www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 20
MILITARY STRIKE
NATION PAGE 8
3-D PRINTING USED
TO REPLACE DIGITS
HEALTH PAGE 19
OBAMA:I MIGHT LOSE CONGRESSIONAL VOTE ON SYRIA
www.UNrealestate.info
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Stubborn Fat?
Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Dr. Carie Chui, M.D.
ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER
280 Baldwin Ave. Downtown San Mateo
(650)344-1121
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The special district oversight
board which last year spared the
scandalized mosquito abatement
district despite questions about
management allowing an
$800,000 embezzlement by work-
ers may reconsider the idea of
transferring its functions to the
county’s Environmental Health
division.
In July, the San Mateo County
Civil Grand Jury concluded that
mismanagement, insufficient
accountability and inadequate
oversight were behind the crimes
at the Mosquito and Vector
Control District. The jury also
urged the county’s Local Agency
Formation Commission — which
opted in 2012 to maintain the sta-
tus quo near-unanimously after the
embezzlement came to light — to
take a second look at dissolving
the district and transferring its
services to the county’s
Environmental Health division.
The San Carlos City Council —
whose representative to the dis-
trict is the one who prompted dis-
covery of the stealing — agrees
the idea needs further revaluation.
The City Council signed off on its
mandated response to the grand
jury Monday night. LAFCo will
gets its turn Wednesday afternoon.
Although county Supervisor
Don Horsley, who chairs the
LAFCo board, voted against dis-
solution last year, he said a deci-
sion this time depends greatly on
whether the district has instituted
recommended controls to prevent
future errors. Horsley said he
remains unsettled the district
Mosquito abatement district in hot seat again
Local Agency Formation Commission, council each respond to grand jury report
City: Train
horns not
overly loud
Ceremony marks three-year anniversary of fire; PG&E announces settlements
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
More than three years after a
study indicated noise from freight
train horns on the Peninsula fall
within federal limits, San Mateo’s
Public Works Commission will
hear a report by city staff
Wednesday night that essentially
supports the claim.
A study released in March 2010
by the Federal Railroad
Administration determined that
noise readings from the horns fall
within guidelines mandated by
law.
The administration conducted
the tests after then-assemblyman
Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, said his
office was receiving complaints
about the horns from Union Pacific
trains, which generally travel on
the Peninsula corridor late at night
or during early-morning hours.
“Public Works staff has devoted
a significant amount of resources
to the train horn issue. We have
thoroughly investigated issues
brought to our attention by the
community and have been very
diligent in facilitating the commu-
nication between our residents and
the railroad operators. Based on
this study, while UP trains are
sounding at a higher level than
Caltrain trains all the trains are
generally operating within the fed-
eral limits,” according to a staff
report.
The department has also investi-
gated other issues brought to its
attention by the community,
including the implementation of a
“Quiet Zone.”
“Based on our research and study,
it would be a significant monetary
investment by the city to improve
all the crossings in San Mateo to
meet the safety standards for a
quiet zone. In addition, although
San Bruno remembers
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
To mark the three-year anniver-
sary of the explosion and fire that
shook San Bruno, the city held a
remembrance service at the blast
site last night.
Pacific Gas
and Electric
also announced
yesterday it has
settled nearly
all of the
remaining vic-
tims’ lawsuits
for $565 mil-
lion, said PG&E
spokeswoman Brittany Chord.
Eight people died as a result of a
Sept. 9, 2010 PG&E pipeline
explosion and fire in the
Crestmoor neighborhood
“I’m disappointed in the tim-
ing,” Mayor Jim Ruane said.
“They announced it when we were
about to commemorate eight peo-
ple who died.”
The event, at Claremont and
Glenview drives, acted as a cele-
bration of families who have com-
pleted reconstruction and are
returning home and was also as a
commemoration for those who
died in the blast. There were also
66 people were injured, traumatiz-
ing a community and affecting the
entire city.
Ruane spoke at the ceremony,
congratulating the four families
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Three years ago yesterday, Debra
Marks had just finished moving
into her home in the Crestmoor
neighborhood in San Bruno when
her life was changed forever. The
Daily Journal spoke with Marks
on the three-year anniversary of
the explosion
and fire that
marred her
neighborhood.
Marks, 57, a
psychologist in
San Francisco,
was sitting
watching televi-
sion with her
partner when they heard an enor-
mous explosion.
The two were 700 feet from the
epicenter of a Pacific Gas and
Electric pipeline explosion and
fire that ultimately killed eight
people. Sixty-six people were
injured on Sept. 9, 2010, while the
Three years later — a reflection
Explosion and fire still reverberates for San Bruno resident
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Scores of people attended a ceremony commemorating the third anniversary of the Sept. 9, 2010 explosion
and fire last night in San Bruno.
Debra Marks
See FIRE, Page 20
See MARKS, Page 20
See LAFCO, Page 18
See HORNS, Page 18
Jim Ruane
HILLSDALE QB
IS THE AOTW
SPORTS PAGE 11
Stork detained as
spy in Egypt found dead
CAIRO — Astork once detained by
Egyptian authorities on suspicion of
being a winged spy has been found
dead.
Mahmoud Hassib, the head of
Egypt’s southern protected areas, said
Saturday that local residents found the
dead bird on an island in the Nile,
south of the ancient city of Aswan.
In August, a local resident found the
stork in Egypt’s Qena governorate,
some 280 miles southeast of Cairo.
Both he and police were suspicious of
the European wildlife tracker found on
it. Authorities later let the bird go.
However, controversy trails the bird
into death. An Egyptian wildlife
organization claimed on its Facebook
page the bird was “eaten by local vil-
lagers.” Hassib denied that the bird
had been eaten, though he didn’t know
an exact cause of death.
Bay Bridge gets
good luck charm: Troll
SAN FRANCISCO — Afinal piece of
safety hardware — a bearded, spindly
legged troll — has been installed in
the new eastern span of the San
Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.
The troll is meant to be a protector
and good luck charm, modeled after a
similar statue placed surreptitiously
by a steelworker on the old span after
the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.
The new statue forged by an
unknown artist was installed at an
undisclosed location, Bay Area Tol l
Authority spokesman John Goodwin
said.
The original troll was removed from
its perch on Labor Day in preparation
for the demolition of the old bridge
and will likely be housed in a museum
or park, but plans were still being
finalized.
The new, $6.4 billion portion of the
Bay Bridge opened to traffic on Labor
Day, nearly 24 years after the Loma
Prieta earthquake damaged the old
span.
Construction was years behind
schedule and billions of dollars over
budget amid political fights over its
design and engineering challenges.
Goodwin said the new troll, with an
axe in one hand and a hammer in the
other, is somewhere inside the new
bridge but its whereabouts will be kept
secret.
“A new troll appeared, as these
things happen, on Labor Day, under
the cover of darkness,” Goodwin said.
Taylor Swift property
trespassing charge dismissed
SOUTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. — Atres-
passing charge has been dismissed
against a Maine man accused of show-
ing up at Taylor Swift’s Rhode Island
vacation home.
The Westerly Sun reports that police
decided to drop the charge after deter-
mining it would be difficult to prove
that 55-year-old Joseph Bernatche of
Portland, Maine, was on Swift’s prop-
erty when he handed her security guard
a note telling the singer to call him.
Westerly police Lt. Phil Williams
said it was not clear whether the guard
had passed onto public property when
he accepted the note.
Bernatche pleaded not guilty to the
charge of willful trespass after his July
27 arrest.
Judge Melanie Quirk in 4th Division
District Court dismissed the charge on
Friday.
Patrick Stewart
tweets news of nuptials
LOS ANGELES — Patrick Stewart is
sharing the news of his nuptials on
Twitter.
The 72-year-old actor posted a
photo on the site Sunday of himself
and his bride buried to their necks in
multicolored plastic balls with the
simple caption, “Yes, married.”
A Stewart spokesman confirmed
Monday that the actor married Sunny
Ozell Saturday in a ceremony in Lake
Tahoe officiated by Ian McKellen.
McKellen and Stewart will share the
screen again in next year’s “X-Men:
Days of Future Past.”
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Movie director
Guy Ritchie is 45.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1813
An American naval force commanded
by Oliver H. Perry defeated the British
in the Battle of Lake Erie during the
War of 1812.
“History is the great dust-heap
... a pageant and not a philosophy.”
— Augustine Birrell, author and statesman (1850-1933)
Actor Colin Firth is
53.
Actor Ryan
Phillippe is 39.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Acrobats on a tightrope cycle toward a telecommunications tower during the annual International Trade Fair of Thessaloniki
in northern Greece.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the upper 60s. South
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the upper
50s. South winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morn-
ing. Highs in the upper 60s. South winds 10 to 20
mph...Becoming southwest 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Wednesday night: Cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight.
Lows in the upper 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the upper
60s.
Thursday night through Monday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1608, John Smith was elected president of the
Jamestown colony council in Virginia.
I n 1846, Elias Howe received a patent for his sewing
machine.
I n 1912, the jungle character Tarzan made his debut as
“Tarzan of the Apes” by Edgar Rice Burroughs was first pub-
lished in The All-Story magazine.
I n 1919, New York City welcomed home Gen. John J.
Pershing and 25,000 soldiers who’d served in the U.S. First
Division during World War I.
I n 1939, Canada declared war on Germany.
I n 1945, Vidkun Quisling was sentenced to death in
Norway for collaborating with the Nazis (he was executed by
firing squad in October 1945).
I n 1962, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the University of
Mississippi to admit James Meredith, a black student.
I n 1963, twenty black students entered Alabama public
schools following a standoff between federal authorities and
Gov. George C. Wallace.
I n 1979, four Puerto Rican nationalists imprisoned for a
1954 attack on the U.S. House of Representatives and a
1950 attempt on the life of President Harry S. Truman were
freed from prison after being granted clemency by President
Jimmy Carter.
I n 1983, John Vorster, prime minister of white-ruled South
Africa from 1966 to 1978, died in Cape Town at age 67.
I n 1987, Pope John Paul II arrived in Miami, where he was
welcomed by President and Mrs. Reagan as he began a 10-
day tour of the United States.
I n 1993, “The X-Files” premiered on Fox Television.
Ten years ago: Swedish Foreign Minister Anna Lindh, 46,
was stabbed in a Stockholm department store; she died the
next day.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
YUCKY ABIDE HUNGRY SCROLL
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The shrubs needed trimming because they
were too — BUSHY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NILFT
TRUBS
SLEIYA
PEOOSP
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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m
b
le

p
u
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le

m
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g
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in
e
s

a
v
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-
Print your
answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous
George, No. 8, in first place; Lucky Charms, No.
12, in second place; and Eureka, No. 7, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:44.31.
6 6 0
2 16 17 22 41 31
Mega number
Sept. 6 Mega Millions
2 19 22 26 45 24
Powerball
Sept. 7 Powerball
3 8 9 14 23
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 9 5 3
Daily Four
9 1 9
Daily three evening
25 28 35 45 47 20
Mega number
Sept. 7 Super Lotto Plus
World Golf Hall of Famer Arnold Palmer is 84. Actor Philip
Baker Hall is 82. Actor Greg Mullavey is 80. Country singer
Tommy Overstreet is 76. Jazz vibraphonist Roy Ayers is 73.
Singer Danny Hutton (Three Dog Night) is 71. Singer Jose
Feliciano is 68. Actor Tom Ligon is 68. Actress Judy Geeson
is 65. Former Canadian first lady Margaret Trudeau is 65.
Political commentator Bill O’Reilly is 64. Rock musician Joe
Perry (Aerosmith) is 63. Actress Amy Irving is 60. Country
singer Rosie Flores is 57. Actress Kate Burton is 56. Movie
director Chris Columbus is 55. Rock singer-musician David
Lowery (Cracker) is 53. Actor Sean O’Bryan is 50.
3
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Baby Expo
Sunday October 6, 2013
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Hillsdale Shopping Center
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SAN MATEO COUNTY
Suspended license. A man was cited for
driving with a suspended license on Cabrillo
Highway before 7:50 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 3.
Burglary. Someone reported their vehicle
was damaged and items were stolen on the
400 block of Valdez Avenue before 4:40 a.m.
Monday, Sept. 2.
Drug possessi on. A man was cited and
released for possession of marijuana on the
300 block of Redondo Beach Road before
8:08 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1.
BURLINGAME
Disturbance. Agroup of people were ques-
tioned for drug use after found smoking and
playing loud music at the train station on the
200 block of California Drive before 6:53
p.m. on Thursday, Sept 5.
Burglary. A woman had her credit cards
stolen after her car was broken into on the
1800 block of El Camino Real before 12:14
p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 5.
Theft. Apurse was stolen on the 1200 block
of Bayshore Highway before 9:04 p.m. on
Tuesday, Sept. 3.
Burglary . Construction materials were
stolen on the 1400 block of Chapin Avenue
before 10:15 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 3.
Police reports
That stinks
A man found a letter on his doorstep
that said he smelled like rotten eggs on
the 1700 block of Hunt Drive in
Burlingame before 6:24 p.m. on
Wednesday, Sept. 4. By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Most of the 35-acre city-owned San Juan
Hills property in Belmont will likely be pre-
served as open space if the council votes in
that direction tonight but Councilwoman
Coralin Feierbach wants to make sure the
action will protect the land forever from
development by future councils.
Feierbach also wants the extra income gen-
erated from the sale of about two developable
acres in the hilly area to be set aside to pur-
chase even more land in the Skymont area to
preserve it as open space.
The city bought the property by taking out
a $1.5 million loan in 2009 and is currently
under contract to sell about eight acres of it to
potential buyer Shikui Chen for a little more
than $2 million.
Feierbach wants the extra $500,000 gener-
ated from the sale to go toward purchasing
more open space land in the Skymont area
and/or to use the money to improve Marsten
Avenue.
“I don’t think this money should be spent
outside of that area,” she told the Daily
Journal Monday.
She also wants to know what degree of legal
protection the land will have if it is designat-
ed open space as compared to parkland.
The property has a total of 87 plots includ-
ed in the purchase that the city bid on in an
auction held by the U.S. Marshals Service.
Much of the property is on steep slopes and
is considered undevelopable and the remain-
der of the open space will be connected to
Belmont’s trail system in the hills. About 22
acres are actually suitable to develop on
Bishop Road and Marsten and Ralston
avenues, according to city staff.
Chen plans to build three homes on the two
acres on Bishop Road and preserve the other
six acres as open space, according to city
staff.
Feierbach’s main concern is that a future
council does not undo all the work councils in
the past have made to permanently protect the
canyon lands.
The Belmont City Council meets 7:30
p.m., tonight, City Hall, 1 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont.
Bank robbery suspect
claims bomb, drinks coffee
A would-be bank robbery who allegedly
told a teller he had a bomb before helping
himself to a cup of coffee and walking out of
the building pleaded not guilty to second-
degree burglary.
Aaron Brandon Justin, 35, entered a Chase
Bank in San Mateo on Sept. 4, 2013 and
handed a teller a note that read “I have a bomb,
give me the money,” according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
After the teller panicked and froze, she
regained herself and pushed the alarm button
but by that time Justin had already poured
himself some coffee and
left the bank. He was
apprehended nearby and
identified by witnesses,
according to prosecutors.
Justin pleaded not guilty
to second-degree burglary,
attempted robbery and
making a false explosives
claim. He did not waive his
right to a speedy trial and
returns to court Sept. 19
for a preliminary hearing.
He is in custody on $50,000 bail.
Open space vote tonight
Extra money from sale of San Juan Canyon lots
could preserve more open space in Belmont Hills
Aaron Justin
Local brief
4
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Newest Shows:
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
SMC Public Safety Memorial 2013
Fallen officers of the past year from
San Mateo County are remembered
in a service at Notre Dame de Namur.
Weekends @9:30 PMStarting 9/14
North Fair Oaks Community Festival
Enjoy the 12th Annual Redwood City
Festival, with Hosts Mark Naismith and
Supervisor Warren Slocum.
SUN / SAT @8 PM
Elizabeth ‘Betty’ J. Patton
Elizabeth “Betty” J. Patton, a longtime
Millbrae resident, did peacefully Sept. 5,
2013.
She was 86.
Born in San Francisco Jan. 6, 1927, the
daughter of John and Madaline Marshall. She
was a treasured wife, sister, mother, grand-
mother, great-grandmother and friend. Betty
and Bob were married 64 beautiful years and
worked together at the family business, B &
B Sheet Metal, in San Francisco. In retire-
ment, she loved baking cookies and apple
pie, gardening and taking care of the grand-
children and great-grandchildren.
Robert, her husband, preceded her in death
in 2010.
Betty is survived by her children Robert
(Gloria), Ronald (Donna), Georgiann (Neal),
Wayne (Heather), Bonnie Jean, Roberta;
grandchildren Robert, Eugene, Robin,
Jeanette, Chirleen, Stewart, John, Steven,
Stephanie, Ricky, Erin, Clifford, Patrick,
Amanda, William, Colleen, Mary Ellen, Sean
and 32 great-grandchildren with three more
on the way.
