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Louis Rapid Transit Connector Study - Get Involved

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Four Alternatives Discussion
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The study is now in the alternatives analysis phase. Four alternatives have been identified: Halls-Ferry Riverview BRT West Florissant-Natural Bridge BRT Page Avenue BRT I-64 Highway BRT These four potential BRT routes are options for improving transit connections between St. Louis County and the City of St. Louis. One of the study’s main goals is to address the need for quick, direct travel from neighborhoods north and south of Downtown St. Louis to employers located in north and west St. Louis County. The “Central Corridor” stretching from Downtown St. Louis to the Central West End and Clayton still holds the region’s largest concentration of jobs, but the largest job growth is occurring in places like Chesterfield, Earth City, and St. Charles – areas easily accessible by highway, but currently not by public transit. The type of BRT service currently being studied is intended to expand access and improve travel time to those job opportunities – of particular importance to reverse commuters traveling to major job centers in suburban areas – while also providing a premium transit alternative for car commuters. The Rapid Transit Connector Study will identify candidates for Metro’s first two BRT routes; Metro will continue to work with the region to identify future BRT routes. Other transit options identified in Moving Transit Forward, such as expansions of the MetroLink System, are intended to meet other long-term goals such as strengthening neighborhoods and encouraging transit-oriented development. Alternatives analysis involves evaluating the performance of each alternative along parameters including ridership, expanded access to key destinations, travel time savings, and land use benefits. These technical outcomes will be combined with public input to identify the two potential projects most likely to meet project goals, benefit the region, and successfully compete for federal funding. The four alternatives are still works in progress. The route configuration, number of stations, frequencies, and service strategies for each transit option described below are initial recommendations that form the basis for ridership projections and more detailed analysis. They are subject to change considering public input and additional findings from the technical process.

You Tell Us: Evaluating the Four Potential Projects
Use the information presented on this website to let us know how well the alternatives presented meet the study’s objectives by completing our online survey. The survey is brief.

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View larger map. Click on individual alternative in above map for additional details.

Halls Ferry - Riverview Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) The Halls Ferry-Riverview BRT Alternative is 15 miles long and would run along a mix of road types between Downtown St. Louis and the new North County Transit Center currently under development, located near West Florissant Avenue and I-270. Learn More >> The Halls Ferry - Riverview BRT alternative is designed to provide a faster, comfortable, and convenient alternative to existing local service. Using buses designed specifically for BRT service, the line would provide direct service along the corridor seven days a week, throughout the day and well into the night, so that many second and third shift workers can take BRT to and from work. The BRT line would also provide connections to other popular destinations, including the future North County Transit Center, the Edward Jones Dome, Busch Stadium, Scottrade Center and other downtown St. Louis destinations. With frequent service - 10 minutes during weekday rush hours - riders won't need a schedule to know when the next bus will arrive. The line will stop only at stations, designed to stand out from local bus stops and provide attractive, comfortable and safe places to wait.

