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Unit Title: Potter's Wheel Grade level: High School Ceramics Length of unit: 4 weeks

Caitlyn McLaughlin

Stage 1 Desired Results Meaning Learning Goals: Enduring Understandings: 1. Art can be captured in a variety of media and techniques. 2. A wide variety of products can be created on the wheel. 3. Many elements of art can be expressed in clay. Essential Questions: 1. How can wheel thrown art be considered artwork? 2. What can be achieved by manipulating clay on the wheel?

1:a, 1:c, 2:a, 2:c, 2:e, 3:c, 4:d, 4:e

Knowledge & Skills Acquisition Students will know Artists/Cultures Asian pottery Bernard Leach Ancient Mediterranean pottery Terms relating to pottery Centering/opening Part of a pot (i.e. foot, body, lip) Kidney Pulling Functional/nonfunctional Grog Bat Kick wheel Electric Wheel Air Pockets Resources Clay times handout You-tube video basic pot Ancient pottery handout Leach video Students will be able to Evaluate ceramic medium using the elements of art. Wedge, clay successfully to avoid air pockets Center clay on the wheel Open clay and pull Create a basic cylinder at least 5 inches high o Advance students will be able to create other shapes. o Advanced students will be able to create lightweight, near blemish free pieces of heights 10 inches or more Pull handles/ address foot and lip to create crack-free forms o Advance students will be able to add handles, spouts, lids, ect. Trim and remove from the wheel o Advanced students will be able to combine wheel thrown pieces

Stage 2 Evidence (Assessment) Types of assessment: Selected-Response (Tests, quizzes); Personal Communication (Interview, Oral exam); Written Response (Short constructed response, essay); Performance Assessment (Role-play, Simulation, Lab, Dramatization) Pre-assessment: Students will experiment with the electric wheel and demonstrate their ability to center, open and pull pots as well as removing their work from the wheel. Students will take a short vocabulary quiz to evaluate their knowledge of the vocab terms. Students will be informally questioned of their prior knowledge of the potters wheel on using and controlling the electric wheel.

Formative Assessments: Students will be assessed on their sketch plans of their 3 projects for the wheel ( one bowl and one 5 inch cylinder [more for advanced students] with one pound of clay and a final choice project), and communicate any issues or ideas that may help direct their projects. Students will participate in and present their work during in- progress critique of each project. Student will be assessed on their progress of ability to center, open and pull pieces successfully, advanced students will also be assessed on their progress based on their ability to control the clay and create unique shapes and a variety of sizes.

Summative Assessment: Once fired and glazed students will be assessed with a critique based on participation and presentation of their pieces. Students will discuss their classmates projects and analyze the elements of art and evaluate the students successes and CONTRUCTIVE criticisms. Students presenting their work will discuss their artist statement and explain their thought process (communication/ oral exam). o Students work will be assessed with a rubric (handed out with the initial assignment sheet). o Students are assessed on their explanation of how they expressed themselves in their final project in their artists statement (written response).

Week Mon Day1 Pre 1


Assess -ment B week

Tues Day2 2

Wed Day3 3

Thurs Day4
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Fri Day 5
5 Wrap up Critique from hand building unit. Transition into a conversation on wheel pottery. Gauge the amount of students who have worked on a wheel before. Ask students to bring in a pail and towels.

1 A week

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As students enter the classroom, I will ask them to watch me on the wheel Discuss the steps and techniques. Discuss 1st step in depth, demonstrate set-up and centering. the Students will be asked to center 1 lb of clay. Other half will learn wedging techniques/ask why is wedging important? Students switch after 20 min. Student will take home and read step 1 on ceramics handout.

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Once class starts I will show a video on Bernard Leach and relate to their history handout. (tie to EQ) I will instruct the advanced students some different ways to open their clay Once students have mastered centering, I will instruct opening clay. I will address vocabulary terms such as foot, lip, body.

2 B week

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Students will fill out an admission slip: What shapes can be created on the wheel? What shapes are created on the wheel? (tie to EQ) Demonstration on pulling clay. Discuss any mistakes or problems I incur during demonstration, How might I fix those? Exit slip: What

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After reading the students exit slips I demonstrate and discuss strategies for creating those shapes. Demonstration on trimming off the wheel and moisture management. Discuss manipulation of wheel thrown clay; adding and subtracting clay. Student can practice some techniques with at least one technique they came up with on their own (tie into EQ).