In lieu of flowers, we request your love be
shown by a donation to your favorite charity.
Arrangements are under the direction of
Chapel of the Highlands in Millbrae 588-
5116.
Brown signs law closing rape loophole
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown
signed into law Monday a bill closing a
legal loophole that allowed a rape convic-
tion to be overturned because the woman
was not married.
The bill, AB65, sponsored by Republican
state Assemblyman Katcho Achadjian of
San Luis Obispo, fixes a state law dating to
the 1870s that said impersonating a per-
son’s spouse to have sex was rape. The law
now also includes impersonating a person’s
cohabitant, boyfriend or girlfriend.
The revision was prompted by a 2009 case
for which Julio Morales was sentenced to
three years in state prison for impersonat-
ing a woman’s boyfriend in order to have
sex with her. A panel of judges overturned
the trial court’s conviction in January
because under the arcane law she wasn’t pro-
tected — she wasn’t married and the man
wasn’t pretending to be her husband.
Leaders seek to avoid
early inmate releases
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown
and the four leaders of California’s
Legislature reached a compromise Monday
on reducing the state’s prison population,
offering to spend more money on rehabil-
itation efforts if a panel of federal judges
will extend an end-of-the-year deadline to
release thousands of inmates.
The deal relies on the state persuading
three federal judges to give California
time to let rehabilitation programs work
rather than spend $315 million to lease
cells in private prisons and county jails.
The leaders agreed that if the judges
don’t extend the deadline, the state will
fall back on Brown’s plan to lease the
cells.
Obituary Around the state
5
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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REUTERS
A plane drops fire retardant on the Morgan fire burning atop Mount Diablo.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Prosecutors yesterday charged two men
with murder and robbery for their alleged
role in a botched San Mateo home invasion
last week that left a third accomplice dead
when the occupant opened fire.
Bunn Vo, 22, of San Jose, and Edwin Lee,
22, of Daly City, were each charged with
first-degree murder, attempted murder, rob-
bery, kidnapping to commit robbery and
conspiracy. Neither entered a plea.
Third suspect, Bryant Ma, 23, of San
Jose, was killed in the shootout. Lee was
also injured but booked into San Mateo
County Jail with Vo after being discharged
from the San Jose hospital where the trio
headed after the shootout.
The incident happened around 11:30 p.m.
Sept. 4 in the 1500 block of Lodi Avenue,
near South Norfolk Street east of Highway
101. Police say the three suspects entered
the home where they confronted four others
and gunfire erupted. Two people were shot —
Ma and the 24-year-old resident who shot
him — and the suspects fled in a dark SUV.
At Regional Medical Center of San Jose,
May was dead on arrival and Lee was treated
for a non-life threatening shot. Hospital
personnel alerted police who connected
them to the San Mateo shooting. Adark blue
SUVwas located in the hospital parking lot.
Authorities have said the home invasion
was not random but haven’t publicly
divulged a possible motive.
California law allows Vo and Lee to be
charged with Ma’s murder because they were
allegedly participating in a felonious crime
that led to his death.
Vo and Lee remain in custody without bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Pair charged with San
Mateo robbery murder
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Peninsula musical theater company
Broadway By the Bay looked inward for its
newest executive director, naming Daren
A.C. Carollo, who sits on its board of direc-
tors.
Carollo, who most recently served as
artistic director for Diablo Theatre
Company and the managing director for
Contra Costa Civic Theatre, said he is com-
mitting to establishing the company as an
artistic leader and collaborator in Bay Area
theater.
“The short- and long-term goals created
by the staff, the board of directors, and the
Broadway By the Bay family are directly in
line with my goals for local theater, ”
Carollo said in a prepared statement.
Artistic director Amanda Folena said
Broadway By the Bay is “energized” by
Carollo coming on board.
“I could not ask for a
better partner,” Folena
said in a prepared state-
ment.
Carollo has a bache-
lor’s of arts in theater
from Illinois State
University and has more
than 50 credits as an
award-winning director in
the last decade.
The news comes a little more than a year
after the Redwood City-based theater com-
pany restructured its leadership and re-exam-
ined itself to ensure fiscally sound progress.
In early 2012, the theater company
launched a fundraising effort with a year
deadline of reaching a half-million dollars.
In August 2012, owners of the historic Fox
Theatre stepped in to help the company
address its immediate debt and expand offer-
ings.
Broadway By the Bay gets new head
Daren Carollo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLAYTON — Awildfire burning in a San
Francisco Bay Area wilderness park grew
Monday, forcing more people to leave their
homes and leading to a smoke advisory for
area residents.
The blaze in Mount Diablo State Park in
Contra Costa County spread to 3,718 acres
or nearly 6 square miles Monday afternoon,
more than double the 1,500 acres reported in
the morning, according to the California
Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.
It was 20 percent contained.
Officials said hot temperatures and wind
gusts fueled the fire’s spread.
The flames were threatening 100 homes in
the sparsely populated area, which is dotted
with animal pens and shooting ranges. The
fire was also threatening electrical transmis-
sion lines, communications infrastructure,
and a historic lookout and visitor center at
the top of the 3,848-foot Mount Diablo. The
Summit Museum was constructed in the
1930s of sandstone from the park.
The blaze broke out Sunday amid nearly
triple-digit temperatures in the early after-
noon. The cause was under investigation.
The fire spewed a plume of smoke visible
for miles. It was burning in steep, rugged ter-
rain near Clayton, a town of about 11,000
people northeast of San Francisco, along-
side the park.
In addition to the difficult terrain, firefight-
ers faced erratic winds and continued high
temperatures. But they were confident they
would get the blaze under control, Cal Fire
spokesman David Shew said.
“We’ll get it, but it will probably be a few
days,” he said.
More than 700 firefighters, aided by two
air tankers and three water-dropping heli-
copters, were battling the blaze.
The Bay Area Air Quality Management
District issued a smoke advisory Monday for
parts of Contra Costa, Alameda and Santa
Clara counties. Residents were advised to
take precautions, including setting air con-
ditioning units and car vent systems to recir-
culate.
About 100 homes evacuated
in Bay Area due to wildfire
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
6
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
S
tudents from Serra, Notre
Dame and Mercy hi gh
s c hool s will participate in
“Walk for Cathol i c Worker, ” a
five mile walk from Mercy High
School in Burlingame to the Cathol i c
Worker House in San Bruno. It takes
place on 9 a.m Saturday, Sept. 14 and
ends at 12:30 p.m. For the first hour
and a half, students will make banners
and learn more about the Catholic
Worker House. Then, starting at 10:30
a.m., they will begin the walk. When
they arrive at noon at the Catholic
Worker House, they will have lunch.
***
Notre Dame de Namur
Uni versi ty and Hillbarn Theatre
will present a cabaret evening of song
entitled “Songs of September” 7
p.m. Sept. 15 at Hillbarn Theatre. The
one night only event will feature alum-
ni from the Music Theatre
Conservatory. The evening will also
include the set of “Spamalot” which
is currently running at Hillbarn. The
cabaret evening will be a special
fundraiser for Music Theatre
Conservatory and Hillbarn’s Youth
Theatre Conservatory. Hillbarn
Theatre is located at 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd. in Foster City.
Tickets are available at hillbarnthe-
atre.org or by calling 349-6411.
Tickets may also be purchased at the
box office Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m.-2
p.m. Ticket are going for $25.
***
The San Mateo County School
Boards Associ at i on is hosting a
CSBA Local Control Funding
Formula Seminar 5 p.m. Sept. 18 at
the San Mateo County Office of
Education, 101 Twin Dolphin Drive
in Redwood City.
***
The Burlingame Elementary
School Di stri ct will host a
Centennial Celebration 2 p.m.-4
p.m. Sept. 22 at McKi nl ey
Elementary School, 701 Paloma
Ave. There will be a building dedica-
tion, music, food, old-fashioned
games, celebration cake and other
entertainment.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Officials launch
crime-fighting phone app
SAN FRANCISCO — State and local
law enforcement officials in California
said on Monday that they hope a new
mobile application will help officers
on the street fight crime by using their
smartphones.
Attorney General Kamala Harris, San
Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Police
Chief Greg Suhr jointly announced
Monday that about 600 San Francisco
police officers have used a smartphone
application called JusticeMobile that
allows them to look up suspects’
statewide criminal records while they
are out on patrol.
Plans call for about 1,600 officers in
San Francisco to receive an expanded
version of the app that will include fed-
eral criminal records. More than
3,600 Los Angeles police officers will
soon receive the application, which
was created by the attorney general’s
office and several San Francisco city
departments using federal, state and
local funds.
New York City police began testing
a similar app to access its department’s
criminal records earlier this year. But
Harris, Lee and Suhr said California is
the only state in the country where
officers will have access to statewide
criminal records.
On Sept.8,St.Matthew’s Episcopal Church and Day School wrapped up its backpack
drive by blessing and filling 100 backpacks benefitting InnVision Shelter Network
kids and teens who cannot afford school supplies. Donations included crayons,
markers, paper, notebooks and gift cards.
STATE GOVERNMENT
• Senat e Bi l l 44, authored by
state Sen. Lel and Yee, D- San
Franci sco/ San Mat eo, was
signed by the governor Monday.
The legislation will require all
state websites to add a link to the
Secretary of St at e’s voter reg-
istration.
Yee authored the bill to expand access to the online
voter registration system implemented last year. Since
the implementation of online voter registration, more
than 1 million Californians have registered to vote
online, according to Yee’s office.
• As s embl y Bi l l 524, authored by Assembl yman
Kevi n Mul l i n, D-South San Franci sco, passed out
of the Legi sl ature and is now on its way to the gover-
nor’s office for approval.
The bill removes ambiguity in the law and strength-
ens human rights protections for immigrants by includ-
ing threats to report a person’s immigration status in
the definition of extortion, according to Mullin’s
office.
By clarifying the definition of extortion, AB 524 will
help level the playing field and prevent unethical
employers from using immigration status as a means of
escaping responsibility for workplace abuses, coercion
and wage theft, according to Mullin’s office.
• As s embl y Bi l l 11 3 5, authored by Mullin to
expand the list of documents used to validate vote-by-
mail ballots was signed into law by the governor, tak-
ing effect Jan. 1, 2014.
Current law says a vote-by-mail ballot may only be
counted if the signature on the ballot envelope com-
pares with the signature on the voter’s original regis-
tration form, according to Mullin’s office.
• Legislation by state Sen. Jerry Hi l l , D- San
Mat eo, allowing voters to confirm their mail-in ballot
was counted was signed Monday by the governor.
SB 589 will create a “free access system” and provide
county registrars with flexibility to determine how they
want to comply with the legislation by notifying vot-
ers on a walk-in basis, over the phone or online,
according to Hill’s office.
• Senat e Bi l l 467, authored by state Sen. Mark
Leno, D- San Franci sco, was passed by the
As s e mbl y Monday. The bill, sponsored by the
Electroni c Front i er Foundati on, requires state law
enforcement agencies to obtain a warrant before asking
service providers to hand over a private person’s elec-
tronic communications, including email and
Facebook and Twi tter messages. It provides the same
reasonable privacy protections for an email in the
Cloud as a letter in a person’s home, according to
Leno’s office.
Around the Bay
LOCAL 7
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Adjusting to new standards, grappling
with new technology and keeping the
Hillsborough City Elementary School
District one of the top districts in the state
are important issues for those running for
the district’s Board of Trustees.
The four seeking seats on the board —
incumbent Lynne Esselstein, Don Geddis,
Kaarin Hardy and Pearl Wu — visited the
Daily Journal office last week for an
endorsement interview. Candidates were
concerned with infrastructure changes need-
ed to usher in the new computer-based
Smarter Balanced assessments that come
with the Common Core curriculum shift and
continuing to have a strong school district.
Upcoming changes
The state’s new Common Core standards
shift to more team collaborative learning,
with less time spent on lectures and more of
an emphasis on classroom technology.
New Smarter Balance aligns with these new
standards and will go into effect during the
2014-15 school year.
Making sure teachers are prepared to have
kids ready for the new assessment standards
was a concern for Geddis.
“Hillsborough is well-prepared, but we
don’t even have the textbooks yet,” Geddis
said. “It’s a lot of work.”
Hardy works in change management con-
sultation and said there’s going to be some
navigation through this curriculum change.
She noted teachers are excited because they
know it means it’s what is best for kids.
Also, being a test site for the Smarter
Balance tests allowed the district to see how
students interacted with them, she added.
Moving forward with cautious optimism
with the transition is Wu’s approach to the
shift.
Esselstein noted that
the district changed the
middle school schedule to
build in Common Core
planning time for teach-
ers. She did say that there
will be a high quantity of
technology devices need-
ed for the change.
In terms of the dis-
trict’s balance of using
technology in the class-
room, Wu said overall the
use is good when it’s used
in the right setting, at
the right time.
“My basic philosophy
is technology is a tool
and part of what we do for
critical thinking,”
Esselstein said, who said
she represents the
board’s institutional
memory. “More technol-
ogy is coming and we’re
building up our Wi-Fi
infrastructure. It’s not
effective if you don’t
have good teaching; oth-
erwise it’s not a good use
of money. ”
Keeping pace with
technology and consid-
ering device replacement
costs is something to
consider, Hardy said.
Geddis, who has a
Ph.D. in computer sci-
ence, said it needs to be
considered whether the
technology serves the
school’s needs or not, but
that the district has been
doing a good job using
technology in the class-
room. He also stressed the need for profes-
sional development to use SMART Boards
and other technology correctly.
Praise for the district’s work
When the issue of the capital apprecia-
tion bonds took the table, all candidates
were in support of how the district used the
funds. Back in July, a civil grand jury
reported that capital appreciation bonds
used by 13 San Mateo County school dis-
tricts are expensive “ticking time bombs”
that will drain future taxpayers.
“They were a great tool for us at the time,”
Esselstein said. “The property tax was in
flux. There was misinformation in the grand
jury report that could have been corrected if
they approached us. The board was very
conscientious about the program.”
When Wu first read the news, she said she
was ambivalent, but then went to a board
meeting and felt reassured.
“We’re ahead of the game,” Wu said. “In
the last 11 years there’s been new build-
ings, learning spaces have been renovated
and the district has been exercising fiscal
responsibility. The lesson learned is you do
not want to plunge in for short-term gains.”
The district had the number one Academic
Performance Index ranking in the state for
K-8 schools this year, Esselstein said. To
continue the success of the district, Hardy
said the district’s current strategic planning
process will be helpful in deciding on what
curriculum should be the focus.
Esselstein said she’d like to see students
do more writing, while Geddis said his main
priority would be making sure students are
motivated and excited about going to
school.
An expansion of the world language pro-
gram is one of Wu’s priorities as well.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Four in the running for Hillsborough school board
Candidates focused on new curriculum and keeping standards high
Convicted rapist
representing self guilty in robbery
Aconvicted rapist who represented him-
self against charges he robbed a South San
Francisco office worker
was convicted after only
two hours of jury delib-
erations of that crime
plus kidnapping.
Tony Alfonso
Johnson, 52, was also
found to have prior con-
victions. Another count
of assault with a firearm
was dismissed for insuf-
ficient evidence.
Johnson, 52, was linked to the Dec. 6,
2007 robbery by DNA on a bandanna left
at the scene that he allegedly used to hide
his face and wipe away fingerprints from
the furniture. Johnson was reportedly
seeking computer laptops at the South San
Francisco office but fled with credit cards
instead.
The victim’s identification and
Johnson’s DNA profile from the sweaty
bandanna linked him to the crime after he
was arrested in Solano County for gun pos-
session. After his conviction in that case,
he returned to San Mateo County where he
stood trial as a third-striker.
In 1985, a jury convicted Johnson of
sexually assaulting a woman in Pacifica in
June 1984. The crime brought him 30
years in prison and made news because he
was found to have committed great bodily
injury against the woman by passing on a
sexually transmitted disease. In the middle
of 2007, Johnson was paroled back to San
Mateo County.
Johnson acted as his own attorney dur-
ing the recent trial but is now considering
hiring or requesting a court-appointed
attorney for sentencing. He returns to
court Sept. 11 to set a sentencing date and
remains in custody.
Local brief
Tony Johnson
Lynne
Esselstein
Don Geddis
Kaarin Hardy
Pearl Wu
NATION/WORLD 8
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Vladmis Isachenkov
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — Syria on Monday quickly
welcomed a call from Russia, its close ally,
to place Syrian chemical arsenals under
international control, then destroy them to
avert a U.S. strike, but did not offer a time
frame or any other specifics.
The statement by Syrian Foreign Minister
Walid al-Moallem appeared to mean that
diplomatic efforts to end Syria’s 2 1/2-year
civil war were gaining momentum. But it
remained to be seen whether it represented a
genuine goodwill gesture by Syria or sim-
ply an attempt by Syrian President Bashar
Assad to buy more time to prepare for a U.S.
military attack.