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View Larger Meeting Study Objectives: The Halls Ferry-Riverview alternative addresses the study’s objectives by: Connecting people in North St. Louis County and North St. Louis City to job centers both north and south. Building off of and strengthening the existing transit market currently served by local bus routes. Increasing mobility and access to jobs for a concentration of customers in this area that rely on transit (zero-car and lower-income households). Facilitating fast north-south travel and local circulation through North St. Louis County by connecting a fast transit "mainline" to the numerous local bus routes at both the North County Transit Center and Civic Center Station. Providing a faster, more efficient connection between a major new Transit Center currently under development and Downtown St. Louis for riders who might otherwise take cars. Over time, helping to stabilize and revitalize neighborhoods that have experienced some level of disinvestment over the past two decades. Route Details: The BRT line would start at Metro’s new North County Transit Center (currently under development), located near the intersection of I-270 and West Florissant Avenue. Heading south to Downtown St. Louis, the line would turn south along Halls Ferry Road to Halls Ferry Circle. At this point the line would run down Riverview Boulevard to West Florissant Avenue, heading southeast toward I-70. The BRT line would merge onto I-70 at West Florissant, and then travel along the expressway into downtown,
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exiting at Broadway. In downtown, the Halls Ferry-Riverview BRT line would run south on Broadway, west on Market Street, south on Tucker Boulevard, west on Clark Avenue and south on 14th Street to Metro’s Civic Center MetroLink Station and Transit Center. The Civic Center Station is adjacent to the Gateway Transportation Center that serves Amtrak and Greyhound, providing the possibility of long-distance, multimodal trips. Heading north from the Civic Center Station, the line would generally reverse the inbound routing. In downtown, it would operate east on Clark Avenue, north on Tucker Boulevard, east on Market Street, and north on 4th Street. The BRT line would enter I-70 and run along the expressway as far as W. Florissant Avenue, where it would continue northwest on West Florissant as far as Riverview Boulevard. The line would turn right (northwest) onto Riverview. At Halls Ferry Circle, the BRT line would proceed north on Halls Ferry Road as far north as I-270, where it would turn left onto Pershall Road and end at the planned North County Transit Center. Communities Served: Within St. Louis County, the Halls Ferry-Riverview BRT alternative would serve portions of the communities of Bellefontaine Neighbors, Ferguson, Dellwood, Jennings, and Moline Acres in St. Louis County. Within the City of St. Louis, the Halls Ferry-Riverview BRT line would serve portions of numerous North City neighborhoods, including: North Pointe; Baden; Mark Twain; Walnut Park East and West; Penrose; College Hill; Near North Riverfront; and Downtown St. Louis. In total, over 60,000 people live and over 80,000 people work within one-half mile of this corridor. Service: The Halls Ferry-Riverview BRT line would operate seven days a week. On weekdays, buses would run from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Buses would run every 10 minutes in both directions during the morning and afternoon/evening peak traffic commuter periods and every 20 minutes in both directions during the off-peak periods of the middle of the day and at night. On weekends and major holidays, the BRT line would be in service from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and operate every 20 minutes. Transit Priority: Transit signal priority, which would allow buses a head start or extra time through busy, signalized intersections, is being considered for the corridor. "Queue jump" and "queue bypass" treatments, which would provide a short lane for buses to bypass traffic at congested intersections, are also under consideration. Transit Priority lanes are also being considered for portions of the corridor. Known as Business Access and Transit (BAT) lanes in some cities, BAT lanes would convert the right-hand land of a five-lane (or more) roadway into a "bus and right-turn only" lane. This treatment promotes efficient bus travel speeds and reduces conflict points along roadways that, from a capacity standpoint, can handle the revision to laneusage. Transit Connections: Passengers would be able to connect to MetroLink and numerous MetroBus routes at the Civic Center Station, as well as several Madison County Transit bus routes within the Downtown Loop. Customers at the northern end of the route will be able to transfer to and from a large network of local MetroBus routes at the new North County Transit Center, which will also provide a Park-Ride Lot. Riders will also be able to transfer to several MetroBus routes along the BRT line, including the #70 Grand and #95 Kingshighway.

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Stations: Approximately 16 stations would be located along the BRT line. Except for the stations at each end of the line, they would be on-street stations spaced an average of about a mile. Because of the density of jobs and activity there, five of the stations would be located in Downtown St. Louis, including one at the Civic Center Station. What is Different Between the Two North-South Alternatives? Both the Halls Ferry-Riverview and the West Florissant-Natural Bridge alternatives run north-south between Downtown St. Louis and North St. Louis County. They share beginning and end points and overlap for a portion of their routes near downtown. The key difference is the use of I-70 for a portion of the Halls Ferry-Riverview line. The West FlorissantNatural Bridge line remains on local streets for its entire route, which makes the service more accessible to residents along the route but lengthens overall travel time between the route endpoints. The two alternatives would also serve different neighborhoods that have substantially different land use characteristics and population densities. Ridership forecasting to be completed as part of the alternatives analysis will be a good indicator of which route will have the biggest impact on system performance.

