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LUZERNE COUNTY COUNCIL MEETING
Exclusively on
Channel 19
Tonight at 6:30 pm
Replay
Sunday at 8:00 pm
Live!
570-825-8508 • www.sectv.com
LUZERNE COUNTY COUNCIL MEETING
WASHINGTON — Battling stiff resistance
in Congress, President Barack Obama con-
ceded Monday night he might lose his fight
for congressional support of a
military strike against Syria,
and declined to say what he
would do if lawmakers reject
his call to back retaliation for
a chemical weapons attack
last month.
The president made his
comment as a glimmer of a
possible diplomatic solution
appeared after months of defiance from the
Russian-backed government of President
Bashar Assad in Syria. In a rapid response,
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid cited
“international discussions” in unexpect-
edly postponing a test vote originally set for
Wednesday on Obama’s call for legislation
backing a military strike.
In a series of six network interviews
planned as part of a furious lobbying cam-
paign in Congress, Obama said statements
suggesting that Syria might agree to surren-
der control of its chemical weapons stockpile
Obama
admits to
problem
Syrian proposal to turn over
chemical stockpile adds to debate
DAVID ESPO and JULIE PACE
Associated Press
Clark Van Orden photos | The Times Leader
Some of the crew members who were working to take down St Mary’s Church on Shoemaker Street in Swoyersville on Monday morning
when it collapsed onto the operator of an excavator talk with Swoyersville’s assistant fire chief shortly after the accident.
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WILKES-BARRE — The
Wilkes-Barre Area School
Board on Monday night
voted 5-1 in favor of a new
four-year teachers contract
that is expected to save the
district $1 million per year
through increased insurance
co-pays for participants,
officials said.
Monday’s meeting also
featured an address to the
board by local NAACP lead-
er Ron Felton on the need
for more minority teachers
in the increasingly diverse
district.
The new contract also will
see teachers receive a pay
increase of $1,000 per step,
or pay grade, although offi-
cials could not immediately
say how much that will cost
the district.
“I thought it was abso-
lutely wonderful, I’m very
happy,” union president Jeff
Ney said, praising the board
for its openness during the
negotiating process.
Ney said union members
viewed increased co-pays as
“an even trade” for the sala-
ry increase, and a move that
would help save the district
money.
While $1,000 per step
sounds like a lot, Wilkes-
Barre Area is unusual in
that it has “banded steps,”
meaning the salary stays
the same for several years
before the next raise. Most
districts give smaller raises
each year. Wilkes-Barre
Area’s contract has 15
steps, but raises only occur
on steps two, five, 10 and
15. In between those years,
salaries are unchanged
unless the teacher advances
in the “column” part of the
pay matrix, which increases
salary based on education
beyond a bachelor’s degree
up to a doctorate.
Solicitor Ray
Wendolowski said the pay
raise coupled with the
health insurance savings
add up to a substantial net
savings for the district.
The contract also clarified
language regarding health
care coverage for retirees,
making it clearer that the
district will not cover insur-
ance once a retiree is eligi-
ble for Medicare at age 65.
And the new contract
added language that makes
W-BArea
teachers’
pact OK’d
NAACP ofcial
pitches for more
minority teachers
ROGER DUPUIS
and MARK GUYDISH
rdupuis@civitasmedia.com
mguydish@timesleader.com
RESPONDING TO SYRIA
Demo frmowner
killed in collapse
SWOYERSVILLE — The owner of
the demolition company that razed
the Hotel Sterling in four days was
killed Monday when the steeple of
St. Mary’s of Czestochowa Church
toppled onto an excavator he was
operating to demolish the former
church on Shoemaker Street.
The collapse happened at about
11:40 a.m. when most of the church
had been brought down and only the
steeple was left standing.
John P. Brdaric Jr., 60, owner
of Brdaric Excavating and Buck
Mountain Quarry in Swoyersville,
was in an excavator on top of what
remained of the church when the
steeple fell.
Witnesses said the steeple
“swayed” and “wiggled” before it fell
onto the excavator.
About 12 to 15 crew members
from Brdaric’s companies rushed to
the mangled excavator that was cov-
ered with bricks and stone.
“They were cursing, yelling
‘Hurry up, hurry up,’ ” said Ted
Klem of Swoyersville. “They were
cutting metal, using a gas cutter to
get at him.”
Emergency crews from
Swoyersville and Forty Fort
removed Brdaric from the excava-
tor’s crushed cab. He was rushed to
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center in Plains Township, where
he was pronounced dead, according
to the Luzerne County Coroner’s
Office.
No problems early on
Demolition of the church began
just after 7 a.m. Monday.