“Syria welcomes the Russian proposal out
of concern for the lives of the Syrian peo-
ple, the security of our country and because
it believes in the wisdom of the Russian
leadership that seeks to avert American
aggression against our people,” al-Moallem
said during a visit to Moscow, where he held
talks with his Russian counterpart, Sergey
Lavrov.
However, al-Moallem, would not give any
further details in his brief statement and did-
n’t take any questions from reporters.
Russia’s proposal confirmed for the first
time from Syria’s most important interna-
tional ally that the Syrian government
possesses chemical weapons, and al-
Moallem’s welcome was a tacit acknowl-
edgment. Syria’s Foreign Ministry last
year retracted a threat to use chemical
weapons, saying it was not acknowledging
that it had them.
Moallem’s statement came a few hours
after U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said
Assad could resolve the crisis surrounding
the alleged use of chemical weapons by his
forces by surrendering control of “every
single bit” of his arsenal to the internation-
al community by the end of the week.
Syria positive about giving
up chemical weapon aresenal
REUTERS
Smoke rises as a result of shelling from forces loyal to President Bashar Assad, according to
activists in Syria.
By David Espo and Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Battling stiff resistance
in Congress, President Barack Obama con-
ceded Monday night he might lose his fight
for congressional support of a military
strike against Syria, and declined to say
what he would do if lawmakers reject his call
to back retaliation for a chemical weapons
attack last month.
The president made his comments as a
glimmer of a possible diplomatic solution
appeared after months of defiance from the
Russian-backed government of President
Bashar Assad in Syria. In a rapid response,
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid cited
“international discussions” in unexpectedly
postponing a test vote originally set for
Wednesday on Obama’s call for legislation
backing a military strike.
In a series of six network interviews
planned as part of a furious lobbying cam-
paign in Congress, Obama said statements
suggesting that Syria might agree to surren-
der control of its chemical weapons stock-
pile were a potentially positive develop-
ment.
At the same time, he said they were yet
another reason for lawmakers to give him
the backing he is seeking.
“If we don’t maintain and move forward
with a credible threat of military pressure, I
do not think we will actually get the kind of
agreement I would like to
see,” he said on CNN.
In a separate interview
with NBC, the president
took the step — unusual
for any politician — of
conceding he may lose
his campaign in
Congress for legislation
authorizing a military
strike. “I wouldn’t say
I’m confident” of the out-
come, he said.
“I think it’s fair to say that I haven’t
decided” on a next step if Congress turns its
back, the president told NBC, part of a furi-
ous lobbying campaign aimed at winning
support from dubious lawmakers as well as a
war-weary public.
The president picked up a smattering of
support but also suffered a reversal when
Sen. Johnny Isakson, a Georgia
Republican, announced he had switched
from a backer of military action to an oppo-
nent.
“They’re in tough shape. It is getting
late,” said Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., after he
and other lawmakers emerged from a closed-
door meeting with administration officials.
The New York Republican favors the legisla-
tion that Obama wants, but he said the pres-
ident didn’t need to seek it and now must
show that a strike “is in America’s national
security interest.”
Barack Obama: I might lose
congressional vote on Syria
Barack Obama
OPINION 9
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
President’s decision
Editor,
America stands on the precipice of
going to war in Syria. The commander in
chief will address the nation tonight.
Congress debates, the U.N. confers and
the folks worry. Our troops deployed
around the world, including thousands at
battle stations in the Mediterranean, will
be ready for whatever orders the president
issues. Our forces are prepared to engage
the enemy from ships hundreds of miles
away, from screaming aircraft or look
them directly in the eye, if necessary. Our
military will carry out the president’s
orders effectively and may have to sacri-
fice their lives in the process. How fortu-
nate we are to have the finest military in
the world.
As we pray for President Obama to
receive divine guidance, let us also
remember the 100,000+ souls at the
Golden Gate National Cemetery, located
near Interstate 280 in San Bruno, who sac-
rificed their lives for their country. Many
were killed in battle. Many more suffered
horrendous injuries in combat. What an
honor to care for the spirits of those
American heroes. Those beautiful, gentle
rolling hills of that sacred ground is not
only a place to honor those servicemen
and women, it is a reminder to all of us to
make sure that we remain worthy of their
sacrifice.
Ethan E. Jones
San Bruno
House of fools
Editor,
There are no rules in war. Wars are
fought between those who have power,
and those who seek power. If there were
rules in war they could only be enforced
by military action of a more powerful mil-
itary. Al-Qaida’s plan was announced by
its leaders Ayman Al-Zawahiri, and Osama
bin Laden years ago. That plan was, and
still is to slowly take over power in other
Middle East countries, and then make a
final move on Israel. Our congressional
representatives don’t see this because of
their ignorance or the night life around
Georgetown is too good to miss out on.
They all deserve a B.S. degree, and I don’t
mean the type you get in science, I mean
the other kind.
Al-Qaida supporters sent a subtle hint of
their intentions with the killing of
Ambassador Stevens in Benghazi, Libya
on Sept. 11 a year ago. In the end, I am
sure it will come out years from now that
an attack on Syria was not done for
humanitarian reasons, but rather for a
political one instead.
Patrick Field
Palo Alto
Syria war poll
Editor,
As of Sept. 5, 2013, the results of the
Daily Journal’s online poll, “Do you sup-
port military action in Syria?” shows that
44 percent said no to war and 13 percent
said that they did support another war.
The question should now be: Will U.S.
Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, listen to
her constituents and vote no to war, or
will she vote with the San Francisco war
criminal, progressive Democrats for yet
another illegal war of aggression?
Frank Scafani
San Bruno
What about Syria?
Editor,
I’m a peaceful activist who believes we
must significantly disable Syria’s mili-
tary. Poison gassing is an atrocity, on top
of 100,000 other horrible atrocities, that
must receive severe consequences.
Without consequences, no standards
against abhorrent behavior can be upheld.
Objectors say, “Why should we be police-
man to the world?” The answer is we are
the most powerful country that also stands
for principles of human rights and justice.
True, we sometimes give only lip serv-
ice to these ideals while pursuing selfish
national or corporate interests, but, the
other powerful countries don’t even pre-
tend to uphold these ideals. They’d let
people kill each other, so long as they
can buy resources and sell their products.
If we don’t act, who will? Objectors say,
“Why go to war now when we did nothing
while 100,000 civilians have been killed
already?”
The answer is that we’ve no clear thresh-
old beyond which condemnation and reac-
tion are called for. Should the world have
reacted after 100,000 murders? or 50,000?
or 1,000? or 50? How many people must
die to call this an atrocity? We don’t
know. But we do know that use of poison
gas, biological or nuclear weapons is an
atrocity, and now, that line has been
crossed.
How can peace-loving people condone
war? When negotiation and diplomacy
fail, then one must push back when con-
fronted by a bully. Diplomacy only works
when all parties actually want to find a
resolution. In the case of Syria, the tyrant
Assad wants only to eliminate his opposi-
t i on.
Bruce Joffe
Piedmont
Transparency
Editor,
This letter is regarding Sue Lempert’s
Sept. 9 column “Areal contest in San
Mateo.”
Mrs. Lempert. No audit. Shame on you
Sue. Transparency is what the citizens
want. Not lobbyists or special interest
groups using their influence to circumvent
the process. There were to many questions
during the 7-Eleven debacle that staff and
planners could not answer, partly because
there was no file for the “501 North San
Mateo Drive Project” (Hard to believe) and
a developer whose end-around efforts and
tactics caused our group and the city to
spend money, not our problem.
The residents provided emails to city
representatives and we were assured by the
city that everyone would be contacted
prior to permits being issued, unfortunate-
ly it was already a done deal and a cyclone
fence around the property with “Big Gulps
Coming Soon” as our notice. Mrs.
Lempert, as you know, this is not the first
time the city of San Mateo has spent
money foolishly — transit center, old
police station property, Kinko’s property.
Mayor Lim and Deputy Mayor Robert
Ross have our vote for “transparency. ”
Fred Chiappe
San Mateo
Housing prices
Editor,
I have decided to write to you regarding
Angela Swartz’s article “Middle-income
grapple with housing prices in San Mateo
County” in the Aug. 20 edition of the Daily
Journal.
I can really relate to Lanelle Duran’s sce-
nario (The woman that was chronicled for
her situation in this article). I fully agree
with her that housing prices are “criminal.”
Like Duran, I was born and raised here. I
am currently renting a one bedroom apart-
ment where the rent was raised $200 a
month upon my arrival. The previous ten-
ant was paying $200 less. The apartment
had nothing done
to it. The previous tenant was there for a
year and a half. There was no new carpet-
ing, paint or fixtures; nothing was updated.
The place was built in the 1950s and has
the same 1950s decor to match. I don’t
understand the sheer greediness of land-
lords or property owners that do not put
any effort to, at the very least, providing
new carpets, paint, etc. to semi-justify the
$200 rent increase. The owner saw an
advertisement on Craigslist for a place
across the street that was getting $200
more per month, and BOOM — it’s a done
deal. I am a single person with no kids or
pets — really a landlord’s dream. When will
the renters of this insane market ever catch
a break? I suppose that I am one of many
on a long list ... still waiting.
Sharon E. Levine
San Carlos
What’s on tape
N
early everyone has their personal
signal for the changing of the sea-
son. Perhaps it is the way leaves
shift from vibrant greens into Halloween-
worthy oranges and rustic browns or the
crunching sound of them underfoot during a
walk down the street. Maybe it’s the last-
minute decision to grab a sweater while
heading out the door, just in case the weath-
er unexpectedly turns. The boxing up of the
standing fan even or the decision to forgo a
pedicure one more week because boot-clad
toes don’t see much of the world — both
might be the moment when somebody
knows summer is getting ready to say adios
and time that
once sprung for-
ward is soon
ready to fall back.
For me, the
noticeable indica-
tor is tape. Good
ol’ regular clear,
sticky tape.
“Do you now
what day it is?”
asked the sports
editor (you may
recognize him as
The Sports
Lounge).
I drew a mental blank before rapid-fire
shooting out possibilities for which he’d
make a point to tell me. I didn’t think
something like a shoe sale or National
Pancake Day would necessarily register on
his radar or drive him to share with the
group.
Dove hunting? An arcane bit of baseball
history? Time to write the weekly column?
His daughter’s return to school? Some sort
of newsroom anniversary? Did Nick the
production guy bring in doughnuts for a
second day in a row? Maybe a new trivia
calendar arrived?
“Wait — I know!” The answer came to me
in a flash. “It’s tape day!”
Tape day is otherwise known as the start
of football season. I frankly pay little other
than passing attention to football except
for the fact that between the September start
and December finish, my tape dispenser
beckons over the head of the sports desk so
he can tack down his score sheet to a clip-
board.
Why don’t you just get your own tape? I
once asked.
Don’t need it that often, came the reply.
Well then take mine. It’s not like I use it
much either, I offered.
The never-ending sea of governmental
reports and agendas clogging my desk make
me more of a paper clip and wide binder clip
kind of gal.
But then I wouldn’t have any excuse to
come visit, he would wisecrack.
So true. You are so far away, I responded
with my own dose of sarcasm.
Disclaimer: In the editorial department, I
sit closest to the sports guys — within a
stone’s throw (or at least a wad of notebook
paper) — if I had even a smidge of athletic
ability. Maybe I should actually try lob-
bing the tape dispenser although chances
are good I’d end up breaking a computer
screen, hitting the advertising guy sitting
behind my target or drop it on my foot.
When the ritual first started, oh so many
football seasons ago, the now-annual
exchange came as a humble request. Hey,
can I borrow some tape?
And without fail I’d reply something
along the lines of: Well, you can have it. I
don’t really want it back when you’re done.
Now, there is simply the announcement
of tape season — if that — followed by two
steps to my desk to pull off a length of
sticky stuff beyond the half-inch covered in
dust from sitting idle the past year. I guess
at this point you could say we have dis-
pensed with the formalities.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email: michelle@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext.
102. What do you think of this column? Send
a letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
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facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
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who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,063.12 +140.62 10-Yr Bond 2.897 -0.041
Nasdaq 3,706.18 +46.17 Oil (per barrel) 108.94
S&P 500 1,671.71 +16.54 Gold 1,386.20
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
MDC Holdings Inc., up $1.72 to $29.37
Citigroup upgrades the homebuilder after a 30 percent pullback for
housing shares since they hit multiyear highs in May.
The Mosaic Co., up $2.15 to $44.31
Shares of fertilizer companies rally after Russian President Vladimir Putin
says a resolution must be found after the breakup of a potash cartel that
had maintained higher prices.
Ford Motor Co., up 31 cents to $17.31
Jefferies & Co.says the carmaker is well positioned to meet strong demand
and expects production to double in China by the middle of the decade.
Nasdaq
Molex Inc., up $9.29 to $38.63
Koch Industries is buying the electronic components and cables maker
for about $6.86 billion.
Apple Inc., up $7.95 to $506.17
On the eve of an event to introduce new products, shares in the
technology giant jump above $500 once again.
Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $3.89 to $31.81
The drug developer announced that it is collaborating with Biogen Idec
Inc. to develop therapies to treat neurological disorders.
Expedia Inc., up 96 cents to $50.64
The stock is upgraded by Lazard Capital, which cited a marketing
agreement between the online travel company and its peer,Travelocity.
Lululemon Athletica Inc., up $1.79 to $71.28
Citigroup initiated coverage with a “buy” rating, saying that the yoga
gear retailer is delivering strong consumer value despite high prices for
its clothing and accessories.
Big movers
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The stock market got a boost on
Monday from mergers, homes, and
phones.
Stocks posted their biggest gains in
almost two months. Two big deals sug-
gested growing confidence in the econo-
my: Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus was
sold for $6 billion, and Koch Industries
bought electronics component maker
Molex for $7.2 billion.
Homebuilding stocks were some of
the biggest gainers in the Standard &
Poor’s 500 index after Hovnavian
Enterprises said home prices are rising
and its backlog jumped almost 27 per-
cent from a year earlier.
Hovnanian rose 11 cents, or 2.2 per-
cent, to close at $5.15. PulteGroup,
D.R. Horton and Lennar also gained.
Homebuilder MDC Holdings rose
$1.72, or 6.2 percent, to $29.37 after
an upgrade from a Citi analyst.
Homebuilding stocks have had a
volatile year. Investors have been bull-
ish because the housing market is recov-
ering, but worried that rising interest
rates make mortgages more expensive
for home buyers.
Apple rose. It’s expected to announce
a new iPhone on Tuesday.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
140.62 points, or 1 percent, to
15,063.12. The Dow hit an all-time
high of 15,658 on Aug. 2. But worries
about Syria and rising interest rates
pushed stocks down since then. The last
time the Dow closed above 15,000 was
Aug. 23.
The S&P 500 index rose 16.54
points, or 1 percent, to 1,671.71. The
Nasdaq composite rose 46.17 points, or
1.3 percent, to 3,706.18. Both the Dow
and the S&P 500 had their biggest daily
gains since July 11.
All 10 industry groups in the S&P500
rose. The index rose for the fifth day in a
row, the longest since eight days of
gains in July.
Two things about the Koch-Molex
deal grabbed investors’ attention: Its
components show up in a wide variety
of products, including housing and
autos, so Koch’s interest suggests that
it sees broad economic improvement.
Also, Koch is paying a large premium
for Molex.
Koch is paying $38.50 per share, 31
percent over Molex’s stock price on
Friday. Molex soared $9.29, or almost
32 percent, to $38.63 on Monday.
“I think it’s really exciting for just
about everybody to see that big of a deal
go through,” said Kim Forrest, senior
analyst with portfolio management firm
Fort Pitt Capital Group in Pittsburgh.
Apple rose back above $500 per
share. It last closed above that level on
Aug. 26. Apple gained $7.95, or 1.6
percent, to $506.17 on Monday in
advance of an expected iPhone
announcement on Tuesday.
Delta Air Lines jumped $1.87, or 9.4
percent, to $21.76 after news that it
would be added to the S&P 500 index.
That benefits Delta because mutual funds
and other investors that track the S&P
500 will now have to buy Delta’s stock.
JPMorgan analyst Jamie Baker estimat-
ed that inclusion in the index will add
demand for almost 89 million Delta
shares.
Stocks in Asia rose lifted by Tokyo’s
win for the 2020 Summer Olympics,
Chinese export growth and an election
victory by Australia’s conservative
coalition.
The coalition supports repealing a 30
percent tax on coal and iron ore miners’
profits, which could help mining and
other raw material companies.
Caterpillar, which makes mining gear
used in China and Australia, rose $2.20,
or 2.6 percent, to $85.59, and mining
company Cliffs Natural Resources was
up $1.33, or 6.1 percent, to $23.18.
The positive news out of the Asia-
Pacific region helped outweigh worries
about rising interest rates and Syria,
said Doug Cote, chief market strategist
at ING U.S. Investment Management.