West Florissant-Natural Bridge Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) The West Florissant-Natural Bridge BRT alternative is 15 miles long and would run along local streets between Downtown St. Louis and the new North County Transit Center currently under development, located near West Florissant Avenue and I-270. Learn More >> The West Florissant - Natural Bridge BRT alternative is designed to provide a faster, comfortable, and convenient alternative to existing local service. Using buses designed specifically for BRT service, the line would provide direct service along the corridor seven days a week, throughout the day and well into the night, so that many second and third shift workers can take BRT to and from work. The BRT line would also provide connections to other popular destinations, including the future North County Transit Center, Fairground Park, Washington Avenue, the Edward Jones Dome, Busch Stadium, Scottrade Center and other downtown St. Louis destinations. With frequent service - 10 minutes during weekday rush hours - riders won’t need a schedule to know when the next bus will arrive. The line will stop only at stations, designed to stand out from local bus stops and provide attractive, comfortable and safe places to wait.

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View Larger Meeting Study Objectives: The West Florissant-Natural Bridge alternative addresses the study’s objectives by: Connecting people in North St. Louis County and North St. Louis City to job centers both north and south. Building off of and strengthening the existing transit market currently served by local bus routes. Providing a faster, more efficient connection between a major new Transit Center (currently under development) and Downtown St. Louis for riders who might otherwise take cars. Increasing mobility and access to jobs for a concentration of customers in this area that rely on transit (zero-car and lower-income households). Facilitating fast north-south travel and local circulation through North St. Louis County by connecting a fast transit "mainline" to the numerous local bus routes at both the North County Transit Center (currently under development) and Civic Center Station. Over time, helping to stabilize and revitalize neighborhoods that have experienced some level of disinvestment over the past two decades. Potentially helping build a ridership market for a potential MetroLink extension. Route Details: The BRT line would start at Metro’s new North County Transit Center (currently under
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development), located near the intersection of I-270 and West Florissant Avenue Heading toward Downtown St. Louis, the line would turn south and operate along West Florissant Avenue as far as Lucas and Hunt Road. The line would turn to the southwest on Lucas and Hunt Road, and travel to the intersection with Natural Bridge Avenue. The BRT line would travel southeast along Natural Bridge to the intersection with Parnell Street and Salisbury Street, where Natural Bridge Avenue becomes Palm Street. The line would continue briefly on Palm Street before turning south on North Florissant Avenue. North Florissant Avenue merges into Tucker Boulevard, and the BRT line would proceed onto Tucker Boulevard into downtown. In downtown, the West Florissant-Natural Bridge BRT line would run south on Tucker Boulevard, east on Washington Avenue, south on Broadway, west on Market Street, south on Tucker Boulevard, west on Clark Avenue and south on 14th Street to Metro’s Civic Center MetroLink Station and Transit Center. The Civic Center Station is adjacent to the Gateway Transportation Center that serves Amtrak and Greyhound, providing the possibility of long-distance, multimodal trips.Heading north from the Civic Center Station, the BRT line would generally reverse the inbound routing. In downtown, it will operate east on Clark Avenue, north on Tucker Boulevard, east on Market Street, and north on 4th Street. The BRT line would proceed west on Washington Avenue and north on Tucker Boulevard. The BRT line would then continue north on North Florissant Avenue; west on Palm