A large crane did most of the
work, turning the church built in
1911 into a large pile of rubble. The
crane removed the cross and dome
from the top of the steeple before
the job was turned over to two exca-
vators to finish the job.
Klem, who was baptized and
served as an altar boy at the church,
and Glen Galion, of Jim Thorpe,
said it appeared Brdaric was using
John P. Brdaric Jr. operating
excavator crushed by steeple
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Workers from Brdaric Excavating wait to hear the condition of John P. Brdaric Jr., 60, owner
of the company, after the demolition accident at St Mary’s Church on Monday.
Ofcials: Group better
prepared for disasters
WILKES-BARRE — A coalition of organi-
zations that coordinated local disaster recov-
ery in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene and
Tropical Storm Lee two years ago accom-
plished some major feats and is now better
prepared to address local disasters in the
future, according to officials.
The Disaster Recovery Coalition of
Luzerne County hosted a reception and pre-
sentation Monday at the county Emergency
Management Agency building to recap what
the organization has done since the record
flooding that devastated several communities
along the Susquehanna River in September
2011, and explain how it has prepared for the
future.
Mike Zimmerman, chief executive officer
of Family Service Association of NEPA, said
volunteers with the coalition’s approximately
30 member organizations donated 15,882 vol-
unteer hours valued at more than $336,000
(based on a rate of $20.51 per hour) to assist
flood survivors on their road to recovery.
Agencies such as the American Red Cross,
Salvation Army, United Way of Wyoming
Valley, Commission on Economic Opportunity
and the Luzerne Foundation some of the local
organizations involved that took a quick lead.
STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
See COLLAPSE | 10A See NAACP | 10A
See SYRIA | 10A
See COALITION | 10A
Obama
PAGE 2A Tuesday, September 10, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DETAILS
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILYNUMBER - 9-0-0
BIG4 - 5-3-2-8
QUINTO - 0-8-3-2-2
TREASURE HUNT
08-09-20-27-28
EVENING DRAWING
DAILYNUMBER -9-0-3
BIG4 - 6-0-7-1
QUINTO - 4-0-0-1-8
CASH5
13-25-29-35-41
MATCH6
02-04-18-22-24-35
No player matched
all fve numbers in
Monday’s“Cash 5”
jackpot drawing. Today’s
jackpot will be worth
$225,000.
Lottery ofcials reported
23 players matched
four numbers, winning
$589.50 each;
1,526 players matched
three numbers, winning
$15 each; and
20,131 players matched
two numbers, winning
$1 each.
No player matched all
six numbers in Monday’s
“Match 6”jackpot
drawing. Thursday’s
jackpot will be worth
$5.6 million.
OBITUARIES
Banashefski, Elynore
Beatty, Shirley
Ciavarella, Bertha
Jenkins, Thomas
Harrison, Lorraine
Kozub, Yuliya
Kuczynski, Albina
Lane, Jared
Nickas, Tom
Schwartz, Leah
Soboleski, Arlene
Thomas, Charlie
Page 8A
WHO TO CONTACT
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Obituaries ........................... 970-7224
Advertising .......................... 970-7101
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Classifed Ads ..................... 970-7130
Newsroom........................... 970-7242
City Editor
Daniel Burnett ................................ 970-7180
Sports Editor
John Medeiros ............................... 970-7143
Features Editor
Sandra Snyder ................................. 970-7383
Online Editor ............................... 970-7329
Photo Editor
Clark Van Orden ............................. 970-7175
E-MAIL ......... tlnews@timesleader.com
BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the newsroom at 829-7242.
THE TIMES LEADER ACIVITAS MEDIAcompany
JANINE UNGVARSKY
Times Leader Correspondent
BEAR CREEK TWP. —
Opinions on the situation on
state Route 115 were all over
the board when representatives
from the state fielded questions
and comments at the town-
ship supervisor’s meeting on
Monday.
The two traffic engineers from
the Pennsylvania Department
of Transportation were at the
meeting at the request of resi-
dents who feel that changes
made in response to safety con-
cerns after the highway was the
scene of multiple fatal accidents
in a short time several years ago
went too far.
In particular, residents have
complained that the elimination
of the passing lane along most
of the highway has resulted in
traffic tie ups and illegal pass-
ing when large trucks and other
slow-moving vehicles are trav-
elling below the 45 mph speed
limit.
The PennDOT representa-
tives said that while the acci-
dents involving a vehicle hitting
a fixed object like a pole haven’t
decreased since the changes
were completed in July 2010,
the number of crashes involv-
ing two or more vehicles have
decreased, something they
attributed to the addition of
left-turn lanes and the increased
distance between opposing traf-
fic.