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Students will be given a handout with techniques and ideas and pictures (art isnt created in a vacuum). (tie into EQ) Student will be given time to create a 5 inch cylinder, advanced students will be encouraged to do 6 or more inches. Finished students will

shapes am I interested in creating on the wheel?

be advised to create more, and choose one to submit. Addressing surface, how is this an artistic choice? (surface texture, element of art). (tie in to EQ).

3 A week

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22 Class discussion on progress of wheel. Students will have a quiz over vocabulary. Demonstrate making bowls/cups Students will be asked to create their bowl if they are ready. Students will have 35 minutes to create or work on their bowls. Students will be asked to bring in examples of pottery made on the wheel, by pictures or actual object.

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24 Discussion on students pictures, what elements of art are present in each students picture? Students will group up and present good examples of certain elements (tie into EQ) (about 10 minutes) Students will sketch 3 ideas for their choice project and present their ideas to me. I will guide their decision by asking them questions about how they will go about the process and help them narrow down a choice. 30 minutes.

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4 Week 4

28 Show a 5 minute clip on addressing surface. Approve each students final sketch. ( half will address surface on their bowls, the other half on the wheel). 20 minutes until class ends students will create a write up discussing their choices (work on at home if they are not finished) (tie into EQ).

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Students will get into pairs (wheelsharing partner) and proof-read each others statements. Read an example statement out loud, allow students to make changes Students will continue on their projects.

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Students are to present their work at their table while the other students discuss the piece in the critique. The artist will then share his/ her ideas on the project from the statement. Students will wrap up discussion and move onto the next piece. This will allow for 6-8 people to share per day.

Each session is 80 minute block schedule

GENERAL INFORMATION Name: Caitlyn McLaughlin Lesson Title: Wheel Basics (centering on the wheel) Grade level(s)/Course: 9-12 Beginner to Intermediate Ceramic s Date taught: October 5th INFORMATION ABOUT THE LESSON Content Standards: NAEA standards 1. Content Standard: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes 2. Content Standard: Using knowledge of *structures and functions 5. Content Standard: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others Enduring Understanding and/or Essential Question: What can be achieved with wheel thrown pottery? Many different forms can be created on the wheel. Instructional Objectives: After a demonstration and explanation of techniques, students will be able to center their piece clay on the wheel with a high degree of accuracy. After a discussion and demonstration, students will apply successful wedging techniques. After leading questions, students will be able to evaluate several important reasons to wedge clay. Prior Learning/Prior Thinking Students may have seen this done as a demonstration before or on television, usually many students have not have a lot of prior experience with wheel thrown pottery. Students will have already learned the basics of clay, including the composition and ingredients as well as choosing the best clay that suits the students needs. Students will already have knowledge with hand-building techniques including manipulation, creating pots, some moisture management and surface texture. Students may not feel the need to follows the steps as directed or skip to the next step before they are ready, usually the most problems come from not having their clay centered. Students may underestimate the importance of centering their clay or wedging their clay. LESSON IMPLEMENTATION Anticipatory Set/Elicit Prior Knowledge I will bring up past errors in student work, like air bubbles in clay, which can be solved with wedging. I will bring in examples of mistakes in moisture management. By asking students what happens when someone applies too much water? Not enough water? Didnt slowly dry out their work? Didnt cover their work? Many students enjoy watching their teacher create something in front of them; it is part

of the mystery that intrigues them. Students may not have had experience with watching someone work on the wheel before. I plan to do a demonstration at the beginning of class to get the kids excited about their potential for this project and get them thinking about what they may be able to achieve. Focus/Purpose Statement The goal of this lesson is to start the students on a solid foundation for building pottery on the wheel. Centering and wedging are especially important, since that is the area where most students have difficulty and it is a first steps to becoming a successful wheel-thrown ceramicist. (Students will be presented with examples of finished works as well as my introduction demonstration so they can have an idea of where thing will be headed.) Procedures I will begin class by inviting students to watch me create a basic cylinder on the wheel (6 minutes) I will start my demo by wedging the clay. I will ask the class leading questions about the importance of wedging you clay before throwing it. What would happen if I did not wedge my clay? Why might this be especially important for wheel thrown pieces? What are some differences between this unwedged piece of clay and this wedged piece of clay? (vocabulary for each step are bulleted)(10 minutes) http://pottery.about.com/od/preparetothrow/tp/3wedgmeth.htm -additional resource 1. rid of air pockets Pug mill Wedging table Cone wedging Bull (cylinder) wedge

2. easier centering 3. aligning the clay particles/ addressing clay shortness Clay memory Clay shortness