Street- which merges into Natural Bridge Avenue; proceed west on Natural Bridge; northeast on Lucas and Hunt Road; then run north on West Florissant Avenue as far north as I-270, where it would turn right onto Pershall Road to end at the new North County Transit Center. Communities Served: Within St. Louis County, the West Florissant-Natural Bridge BRT alternative would serve portions of the communities of Beverly Hills, Country Club Hills, Dellwood, Ferguson, Jennings, Normandy, Northwoods, Norwood Court, Pasadena Hills, Pine Lawn, and Uplands Park. Within the City of St. Louis, the West Florissant-Natural Bridge BRT line would serve portions of numerous North City neighborhoods, including: Wells-Goodfellow; Mark Twain; Kingsway East and West; Penrose; Greater Ville; O'Fallon; Jeff Vanderlou; Fairground; Hyde Park; St. Louis Place; Old North; Carr Square; Columbus Square; and Downtown St. Louis. In total, nearly 70,000 people live and approximately 90,000 people work within one-half mile of this corridor. Service: The West Florissant-Natural Bridge BRT line would operate seven days a week. On weekdays, buses would run from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Buses would run every 10 minutes in both directions during the morning and afternoon/evening peak traffic commuter periods, and every 20 minutes in both directions during the off-peak periods of the middle of the day and at night. On weekends and major holidays, the BRT line would be in service from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and operate every 20 minutes. Transit Priority: Transit signal priority, which would allow buses a head start or extra time through busy, signalized intersections, is being considered for the corridor. "Queue jump" and "queue bypass" treatments, which would provide a short lane for buses to bypass traffic at congested intersections, are also under consideration. Transit Priority lanes are also being considered for portions of the corridor. Known as Business Access and Transit (BAT) lanes in some cities, BAT lanes would convert the right-hand land of a five-lane (or more) roadway into a “bus and right-turn only” lane. This treatment promotes efficient bus travel speeds and
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reduces conflict points along roadways that, from a capacity standpoint, can handle the revision to laneusage. Transit Connections: Passengers would be able to connect to MetroLink and numerous MetroBus routes at the Civic Center Station, as well as several Madison County Transit bus routes within the Downtown Loop. Customers at the northern end of the route will be able to transfer to and from a large network of local MetroBus routes at the new North County Transit Center, which will also provide a Park-Ride Lot. Riders will also be able to transfer to several MetroBus routes along the BRT line, including the #61 Chambers, #70 Grand, #74 Florissant, #90 Hampton, and #95 Kingshighway. Stations: Approximately 16 stations would be located along the BRT line. Except for the stations at each end of the line, they would be on-street stations spaced an average of about a mile. Because of the density of jobs and activity there, five of the stations would be located in downtown, including one at the Civic Center Station. Differentiating the Two North-South Alternatives: Both the Halls Ferry-Riverview and the West Florissant-Natural Bridge alternatives run north/south through North St. Louis County and North St. Louis City. They share beginning and ending points and overlap for a portion of their routes near downtown. The key difference is the use of I-70 for a portion of the Halls Ferry-Riverview line. The West Florissant-Natural Bridge line remains on local streets which make the service more accessible to residents along the route, but increases travel time between stops. The two alternatives would also serve different neighborhoods that have substantially different land use characteristics and population densities. Ridership forecasting to be completed as part of the alternatives analysis will be a good indicator of which route will have the biggest impact on system performance.