Resident Rosemary Mulligan
agreed, and said that even when
she’s stuck behind a slow-mov-
ing truck, her main thought is,
“At least I’m safe.”
Supervisor Jim Smith, who
lives along the state highway,
said he approves of the changes
and feels they make the road
much safer. But while others
agreed the changes improved
the safety concerns they were
intended to address, some said
they were “overkill” while oth-
ers sought a middle ground
between the way things were
and the way they are now.
“I think you created some
unintended consequences with
the changes,” said Supervisor
Jeff Popple, referring to the
stopped traffic and illegal pass-
ing resulting from the slow-
moving traffic. He called the
changes “regressive” in light
of the increased traffic volume
because of the casino and com-
merce.
Popple and others called for
PennDOT to rethink the high-
way situation and consider
other options.
The PennDOT representa-
tives asked the supervisors
to make a written request for
review of the Route 115 situa-
tion.
PennDOT discusses Route 115 safety changes
WILKES-BARRE—Two menwere arrested
after police witnessed an alleged narcotics trans-
action in the parking lot of a local grocery store.
State police in Wyoming said James
Featherstone, 33, of Academy Street, Wilkes-
Barre, and Jeremy Valcarcel, 22, of Pettebone
Street, Forty Fort, were observed in a narcotics
transaction at about 2 p.m. in the parking lot of
Schiel’s Market on George Avenue.
The men were charged with possession with
intent to deliver a controlled substance, posses-
sion of a controlled substance, resisting arrest,
conspiracy and possession of drug parapherna-
lia. Police said they seized money, crack cocaine,
heroin and marijuana.
Members of the state police Troop P Vice/
Narcotics Unit and the Wilkes-Barre Police
Department’s Anti-Crime Unit conducted the
investigation.
WILKES-BARRE TWP. —Township police
are investigating the robbery of the Turkey Hill
Minit Market at 340 Wilkes-Barre Township
Boulevard early Saturday morning.
Police said a black male, about 5 feet, 11 inch-
es tall and weighing 195 pounds fled with the
cash drawer at about 1:30 a.m. He was wearing
a black hooded sweatshirt and a white mask on
his face. No weapon was displayed and no one
was injured. Anyone with information should
call police at 570-208-4635 or call 911.
Times Leader staf
A three-judge panel of the state
Superior Court has ruled that the law
firm run by Attorney Robert Powell, a
key figure in the scandal that sent two
Luzerne County judges to jail on cor-
ruption charges, must pay more that
$6 million in loans and attorney fees in
defaulted loans and attorney fees owed
for two businesses Powell ran.
In three separately but similarly word-
ed opinions penned by Senior Judge
Robert E. Colville, the panel unanimous-
ly rejected appeals by the Powell Law
Group regarding a lower court decision
about the loans, which included a 2003
loan to his firm Big Kahuna totaling
$1.35 million, a 2004 loan to Big Kahuna
for $225,000, and a 2005 loan to his
development company, W-Cat, initially
for $2.5 million by extended with two
separate $1 million lines of credit.
Powell’s firm had contended the attor-
ney fees, totaling $635,743 for the three
loans, were “excessive” and the loan
documents lacked proper signatures and
initials. Colville’s opinion called the the
appeals “poorly crafted arguments.”
Powell was co-owner of two private
juvenile detention and treatment centers
at the heart of the scandal that brought
down former county judges Michael
Conahan and Mark Ciavarella, both cur-
rently serving long prison sentences.
During Ciavarella’s trial, Powell testified
the two judges essentially strong-armed
him into making recurring payments in
exchange for them assuring juveniles
deemed delinquent in county court
would be sent to the facilities.
The scandal became known as “kids
for cash,” a label Ciavarella has relent-
lessly rejected, insisting that, while he
did get money from Powell and facility
builder Robert Mericle, it was not in
exchange for sending youths to the facili-
ties.
Powell was sentenced to 18 months in
prison after pleading guilty in July 2009
to charges of failing to report a crime
related to those payments.
Court: Powell must pay back $6 million in loans
NAACP preps committee for CEOsearch
BRETT ZONGKER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Leaders
of the nation’s largest civil
rights group pledged to con-
tinue fighting for voting rights,
health care, a higher minimum
wage and immigration reform,
even as the NAACP begins
searching for a new president
and CEO.
After suffering turbulent
leadership changes and scan-
dals in the past, NAACP board
members said the 104-year-
old group is poised for a
smooth transition this time as
it seeks to replace outgoing
President Benjamin Jealous.
He announced on Sunday that
he would step down at the end
of the year.