“The risk of taking action seems too
great for them to act,” he said. “I’m
watching it daily, but I’m certainly not
worried about it.”
In U.S. government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to
2.92 percent from 2.94 percent late
Friday.
Stocks rise on mergers, homebuilder outlook
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Americans cut
back on using their credit cards in July
for the second straight month, while
taking on more debt to buy cars and
attend school. The decline in credit
card use suggests consumers remain
cautious, a trend that could hold back
economic growth.
Consumers increased their borrow-
ing $10.4 billion in July from June to
a record high of $2.85 trillion, the
Federal Reserve said Monday. That
followed a gain of $11.9 billion in
June.
A category that includes auto loans
and student loans increased $12.3 bil-
lion in July to a record $2 trillion. But
a measure consumers’ credit card debt
fell $1.8 billion to roughly $850 bil-
lion. That followed an even larger
$3.7 billion decline in the credit card
category in June.
July’s pattern of consumers’ borrow-
ing habits illustrated trends that have
surfaced in the post-recession econo-
my: Americans are using credit for
their most urgent needs, while forgo-
ing debt for discretionary purchases.
The auto and student loan category
is up 8.1 percent from a year ago and
has risen in every month but one since
May 2010. But credit card debt has
barely changed in the past year and is
nearly 17 percent below its peak hit in
July 2008 — seven months after the
Great Recession began.
Slow but steady job growth and
small wage gains have made many
Americans more reluctant to charge
goods and services to their plastic.
That could hold back consumer spend-
ing, which accounts for 70 percent of
economic activity. Americans may
also be hesitant to take on more high-
interest debt because of higher Social
Security taxes.
At the same time, the weak economy
is sending more people back to
school. The Federal Reserve’s con-
sumer credit report does not separate
student loans and auto loans. But the
Federal Reserve Bank of New York
quarterly report on consumer credit
shows student loan debt has been the
biggest driver of borrowing since the
Great Recession officially ended in
June 2009.
Consumer borrowing rises $10.4B in July
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Apple is
expected to unveil its latest take on
the iPhone Tuesday during an annual
ritual that will probably cast a spot-
light on the gadget maker’s drive to
regain market share and its sluggish
pace of innovation.
In keeping with its tight-lipped
ways, Apple Inc. hasn’t disclosed
what’s on the agenda for the coming-
out party scheduled to begin at 10 a.m.
PDT at its Cupertino headquarters.
But this is the time of year that
Apple typically shows off the latest
generation of its iPhone, a device that
has reshaped the way people use com-
puters since its debut in 2007. Apple
took the wraps off the iPhone 5, the
current model, last September. The
company has never waited longer than
a year to update the iPhone, which has
generated $88 billion in revenue dur-
ing the past year.
Apple’s timetable for rolling out
products has vexed many investors
who have watched the company’s
growth slow and profit margi ns
decrease. Meanwhile, a bevy of smart-
phone makers, most of whom rely on
Google Inc.’s free Android software,
release wave after wave of devices that
cost less than the iPhone. Those con-
cerns are reflected in Apple’s stock
price, which has declined nearly 30
percent since peaking at $705.07 at
about the same time the iPhone 5 went
on sale last year. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index has risen about 14
percent during the same stretch.
Even though Apple’s market value
of roughly $460 billion is more than
any other company in the world, the
deterioration in its stock price is esca-
lating the pressure on CEO Tim Cook
to prove he’s the right leader to carry
on the legacy of co-founder Steve
Jobs.
Apple expected to expand selection of iPhones
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Toyota is recalling
880,584 RAV4 SUVs and Lexus HS
250h sedans in the U.S. and Canada
because a repair announced last year
may not have solved a safety problem.
RAV4s from the 2006 through 2011
model years and the Lexus HS250h
from the 2010 model year are involved
in the recall.
Toyota says if rear suspension nuts
aren’t tightened properly after a wheel
alignment, the rear lower suspension
arm can rust and separate from the
vehicle, increasing the risk of a crash.
At least nine crashes and three
injuries related to the problem have
been reported, according to the
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration. At least 131 owners
have complained about the issue to
NHTSAand Toyota.
Toyota recalled the vehicles last
August for the same issue, but spokes-
woman Cindy Knight said the repair pro-
cedure in the previous recall was incor-
rect. Knight didn’t know if Toyota sent
out the wrong instructions or if techni-
cians at its dealerships didn’t follow the
correct procedures. She said technicians
are receiving additional training.
Toyota is recalling 780,584 vehi-
cles in the U.S. and 100,000 in
Canada. Owners will be notified over a
six-month period starting this month.
Toyota technicians will inspect the
vehicles and replace suspension arms
which are loose or rusted for free.
Toyota again recalling 880,584 RAV4, Lexus sedans
Judge: Abercrombie
wrongly fired Muslim for hijab
SAN FRANCISCO — Afederal judge in San Francisco
has ruled that trendy clothing retailer Abercrombie &
Fitch wrongly fired a Muslim worker who insisted on
wearing a head scarf.
U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers said the
company violated anti-discrimination laws when it fired
Hani Khan from its Hollister store in San Mateo, in
2010. Rogers issued the ruling on Tuesday.
The company claimed the head scarf violated its poli-
cy governing the look of its employees, which it said
was part of its marketing strategy. The store argued that
deviating from its look policy would affect sales.
But the judge said Abercrombie & Fitch offered no
“credible evidence” that Khan’s head scarf cost the com-
pany any sales.
“Abercrombie only offers unsubstantiated opinion
testimony of its own employees to support its claim of
undue hardship,” Rogers said.
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
filed a lawsuit on Khan’s behalf in 2011.
“Abercrombie & Fitch does not discriminate based on
religion and we grant religious accommodations when
reasonable,” spokesman Bruce MacKenzie said. “It is
our policy not to comment on pending litigation.”
Atrial on the company’s liability is scheduled for later
this month. The judge said the jury is free to award puni-
tive damages if it chooses.
It’s the latest employment discrimination charge
against the company’s so-called “look policy,” which
critics say means images of mostly white, young, ath-
letic-looking people. The New Albany, Ohio-based com-
pany has said it does not tolerate discrimination.
Business briefs
T
he best thing about the Internet,
you can find out almost anything
you need to know — at least as it
pertains to sports.
Blogs, message boards, social media,
Web-only sport sites have revolutionized
how sports information can be distributed
and accrued.
But I had to do a double take Monday
morning when I looked up Menlo School’s
football result against San Angelo Central
High School in Texas.
Originally, the final score was listed San
Angelo 84-63 winners over the Knights,
later amended to 84-
49.
That couldn’t be
right, I thought.
After putting in a
call in to the Menlo
coach to verify the
score, I started an
Internet search and I
came across the
game story from the
San Angelo Standard
Times and it verified
it: San Angelo,
indeed, had hung 84
points on the
Knights.
Even more eye-popping: the Bobcats
scored 50 points in the first quarter alone,
including scoring a pair of their 11 touch-
downs about three minutes into the game.
San Angelo racked up more than 600
yards of offense for the second consecutive
game and broke a school record for most
points scored. The Bobcats scored 71
points in the season opener.
If not for a pair of early turnovers, Menlo
might have made the score a lot closer.
Senior quarterback Jack Heneghan threw for
411 yards and four touchdowns — setting
a stadium record for most passing yards
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Hard to believe this is the
same Rafael Nadal who was home during the
U.S. Open a year ago, nursing a bad left
knee.
Hard to believe this is the guy sent pack-
ing in the first round of
Wimbledon in June, los-
ing against someone
ranked 135th.
Looking fit as can be
and maybe even better
than ever, the No. 2-
ranked Nadal pulled away
from No. 1 Novak
Djokovic 6-2, 3-6, 6-4,
6-1 on Monday in a taut,
tense U.S. Open final for
his 13th Grand Slam title.
“Very, very emotional, no?” Nadal said
during the on-court trophy presentation.
“Probably only my team knows how much
(this) means for me.”
They started in sunlight and finished at
night, a 3-hour, 21-minute miniseries of
cliffhangers and plot twists and a pair of
protagonists who inspired standing ova-
tions in the middle of games.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Hillsdale High School head football
coach Mike Parodi and his starting quarter-
back, senior Cole Carrithers, have come a
long way.
Areally long way actually.
“We joke about it now, ”
Parodi said. “We were
probably the only head
coach and quarterback
who were high-fiving
after an interception last
season.”
And while that might
not be funny to many
other football minds, such has been the
maturation of the now senior signal-caller.
When Carrithers took over the role last sea-
son, it wasn’t a mystery that he needed a lit-
tle seasoning — and thus, there was no bet-
ter way for the quarterback to grow than to
be thrown right into the fire.
“I think he needed the experience,” Parodi
said. “He needed to get used to that speed and
that level of competition — and just, the
constant repetition, me in his ear, watching
film.”
The year was rough at times, despite
Carrithers’ All-League performance. “There
was definitely some getting used to his first
varsity season,” Parodi said. “It took him a
while to get used to the speed and under-
standing what we were trying to do offen-
sively. He learned the hard way sometimes
about making mistakes. After an intercep-
tion, I made him tell me what he saw and
why he saw it. And then we talked about
what was wrong. We high-fived and said
‘let’s not do that ever again.’”
Fast-forward an off-season and Carrithers
seems more willing to high-five his coach
after a touchdown instead of an interception
in 2013.
With Week 1 in the books, Carrithers
fueled the Knights’ offense in a 31-28 upset
win over the PAL Ocean’s Half Moon Bay.
Carrithers threw for 196 yards and three
touchdowns while completing nearly 61
percent of his passes and hooking up with
three different receivers in those TDs.
For his efforts, Carrithers is the Daily
Journal Athlete of the Week.
“It was a great win for us for so many rea-
sons,” Parodi said. “Just, to start the year 1-
0, to go over the hill to Half Moon Bay to a
perennially outstanding program and get a
win in Half Moon Bay was awesome. It was
a great feeling for our kids for sure.”
And probably an even better one for
<< Belt ends the game in the 11th, page 12
• 49ers fan dies from fall , page 12
Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013
RAIDERS FOOTBALL: OAKLAND READY TO HAND FULL-TIME JOB TO PRYOR AFTER INDY GAME > PAGE 13
See LOUNGE, Page 14
See NADAL, Page 15
Carrithers gets major high five in win
Athlete of the Week
See AOTW, Page 16
“If you’re going to go to the face, come with some knuckles, not an open slap.
I think if that young man works very hard on being a tough guy, he’ll have some
repairing to do to his image after the slap.”
49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh
Harbaugh aims at Matthews
REUTERS
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRES
SANTACLARA— Jim Harbaugh offered
a parting shot at Packers linebacker Clay
Matthews: Slapping is not the tough-guy
way.
Harbaugh said Monday that Matthews
threw one punch and slapped 49ers left
tackle Joe Staley when they tussled fol-
lowing Matthews’ late hit on quarterback
Colin Kaepernick in the second quarter of
San Francisco’s 34-28 season-opening
win against Green Bay on Sunday.
“If you’re going to go to the face, come
with some knuckles, not an open slap,”
Harbaugh said. “I think if that young man
works very hard on being a tough guy,
he’ll have some repairing to do to his
image after the slap.”
Matthews promised leading up to the
game that Green Bay
would target
Kaepernick after he ran
for a quarterback-record
181 yards to beat the
Packers in the playoffs
eight months ago, and
Matthews did just that.
On the play, he threw
his right arm around the lower part of
Kaepernick’s neck.
“Like I said last week, usually a man
will tell you his bad intentions if you just
listen. That certainly was a cheap shot,
launching, clotheslining to the neck-
head area,” Harbaugh said. “Bad play.”
While Matthews was flagged for a late
hit, Staley received an unsportsmanlike
conduct penalty that Harbaugh didn’t
think was right.
Staley immediately came to
Kaepernick’s defense on the play. The
penalties were offset and the 49ers scored
on the next play, which officials later said
should have been fourth down rather than
a repeated third down.
The NFL said Monday that a review
showed Staley should not have been
penalized.
See HIT, Page 13
More on
Boldin’s big
debut game
See page 13
INSIDE
Score not to
be believed
Nadal prevails in
classic U.S. Open
match vs. Djokovic
Rafael Nadal
Fall season’s
first athletic
Honor Roll
See page 16
INSIDE
SPORTS 12
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
2808 EL CAMINO REAL
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THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week Two
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 9/13/13
Cleveland Baltimore
Washington Green Bay
San Diego Philadelphia
Tennessee Houston
St. Louis Atlanta
Miami Indianapolis
Dallas Kansas City
Minnesota Chicago
Carolina Buffalo
Detroit Arizona
New Orleans Tampa Bay
Denver NY Giants
Jacksonville Oakland
San Francisco Seattle
Pittsburgh Cincinnati
TIEBREAKER: Pittsburgh @ Cincinnati__________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
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Belt gets walk-off hit
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Brandon Belt’s RBI
single with one out in the bottom of the
10th inning gave the San Francisco Giants
a 3-2 victory over the Colorado Rockies on
Monday night, their second straight
walkoff win.
The defending World Series champions,
however, were eliminated from contention
in the NL West earlier in the evening when
the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Arizona
Diamondbacks.
Angel Pagan hit a one-out single off
reliever Adam Ottavino (1-3) and took third
on Marco Scutaro’s single. Belt, who dou-
bled in the tying run in the eighth, hit a 1-2
pitch over the head of left fielder Charlie
Culberson for his second game-ending hit
this season.
D.J. LeMahieu singled and doubled to
extend his career-high hitting streak to 11
games, and Nolan Arenado scored from sec-
ond base on an infield groundout for the
Rockies.
Buster Posey hit his 15th home run of the
season for San Francisco, which was kept in
check offensively most of the game by
Colorado starter Jhoulys Chacin.
Chacin struck out five and walked one over
seven innings, lowering his ERA in 12
starts on the road to 2.10. The right-hander
retired 16 of the final 18 he faced and left
with a 2-1 lead.
Colorado’s bullpen couldn’t make it hold
up.
Pagan reached on a one-out infield single
off Matt Belisle and took second when
Arenado’s throw from third sailed past first
base for an error. After Scutaro’s groundout
moved Pagan to third, Belt doubled to right
to drive in Pagan with the tying run.
The Giants are still on the brink of being
eliminated from playoff contention alto-
gether with one more loss.
They were on the verge of that before Belt
led the comeback after a pitcher’s duel
between Chacin and San Francisco’s Tim
Lincecum.
Lincecum allowed two runs over eight
innings but was denied a chance at his fourth
consecutive win.
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — NFL opening day
excitement was tarnished with the death of
one fan who fell from a pedestrian overpass
outside the big game in San Francisco, and
injuries to two others from falls inside the
Indianapolis stadium.
Early indications suggest 32-year-old
Kevin Hayes of Hayward fell accidentally,
San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr said.
“Alcohol may or may not have played a
role to some varying degree, but right now,
it looks like a very sad, tragic accident,”
Suhr said.
Hayes fell while walking with his brother
on a bridge over four lanes of traffic outside
the stadium, police said. Off-duty medics and
police officers gave him first aid until an
ambulance arrived, but authorities said he
was declared dead from his injuries.
“We would like to express our deepest con-
dolences to the family during this difficult
time,” 49ers spokesman Bob Lange said in
an email.
The death came just after kickoff in what
was eventually San Francisco’s 34-28 win
over Green Bay. Multiple witnesses reported
that Hayes appeared to be intoxicated and
having trouble walking before he fell over
the rail to a sidewalk below.
“It certainly marred what otherwise a very
happy day for fans who know this is the last
opening game we will see in Candlestick,”
San Francisco Mayor Lee said.
Also Sunday, a railing collapsed at the
Colts game against the Raiders in
Indianapolis, injuring two unidentified fans
who were leaning against the barrier above a
tunnel leading to Oakland’s locker room.
One person was taken away on a stretcher,
while another left in a wheelchair, witness-
es said.
After the Colts 21-17 victory, Barney
Levengood, executive director of the
Indiana Convention Center and Lucas Oil
Stadium, issued a statement that said one of
the people was released after receiving med-
ical attention at the stadium. The other per-
son was treated at the stadium and transport-
ed to Methodist Hospital for additional eval-
uation. Levengood said the second fan did
not appear to be seriously injured.
Fan Dalton Tinklenberg of Kokomo.,
Ind., told The Indianapolis Star on Monday
the railing that collapsed appeared to be
wobbly. Stadium officials did not immedi-
ately return phone messages and emails
from The Associated Press seeking com-
ment.
Witnesses who saw the incident said the
two fans were leaning against the railing
and fell from the top of the tunnel onto the
hard walkway used by Raiders players and
coaches to reach the locker room.
Since 2003, there have been more than
two dozen serious cases of fans falling at
stadiums across the United States, according
to the Institute for the Study of Sports
Incidents.
That includes a 2007 fatality at
Candlestick Park when a fan in the conces-
sion area misjudged a jump up to sit on a
wall and fell instead from the upper con-
course to the mezzanine level, said Alana
Penza, director of the institute, which is part
of the National Center for Spectator Sports
Safety and Security, based at the University
of Southern Mississippi.