Page Avenue BRT Alternative The Page Avenue BRT alternative is 18 miles long and would travel between Downtown St. Louis, the Central West End, and Westport Plaza at I-270. Learn More >> The Page Avenue BRT alternative is designed to provide a faster, comfortable, and convenient alternative to existing local service. Using buses designed specifically for BRT service, the line would provide direct service along the corridor seven days a week, throughout the day and well into the night, so that many second and third shift workers can take BRT to and from work. The BRT line would also provide connections to other popular destinations, including Westport Plaza, Ranken Technical College, the Central West End, Midtown, St. Louis University, Harris Stowe State University, Union Station, Washington Avenue, the Edward Jones Dome, Busch Stadium, Scottrade Center and other downtown St. Louis destinations. With frequent service - 10 minutes during weekday rush hours - riders won’t need a schedule to know when the next bus will arrive. The line will stop only at stations, designed to stand out from local bus stops and provide attractive, comfortable and safe places to wait.

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View Larger Meeting Study Objectives: The Page Avenue BRT alternative meets the study’s objectives by: Upgrading the #94 Page route with faster and more frequent service, providing an all-day, rapid transit connection between major employment centers including Downtown St. Louis, the Central West End, and Westport, as well as local circulation along one of the region's busiest corridors. Building off of and strengthening the existing transit market currently served by one of Metro’s primary bus routes, the #94 Page. Attracting new riders who do not currently utilize local bus routes with faster travel times, more frequent service, and pedestrian-accessible station. Traffic in this area could make efficient transit appealing to people who currently drive. Over time, helping to improve the streetscape and stabilize neighborhoods in both St. Louis County and the City of St. Louis. Route Details: The Page Avenue BRT alternative is 18 miles long and would travel between Downtown St. Louis, the Central West End, and Westport Plaza at I-270. The BRT Line would start in the vicinity of Westport Plaza Drive and Route 364 (Page Avenue). It would proceed east along Page Avenue through St. Louis County as far as Taylor Avenue in the City of St. Louis. The line would then turn south on Taylor through the Central West End, before turning east on Lindell Boulevard. The line would travel east on Lindell - which becomes Olive Street east of Grand Boulevard - into Downtown St. Louis. In downtown, the Page Avenue BRT line would run north on Tucker Boulevard, east on Washington Avenue, south on Broadway, west on Market Street, south on Tucker Boulevard, west on Clark Avenue and south on 14th Street to Metro’s Civic Center MetroLink Station and Transit Center. The Civic Center Station is adjacent to the Gateway Transportation Center that serves Amtrak and Greyhound, providing the possibility of long-distance, multimodal trips. Heading north from the Civic Center Station, the BRT line would generally reverse the inbound routing. In downtown, it would operate east on Clark Avenue, north on Tucker Boulevard, east on Market Street, and north on 4th Street. The BRT line would proceed west on Washington Avenue and south on Tucker Boulevard to Olive Street. Continuing outbound to the west, the line would proceed on Olive Street (which becomes Lindell Boulevard
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west of Grand Boulevard), north on Taylor Avenue, and west on Page Avenue to the vicinity of Westport Plaza. Communities Served: Within St. Louis County, the Page Avenue BRT line would serve portions of the communities of Hanley Hills, Maryland Heights, Overland, Pagedale, Vinita Terrace, and Wellston. Within the City of St. Louis, the BRT line would serve portions of the neighborhoods of Academy, Central West End, Downtown, Downtown West, Fountain Park, Hamilton Heights, Lewis Place, Midtown, Covenant BluGrand Center, and West End. In total, over 60,000 people live and nearly 150,000 people work within one-half mile of this corridor. Service: The Page Avenue BRT line would operate seven days a week. On weekdays, buses would run from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Buses would run every 10 minutes in both directions during the morning and afternoon/evening peak traffic commuter periods and every 20 minutes in both directions during the off-peak periods of the middle of the day and at night. On weekends and major holidays, the BRT line would be in service from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and operate every 60 minutes. Transit Priority: Transit signal priority, which would allow buses a head start or extra time through busy, signalized intersections, is being considered for the corridor. “Queue jump” and “queue bypass” treatments, which would provide a short lane for buses to bypass traffic at congested intersections, are also under consideration. Transit Priority lanes are also being considered for portions of the corridor. Known as Business Access and Transit (BAT) lanes in some cities, BAT lanes would convert the right-hand land of a five-lane (or more) roadway into a “bus and right-turn only” lane. This treatment promotes efficient bus travel speeds and reduces conflict points along roadways that, from a capacity standpoint, can handle the revision to laneusage. Transit Connections: Passengers would be able to connect to MetroLink and numerous MetroBus routes at the Civic Center Station, as well as several Madison County Transit bus routes within the Downtown Loop. Customers would also be able to transfer to other major local bus routes at various points along the line, including the #4 Natural Bridge, #70 Grand, #40 Broadway, #47 North Hanley, and #97 Delmar. A shuttle/circulator could connect the BRT line in Westport Plaza with other locations in the Westport Plaza area. Park and ride facilities would be located near the western end of the line. Stations: Approximately 23 stations would be located along the BRT line, spaced about every mile. Because of the density of jobs and activity there, five of the stations would be located in downtown, including one at the Civic Center Station.

