You are on page 1of 4

Name: ___________________________________________

Civil Rights Leader Project Ms. Manzelli and Ms. Connolly What: Students will be able to research a prominent civil rights leader and create a poster displaying facts and your thoughts about the leaders role in the movement. Why: We just celebrated the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s I Have a Dream speech. Martin Luther King (MLK) is the most famous leader of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. Slavery in America was ended in 1865 when Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation freeing all slaves. Yet 100 years later, AfricanAmericans lived in a segregated society (for example: black people had to sit at the back of busses, blacks and whites used separate water fountains and bathrooms, and there were separate schools for black and white students). MLKs philosophy of non-violent resistance (which he learned from Indian civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi) was a movement that became very popular. African-Americans were encouraged to resist segregation nonviolently through sitins and boycotts. In his first civil rights action, MLK organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott after another famous civil rights figure, Rosa Parks, refused to give her seat up to a white man. MLK organized a city-wide boycott of the citys transportation system. On August 28, 1963, MLK delivered his famous I Have a Dream speech which is just as well-known as it was the day he delivered it. He delivered the speech during the March on Washington which drew over 250,000 people to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. (Quiz: Why would having the March at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial be so important for the movement?) Fast forward to today. You are sitting in a classroom full of students from around the world and from many different backgrounds. Ms. Manzelli and Ms. Connolly ask you to learn about the life and ideas of some of the most influential people in this countrys history those who stood up for equal rights for all. Choose from the list of leaders on the board. Check the rubric as you continue your research to make sure youre including all of the details necessary. Be sure to keep track of your sources and create a beautiful Works Cited list!

CATEGORY

3 Used time well during each class period. Usually focused on getting the project done and never distracted others. Most graphics are in focus and the content easily viewed and identified. All graphics are related to the topic and most make it easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a citation in your Works Cited list. Almost all items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled.

2 Used some of the time well during each class period. There was some focus on getting the project done but occasionally distracted others.

1 Did not use class time to focus on the project OR often distracted others.

Use of Class Time Used time well during each class period. Focused on getting the project done. Never distracted others.

Graphics -Clarity

Graphics are all in focus and the content easily viewed and identified. All graphics are related to the topic and make it easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a citation in your Works Cited list. All items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled.

Most graphics are Many graphics are in focus and the not clear or are too content is easily small. viewed and identified. All graphics relate to the topic. Most borrowed graphics have a citation in your Works Cited list. Graphics do not relate to the topic OR several borrowed graphics do not have a citation in your Works Cited list.

Graphics Relevance

Labels

Several items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled.

Labels are too small to view OR no important items were labeled.

Works Cited List

You include a citation for every (See next page for Website or book list of Works Cited you used to create required elements.) your poster. The formatting of your Works Cited list exactly matches the Works Cited list example (use EasyBib!). Required Elements The poster on Poster includes all (See next page for required elements. list of required elements.)

You include a citation for all but 1 Website or book you used to create your poster. The formatting of your Works Cited list matches the example Works Cited list example (use EasyBib!). All but 1 of the required elements is included on the poster.

You include a citation for all but 2 Websites or books you used to create your poster. The formatting of your Works Cited list somewhat matches the Works Cited list example (use EasyBib!). 2 of the required elements are missing on the poster.

You are missing several citations and/or the formatting of your Works Cited list does not match the Works Cited example.

Several required elements were missing.

Required Elements These elements must be on your poster. Title (Include the name of your leader.) His or her role in the Civil Rights Movement A head shot of the leader (think: school picture) At least one (if not more) picture of the person in action with a caption underneath the photo explaining what is happening in the photo A quote from the leader about the Civil Rights Movement Reflection: Include your thoughts about your leaders role in the Civil Rights Movement AND include your thoughts about the quote that you found. Some questions to consider: What did your leader mean to the Movement? How did your leader help make MLKs dreams come true? How do we see the fruits of your leaders labor alive today? How far do we still have to go for true equality in this country?

Works Cited List: Required Elements Make sure that You include a citation for every single Website or book you use for your research! You Use EasyBib.com to create your citations just as we learned in class. Your citations are alphabetized according to the first letter of each citation. The citations are indented as they are on the example. You include a heading (see example) at the top of your Works Cited list because you are turning this in separately from your poster. There is just one space between each line (even the heading). That your font is Times New Roman and size 12 point.

Joe Smith Science, Library 7A December 19, 2012 Works Cited "Pluto." Astronomy For Kids. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Oct. 2012. <http://www.kidsastronomy.com/pluto.htm>. "Pluto Not a Planet, Astronomers Rule." National Geographic. National Geographic Society, n.d. Web. 01 Oct. 2012. <http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/08/060824pluto-planet.html>. "Solar System Exploration: Planets: Dwarf Planets: Pluto: Overview." Solar System Exploration: Planets: Dwarf Planets: Pluto: Overview. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Oct. 2012. <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Pluto>.