I will then begin to go through the steps of throwing basics with my wedged piece of clay, discussing steps while demonstrating. I will address and problems as they occur as good teaching moments, it is likely my students may come across some of these likely problems, and during a discussion we can discuss possible solutions, what happened here? Why do you think that happened? How could I prevent or solve it? Going through the step I plan to address all vocabulary pertaining to these steps ( which are bulleted under each step) 1. Centering on the wheel

Electric wheel Kick wheel Bat

2. Opening on the wheel Lip Foot body

3. Pulling up sides Make a pull

4. Trimming Wood clay tools S crack

5. Finishing Rubber kidney Chamois

I will ask students why each step is important to master before going on to the next step. I will explain my process and tips for each step. Assuming the wheels are limited, I will ask one set of students to practice centering with the clay I provided (1 lb wedged earthenware balls) while the other students are preparing their clay. I will evaluate the students wedging by giving them pointers and demonstrating a few wedging techniques as well as moisture management. Students on the wheel will be given tips on centering personally, therefore any student that is more advanced may challenge herself with the next step (any issues that are widespread may be addressed as a class) and I will ask students to correctly judge if their piece is centered or not. Students who complete this task switch with students who have finished wedging the clay. About 15-20 minutes to the end of class I will have the students clean up and have the students write up an exit slip based on their celebrations and frustrations on the wheel so I may address any issues they did not express me during class (10 minutes to clean up, 5 minutes to write). Students will then be given a handout with Step 1 - Centering the Clay students should be ready to identify the steps to centering for the next class. Handout: http://www.jhpottery.com/tutorial/center.htm

Differentiation Advanced students will be able to practice more advanced steps on the wheel. Students that already know some content can help aid to discussion when more difficult questions are posed. Students with less background can contribute to general ideas during discussion. Each student is capable of providing a fresh perspective that may aid other students; this will hopefully engage all students in critical thinking. I will present students with different learning needs with step by step instructions with pictures so that they may reinforce their learning with an idea of what that instruction looks like. Many language learners may find picture directions better to understand. If, troubles persist I may find instructions in their native language. Special learners may find the wheel exercises very therapeutic and very kinesic, but instead of writing their exit slip special learners and language learners may discuss with me their celebrations and frustration. Pictorial guide to wheel thrown pottery: http://www.lakesidepottery.com/Pages/Potterytips/Throwing-a-pot-Lakeside-Pottery-Tutorial.htm Closure At end of class I will have the students clean up and have the students write up an exit slip based on their celebrations and frustrations on the wheel so I may address any issues they did not express me during class. As well as discuss any breakthroughs or think of possible solutions to problems that occurred, and direct this question at the class What are some possible solution to blank problem? Materials and Resources 1 pound balls of clay. 1 gallon ice cream pail, Water, sponge, electric wheel. towels. paper, pencil, erasers. Set Up: a dozen 1 pound balls of clay. Ice cream buckets (12)one at each wheel, Water bottles at wedging stations, wire to cut clay available at wedging stations, canvas covering the counter to create a wedging station, A large bucket in the sink and next to the sink for old clay and rinsing off dirty hands, lotion and soap available at sinks. Students were to bring in their own towels to prevent the overuse of paper towel materials and are more durable. Students who cannot bring them in will use ones I have provided for them. Before the lesson Gathering information about student knowledge I will examine the students use of vocabulary pertaining to ceramics. I will also examine the students ability to manipulate clays in other areas such as hand -building. Pre-assessment that may be used Short Familiarity quiz on wheel-throwing. Informal questioning. During the lesson During discussion many students will share their finding and breakthroughs. Especially for but not limited to students who do not share as much during class, will be asked

personally about any frustrations or techniques they have found useful (something I would like to hear, so that my future sessions on wheel throwing can be more successful.). I will teach the students how to know if it is centered. I will also observe the students ability to center clay on the wheel and give the students the power to decide if it is centered or not. Students who may be struggling may not know how to tell if the clay is centered or how to get it to successfully center, at this point of time I will suggest they put more weight into their hands or less weight depending on their struggles or use more water if there is too much friction or less water if the clay slips from the center. I will handle these issues by posing question like: What happens if you use more water? Ect. Informal Formative Assessment Asking questions of understanding: Did you get your clay centered, How did you get it centered? Can you demonstrate to me your process? What frustrations do you have? At the end of the lesson Students will complete an exit slip before they leave class on successes and frustrations they experienced trying to center the clay. Were you able to center you clay? If not, what were some things you felt were successful? What problems are you experiencing? May be some starting questions if some students are unsure what to write.

Name:_________________________ Block;____________ Pre-Assessment Quiz: What do I already know? Wheel Throwing 1. Have I ever thrown on the wheel before?___________ 2. If so, what did I make (if needed use the space below to draw the shape)?

