuality survives, Everyone dressed the same, skin pale to the eye

Josh Gibbens

Use the following rubric as a guide for you to evaluate the Inner Circle. You can write names in the boxes where you think different people belong, or you could just use these ideas as something to keep in mind when you write your glow/grow. Remember, a glow is something that was done well. It can be about a specific person, or the whole group. A grow is something that was done just OK but theres room for improvement. This should focus on the group discussion as a whole, and not one person.

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GLOW: Participation is Outstanding

GROW:

Participation is very good

Participant offers enough solid analysis, without prompting, to move the conversation forward Participant, through his/her comments, demonstrates a deep knowledge of the text and the question Participant has come to the seminar prepared, with notes and a marked/annotated text Participant, through his/her comments, shows that he/she is actively listening to other participants She/he offers clarification and/or follow-up that extends the conversation Participant's remarks often refer to specific parts of the text Participant offers solid analysis without prompting Through his/her comments, participant demonstrates a good knowledge of the text and the question Participant has come to the seminar prepared with notes and/or a

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marked/annotated text Participant shows that he/she is actively listening to others. She/he offers clarification and/or follow-up Participation is satisfactory Participant offers some analysis, but needs prompting from the seminar leader and/or others Through his/her comments, participant demonstrates a general knowledge of the text and the question Participant is less prepared, with few notes and no marked/annotated text Participant is actively listening to others, but does not offer clarification and/or follow-up to others' comments Participant relies more upon his/her opinion, and less on the text to drive his/her comments Participant offers little commentary Participant comes to the seminar ill- prepared with little understanding of the text and question Participant does not listen to others, offers no commentary to further the discussion

Participation is not satisfactory

Reconfigured rubric based on Adams@studyguide.org

Grace Jones

Your Name: Grace Jones Name of Unit: Lord of the Flies and Dystopia
Subject Area: English Language Arts Grade Level: 10th Instruction time: 45 minutes

Lesson Summary Description


For this lesson, students are going to delve further into the topic of characters and what the characters roles are within the dystopian texts that we have read. During this days class period, I will have students get out their character charts that they have been working on so that we can begin to analyze characterization within the texts. This lesson will come at the end of the third week as students near the end of Lord of the Flies. To start the lesson off, as a class we will look over my own character chart and I will model for students what information they are going to want to use in developing their ideas for their essay. We will discuss word choice and character actions that have an effect on the overall characterization of the character. Students will be allowed to choose which character they write their essay on, so long as they are able to fully develop their character and create an interpretation as to why the author created the character in this way.

Standard(s)
Grades 9-10 students will analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Grades 9-10 students will cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

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Grades 9-10 students will write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s)


-Why do authors create their characters in the way that they do? -What purpose does strong characterization serve? -Why is it important to pay attention to characterization when reading a text?

Objective(s)
At the end of this lesson (C), students (A) will be able to identify (B) phrasing and actions that create characters, which will be evident through their character charts and essays (D). At the end of this lesson (C), students (A) will be able to reflect (B) on the concept of characterization and its purpose within text, which will be seen through their essay (D).

Differentiation
As students work on developing their essays, there may be some who havent paid attention as weve gone through the novel or who havent read the entirety of the readings. For these students, Im going to want to talk with them and gauge their understanding thus far. If they really are not ready for this essay and the level of comprehension it requires, I might have them just turn in a more detailed version of the character chart, or perhaps an outline on their favorite character within the novel.

Resources & Materials


-Assignment prompts -Character Charts

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-ELMO to work on character charts as a class

Student Assessment(s)
The essay that students turn in for this will be both summative and formative. During the first two weeks of the Unit, students worked on their character charts and developed their concepts of characterization within the text. Since this essay is a summarization of their understanding and learning of characterization, it is summative so that I can understand where students are at in their comprehension. It is also formative since students will still build off of this in the next week when they write their final essay. They may want to reference some of the ideas they use in this essay as they workshop and develop their final writing.

Instructional strategies/methods
Think-pair-share: I will start the class with a question asking them how characterization comes into play in Lord of the Flies and other novels theyve read. They will then pair off and discuss their answer and one student from the pair will share with the class what their thoughts are on the concept. This lesson will involve a lot of direct instruction as I model my character chart and we add to it together. After this, we will get into a discussion of the essay based off of the prompt that I hand out. I will want to make sure students are properly prepared to begin working on their essays that evening after class. Then, the next day, they can come in with any questions they may have.

Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence


1. 10 minutes: Think-pair-share: Introduce the days lesson by telling students that we are going to be focusing even more on characterization. And then, present the question of, How does characterization come into play/how is it important within Lord of the Flies? Then students will think about their answers until I have them pair off and discuss with their partner their answer. After 5 minutes of partner time, we will do a sharing whip and one partner from each pair will share what conclusions they came to.

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2. 15 minutes: Character Chart Modeling: During this time, I will have a blank character chart on the ELMO and the students will help me fill it in based off of their own character charts (which should already be near completion). I will guide their commentary by asking them guiding questions, such as, How does Jacks personality affect his actions on the island? 3. 15 minutes: Assignment breakdown: This is when I will hand out the assignment prompt for the essay on characterization. I will have on student read the prompt aloud and then I, myself, will read it aloud and add in some extra comments (to increase comprehension). I will outline things such as the due date, the length, and the organization. 4. 5 minutes: Brainstorm: During this time, students will be able to ask me any questions they have about the assignment and bring up ideas they might have regarding what they are going to write about.

Grace Jones

(Assignment Sheet for Lesson #3)

Characterization within Lord of the Flies Mini essay: due in two class periods You have already been working on your character charts about the characters in William Goldings Lord of the Flies. These charts are going to be what you want to use to guide you as you write this next essay. Understanding characterization is key in understanding how things play out in LOTF. The personalities of each character help define why things end up the way they do. Keeping this in mind, you need to develop a 1-2 page essay that focuses on one character. Once you decide which character you want to write about, think about the following questions: -What is his personality? -How does his personality change through the course of the novel? -What are some words or phrases that help characterize this character? As you think about these questions, find specific quotes from the book that help your argument on the importance of characterization within the novel. Try and develop your ideas on characterization and how the characters differences effect the course of the novel. While yes, this paper is only 1-2 pages, make sure that you fully develop your ideas and organize them in an understandable way.