I-64 Highway BRT The 23 mile long I-64 Highway BRT alternative would operate between Downtown St. Louis and the City of Chesterfield. Learn More >> The I-64 Highway BRT alternative is designed to provide an alternative to today’s rush hour-only express
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service by operating throughout the day, at night and on weekends. The I-64 Highway BRT line would provide better connections between the City of St. Louis and central and western St. Louis County, serving commuters moving in both directions to access jobs in Downtown St. Louis and along the job-rich I-64 corridor. It will also provide connection to major destinations including Chesterfield Mall, Maryville University, Brentwood MetroLink Station, Central West End, Midtown, St. Louis University, Harris Stowe State University, Union Station, Washington Avenue, the Edward Jones Dome, Busch Stadium, Scottrade Center and other downtown St. Louis destinations. Buses will stop at stations along I-64, but will transition to on-street running with stops at major employment centers. Frequent, 20-minute service would be operated during peak periods on weekdays while buses will run every hour in both directions at all other times, providing needed connections to jobs, medical centers and other activities.

View Larger Meeting Study Objectives: This route meets the study’s objectives by: Improving access to jobs, cultural activities, and major regional attractions with a one-seat ride for residents of West St. Louis County. Expanding access to jobs, shopping, health care facilities, schools, and other economic opportunities for current transit riders and reverse commuters, who currently cannot easily access these major employment centers. Improving mobility and travel throughout the Metro System by providing north-south local bus routes with a fast and efficient east-west connection. Expanding travel choices and attracting new transit riders with a faster, easier transit service. Traffic in this area could make efficient transit appealing to people who currently drive. Route Details: Starting in the vicinity of the Chesterfield Mall in the City of Chesterfield, the I-64 Highway BRT line would operate along I-64 in mixed traffic lanes. The line would exit at key destinations and employment centers to pick up and drop off passengers, then immediately re-enter the interstate. At the planned new interchange at I-64 and Boyle Avenue in the Central West End, the line would exit the interstate at Tower Grove Avenue and proceed north to Forest Park Avenue. The line would then head east to Downtown St. Louis via Forest Park Avenue, which merges into Market Street at Compton Avenue. In downtown, near Union Station, the line would turn north on 18th Street, then east on Washington Avenue, south on Broadway, west on Market Street, south on Tucker Boulevard, west on Clark Avenue and south on
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14th Street to Metro’s Civic Center MetroLink Station and Transit Center. The Civic Center Station is adjacent to the Gateway Transportation Center that serves Amtrak and Greyhound, providing the possibility of long-distance, multimodal trips. Heading north from the Civic Center Station, the I-64 Highway BRT would generally reverse the inbound routing. In downtown, it will operate east on Clark Avenue, north on Tucker Boulevard, east on Market Street, and north on 4th Street. The line would proceed west on Washington Avenue, south on 18th Street, and west on Market Street, merging into Forest Park Avenue. The line would then turn south on Boyle Avenue before merging onto I-64 and continuing outbound to Chesterfield. Communities Served: Within St. Louis County, the BRT line would serve portions of the communities of Brentwood, Chesterfield, Richmond Heights, and Town and Country. Within the City of St. Louis, the line would serve portions of the neighborhoods of Central West End, Downtown, Downtown West, and Midtown. In total, over 50,000 people live and nearly 190,000 people work within one-half mile of this corridor. Service: The I-64 Highway BRT would operate seven days a week with all day service. On weekdays, service would run from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Buses would run every 20 minutes in both directions during the morning and afternoon/evening peak traffic commuter periods, and every 60 minutes in both directions during the off-peak periods of the middle of the day and at night. On weekends and major holidays, the line would be in service from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and operate every 60 minutes. Transit Priority: Transit signal priority, which would allow buses a head start or extra time through busy, signalized intersections, is being considered for portions of the corridor. “Queue jump” and “queue bypass” treatments, which would provide a short lane for buses to bypass traffic at congested interchanges and intersections, are also under consideration. Ramp metering, currently under consideration by MoDOT along I-64, will further improve the flow of general traffic and transit vehicles operating in mixed flow. Transit Connections: Passengers would be able to connect to MetroLink and numerous MetroBus routes at the Civic Center Station, as well as several Madison County Transit bus routes within the Downtown Loop. Passengers would also be able to connect to several MetroBus routes at other locations along the line, particularly at the Ballas Transit Center in Town and Country. A connection to MetroLink at the Brentwood Station for customers traveling to Clayton and Maplewood is also proposed. As currently configured, the I-64 Highway BRT would also serve a potential MetroLink Station and Transit Center in the Cortex Bioscience District, but those facilities do not yet exist and are still being studied. Shuttle/circulator routes could connect the I-64 line in Chesterfield, the Maryville University-St. Luke Hospital area in Town and County, and the Brentwood-Richmond Heights area. Park and ride facilities would be proposed at each station between Chesterfield and Boyle Avenue Stations: Approximately 15 stations would be located along the BRT line. Seven of the potential stations would be located between Chesterfield and Grand Boulevard in the City of St. Louis; the other eight would be in Downtown St. Louis east of Jefferson Avenue. Some stations would be at I-64 interchanges with major cross streets.