3. Name the parts of a pot (4 Points)

4. What is this crack called and what does it mean?

GENERAL INFORMATION Name: Caitlyn McLaughlin Lesson Title: Opening/cultures on pottery Grade level(s)/Course : 9-12 Beginner to Intermediate Ceramic s Date taught: October 7th

INFORMATION ABOUT THE LESSON Content Standards: 4. Content Standard: Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures 1. Content Standard: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes Enduring Understanding and/or Essential Question: 1. How can wheel thrown art be considered artwork? 1. 2. A wide variety of products can be created on the wheel. Many elements of art can be expressed in clay.

Instructional Objectives: While watching the Bernard Leach video, students will evaluate a few parameters of art. After the video, students will analyze 3-4 Japanese influences of Leaches pottery. After a demonstration and follow ups, students will begin to open their clay forms successfully Prior Learning/Prior Thinking From an earlier lesion in hand building I will facilitate a discussion with students about possible techniques they have witnessed during the video which displays Leach manipulating his pot by changing surface texture, adding coils, manipulating its shape, etc.. Students may not have known you can apply the elements of design to building a pot.

LESSON IMPLEMENTATION Anticipatory Set/Elicit Prior Knowledge I will show a video on Bernard Leach, and during the video discuss the techniques he uses and pay attention to his process to bring in a fresh perspective on center and other techniques I have already shown the students. The video calls Leach an inventor of studio pottery as an art form, which will lead to a discussion on what is art? Why would other pots be considered a craft prior? Focus/Purpose Statement We will learn how to move to step 2 and open their centered clay. But first, after the video we will also reflect on what they think art is. Procedures We will watch a 6 minute video on Bernard Leach: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irSJKRHK-bw While watch the video we will pause for short questioning why is he doing that? What technique is he using that we already learned? What step is he doing now?

Once the video is over I will address on of the topics of the video: The video described Leach as the inventor of studio pottery as an art form, what do you think makes his work artistic? Discuss with table group. (Which are based on predetermined groups, not selfselected). Ask if the students would like to share their reactions. Present them with an ordinary pot (attached as supplemental info) ask students to raise their hand if they think it is art , if its not art(if there is a consensus I will play devils advocate), I will even out the group with those who are unsure. I will ask the students to keep a log and write down why they think it is or is not art. Students will then present their sides and then any rebuttals (attached as supplemental info). Discuss common themes and the difficulty of defining art after the debate. The remaining time I will demonstrate opening pottery and have the students practice it.. I will assign A group to work on the wheel and B group will write up an exit slip on what they think art is and the difference between arts and crafts if any. Any extra time will be devoted to reading Step 2 of the handout http://www.jhpottery.com/tutorial/opening.htm. After 15 minutes A group and B group will switch. I will circulate the room assisting struggling students. I will guide students who are still struggling with centering or any student who have recently missed a class. I will then do a walk through and check for understanding. I will use any student frustrations as a learning moment and direct all students to persisting problems and ask for any ideas on how to fix the problem. 10 minute clean up. Differentiation Students will be practicing centering if they are not able to achieve that yet, finished students will move onto step 2. Every student will travel at their own pace. I will assist students who are still struggling with step 1 first. Closure Students will write up an exit slip of what is art and how is it different from crafts. Students will clean up and make their way back to their desks and ask the students if they were able to open successfully, Celebrate those who have and encourage those who havent by letting them know the beginning is the hardest process. The student will have to go through these steps every time so they can practice on getting it better every time. Students will be allowed to share any of their discoveries that have aided them along the way with the rest of the class. Materials and Resources Students will have made several balls of clay during their last lesson on wedging these will be needed.

12 ice cream pails Sponge/ water/towel. Paper/pencil Handouts (attached) ASSESSMENT Gathering information about student knowledge By now all students should be familiar with the wheel, students who havent quite have their clay centered yet and students who may have missed class will have an opportunity to catch up today while others will go on to the next step. Students will be gathering their vocabulary knowledge and encourage to use vocab in class (attached vocab sheet) During the lesson Informal Formative Assessment What is art and how is it different from craft debate participation Students will complete exit slip on their personal beliefs on crafts vs. arts.

Name;__________________________ Block__________ Debate on Art or Craft: Instructions 1. Separate into the groups you have been assigned to 2. Analyze the pot, pick it up, turn it upside down, feel the texture, put a flower in it, stand back, whatever you would like to get to know the pot well. 3. Discuss with you groups for 5 minutes. Record any data that might prove your point. 4. Discuss any counter statement you can make to the opposing side (the other group). Record any data that might prove your point. 5. Debate the issue (about 10 minutes). 6. Come together. Is this a craft or art?