“Sometimes a venue will say this was an
accident, but other times they might decide
to make adjustments,” said Penza.
Historic Candlestick Park closes after this
season and will be replaced by a shopping
center.
Niners fan falls to
death, 2 others hurt
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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“After reviewing the play, Vice President
of Officiating Dean Blandino determined
that Joe Staley should not have been penal-
ized,” spokesman Randall Liu said in an
email. “It should have been first-and-goal
for the 49ers from the Green Bay 3-yard
line.”
“That’s what I saw,” Harbaugh said.
Harbaugh praised referee Bill Leavy and
his crew, and said San Francisco would have
gone for it on fourth down anyway.
“First of all, it never should have been
offsetting penalties, in my opinion,”
Harbaugh said. “All in all, there’s a lot of
things going on in that stretch. The other
one was the entire Packers bench cleared,
practice squad players, coaches. Members
of the Green Bay Packers are all out of their
bench area down along the goal line. There
was no repercussion for that as well.”
While Staley said after the game he needs
to control his emotions, he insists he will
defend his quarterback in a case like that.
Harbaugh said it’s rather simple when
coaching a situation like that.
“When guys are going at each other after
the whistle, and looking to push and shove
people, just lock up, protect yourself,” he
said. “Not going to back down from it,
we’re not going to get pushed all around
after the whistle when it’s not being called,
when the first offense is not being called.
You have to have a plan. For us, it’s not to
go pushing and throwing punches, it’s to
lock up and protect yourself. And Joe did
that about as well as you could do it. If you
call somebody for that then you’re going to
have 30 flags, 30 times. That’s happening
all the time in our league after the whistle.”
Also Sunday, Harbaugh had to change his
game-day attire at halftime from Reebok to
Nike. He said he could be subject to a fine.
“That was a mistake, grabbed the wrong
one,” Harbaugh said. “It was an honest mis-
take, there was no malice intended. It won’t
happen again.”
Continued from page 11
HIT
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Anquan
Boldin sprinted off the field for the
locker room following a memo-
rable 49ers debut, then insisted
afterward that’s just how he rolls.
He gets paid to catch footballs,
and he approaches each game as a
job from the moment he steps
onto the field to the way he exits
the turf a few hours later — with a
little bit of fun mixed in, of
course. On Sunday, he scurried
away before the game clock had
even ticked down to 0:00.
“That’s just how I am,” Boldin
said. “I don’t go out for the coin
toss, I go to the locker room. For
me, this is a business. I come out
here to do a job, and, hopefully, I
do my job well.”
Nobody will question what he
says or does after the performance
he put on with 13 receptions for
208 yards to lead San Francisco
past the Green Bay Packers 34-28
in a wild season opener between
NFC powers.
“He went out there and played
like a grown man,” said quarter-
back Colin Kaepernick, who threw
for a career-high 412 yards.
Coach Jim Harbaugh saw no
need to call big brother, John, and
thank him for trading the star
wideout from Super Bowl champi-
on Baltimore to the West Coast.
Harbaugh has done so many times
already in recent months.
“You talk about the analogy of
the salesmen out there who sell
their product, they meet their
quota,” Harbaugh said Monday.
“And then there’s other salesmen
who meet their quota and also
coach up other salesmen on how
to meet their quota. It’s a multiply-
ing effect that guys like that have
... Anquan Boldin is one of those
types of guys.”
Boldin finished one catch shy of
his career high, set in his rookie
season with Arizona 10 years ago.
His 208 yards receiving were sixth
most in an NFL season opener —
and he also has the second most
with 217 yards on 10 catches in
that September 2003 debut against
Detroit.
“I guess this is a debut game in
the NFC West, huh?” he said.
Now, Boldin is a few weeks from
his 33rd birthday and beginning
his 11th season for a third team
looking as fresh as ever.
Boldin memorable in 49ers debut
REUTERS
Anquan Boldin caught 13 passes for
208 in San Francisco’s win.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Oakland Raiders
coach Dennis Allen doesn’t need
to play any games about who his
starting quarterback will be this
week.
Terrelle Pryor answered those
questions in the season opener
with his game-breaking running
ability and vastly improved pass-
ing that almost helped Oakland
pull off a shocker before losing
21-17 at Indianapolis.
After refusing to announce his
starter last week for “competitive”
reasons, Allen is all in with the
dual-threat quarterback heading
into Sunday’s home opener
against Jacksonville. Pryor spent
most of training camp working
with the backups while Matt Flynn
ran with the first team.
“Pryor is going to start for us,”
Allen said Monday.
For good reason.
Pryor completed 19 of 29 passes
for 217 yards and a touchdown and
set a Raiders franchise record for
rushing by a quarterback with 112
yards on 13 carries. Pryor became
the eighth quarterback since the
1970 merger to throw for at least
200 yards and run for at least 100
in a single game.
“That’s the element that he
brings to the game,” Allen said.
“So, that’s always going to be
there, his ability to create, his
ability to make things happen
with his feet. The thing that we
judge on the practice field is his
ability to make good decisions,
his ability to throw the ball on
time, with accuracy. Those are
things that we want to see that he
continues to improve because
that’s what’s going to make him a
really good quarterback, is if he
continues to improve in those
areas.”
There are areas in the passing
game that Pryor needs to work on
still and he is quick to acknowl-
edge them.
Raiders ready to ride Pryor at QB
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
by
thrown against a San Angelo defense. He
also scored two more on the ground.
Jack Marren caught three scoring passes
and finished with seven catches for 95
yards. Graham Stratford led the team with
123 yards receiving on six catches, while
Pete Bouret finished with seven receptions
for 118 yards.
***
Menlo’s wild and wooly game just
brought some extra excitement to a good
weekend of football from the teams of the
Peninsula Athletic League.
The 18-team PAL went a combined 11-6
in opening-weekend action. Throw out the
two games that matched two PAL teams
together — Aragon’s 50-0 over Jefferson
and Hillsdale’s 31-28 win over Half Moon
Bay — and the record is still a very
respectable 9-4 against outside competi-
tion.
The Lake Division, considered to be the
weakest division in the Peninsula Athletic
League, had the best opening weekend of
the three divisions, going a combined 4-1
(King’s Academy had a bye). As it has been
the case the last couple of years, the race
for the Lake Division title could be the
best in the PAL.
Hillsdale had the most impressive win,
taking down Ocean Division squad Half
Moon Bay, but Mills may have opened
some eyes with a 53-point explosion in a
win over Harbor. Carlmont opened the
Marcus Farhad era with a 17-6 victory over
Yerba Buena and El Camino took down
Washington-San Francisco, 28-7.
The lone Lake Division loss was
Jefferson, which, despite getting run over
by Aragon 50-0, showed it has some talent
and team speed and could be a spoiler this
season. The last three seasons have seen
the best PAL races coming out of the Lake
and it appears it will come down to the wire
again in 2013.
***
The most impressive win of the weekend
had to be Terra Nova’s 45-7 shellacking of
East Bay power Bishop O’Dowd. The
Dragons are off to an 0-2 start and appear
headed for a down year, but that doesn’t
take away from the fact the Tigers shredded
them. Anthony Gordon, in his first varsity
start, threw for 362 yards and three touch-
downs, completing 60 percent of his pass-
es in the progress.
Receiver Jaylen Jones lived up to presea-
son billing as a player to watch as he fin-
ished with seven catches for 147 yards.
The most exciting was South City’s 26-
25 overtime win against Santa Clara. Tied
at 19, South City’s Maligi Maluia scored
from four yards out in the first overtime.
James Donegan’s extra point gave the
Warriors a 26-19 lead.
Santa Clara scored on its overtime drive,
but it’s 2-point conversion attempt was
knocked away to preserve the win for
South City.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Oracle Team USA’s
heart-stopping victory in Race 4 of the
America’s Cup may have saved the event as
well as the syndicate’s chances to retain the
oldest trophy in international sports.
Skipper Jimmy Spithill aggressively
sailed Oracle’s 72-foot catamaran to an 8-
second victory against Emirates Team New
Zealand in the fog, wind and salt spray on
San Francisco Bay on Sunday.
Oracle Team USA, owned by software bil-
lionaire Larry Ellison of Oracle Corp.,
hopes the victory helps swing the momen-
tum and allows it to learn a thing or two
about what it’s going to take to defeat a
strong Kiwi team.
One of those things is home-water advan-
tage.
The finish line of the five-leg course is
just a few hundred yards off America’s Cup
Park on Pier 27-29 on the Embarcadero.
The end of the pier is packed with fans on
race days, many of them waving New
Zealand and American flags. On Saturday,
police closed off access to the area when the
crowd reached about 3,500.
Spithill wants the fans to know that the
sailors can hear them cheering as the races
end and the boats fly across the line on
hydrofoils.
“There’s something about the home court
advantage, and it’s very hard to put a value
on, but it makes a difference,” said Spithill,
an Australian who lives in San Diego with
his American wife and their two young
boys.
“The more people we can get behind us,
the more good energy they can send our
way. It affects the guys on board and it lifts
them. We want to keep the Cup here. We
want to keep it on the bay. These guys
don’t,” he said, referring to skipper Dean
Barker and the rest of the Kiwis. “They want
to take it all the way down to New Zealand,
which is a long way away. So we need to use
that advantage. We need all the people from
San Francisco and the U.S. to get behind
us.”
The Race 4 victory came after Oracle —
which has only two Americans on its 11-
man crew — let the Kiwis come from behind
to win Race 3.
Oracle trails the best-of-17 series 3 to
minus-1. The syndicate was docked two
points in the biggest cheating scandal in
the regatta’s history.
That means Oracle needs to win 10 more
races to keep the Auld Mug. Team New
Zealand needs to win six more to sweep the
trophy away to the Royal New Zealand Yacht
Squadron, which held it from 1995-2003.
Races 5 and 6 are scheduled for Tuesday.
Monday was a lay day. Oracle was out on
the bay working on improving its perform-
ance upwind, where the Kiwis have shown
better boat speed.
“It was good to get out there and work on
a couple of things,” said Oracle Team USA
CEO Russell Coutts, who won the first two
of his four America’s Cups as skipper of
Team New Zealand in 1995 and 2000.
“We’ve got to improve our upwind perform-
ance. We were out there working on a bit of
that and our tacking. We made some
progress.”
The Kiwis showed better speed upwind in
winning Saturday’s first two races.
Race 4 victory saves Oracle’s Cup chances
Sports brief
Billionaire fined for
trying to undo Kings arena
SACRAMENTO — Billionaire Chris
Hansen must pay $50,000 for his role in a
secretive effort to funnel money to a group
trying to thwart Sacramento’s efforts to build
a new downtown arena, the California Fair
Political Practices Commission said Monday.
The FPPC found that, just days after the
NBA rejected Hansen’s $625 million bid to
buy the Sacramento Kings and move them to
Seattle, he gave $100,000 to a group leading
an effort to thwart Sacramento’s efforts to
keep the team.
A group of investors led by technology
executive Vivek Ranadive bought the team for
$535 million, one day after the NBArejected
Hansen’s bid.
The NBA has said that Sacramento must
build a modern arena to keep the Kings in
town. The team’s new owners have set a 2016
target.
The state political watchdog found that
Hansen gave $100,000 to a group gathering
signatures to thwart Sacramento’s plan to
keep the team by forcing a citywide vote on
the city’s planned $258 million subsidy for a
downtown arena.
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There was no quit in either of them,
during points that lasted 15, 25, even
more than 50 strokes.
“Probably nobody brings my game
to the limit like Novak,” said Nadal,
who collected $3.6 million in prize
money, including a $1 million bonus
for results during the North American
hard-court circuit.
This was their 37th match against
each other, the most between any two
men in the Open era, and Nadal has
won 22. It also was their third head-to-
head U.S. Open final in the last four
years. Nadal beat Djokovic for the
2010 title, and Djokovic won their
rematch in 2011.
They know each other’s games so
well, and play such similar hustle-to-
every-ball styles, but in the end, it
was Nadal who was superior.
“He was too good. He definitely
deserved to win this match today and
this trophy,” Djokovic said.
“Obviously disappointing to lose a
match like this.”
Nadal improved to 22-0 on hard
courts and 60-3 overall in 2013 with
nine titles, including at the French
Open, which made him the first man
with at least one Grand Slam trophy
in nine consecutive seasons. The 27-
year-old Spaniard’s total of 13 major
championships ranks third in the
history of men’s tennis, behind only
Roger Federer’s 17 and Pete
Sampras’ 14.
Nadal no longer wears the strips of
white tape he once did to bolster his
left knee, and the way he covered the
court against Djokovic — switching
from defense to offense in a blink —
proved that while he says he still feels
pain in that leg, he definitely does not
have problems moving around.
These are the same two who played
the longest Grand Slam final in histo-
ry, a nearly six-hour struggle that left
both needing to sit in chairs during
the ceremony after Djokovic’s victory
at the 2012 Australian Open.
This time, when it ended with a fore-
hand into the net by Djokovic, Nadal
dropped to his back on the court,
saluted by an Arthur Ashe Stadium
crowd that included the Queen of
Spain.
Continued from page 11
NADAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 86 57 .601 —
Washington 74 69 .517 12
Philadelphia 66 77 .462 20
New York 64 78 .451 21 1/2
Miami 53 89 .373 32 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 83 60 .580 —
Pittsburgh 82 61 .573 1
Cincinnati 82 63 .566 2
Milwaukee 62 80 .437 20 1/2
Chicago 61 82 .427 22
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 84 59 .587 —
Arizona 72 71 .503 12
San Diego 65 77 .458 18 1/2
Colorado 66 79 .455 19
San Francisco 65 79 .451 19 1/2
Monday’sGames
N.Y. Mets 2, Cleveland 1
Washington 6, Miami 4
Philadelphia 3, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 2
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 3, Arizona 2, 11 innings
San Diego 5, Colorado 2
Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Tuesday’sGames
San Diego (Cashner 8-8) at Philadelphia (Cloyd 2-
3), 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 11-7) at Miami (Koehler 3-9),4:10
p.m.
Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 7-15) at Cincinnati (Cin-
grani 7-3), 4:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 16-8) at N.Y.Mets (Gee
11-9), 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 15-7) at Texas (M.Perez 9-3),5:05
p.m.
Milwaukee (W.Peralta 9-14) at St.Louis (S.Miller 12-
9), 5:15 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 6-10) at L.A. Dodgers (Volquez 9-
11), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 16-6) at San Francisco (Vo-
gelsong 3-5), 7:15 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 9:35 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Texas, 11:05 a.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 12:45 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 87 58 .600 —
Tampa Bay 78 64 .549 7 1/2
Baltimore 77 66 .538 9
New York 76 68 .528 10 1/2
Toronto 67 76 .469 19
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 82 62 .569 —
Cleveland 77 66 .538 4 1/2
Kansas City 75 69 .521 7
Minnesota 62 80 .437 19
Chicago 58 85 .406 23 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 83 60 .580 —
Texas 81 62 .566 2
Los Angeles 67 76 .469 16
Seattle 65 78 .455 18
Houston 47 96 .329 36
Monday’sGames
Cleveland 4, Kansas City 3
Baltimore 4, N.Y.Yankees 2
Minnesota 6, L.A. Angels 3
Pittsburgh 1,Texas 0
Chicago White Sox 5, Detroit 1
Houston at Seattle, Late
Tuesday’sGames
Kansas City (Guthrie 13-10) at Cleveland (McAllis-
ter 7-8), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 8-4) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonza-
lez 9-7), 4:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels (Williams 6-10) at Toronto (Buehrle 11-
7), 4:07 p.m.
Boston(Buchholz9-0) atTampaBay(Price8-7),4:10
p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 15-7) at Texas (M.Perez 9-3),5:05
p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 11-8) at Chicago White Sox
(Er.Johnson 0-1), 5:10 p.m.
Oakland (J.Parker 11-6) at Minnesota (Hendriks 1-
2), 5:10 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 6-7) at Seattle (J.Saunders 11-13),
7:10 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Kansas City at Cleveland, 9:05 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Texas, 11:05 a.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
HOUSTON ASTROS — Recalled INF Brandon
Laird,OF Jimmy Paredes and RHPs David Martinez
and Rhiner Cruz from Oklahoma City (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Recalled SS Tommy
Field from Salt Lake (PCL).
MINNESOTATWINS — Recalled RHPs Michael
Tonkin and Cole De Vries, LHP Scott Diamond, OF
Chris Parmelee and INF Eduardo Escobar from
Rochester (IL).Selected the contracts of C Eric Fryer
andRHPShaironMartisfromRochester.Transferred
RHP Samuel Deduno and OF Wilkin Ramirez to the
60-day DL.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Recalled C Christian
Bethancourt from Mississippi (SL).