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Process of Selecting and Evaluating Potential Projects
What does it mean to identify or define a project? Defining a project involves selecting a route, drafting potential station locations, and formulating draft service characteristics such as hours of service and frequencies. Many alternatives were considered before narrowing down to four alternatives. They included various modes of transit - Bus Rapid Transit, Express Bus and Priority Bus - and many potential routes within the final study area. These were in turn screened using objectives and core values from Metro’s long-range plan, Moving Transit Forward, as well as technical criteria and field evaluation. Four alternatives emerged as the best choices for additional study: I-64 Highway Bus Rapid Transit, Page Avenue Bus Rapid Transit, West Florissant-Natural Bridge Bus Rapid Transit, and Halls Ferry- Riverview Bus Rapid Transit. The strengths of the four routes are: a significant density of activity centers and employment needed to support premium transit service; a heightened need for transit; and accessibility of key destinations for service by Bus Rapid Transit.

Narrowing Down the Choices: Why Some Routes Were Not Selected for Further Study
Some of the alternatives originally considered included north-south alternatives such as I-270, US 67 (Lindbergh), I-170 and arterial routes like W. Florissant Road, Natural Bridge Road, Halls Ferry and Riverview Boulevard. East-west alternatives included I-64, Page Avenue and I-70. Many of the north-south corridors, particularly in the western portion of the region, lacked the major anchortype development or employment base that the St. Louis "Central Corridor " provides. The Central Corridor spans the area between Downtown St. Louis and the Westport- Chesterfield area and includes the Central West End and the Clayton-Brentwood-Richmond Heights area. Among the east-west corridors, I-70 was eliminated as a final alternative. In order to fully leverage the benefits of any premium transit service on I-70, involvement and support from either or both St. Charles County and the City of St. Charles would be necessary.

Detailed Analysis of "Semi-Finalist" Projects
Evaluation of the four alternatives is underway and will wrap up the first week of September. Technical analysis will focus on the likely performance of each alternative in terms of ridership, expanded access to key destinations, travel time savings, land use benefits, etc. Projected ridership is a key component at this point, driving the next level of decision making where the transit service really “comes to life.” Ridership will heavily influence decisions regarding vehicle type, frequency of service and transit station needs. While technical analysis is taking place, the project team will conduct extensive public outreach to add public perspective to the evaluation of the four alternatives. Technical outcomes will be combined with public input to identify the two potential projects most likely to meet project goals, benefit the region, and successfully compete for Federal funding.

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In-depth analysis of these two projects will be presented to the public at open house meetings scheduled in mid-September. At the meetings, the public will be invited to help shape service characteristics and performance features of the two projects to be advanced for federal funding.

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