Explain:

Rebuttals:

Name:___________________________ Block___________ Vocabulary List words to know: Foot: Lip: Body: Steps to making a pot:

S-Crack:

Electric Wheel:

Kick Wheel:

Bernard Leach: Bat: Kidney: GENERAL INFORMATION Name: Caitlyn McLaughlin Lesson Title: Wheel Basics (pulling sides on the wheel) Grade level(s)/Course: 9-12 Beginner to Intermediate Ceramic s Date taught: October 12th INFORMATION ABOUT THE LESSON Content Standards: NAEA standards 1. Content Standard: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes 2. Content Standard: Using knowledge of *structures and functions 5. Content Standard: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others Enduring Understanding and/or Essential Question: What can be achieved with wheel thrown pottery? Many different forms can be created on the wheel.

How can wheel thrown art be considered artwork? What can be achieved by manipulating clay on the wheel? Instructional Objectives: After a discussion, students will analyze what shapes can be made on the wheel. After another demonstration students will learn how to pull sides of a pot. Prior Learning/Prior Thinking Students will have learned how to center and open on the wheel. They will also know forms they have already made in the hand-building unit. LESSON IMPLEMENTATION Anticipatory Set/Elicit Prior Knowledge I anticipate by this time most students re able to center and at least tried to open their pieces. Focus/Purpose Statement The goal of this lesson is to start the students on a solid foundation for building pottery on the wheel. Centering and wedging are especially important, since that is the area where most students have difficulty and it is a first steps to becoming a successful wheel-thrown ceramicist. (Students will be presented with examples of finished works as well as my introduction demonstration so they can have an idea of where thing will be headed.) Procedures Students will come into the classroom I will direct their attention to the board where : What forms can we make on the wheel? Students will discuss some possible ideas by drawing shapes on the board. I will bring up questions like: What different ways can bowls look like? Cups? Do they have to have a function? Do they have to fall into a category?

This will hopefully open students eyes to the limitless possibilities of form. Students will then watch a demonstration on pulling the sides of a pot and given Step 3 handout: http://www.jhpottery.com/tutorial/pulling.htm. I will demonstrate pulling sides and narrate what I am doing and possible techniques students can use Steady movement Constant pressure Little bit at a time

Group A will wedge clay and prepare more clay balls for future use. Then these students will read the handout provided.

Group B will work on the wheel on the wheel and practice step three if they are there yet I will work with students still on step 2 one on one and ask them to show me any issues and make sure they are keeping up with moisture management as well as answer any questions they come across. Any remaining time will be used to plan forms for projects. Group A and B will switch at 35 to end of class 10 minute clean up Student will make an exit slip with a drawing if they are able of forms they are interested in creating. I will later use this information to help guide instruction of interest. At close I will ask students to let me know with what struggles they are having if they did not tell me during work rime and students will celebrate any success stories. Differentiation I will let students practice at their own pace and will be watching for improvement rather than getting it right. Using the A group and B group stations I can allow the struggling group I have arranged by now into an A group, who needs more time on the wheel and the B group. Who can use their B grater planning wedging time thinking about things they want to create and how they may go about doing that. Closure Student will make an exit slip with a drawing if they are able of forms they are interested in creating. I will later use this information to help guide instruction of interest. At close I will ask students to let me know with what struggles they are having if they did not tell me during work rime and students will celebrate any success stories. This will hopefully motivate students who almost have it. Sharing frustrations should help any struggling student feel like they are not alone. Materials and Resources Several 1 pound balls of clay. 1 gallon ice cream pail, Water, sponge, electric wheel. towels. paper, pencil, erasers. During the lesson Students will be evaluated today by their participation in discussions, their progress on the wheel and their exit slips.

GENERAL INFORMATION Name: Caitlyn McLaughlin Lesson Title: Wheel Basics (trimming on the wheel) Grade level(s)/Course: 9-12 Beginner to Intermediate Ceramic s Date taught: October 14th INFORMATION ABOUT THE LESSON Content Standards: NAEA standards
2. Content Standard: Using knowledge of *structures and functions 1. Content Standard:

Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes

Enduring Understanding and/or Essential Question: What can be achieved with wheel thrown pottery? Many different forms can be created on the wheel. How can wheel thrown art be considered artwork? What can be achieved by manipulating clay on the wheel? Instructional Objectives: After a demonstration on trimming students will trim their own work. After a demonstration of forms students will begin to create new forms. Prior Learning/Prior Thinking Students should know how to center, open and pull sides of their pots by now. LESSON IMPLEMENTATION Anticipatory Set/Elicit Prior Knowledge I anticipate by this time most students re able to center and at least tried to open their pieces and pull sides. Procedures After reading their exit slips from last class, students will enter the class room and their attention will be directed to the board, I will draw 4 figures: Vase Bowl Plate Cup

Students will vote next to the forms they would like to see demonstrated today. They will choose 2 Using this information I will demonstrate techniques for making those forms. I will discuss my process and ask the students how I will apply these ideas to making new shapes like how this cup is similarly shaped to a bowl. What might I need to do differently? I may ask my more advanced students how to control the pulls to create unique shapes I will present the new handout: http://www.jhpottery.com/tutorial/trimming.htm Group A will work on the wheel, practicing steps or creating new forms. I will talk to students who had frustrations or are behind and watch their techniques and provide tips and well as questions to think about (do you think that is centered enough? Do you know why the form is getting bigger at the top? What do you think is happening that may make your piece unbalanced?. I will also demonstrate different forms if the students exit slip showed interest in other forms. Group B will plan for future projects by sketching 3 forms for a bowl, 3 forms for a cup, and 3 forms for a nonfunctional piece, along with a brief description of each and read the handout. Groups will switch The class will clean 15 minutes to class ends.

We will have a class discussion on findings, ideas and frustrations. Differentiation Student will get to share what they want to learn and come up with their own ideas. Students will be allowed to do what he or she chooses in the sketches. There are 2 groups of learners learning and group A will get more time to work on the wheel, Group B will get more time to plan for more advanced forms. Closure Discussion on finding and ideas for new forms, students will tell me what else they are interested in learning. Materials and Resources Several 1 pound balls of clay. 1 gallon ice cream pail, Water, sponge, electric wheel. towels. paper, pencil, erasers. Sketchbook. During the lesson Students will be evaluated on their sketches and their performance on the wheel.

GENERAL INFORMATION Name: Caitlyn McLaughlin Lesson Title: Wheel Basics (trimming on the wheel) Grade level(s)/Course: 9-12 Beginner to Intermediate Ceramic s Date taught: October 16th INFORMATION ABOUT THE LESSON Content Standards: NAEA standards
2. Content Standard: Using knowledge of *structures and functions 1. Content Standard: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes 4. Content Standard: Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures

Enduring Understanding and/or Essential Question: What can be achieved with wheel thrown pottery? Many different forms can be created on the wheel. How can wheel thrown art be considered artwork? What can be achieved by manipulating clay on the wheel? Instructional Objectives: After a reading, students will analyze how history in pottery has influenced contemporary pottery. After an introduction to the assignment students will create a 5 inch cylinder.

LESSON IMPLEMENTATION Procedures Students will read an brief history on wheel pottery http://destrier.hubpages.com/hub/pottery-wheel Students will then think-pair- share. They will think about the connections between pottery then and now and together come up with differences and similarities as well as connections to contemporary art from the first pottery. This will be written down and handed in as an admission slip. Students will then be given their 5 inch cylinder project assignment. I will go through it with them as well as what I am expecting. (attached material) Group B will be given time to work on the wheel first Group A will plan the surface of their cylinder each student will come up with 4 ideas for applying to their surface. As Group B people finish I will file Group A on the wheel based on their ability lower able students will have more time on the wheel which higher ability students will have less time on the wheel. Group B will then start the planning process as group A did. Clean up Discussion about who has finished their basic forms,

Questioning: was it difficult? Are you ready for something more difficult? What are your concerns? Differentiation Student will get to share what they want to learn and come up with their own ideas. Students will be allowed to do what he or she chooses in the sketches. There are 2 groups of learners learning and group A will get more time to work on the wheel. Each student will get as much time as he or she needs. Closure Questioning: was it difficult? Are you ready for something more difficult? What are your concerns? Students will let me know where exactly I should go from here and if any modifications need to be made for the final assessment. Materials and Resources Several 1 pound balls of clay. 1 gallon ice cream pail, Water, sponge, electric wheel. towels. paper, pencil, erasers. Sketchbook. During the lesson Students will be evaluated on their sketches and with the short assessment over their cylinders will be graded based on a simple rubric. (Mid unit check)

Assessment Name________________________________ Block__________ Assignment sheet 1