NEWYORKMETS—RecalledOFMikeBaxter from
Las Vegas (PCL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Promoted
player development coach David Adelman to as-
sistant coach. Named Bobby Jackson player
development coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGOBEARS— Signed OT Jonathan Scott to
a one-year contract. Signed QB Jerrod Johnson to
the practice squad. Waived TE Kyle Adams. Termi-
nated the practice squad contract of G Derek
Dennis.
MIAMI DOLPHINS— Named Tom Garfinkel pres-
ident and CEO.
NEWYORK JETS — Re-signed QB Brady Quinn.
Released LB Danny Lansanah.Signed WR Rahsaan
Vaughn to the practice squad.
PITTSBURGHSTEELERS— Placed LB Larry Foote,
C Maurkice Pouncey and RB LaRod Stephens-
Howling on the injured reserve list. Signed RB
Jonathan Dwyer, C/G Fernando Velasco and K
Shayne Graham.
CanadianFootball League
HAMILTONTIGER-CATS— Signed LB C.O.Prime.
DB Kevin Barnes and RB Kendial Lawrence.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
TRANSACTIONS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 1 0 0 1.000 23 21
Miami 1 0 0 1.000 23 10
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 18 17
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 21 23
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 21 17
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 16 9
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 31 28
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 2 28
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 21 24
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 9 16
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 10 23
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 28 2
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
San Diego 0 1 0 .000 28 31
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 17 21
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 27
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 31
Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 33
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 36
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27
Sunday’sGames
NewOrleans 23, Atlanta17
Chicago24, Cincinnati 21
NewEngland23, Buffalo21
Monday’sGames
Philadelphia33,Washington27
Houston31, SanDiego28
NFL GLANCE
@Rangers
12:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/15 9/14
@Twins
10:10a.m.
CSN-CAL
9/12
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/13
at Dodgers
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/13
vs. Rockies
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/11
at Dodgers
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/12
vs.Vancouver
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/14
vs.Montreal
7p.m.
9/17
@Rangers
10:05a.m.
FOX
@Salt Lake
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/21
@ChivasUSA
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/9
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
@Seattle
5:30p.m.
NBC
9/15
vs. Colts
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/22
@Rams
5:25p.m.
NFLNetwork
9/26
vs. Texans
5:30p.m.
NBC
10/6
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/15
@Denver
5:40p.m.
ESPN
9/23
vs.Redskins
1:25p.m.
FOX
9/29
vs. Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/6
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
bye
at Dodgers
6:10p.m.
NBC
9/14
at Dodgers
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/17
vs. Rockies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/9
vs. Rockies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/10
vs.Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/16
@Twins
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/10
@Twins
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/11
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
Frenetic Eagles roll
past RG3, Redskins 33-27
LANDOVER, Md. — Just try to keep up
with Michael Vick, LeSean McCoy and the
Philadelphia Eagles this season. Robert
Griffin III and the Washington Redskins sure
couldn’t .
Playing at a frenetic pace that left the
Redskins bumbling and stumbling, the
Eagles unleashed coach Chip Kelly’s
offense on the NFL and crammed 77 plays
into 60 minutes of football. They had their
share of miscues, of course, but they held on
for a 33-27 upset of the defending NFC East
champs.
Vick, running the don’t-take-a-breath
attack that won 87 percent of the time dur-
ing Kelly’s four years at the University of
Oregon, completed 15 of 25 passes for 203
yards and two touchdowns, and he ran nine
times for 56 yards and a score. McCoy had
31 carries for 184 yards, including a 34-yard
TD. DeSean Jackson piled up 104 yards on
seven catches.
Vick hit Jackson for a 25-yard touchdown
and Brent Celek for a 28-yard score, then
found the end zone himself on a 3-yard run
— and that was just the first half.
16
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Here we go. The fall season for the 2013-
14 school year is upon us with a rush of new
young prep stars establishing themselves
in the nascent stage of the new season.
Football got off to a hot start, with the
Peninsula posting a .690 winning percent-
age in Week 1 so there is plenty of Honor
Roll love to go around.
First up, Faavae Brown of Sequoia foot-
ball. The sophomore accounted for three
touchdowns in the Cherokees’ 42-14 win
over Fremont-Sunnyvale Friday night.
Brown rushed for a 1-yard score and had
touchdown tosses of 29 yards to Liam
Clifford and 1 yard to Ivan Ayarza. Brown
finished the game completing 9 of 12 pass-
es for 94 yards and rushed for a team-high 86
yards on 20 carries.
Hillsdale scored a nice upset victory over
Half Moon Bay High School. Cole
Carrithers, quarterback for the Knights, had
a big hand in that. The second-year varsity
signal caller threw for 196 yards and three
touchdowns. He completed nearly 61 per-
cent of his passes (14 for 28) and threw
scoring strikes to Justin Kelly, Vince Guidi
and Hollon James.
Speaking of James, the running back
scored a pair of touchdowns playing in only
his first varsity game. He led the team in
rushing with 88 yards and a touchdown on
17 carries. He also caught three passes for
40 yards and another score.
Burlingame High School scored an eye-
popping 45-0 victory over Mountain View.
While Robbie Baumgarten got the party
started with a kickoff return for a touch-
down, Griffin Intrieri and Steve Cosenza
kept it going all game long. Intrieri scored
a pair of rushing TDs (11 and 4 yards) while
Cosenza caught a 29-yard touchdown and
also recovered a fumble.
Kono Filimoehala-Egan of Aragon had a
nice 2013 debut. The Riordan transfer
scored twice — once on offense, once of
defense — during the Dons’ 50-0 win over
Jefferson Friday night. Early in the first
quarter, he stepped in front of an Indians
receiver, snatched the ball out of the air and
went 40 yards untouched. Later, he hauled in
an impressive one-armed, 31-yard strike
from quarterback Nat Blood. He finished
with three catches for 93 yards.
Sacred Heart Prep posted a convincing 48-
0 win over Branham to start the year and
they had plenty of contributors.
While offensive lineman was rarely laud-
ed, Patrick Finningan makes his onto the
Honor Roll by recovering a fumble in the
end zone during SHP’s win. Miguel
Mendoza was churning his way toward the
goal line when he coughed up the ball,
bounding into the end zone. Finnigan beat
Mendoza and a third Gator to the ball for the
touchdown. He also helped pave the way for
266 rushing yards.
Nick Collazo of SHP was huge as well.
The defensive end was in the quarterback’s
face early and often during the Gators’ win.
Collazo finished with four tackles, a sack,
fumble recovery and several quarterback
pressures.
SHP looks like it has a couple of promis-
ing young offensive weapons. Chief among
those is tight end Andrew Daschbach. The
sophomore got the most out of the mini-
mum. He caught two passes for 62 yards —
both touchdowns.
San Mateo’s Line Latu showed why he’s
one of the most exciting players in the
Peninsula Athletic League. Latu rushed for
181 yards on 21 carries and scored two
touchdowns — including one on a kickoff
return — to beat Gunn of Palo Alto. He also
caught a pass for 21 yards. Finau Hafoka
scored twice for the Bearcats as well. San
Mateo rushed for 333 yards.
In Saturday action, Mills got off to a fast
start thanks in large part to Antonio Jeffrey.
The Vikings rushed for five touchdowns and
297 yards on 41 carries. Jeffrey finished
with 141 yards on 17 carries and three of
those scores. Victor Beglitsoff caught two
TDs.
VOLLEYBALL
High School volleyball is in full swing as
well.
Ella McDonough of Carlmont volleyball
is off to a hot start. She had 33 kills in five
matches during the Milpitas Spikefest tour-
nament over the weekend. Her weekend high
came in the 11th-place match against St.
Ignatius, finishing with 10 kills. Carlmont
went 3-2, with wins over Lynbrook, Gunn
and the Wildcats.
Victoria Garrick of Sacred Heart Prep vol-
leyball had 19 kills and 10 digs in the
Gators’ 25-8, 20-25, 25-19, 25-14 win over
South City Saturday as the five-time defend-
ing Central Coast Section champion
improved to 2-0. Garrick’s performance
came a couple days after a 10-kill, 11-dig
showing against Mercy-Burlingame. Ara
Peterson was huge in that game too with 10
kills and six blocks.
The Menlo volleyball team went 3-2 at
Spikefest, with a mountain of injuries pil-
ing up. Maddie Huber and Lida Vandermeer
led the team in kills over the course of the
tournament. Melissa Cairo and Jessica
Houghton were outstanding at libero.
Huber was instrumental in Menlo’s big
win over Menlo-Atherton — the reigning
CCS champions. She had 13 kills and hit
.263. Morgan Dressel had three blocks and
11 kills. Vanderneer tallied 11 kills.
WATER POLO
In a water polo note, Menlo’s John
Wilson recorded 19 huge saves against PAL
rival Menlo-Atherton. Nick Bisconti led
the team with five goals in that win.
Football takes center stage in Honor Roll
Carrithers considering his trek as the
Hillsdale starter. While his physical tools
have never been in question, what’s stood
out so far after an off-season and one game,
are Carrithers’ intangibles.
“His poise, his ability to take what they
(Half Moon Bay) were giving us,” Parodi
said. “And, he’s worked hard this last off
season. His understanding of the offense is
really high right now. I knew that this was
going to happen with him at some point.
And I’m glad that it happened when it did.
He was even coming over and making sug-
gestions based on what he saw and we’re in
a good place when he starts doing some of
that stuff. It’s cool to see the growth and the
maturity. He definitely played one of his
better games as a varsity player. ”
It’s that growth and maturity Parodi hopes
will help Carrithers guide the Knights to the
top of the Lake Division in the Peninsula
Athletic League.
“We talk about how we have to be as con-
sistent as possible,” Parodi said. “From
Week 1 to Week 10. And if we do what we
want to do, the good stuff happens at the
end.”
Continued from page 11
AOTW
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Hillsdale Cole Carrithers threw three TDs in
the Knights win over Half Moon Bay.
Sports brief
17
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Coping with advanced
cancer, Bev Veals was in the hospital for
chemo this summer when she got a call that
her health plan was shutting down. Then,
the substitute insurance she was offered
wanted her to pay up to $3,125, on top of
premiums.
It sounds like one of those insurance hor-
ror stories President Barack Obama told to
sell his health overhaul to Congress, but
Veals wasn’t in the clutches of a profit-driv-
en company. Instead, she’s covered by
Obama’s law — one of about 100,000 peo-
ple with serious medical issues in a finan-
cially troubled government program.
Raw political divisions over health care
have clouded chances of a fix for the Pre-
Existing Condition Insurance Plan, leaving
families like Veals and her husband Scott to
juggle the consequences. That’s not a good
omen for solving other problems that could
surface with “Obamacare.”
“You don’t advertise one thing and then
give the customer another thing,” said
Veals, 49, who lives near Wilmington, N.C.
“I finally felt for the first time going
through this cancer that I had something
dependable, and somebody pulled the plug.”
In a statement, the federal Health and
Human Services department said the pro-
gram “continues to provide excellent cover-
age.” But the department said it was unable
to provide current enrollment numbers,
which might reflect the impact of belt-
tightening this summer that led North
Carolina and 16 other states to turn their
programs over to federal officials.
Known as PCIP, the program was intended
as a temporary lifeline for people denied
insurance because of medical problems. It’s
supposed to provide coverage at premiums
that healthy people would typically pay.
PCIP will end Jan. 1, when Veals and other
enrollees will be able to transition to new
insurance marketplaces where they may be
able to find lower-cost plans.
Jan. 1 is also when Obama’s law will for-
bid insurers from turning away people in
poor health. At the same time, virtually all
Americans will be required to have cover-
age. Many who are currently uninsured will
be able to get tax credits to help pay premi-
ums.
Part of the problem with PCIP stems from
a decision by the president and Congress
more than three years ago to cap funding at
$5 billion. Some experts warned that might
not be enough to last through the end of
2013.
Veals is a breast cancer survivor now bat-
tling colorectal cancer. A runner, she has
participated in more than 125 fundraising
races for cancer research. Her husband Scott
is self-employed, a slow-motion replay
operator for televised sporting events.
Patient’s bill soars as health law program falters
doesn’t contract its human resources to a
more experienced agency and retains a 21-
member governing board.
“I still have concerns about the gover-
nance. They may have some good processes
and procedures in place but governance
remains a problem for me,” Horsley said.
“I’ll reserve judgment.”
The jury report also took aim at the board,
arguing the district’s insurance company
denied its $790,000 loss claim because of
its failure.
The report said trustees are “confused”
about their responsibilities and cities don’t
prioritize having representation on the dis-
trict board. The internal financial controls
were “inadequate,” important policies were
not followed and there were significant dif-
ferences of opinion about whether district
manager Robert Gay is equipped to manage
the district, the jury concluded.
Gay hired finance director Jo Ann
Dearman, otherwise known as Joanne
Seeney, without a background or reference
check and she in turn hired bookkeeper
assistant Vika Sinipata. Between 2009 and
2011, the women embezzled district money
by giving themselves extra pay at a higher
pay rate and fraudulent time off, excessively
contributed to their deferred compensation
funds, used credit cards for personal purchas-
es and electronically transferred money into
their own accounts. Dearman even charged
defense attorneys fees for an earlier embez-
zlement case to the district and at one point
took medical leave, claiming she needed to
care for her mother but in actuality served
two years and eight months in prison for
the two different embezzlement cases. In
one of those previous cases, Dearman ran up
more than a half-million dollars on her
boss’ credit card.
Dearman pleaded no contest to 10
felonies and Sinipata faces eight years on
12 counts. Both are due in court Sept. 13 for
sentencing.
Gay was placed on a performance
improvement plan by the district which
later extended his contract and LAFCo toyed
with dissolution. The county previously
handled rodent responsibilities but trans-
ferred them to the district in 2008 and shift-
ed all vector control three years later.
The LAFCo board ultimately decided that
while the district needed monthly auditing
and scrutinizing of its operations, dissolu-
tion would only jeopardize public safety and
punish the agency.
But while LAFCo, in its draft grand jury
response, agreed dissolution warrants fur-
ther evaluation, it continues that the
Environmental Health division and the dis-
trict are best equipped to study the transfer
of employees, accountability and any pos-
sible cost savings.
In an Aug. 7 letter to LAFCo Executive
Officer Martha Poyatos, district staff called
dissolution “unnecessary” and said it would
make maintenance of quality service “diffi-
cult.”
LAFCo meets 2:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 11 in Room 101 of 455 County
Center.
Continued from page 1
LAFCO
there is no federal requirement for a city to
assume liability for accidents which may
occur in a quiet zone, some railroad opera-
tors require that cities indemnify them
against any claims which arise as the result
of quiet zone implementation,” according
to the staff report.
The FRAallows for quiet zones by imple-
menting supplementary safety measures
including the installation of four-quadrant
gates or the less costly option of installing
gates with medians or channelization
devices, for instance.
The city concluded, however, that none of
its nine grade crossings are suitable for the
safety measure requirements, according to
the staff report.
It would be difficult to implement the less
expensive median option and too costly to
install a four-quadrant system, according to
city staff.
The costs to install a four-quadrant gate
system would reach up to $10 million,
according to city staff.
In October 2009, Caltrain officials actual-
ly apologized to city residents for excessive
noise from the horns when they were moved
from the bottom of the trains back to the
top to keep in line with federal regulations.
Caltrain moved the horns to the underside
of locomotives and cab cars in response to
previous complaints from the community
but had to move the horns back on top of
the trains, soliciting a whole new slew of
resident complaints.
The horns were then returned to the bot-
tom of the carriage to help muffle the sound
and still keep in line with federal regula-
tions.
Federal regulations require the horns to
produce distinct, separate and sequential
blasts and a summer safety inspection that
year revealed the horns were not making the
unique “toot” and “tweet” required by law.
The train horn assessment update the
Public Works Commission will hear this
week indicates that the duration of train
horns at Second Avenue varied between 7
seconds and 1 minute and 18 seconds. At
16th Avenue, train horn soundings lasted
between 7 seconds and 51 seconds.
The Public Works Commission meets
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 11, City Hall,
330 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.
Continued from page 1
HORNS
HEALTH 19
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Malcolm Ritter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Two scientists who illumi-
nated how brain cells communicate, three
researchers who developed implants that let
deaf people hear and philanthropists Bill
and Melinda Gates have won prestigious
Lasker Awards for medical research and con-
tributions to public health.
The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation
announced the recipients of the $250,000
prizes on Monday. The awards will be pre-
sented Sept. 20 in New York City.
The Gateses won the public service award
“for leading a historic transformation in the
way we view the globe’s most pressing
health concerns and improving the lives of
millions of the world’s most vulnerable,”
the Lasker foundation said.
They have donated more than $26 billion
to their philanthropic foundation. They
often team up with agencies that can pro-
vide diverse expertise, the Lasker founda-
tion said, noting that they supported an
international partnership that has helped
immunize hundreds of millions of children
against killer diseases. Their current priori-
ties include polio, agriculture and family-
planning information and services.