5 Inch cylinder What youll need: 1 lb of clay Bucket of water Sponge Towel Wood tools
Create 1 5 inch cylinder using just a pound of clay and decorate the surface in the way of your choosing, can be textured or smooth, include drawings and designs. Reminders: It will be important to pull straight up at a consistent rate. You will need to trim off wheel and let it dry to leather hard before addressing surface. Make sure your walls are thin, your bottom is not too thick and the narrower the cylinder the taller you can make it! Cylinders taller than 5.25 inches will earn extra credit and have their work displayed if he/she wishes. My form is a cylinder My form is over Surface design is creative Score
5pts 5.25 inches tall 5 pts + 5 ec and finely crafted (no dents/ fingernail marks etc. 5 pts Nice design with a few imperfections 2.5pts

My form is wobbly or slightly off shape 2.5 pts Is not a cylinder 1 pt

Lacks creativity and many imperfections, ______/_15_ not finished surface. 1 pt End of Unit Performance Assessment Wheel Pottery Art Exhibition (100 Points): A presentation of pottery on the wheel as art and critique Role-play Activity: Role: Artist Audience: Observer Format: Critique Topic: Wheel Pottery The Artist: You will gather your finished pieces from the kiln rack. Present the podiums (line up of 12 desks). You will display your exhibit with an artists statement, just as at the gallery. You will present your piece as an artist on his opening day exhibition. Observers

My form is 5 inches 5 pts Is not 5 inches tall 1 pt.

and other artists are naturally curious about your piece and want to ask you about your process. You should answer them directly and as thoroughly as possible; remember you have a reason for everything you do. The observer: You will file in and start to gather at the first exhibit. You may be thinking what interesting work! Let the artist know what their successes in your opinion are. But remember you want to help this young and upcoming artist, be sure to be constructive! (as you remember during a critique means you do not simply says it looks good or bad but tell the artist what about it needs to be worked on and what is successful) The other artists are encouraged to ask the young artist about his or her work as well. Once 7 minutes is up you will move on to the next piece. *Questions to consider: What elements of art did she try to incorporate? Why? How did he/she accomplish________? Would you consider this a successful piece? *These are not questions I want you to ask the artist but keep these thoughts in mind when viewing his/her piece. Questions are fine but the artist wants to hear your impression of the piece and wants you to analyze it. Ask questions if it will help you analyze the piece further. Additional Considerations Please be as constructive as possible with your critique and courteous to your peers. o See attached handout A group will be the observers first and artists second (November 1 st) B group will be the artist first and observers second (November 4 th) Each artist will have no more than 7 minutes to present Review the rubric so you know exactly what is all being assessed. Please be certain to have your artist statements by the beginning of your presentation and turn it in to me after your turn to go o See attached assignment. Artist Statement Assignment Artist statements should discuss you views on art. They should also address your art style and why you gravitate toward those styles. The statement should present what is it that you are trying to communicate as an artist and maybe even where you plan on going. These are professional documents so formatting is important. The statement should be arranged so it transitions naturally from one paragraph to another. Assignment format: If you are unsure of the format look at the example attached for hints, also feel free to ask. a page ( a piece of paper is 8 inches long, this means the last line should be at least 4 inches but not over 6 either) if you are unsure let me know! Size 12 font/ Times New Roman/ SINGLE spaced Title (can be creative! Should reflect your style) Left aligned no indents

You will be displaying your statement along with your critique for other students to read. This will be graded along with your critique (see attached rubric)

Whimsical Proclamations My artwork takes a critical view of social, political and cultural issues. In my work, I deconstruct the American dream, fairy tales, nursery rhymes, and lullabies that are part of our childhood and adult culture. Having engaged subjects as diverse as the civil rights movement, southern rock music and modernist architecture, my work reproduces familiar visual signs, arranging them into new conceptually layered pieces. Often times these themes are combined into installations that feature mundane domestic objects painted blue, juxtaposed with whimsical objects, and often embellished with stenciled text. The color blue establishes a dream-like surreal quality, suggests notions of calmness and safety, and formally unifies the disparate objects in each installation. The texts provide clues to context. While I use a variety of materials and processes in each project my methodology is consistent. Although there may not always be material similarities between the different projects they are linked by recurring formal concerns and through the subject matter. The subject matter of each body of work determines the materials and the forms of the work. Each project often consists of multiple works, often in a range of different media, grouped around specific themes and meanings. During research and production new areas of interest arise and lead to the next body of work.

-A. Student Inspirational Thread Knitting is my key to the secret garden, my way down the rabbit hole, my looking glass. Hand knitting started it. From the beginning the process of transforming string into cloth has struck me as magical. And, over the years, that magical process has had its way with me, leading me from hobby to art. Knitting fills me with a sense of accomplishment and integrity, and has proven a most amenable vehicle for translating inner vision to outer reality. I knit from the inside out. Though I work quite deliberately, consciously employing both traditional and innovative techniques, my unconscious is the undisputed project manager. The concrete, repetitive nature of this work frees my imagination and provides many opportunities for happy accident and grace to influence the finished product. Recently I discovered some childhood drawings: simple, crayoned patchworks that resonate deeply with my fiber work. Inspired and invigorated by a renewed sense of continuity, and awed by the mystery of how creation occurs, I am now knitting richly varied fabrics exploring many patterns, textures and colors. Once knit, the fabrics are pieced to form an always new patchwork from which I make my garments and accessories. -B. Creative Constructive Criticism As the artist: 1. First Reaction is not the best reaction Dont react initially. Calmly listen and acknowledge the feedback. Do not take it personally; the observers are there to make you better. It is difficult as an artist and usually the first reaction to a criticism of an artwork is become defensive because of the time you have spent with creating it. If you become upset, take a deep breath and consider the validity of the observers point, also be sure to note that is one persons opinion. 2. Remember the Benefit of Getting Feedback Remember that hearing from your peers will help you improve and think of new and different ways to express yourself. They need to comment on it is part of their role as an observer, and you role as an artist will be to acknowledge ways to improve. Even uneducated public viewer can give meaningful advice, respect all observers contributions. Getting negative reactions is not necessarily bad, most famous artist including Vincent Van Gogh, Michelangelo, and Monet have all endured harsh criticisms in their career. 3. Listen for understanding If you are unclear about someones comment ask them or you can repeat their comment in your own words, it is possible you misinterpreted their comment. It is possible the observer was nervous and didnt articulate his/her comment well. As the Observer 1. Back up your thoughts

Be sure to indicate the concerns you have by pointing out improvement that can be made and where. Avoid making short declaratives such as I think you could have had better craftsmanship .A better sentence like More attention to the surface area may help the viewer understand if you are going for a rough look or a smooth look. This sentence does not attack the artist yet gives the artist more direction for future pieces and offers insight to things they may have overlooked. Using proper vocabulary is useful to articulate your ideas better. 2. No one likes to be the bearer of bad news. It may seem though to talk critically about your peers work but you should keep in mind that your advice is helpful to the artist and a valuable part of making art is analyzing you art as well as others. You provide a fresh perspective for the artist and since art is meant to be seen as an observer you are meant to react to it. That being said, not all initial reactions will be negative be sure to note successes in the work as well. 3. Dont put others down When stating a criticism you must make it about the work and the person. Separating artwork from the artist may seem difficult but you must remember the art work should be the only thing we are examining. Also, adding positive feedback is helpful to the artist as well.

Rubric
Project: Wheel Thrown Points Possible: 100
Criterion As an artist 20-25 Points Students presented their art on time and were able to concisely and thoroughly respond to the observers. Students stayed in role and responded appropriately to constructive criticisms. 15-20 Points Student presented artwork on time and were able to eventually answer the observers. Students seemed slightly irritated or emotionally defensive about constructive criticisms. Stayed in character most of the presentation. Student responded to 1 or 2 pieces. The student paid attention most of the time. Responses to art work may have been unclear or too general I like it statements. 0-15 Points Student was not on time or did not respond appropriately to the observers. The student was bother by constructive criticisms. Student did respond to observers. Student may have personally attacked the artist or did little to contribute. The student was distracted from the critique often.

As an observer

Work Ethic

Student contributed by responding to 3 or more art works and used pertinent vocabulary. Student was able to do so constructively and did not personally attack the artist. Observer was quietly contemplating art while she/he was not contributing. Student show up and was on time for all classes and participated fully. He/she contributed to class discussions and asked questions if needed. Student kept his/her assigned area tidy. His or her piece was thoroughly thought about, shows good craftsmanship (no scratches, dents, fingernail marks) and exhibits understanding of the steps as well as creativity. The statement was correctly formatted and free from grammatical and spelling errors. The paragraphs were cohesive and the statement reflected the students work.

Student showed up or was tardy a few times. Student participated for most activities. Student rarely forgot to tidy up.

Student did minimal tidying. The student rarely participated or showed up.

Finished piece

The piece was complete and showed some creativity. The piece did not exhibit mastery of all the steps.

Piece was unfinished. The artwork showed poor craftsmanship.

Artist statement

There were 2-3 spelling or grammatical errors. The statement lacked cohesion or the statement mostly reflected the work.

The statement was difficult to read and contained many grammatical errors. The statement was poorly organized.