The Lasker clinical medical research
award will be shared by Graeme Clark, an
emeritus professor at the University of
Melbourne in Australia, Ingeborg Hochmair
of the company MED-EL in Innsbruck,
Austria, and Blake Wilson of Duke
University in North Carolina, for develop-
ing the modern cochlear implant. More
than 320,000 people around the world use
the implants for severe hearing loss, the
foundation said.
The devices stimulate the auditory nerve
with electric signals. Hochmair and Clark
worked independently, in the face of scien-
tific skepticism that electrical stimulation
could produce meaningful hearing. The
implants were approved in the U.S. in
1985.
Wilson later designed a new way for
implants to process speech, which has
allowed most users to understand words and
sentences with no visual cues. The advance
fueled a growth in implant use that began in
the early 1990s, the foundation said.
The Lasker award for basic medical
research will be shared by Richard Scheller
of the biotech company Genentech and Dr.
Thomas Sudhof of Stanford University.
With research they began independently in
the late 1980s, they unraveled details of
how brain cells release chemical messen-
gers to communicate with each other.
Scientists are beginning to find connec-
tions between the molecular equipment they
studied and serious illnesses like
Parkinson’s disease, the foundation said.
Gates, five scientists win Lasker medical prizes
By Carley Petesch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — Richard Van As, a
South African carpenter, lost four fingers
from his right hand to a circular saw two
years ago.
He was unable to afford the tens of thou-
sands of dollars to get a myoelectric hand,
which detects a muscle’s electric impulses to
activate an artificial limb.
“After my accident, I was in pain, but
wouldn’t take painkillers. I barely slept, and
the more pain I had the more ideas I got,” he
told the Associated Press. “Sometimes you
have to chop fingers off to start thinking.”
He decided to build his own hand. After
seeing a video posted online of a mechani-
cal hand made for a costume in a theater pro-
duction, he reached out to its designer, Ivan
Owen, in Seattle.
Enter Robohand — a device that Van As
and Owen invented that is made from cables,
screws, 3-D printing and thermoplastic. It
uses the rotation of a joint to enable five
plastic digits to grasp. The device looks like
a robot’s hand in a science fiction movie,
costs about $500 to make and can be repro-
duced using plans on the Internet and a 3-D
printer.
Van As is now on a mission to spread the
mechanism to people without fingers or
hands all over the world. The two gadget-
lovers collaborated on developing a design
for the device for a wide range of ages that
could be used to grab objects, unlike most
existing arm prostheses. Van As has fitted
Robohands on about 170 people, from tod-
dlers to adults, thanks to donations.
At first they used a milling machine, mak-
ing Van As a metal robotic forefinger digit
that helps him work in carpentry to this day.
That’s when they perfected the shape for the
robotic fingers.
“Ivan was a gift to me,” Van As said.
Then they turned to 3-D printing which
creates the device in plastic. The 3-D printer
gives much greater flexibility, allowing the
device to be re-sized on the computer for
each user and then manufactured through the
printer. A glove-like covering is fitted in
thermoplastic, and then fingers are created
on the 3-D printer by melting and stacking
plastic to make Lego-like digits which are
connected to the glove with small cables
and screws.
The team got a boost when two printers
were donated by the Brooklyn-based
Makerbot, one for use in Johannesburg and
the other for Seattle.
“What was taking us two weeks to put
together took us 20 hours,” Van As said. He
opened drawers full of bolts, screws and left-
over hinges from the beginning phases of
the project. “Now it looks easy. ”
They then started working on a design to
help children with Amniotic Band
Syndrome, a condition where children are
born without appendages because their cir-
culation is cut off in the womb by amniotic
bands.
To spread the device as widely as possible,
they made the Robohand an Open Source
design available online, and Van As now
collects donations to make hands for people
around the world.
Robohand uses 3-D printing to replace lost digits
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates attends the Microsoft Shareholders meeting.
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DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10
Attendance Matters: Stopping
Chronic Absence in its Tracks —
Pre-K to Elementary. San Mateo
County Office of Education, 101 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. Free
workshop. For more information call
802-5643.
Workshop on future uses for the
Driscoll Ranch Event Center held
by the Midpeninsula Regional
Open Space District Board of
Directors. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Elkus
Ranch Conference Center, 1500
Purisima Creek Road, Half Moon Bay.
To view an agenda or get more infor-
mation go to
www.openspace.org/plans_proj-
ects/driscoll_ranch.asp. To RSVP
email driscoll@openspace.org.
Caring for Elders support group.
6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Senior Focus
Center, 1720 El Camino Real, suite. 10,
Burlingame. Free. Drop-in. For more
information call 696-3660.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11
RSVP Deadline for Newcomers
Club. Sakota, 2198 Broadway,
Redwood City. Luncheon at noon,
Tuesday, Sept. 17. Karen Mead and
Nancy McFarland of the Assistance
League of San Mateo County will
speak about their various philan-
thropic programs, including
Turnstyle Thrift Shop. $25, send to
Janet William, 1168 Shoreline Drive,
San Mateo. For more information call
286-0688.
Russell Bede School tour. 9 a.m. 446
Turner Terrace, San Mateo. Russell
Bede School helps elementary-age
children whose learning decisions
make mainstream schools a chal-
lenge. Prospective parents, thera-
pists, pediatricians, school directors
and principals are welcome. Please
call 579-4400 to schedule a spot for
the tour.
Free Blood Pressure and $2 Blood
Glucose. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Senior
Focus, 1720 El Camino Real, suite 10,
Burlingame. Eight-hour fast, water
and meds only, delay diabetes meds.
Drop-in. For more information call
696-3660.
Sons in Retirement (Branch 1)
luncheon. Noon. Elks Lodge, 229 W.
20th Ave., San Mateo. Guest speaker
Bill Reed will discuss the next cold
war in the Arctic. All retired men are
welcomed. For more information call
341-8298.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Launch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Admission is
free but lunch costs $17. For more
information call 430-6500 or go to
www. sanmateoprofessi onal al -
liance.com.
JVS Peninsula Orientation and
Enrollment Session. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Peninsula JCC, 800 Foster City Blvd.,
Foster City. For more information
email jcowan@jvs.org.
Free job interview skills workshop.
2 p.m. San Mateo Main Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. To register call
522-7818. For more information con-
tact Eric Groth at egroth@cityofsan-
mateo.org.
Teen (Low-budget) Movie:
‘Napoleon Dynamite.’ 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. PG, 82 minutes.
For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
‘Water Water’ show. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Main Gallery, 1018 Main St., Redwood
City. This exhibit will run through
Oct.13. There will be a free reception
on Saturday, Sept. 14 from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m.
‘Productive Learning and Leisure
with Ann McGinnis.’ 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Dave Checutti Room locat-
ed at 450 Poplar Ave., Millbrae. Free.
For more information call 588-0180.
Choir Sings Spirituals and
American Folk Hymns. 7 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Messiah Lutheran Church,
1835 Valota Road, Redwood City.
Experience the joy and satisfaction
of singing with a vibrant community
of faith. For more information email
jon.siapno@gmail.com.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Veterans Memorial Senior
Center, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. The process of chip budding,
amongst other things, will be dis-
cussed. Free. For more information
go to www.peninsularosesociety.org
or call 465-3967.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 12
Workshop: The Basics of San
Mateo County Housing Elements.
10 a.m. to noon. Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, 1300 El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Josh
Abrams, consultant at Community
Planning Collaborative, will provide
an overview of housing elements
and answer questions. To register or
receive more information call 872-
4444 ext. 2.
Neighbor Law. Noon. San Mateo
County Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Learn how to be a
good neighbor. Free. For more infor-
mation call 363-4913.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Despicable Me.’ 3:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Free. For more informa-
tion call 522-7838.
Middle School Ice Cream Social.
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Must show student identification,
homework or something that shows
what school you attend. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Empowering Youth Initiative
Community Briefing and Panel
Discussion. 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Franklin Templeton Investments, 1
Franklin Parkway. $25. For more infor-
mation email srandazzo@pcrc.org.
Managing Talent for
Organizational Success — HR
Business Partner Series. 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. Sequoia, 1850 Gateway
Drive, Suite 600, San Mateo. Learn to
use metrics to measure financial pay-
back from three aspects of your tal-
ent management plan: onboarding,
employee engagement and talent
retention. General: $35, free for
NCHRA members. For more informa-
tion visit www.nchra.org.
Heart Partners. 5:45 p.m. to 7:15
p.m. Burlingame Center, Conference
Room G, 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. For cardiac patients and
their families. For more information
call 654-9966.
Sense of Place — Art Reception. 6
p.m. The Studio Shop, 244 Primrose
Ave., Burlingame. The Studio Shop is
presenting artist Melinda Cootsona.
For more information email
julie@thestudioshop.com.
Planning and Preparing College
Visits. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Enerspace
Coworking, Suite 100, 2225 E.
Bayshore Road, Palo Alto. Janice
Caine will provide guidance on put-
ting together college visits. Free. For
more information email janice@cus-
tomcollegevisits.com.
Repetitive strain support group. 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Mills Health Center, 100
S. San Mateo Drive, San Mateo. Free.
Drop-in. For more information call
654-9966.
‘Running for Jim.’ 7:15 p.m. Menlo
Atherton High School, 555
Middlefield Road, Atherton.
Screening of ‘Running for Jim,’ an
award-winning documentary, pre-
sented by the ALS Association
Golden West Chapter. Tickets are $8
for students and $12 for general
admission. Proceeds from the event
will be donated to the ALS
Association GoldenWest Chapter to
support ALS research and families in
the Bay Area who are affected by ALS
and to the Jim Tracy Special Needs
Trust. For more information or to pur-
chase tickets go to www.alsagolden-
west.wordpress.com.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights.Through Sept.
22. Tickets start at $23 and can be
purchased at hillbarntheater.org or
by calling 349-6411.
Movies on the Square: ‘42.’ 8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or
go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movie
s.html.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 13
Preserving Your History. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. The National Archives at San
Francisco, 1000 Commodore Drive,
San Bruno. Genealogical workshop
on how to care for your personal
family papers and photographs. $15
payable in advance. For more infor-
mation or to reserve a space call 238-
3488.
Free preview: American Line
Dancing — Levels Zero and One
Series. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Foster
City Recreation Center, 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. For more informa-
tion call Allen at 515-2320 or go to
www.LDVALI.com.
‘Life Begins at 70.’ Noon. Twin Pines
Senior and Community Center, 20
Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. Join us for
a pizza luncheon followed by a per-
formance by Norm Coleman.
Admission is $2 payable at the door.
Reserve a seat by calling 595-7444.
Women’s Recovery Association
Open House. Noon to 2 p.m. The
Open House will include unveiling
of the new logo, inspiring stories of
recovery and a tour of the new facil-
ities. Refreshments will be available.
To RSVP call Amy at 348-6603 or
email her at aphan@womensrecov-
ery.org. For more information con-
t r a c t
bbrown@womensrecovery.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
explosion and resulting shock wave
registered as a magnitude 1.1 earth-
quake.
Marks had purchased the home two
and half months prior to the explo-
sion, after living in San Francisco for
more than 30 years. It was a move that
was decided upon because of health rea-
sons. She also brought her two then-
11-month-old kittens.
“There was the stress of moving and
finding the right place not too far from
city because we both worked in the
city,” Marks said. “It landed us in San
Bruno. Alot of things went wrong with
the move and we had just finished
changes we needed to make to the
house, upgrades, getting all window
coverings a couple of days before,
then the explosion happened.
“What I remember is a horrific sound
and shaking that I couldn’t place,”
Marks said. “The sound came first in
my recollection. I remember saying
what is that? My partner said, ‘I think
it’s a plane.’ Then the whole house
started to shake in a way that was very
different from an earthquake. I felt like
the home was going in every direction
simultaneously, then I heard an enor-
mous explosion.”
Marks recounted one of the kittens
flying straight up in the air. She then
walked to the front of the house and
saw a massive fireball in the front win-
dow.
“I could feel the heat and called to my
partner, saying oh my god, oh my
god!” she said.
She knew they had to get out and
they went to look for their cats. They
ended up getting out of the house in six
minutes. They proceeded to the Church
of the Highlands and perched them-
selves there. She said her partner start-
ed to shake furiously as the shock set-
tled in and it was a really a powerful
moment for them that has not gone
away.
“What saved us was that the wind was
blowing in the opposite direction of
our home,” Marks said. If the wind
were blowing in reverse, we would not
have a home.”
Damage to the home included a wall
left with a curvature, damage to the
foundation, a cracked and broken sewer
pipe, along with pieces of the road
landing in their yard. Marks and her
partner stayed with a friend in San
Francisco with the cats and moved
back in the day after the evacuation
was lifted.
Most of the damage was fixed the fol-
lowing January and February, but there
is some work still left undone. Damage
to the floor would require sanding out
the entire place.
“We just couldn’t take it on,” Marks
said. “Everything was too much and it
requires us leaving the house.”
How has the event changed Marks?
“I think it’s made me aware that
every day is full of triggers,” Marks
said. “It’s made me more aware that
trauma is not neat, it can be very long-
lasting. I didn’t know neighbors
before the explosion because we had
just moved into the neighborhood, so
I’ve met them and listening to how
affected they are by this. I’ve seen the
different stages of trauma they’ve gone
through: the hopelessness, powerless-
ness and learned the feeling of com-
plete powerlessness over every aspect
of this explosion with PG&E, the
courts, the city, construction, the
timeline, the excuses.”
Over and over again you’re realizing
you have no control, Marks said.
“As human beings we like control,
but ultimately we don’t have control,”
Marks said. “I’ve coped through my
own personal work on myself, by try-
ing to find the lesson in this and by
trying to lead neighbors through hav-
ing community meetings with the city
to get their voices heard. Some days
are OK and some days are not, today is
not. I think the hardest part is know-
ing that this is going to drag on for a
very long time and that it’s a never-
ending process for us still living it
every day. ”
What are her hopes for the future of
the neighborhood?
“My first hope is that this will be
done, all construction and repairs, so
we can have some peace and cleanli-
ness around here,” she said. “I hope we
can all heal from this to the best of our
individual abilities. My fantasy hope
is that the CEO of PG&E would sit
down with me and hear my story. I
have not gotten any indication that
settlement has been reached. For me, a
lawsuit was never about the money, it
was about being heard, so even when it
settles it’s going to fall flat for me.”
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
MARKS
who are returning home.
“Tonight we celebrate their accom-
plishments and let them back into
their homes with open arms,” he said.
“We give a special welcome to new
families who have moved into the
neighborhood in the last two years.
You have chosen a great place to call
home — welcome and congratula-
tions.”
Four more families will be moving
back into their homes in the next 60-
90 days.
A resident even read a poem to wel-
come back the neighbors and to
remember the victims.
“Three years ago, a horrific explo-
sion and fire killed eight of my con-
stituents and destroyed a neighbor-
hood,” U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo, said in a statement. “Those
who lost loved ones will forever be
scarred by this horrendous tragedy.
Those who escaped with their lives are
still haunted by the trauma and memo-
ries. Many improvements have been
made to the natural gas system, but I
continue to be disappointed by
PG&E’s dismal record keeping and the
CPUC’s inadequate oversight. We just
recently learned that PG&E belatedly
admitted to the CPUC that it kept bad
records on two transmission lines on
the Peninsula. Bad records can lead to
bad outcomes. It is time for the CPUC
to fine PG&E for its negligence in the
past and force it to assure a safe gas
system in the future. The San Bruno
community is optimistic and resilient
and will continue to heal in the years
ahead.”
So far, of the 38 homes destroyed by
the explosion, 16 have completed
construction and are occupied, accord-
ing to the city. Five homes are active-
ly under construction with active
building permits, while one home is
preparing plans for a building permit
submittal. Sixteen parcels remain
vacant.
Together with the mayor of
Allentown, Penn., where a similar
pipeline explosion occurred in 2011,
Ruane is forming the Mayors Council
on Pipeline Safety through the U.S.
Conference of Mayors to assure that
the call for critical reform and public
awareness is heard nationwide.
For more information on the rebuild
effort visit rebuildcrestmoor.org.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
FIRE
COMICS/GAMES
9-10-13
Monday’s PUZZLE soLVEd
PrEVioUs
sUdokU
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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4 Bean variety
8 Yearn
12 Uris hero
13 Cornelia — Skinner
14 Fasten
15 Coffee brewer
16 Tide type
17 Formerly
18 Bookkeeper’s book
20 Laird or lassie
22 Wonka’s creator
23 Gas or elec.
25 Half shell item
29 “The Matrix” hero
31 Shakes up
34 Crony
35 — citizenship
36 Step — — (hurry)
37 Freud, to himself
38 Proceed
39 Auction action
40 Lead on
42 Tolstoy et al.
44 Bone below the elbow
47 Unwanted email
49 Going up in fames
51 Loafer, maybe
53 — spumante
55 Wet dirt
56 Go sightseeing
57 Weird-sounding bird
58 Prior to
59 Jazzy James
60 Wood fnishing oil
61 Fox’s abode
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1 Ancient France
2 Bungled
3 Evans or Hunt
4 Forsaken, maybe
5 Ovid’s route
6 Hamm of soccer
7 Venomous vipers
8 “What — —!”
9 Resume
10 Ad — committee
11 — out a living
19 Poltergeist
21 Stray dog
24 Rangy
26 Whirl
27 Diplomat’s forte
28 K-12
30 Well-worn
31 Chore
32 Dye-yielding plant
33 Stays put (2 wds.)
35 Reside
40 NASA counterpart
41 Raising 2 to 8
43 “Aida,” e.g.
45 Called
46 Lapis lazuli color
48 Beer base
49 Oodles
50 Blissful spot
51 Sault -- Marie
52 Trendy
54 Worthless coin
diLBErT® Crossword PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHoCk®
PEarLs BEforE swinE®
GET fUZZy®
TUEsday, sEPTEMBEr 10, 2013
VirGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Discussions will lead
to all sorts of interesting offers. Share your thoughts
and look for someone who shares your sentiments.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Don’t let laziness or lack
of insight cost you your reputation or your position.
Now’s the time for you to stick to the rules and the
game plan. Don’t make waves.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You’re in a good cycle
for socializing and networking. Engage in unusual
pastimes that inspire you to explore your talents
and develop relationships with imaginative and
motivational comrades.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Keep your story
straight. Undue embellishment will come back to
haunt you. You need to put more emphasis on fixing
up your personal space or finding concrete ways to
lower your costs.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Take
initiative and show courage when dealing with
responsibilities. Your reputation will be directly
linked to what you produce and how you carry out
your duties.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You may face a
conflict between your personal desires and your
workload. Tend to your obligations before you move
on to more enjoyable pastimes. Get as much done
as you can as early in the day as possible.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) — Your unusual
approach to financial, health or legal matters will
leave a lasting impression. The right people are
watching, so behave accordingly.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) — Consistency will be
an issue today. Unpredictable situations will put
added pressure on you to make a decision. Your
best option is to find a physical way to blow off
steam.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) — If you’re facing a
challenge, seek out people who’ve been in similar
situations. An unusual offer could result if you take
the initiative.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) — Live aggressively and
make needed changes in your life. It’s time for you
to step into the spotlight, and you’ll want to look
your best.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) — Avoid disagreements.
Consider the consequences that will result from the
choice you make. By looking out for others, you will
gain the support you need to follow your dreams.
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Experience will be key
when it comes to overcoming a challenge or
besting an adversary. Problems due to personal
responsibilities can be expected. Prepare to deal
with such matters with compassion and diplomacy.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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PENINSULA
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Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
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coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
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Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
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104 Training
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than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
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110 Employment
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NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
110 Employment
DRIVER -
Route Driver
Bay Area, Commission based compen-
sation. Wanted independent contractor to
handle Bay Area route, five days per
week. Must have valid California drivers
license. Must have good driving record.
Must be neat and detail oriented and ac-
curate with calculations and record keep-
ing. Responsible for inventory in truck
and at customer.Must be reliable. Must
be able to lift and move 60lb boxes. Re-
sponsible to develop new customers.
Good people skills. Send resume to D&X
Distributing, 285 Old County Rd, San
Carlos CA 94070. Call Bob at 650-207-
4162
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
JOB TITLE: HR COORDINATOR
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MA in HR Mgmt or MBA
or equiv. + 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5).
Exp. w/ HRIS, ATS, Jira, OBS, Oracle
and Concur VMS, MAC OS, MS OS,
CMS, MS Office and HTML reqd. Mail
Resume: RingCentral, Inc. Attn:HR Dept.
1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
124 Caregivers
TOM’S
COMPASSIONATE CARE
Are you in need of home
patient care?
We've got you covered.
Please call us.
You won't regret it.
650-515-0669
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257080
The following person is doing business
as: TMK Marketing Services, 205 Aber-
deen Drive, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Tonya Kaufman, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Tonya Kaufman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/20/13, 08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257267
The following person is doing business
as: K & K Seafood and Meat, 890 7th
Avenue, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
IJC Food Distribution LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Enrique Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
23 Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523187
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Unknown Parminder Singh
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Unknown Parminder Singh
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Unknown Parminder
Singh
a.Proposed name: Parminder Singh
Grewal
b.Present name: Unknown Rajinder
Kaur
b.Proposed name: Rajinder Kaur Grewal
c.Present name: Unknown Rupinderpal
Singh
c.Proposed name: Rupinderpal Singh
Grewal
d.Present name: Unknown Gagenjot
d.Proposed name: Nimreet Kaur Grewal
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 9,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/16/2013
(Published, 08/27/13, 09/03/2013,
09/10/2013, 09/17/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257159
The following person is doing business
as: Building Team Construction, 501
Parkway, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Sean Penna, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/01/2013.
/s/ Sean Penna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/20/13, 08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257090
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Regrained, 1720 Toledo Ave-
nue, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Jor-
dan Schwartz, same address, and Dan
Kurzrock, 1565 Wedgewood Dr., Hills-
borough, CA 94010. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Jordan Schwartz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/20/13, 08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257315
The following person is doing business
as: Tri Pointe Homes, 1920 Jamboree
Road, Suite 200, IRVINE, CA 92612 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Tri Pointe Homes, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 09/24/2010.
/s/ Douglas F. Bauer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257088
The following person is doing business
as: Aikido by the Bay, 390 El Camino
Real, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jac-
ques Brasse (Daniel), 614 Guildford
Ave., San Mateo, CA 94402. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Daniel Brasse /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257064
The following person is doing business
as: Neat Nits Natural Home Cleaning,
990 Alice Ln., #5, MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Thore Aatlo, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on 09/01/13.
/s/ Thore Aatlo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257303
The following person is doing business
as: A2Z Parts, 125 San Marcos Ave., #7,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Hassan Ai-
saleh, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/09/2013.
/s/ Hassan Aisaleh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257360
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Dependable Senior Services, 2)De-
pendable Senior Advisors, 3)Bloom,
1175 Chess Dr., Suite 200, FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Bhumi Bhutani, 560
Fathom Dr., San Mateo, CA 94404. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Bhumi Bhutani /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256989
The following person is doing business
as: Sewing Lessons in Redwood City, 5
Elwood Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Precise Business Solutions,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
05/01/2013.
/s/ Isabela Cicero /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257361
The following person is doing business
as: Scherzo Music Studio, 173 South
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Aurelio
P. Torres, 929 S. B Street, San Mateo,
CA 94401. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Aurelio P. Torres /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/27/13, 09/03/13, 09/10/13, 09/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257401
The following person is doing business
as: Aiko Fushida, 1851 Alden St., BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Aiko Nishida,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/19/2013.
/s/ Aiko Nishida /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/10/13, 09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257476
The following person is doing business
as: Coomax, 1577 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: A & J Busi-
ness Alliance, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Nuo Xu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/10/13, 09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257472
The following person is doing business
as: Carpe Diem Juggling, 625 Nevada
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: David
John Pawson, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ David John Pawson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/10/13, 09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257455
The following person is doing business
as: Corelli Strings, 241 Alta Vista Dr.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Midori Nakayama, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/29/2013.
/s/ Midori Nakayama /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/10/13, 09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #253122
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name:
Keeping Traditions, Inc. dba Traditions,
850 Santa Cruz Avenue, MENLO PARK,
CA 94025. The fictitious business name
was filed on 11/09/2012 in the county of
San Mateo. The business was conducted
by: Roland Wentzel, 424 Haydon St.,
Healdsburg, CA 95448.
/s/ Roland Wentzel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 08/02/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 08/20/13,
08/27/2013, 09/03/2013, 09/10/2013).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
296 Appliances
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. (650)654-9252
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., SOLD!
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SIGNED MARK MCGWIER BASEBALL
- 70th Home Run, $30., (650)595-3933
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash.(650)654-9252
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
298 Collectibles
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA TRUCK -great
condition, $25., 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LEGO, UNOPENED, 299 pieces Mon-
ster Truck Transporter, 3 projects to build
, 3 action figures, tools, 5-12, $27.00
(650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
24
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
303 Electronics
HP PHOTOSMART Printer, mint condi-
tion, 2 sided, view & print color & black,
multi-functions, includes 2 unopened car-
tridges $45.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
304 Furniture
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., (650)591-2720
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
ELECTRIC MEAT slicer $30., SOLD!
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, SOLD!
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
KITCHEN POTS - (3) stainless steel
with black handles - 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5
gal. Asking $10 all. Will sell separately,
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET - lid
cover and mat, beige. Asking $10. Call
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINYL SHOWER CURTAINS (3) one is
beige/coral floral; one is aqua/black/
gold floral, and one is royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10 each. Call (650)574-3229 (Foster
City) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" HEDGE TRIMMER - pro mod-
el, sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BLACK AND Decker electric 18" blade
lawn mower, rated at 4 HP,
$45.(650)367-8146
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
308 Tools
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DENIM JACKET - faded but in good
condition, man's XL, $19., 650-595-3933
ELECTRIC BLOWER. Plenty of power.
Clean your leaves. Adjustable tube
length/direction. $20 Cash SOLD!
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
GARDEN CLAW. Excellent for tilling
you soil for planting flowers/vegetables.
$20. SOLD!
LAWN AERATOR. Irrigate your lawn at
the roots. Hose attachment. $15 Cash.
SOLD!
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, 650)315-5902
NEW NEWTONE DOOR BELL -factory
pack, complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NEW PRO Torque Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty and case $29, 650-595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
ROSS ROOT feeder. Excellent for
feeding trees/shrubs. $15 Cash.
SOLD!
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
SOLD!
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, SOLD!
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50 SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BRAND NEW TARP - 7' X 5' sealed fac-
tory package, Only $9., 650-595-3933
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
model #38640, lead drisel dome, 44 car-
ot plated, $45., (650)315-5902
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60
(650)697-5405
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI MAKER - elec-
tric, heat top & bottom only, $9., 650-
595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), clay colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), gold colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 SOLD!
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
310 Misc. For Sale
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10.00 all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
SUMMER READING, 100 paperbacks
and hard cover, popular authors, Cuss-
ler, Patterson, Brown, Steele, more.
$30.00 all obo (650)578-9208
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10., Call (650)574-3229
(Foster City) between 10 am - 7 pm.
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited edi-
tion with Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-
5902
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
316 Clothes
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - $.25 each, or all for
$100., (650)921-6741
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
25 Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Uniformed figure
in the National
Toy Hall of Fame
6 Corp. fiscal execs
10 Kiss from 10-
Down
14 Epps and Sharif
15 Sow’s squeal
16 43,560 square
feet
17 Oenophile
20 Indianapolis-to-
Fort Wayne dir.
21 Sleepover wear,
briefly
22 Shiny finish
23 Lone Ranger’s
pal
26 iPhone’s voice-
activated
personal
assistant
27 Response to
snake oil,
perhaps
31 Steering system
component
32 Caresses
33 GM labor gp.
35 Redding of soul
36 FG’s three
37 Hockey great
Phil, familiarly
38 Tails and tongues
do it
39 Feng __:
decorating
philosophy
41 Redeem
43 Privacy protector
of a sort
46 Close to
47 “Incorrect!”
48 Ready to mate,
animal-wise
51 Pouch
52 Just minted
55 Has a big track
payday (and a
hint to hidden
words that begin
17-, 27- and 43-
Across)
59 Against
60 Dutch cheese
61 A driver who
forgets
something might
make one
62 Info
63 Toupees
64 Evaluated
DOWN
1 Graduation wear
2 Poker declaration
3 “Psycho” Oscar
nominee
4 Prospector’s quest
5 “Never mind” PC
key
6 Grifter’s game
7 Swimming aids
8 Artist who lives
across from
Central Park’s
Strawberry Fields
9 Way up the slope
10 Heroic TV dog
11 Rapper-turned-
actor
12 “Mötley” group
13 Actress Deborah
18 Went (for)
19 Pokes around on
the Internet
24 Some regatta
equipment
25 Cpl., for one
26 Takes in, as a
movie
27 Greek deli
stockpile
28 Vision-related
29 Pillow-shaped
diamond style
30 Golfer’s gimme
31 __ truck
34 Took the cup
36 Sound from a
contented kitty
37 Those gals, in
Guadalajara
39 “Don’t __ the
small stuff!”
40 Moor flora
41 Early spring
blooms
42 ABA member
44 Layette suit
45 Strips of weapons
48 “If __ my way ...”
49 Spanish lad
50 URL opener
51 Deer dad
53 French 101
infinitive
54 Mascara
applicator
56 University URL
ending
57 Pelt
58 H-like Greek
vowel
By Donna S. Levin
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/10/13
09/10/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SPECIALIZED CROSSROADS bike. 20"
frame/18 speed. Needs tires.Great com-
mute bike. $99. Cash SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TRAINING BASEBALLS - Soft center
(3) $2. each and Regular Softballs (2)
$3. each, (650)595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
620 Automobiles
2001 NISSAN Xterra XE-V6, 4x4 228k
miles. Runs good, needs minor exhaust
work, $2300, (650)588-9946
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD ‘95 LX Coupe -
$1900., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excellent Condition $1,500
SOLD!
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Neat Nit’s
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsula’s genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-ڀInterior Residential
- Oďce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Eďcient StaČ
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650)453-3002
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Carpet, Tile
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
27 Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
WORLD 28
Tuesday • Sept. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Dennis Rodman is going
back to North Korea, and bringing a team of
former NBAplayers with him.
Days after returning from his second trip
to visit Kim Jong Un — in which he said he
became the first foreigner to hold the
leader’s newborn daughter — Rodman
announced plans Monday to stage two exhi-
bition games in North Korea in January.
The first will be Jan. 8 — Kim’s birthday
— with another to follow two days later.
Rodman’s friendship with the autocratic
leader has been criticized — and led to a cou-
ple of testy exchanges during his
Manhattan news conference. But Rodman
insists Kim is a good person, wants to have
better relations with the United States and
that he’s the one who can help make it hap-
pen with his plan for “basketball diploma-
cy. ”
“Why North Korea? It’ll open doors,”
Rodman said.
Touting his friendship with Kim and
taunting President Barack Obama for not
talking to him, Rodman said he will go back
to North Korea for a week in December to
help select local players for the game. He
hopes to have stars such as former Chicago
teammate Scottie Pippen and Karl Malone.
“Michael Jordan, he won’t do it, because
he’s Michael Jordan,” Rodman said.
Rodman, holding a cigar and wearing the
shirt of a vodka company and a hat of a bet-
ting company that is funding the event, said
Kim has asked him to train his players to
compete in the 2016 Olympics and offered
to allow the Hall of Famer to write a book
about him.
Though looking like a billboard, Rodman
said he’s not doing the event for money. He
said the Irish betting company Paddy Power
would put up $3.5 million. Power later said
finances hadn’t been determined.
And Rodman, who joked that he hadn’t
drawn such a crowd in New York since he
wore a wedding dress to a book signing, was
adamant that this venture was serious —
“groundbreaking,” in Rodman’s words.
“People think this is a gimmick. I would
love to make this a gimmick ... but it’s not
about the money,” he said.
He rarely referred to Kim by name, fre-
quently calling him “the marshal.” Rodman
first met Kim, a basketball fan, when travel-
ing to North Korea in February for a film
project.
Though saying he didn’t want to discuss
politics, Rodman raised his voice when
answering a questioner about Kim’s human
rights record and portrayed himself as the
person who could make outsiders see the
young leader as different than his father and
grandfather.
Rodman returning to North Korea, with others
By Bradley Brooks
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazilian President
Dilma Rousseff again demanded answers
from the U.S. government Monday after a
new report about National Security Agency
spying on Brazil.
The report broadcast by the Globo TV net-
work Sunday night, based on leaked docu-
ments from Edward Snowden, said the NSA
targeted Brazil’s state-run oil firm Petrobras.
That came a week after a report on Globo
indicated that the communications of
Rousseff herself were intercepted by the
NSA.
The new Globo report also said Google and
the Belgium-based Society for Worldwide
Interbank Financial Telecommunication, an
organization better known as SWIFT that
oversees international bank transfers
thought to be secure transactions, were tar-
geted by the NSA.
The report gave no
indication about what
information the NSAmay
have obtained from the
companies. All three
companies are included in
an NSA training manual
for new agents on how to
target the private com-
puter networks of big
companies, the report said.
“If the facts in the report are confirmed,
then it’s evident that the motive for the ...
espionage is not security or to fight terror-
ism, but economic and strategic interests,”
Rousseff said in an emailed statement.
Rousseff met with U.S. President Barack
Obama last week in Russia during a Group of
20 meeting. She said Obama promised to
provide explanations about the NSA pro-
gram by this Wednesday.
Rousseff says any Petrobras
spying has economic motive
REUTERS
Former basketball star Dennis Rodman gestures as he talks to journalists chasing him upon
his arrival at Beijing Capital International Airport inChina.
Dilma Rousseff

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