Chairwoman Roslyn Brock
said the board is disappoint-
ed Jealous is leaving after
five years but that the group
remains energized on issues
nationwide.
“The NAACP is alive, and
it’s well,” Brock said. “We have
a strategic plan in place that
will help guide our work for
the next 50 years.”
Brock said the NAACP’s
board is forming a search com-
mittee to find someone to suc-
ceed Jealous.
Former NAACP Chairman
Julian Bond said there had
been no indication at the
board’s last meeting in July
that Jealous would leave, but
he added that leading the orga-
nization is an extremely diffi-
cult job.
“We’ve had our ups and
downs over the years, but
we’ve had a wonderful, won-
derful steward for the past five
years and he’s brought an enor-
mous amount of energy to the
NAACP,” Bond said. “We’re
going to be much poorer with-
out him.”
In a written statement to
The Associated Press, Jealous
vowed the transition to a new
leader would be orderly and
planned. “Their success will be
my success,” he said.
When he was hired for the
job in 2008, Jealous became
the group’s youngest-ever
leader at the age of 35. The
job is unique in its intensity,
Jealous said Monday, because
“you commit to work 24/7/365
and spend half your year on
an airplane and every minute
working to advance the cause
of civil and human rights.”
Under Jealous, the group
worked to abolish death
penalty laws in at least four
states, opposed “stop-and-
frisk” police tactics and stand-
your-ground laws following
the death of Florida teenager
Trayvon Martin and embraced
gay rights in a historic 2012
vote to support same-sex mar-
riage rights.
Donations have increased
from $23 million in 2007 —
the year before Jealous was
hired —to $46 million in 2012,
he said. The group also said its
donors have increased from
16,000 people giving each year
to more than 132,000.
Jealous said he had been
increasingly wrestling with the
need to spend more time with
his family. Several years ago,
he told his daughter that he
needed five years to do impor-
tant work at the NAACP.
AP Photo
NAACP President Ben Jealous
speaks at a news conference in
Annapolis, Md. in March. Jealous,
the president and CEO of the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
says he plans to step down by the
end of the year.
2013-253
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Regional Business Development
Director &General Manager
(570) 970-7158
wlaferty@civitasmedia.com
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VP/Chief Revenue Ofcer
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Circulation Manager
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Production Director
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One man shot, another assaulted in West Hazleton
WEST HAZLETON — One man
was shot and another assaulted early
Monday morning at a home on East
Broad Street.
Borough police were dispatched
to the 200 block of East Broad Street
for multiple reports of shots fired just
before 12:30 a.m. and found Joshua L.
Crutch, 20, of West Hazleton, on the
second floor of 227 E. Broad St. with a
gunshot wound to his leg.
Police also found Leshawn Williams,
21, of West Hazleton, in the residence.
Williams had suffered lacerations and
contusions to his face, police said.
Crutch was transported to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center in
Plains Township for treatment of non-
life-threatening injuries. Williams was
taken to Hazleton General Hospital for
evaluation and was treated and released,
according to police Chief Brian Buglio.
Witnesses told police more than 10
shots were heard being fired both inside
and outside the residence, and three
men were seen running from the house.
Buglio said the suspects reportedly
fired about four shots at the house as
they were crossing the street on their
way to a small, dark-colored vehicle.
He said a preliminary description
of the suspects described them as
Hispanic males in their 20s, with one of
them possibly wearing a black baseball
cap.
Police are reviewing video surveil-
lance footage in the area. Anyone with
information is asked to contact West
Hazleton police at 570-455-3733 or by
calling 911.
West Hazleton police were assisted
on scene by officers from the Hazleton
city and Butler Township police depart-
ments and members of the Pennsylvania
State Police Forensic Services Unit.
STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
Lafin council tables hiring police ofcers
due to possible department elimination
GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
LAFLIN — Monday night’s Borough
Council meeting provided dozens of bor-
ough residents the opportunity to again
respond to the possibility of the elimina-
tion of the borough’s police department.
Most who showed up Monday seemed
to want to keep the borough police pres-
ence “as is.”
Borough Council has been exploring
the disbanding the department at recent
meetings.
Many residents shared stories reflect-
ing quick response times by borough
officers that saved lives. Some cited the
borough’s low crime rate relative to other
nearby municipalities such as Wilkes-
Barre.
“As council members, you are also
residents,” said Larry Brogna. “You live
here and your children live here, I don’t
understand how you could be willing to
put them at risk.”
The issue came to the forefront when
council tabled a motion to hire two part-
time police officers. Several members said
they felt uncomfortable considering the
hiring of newofficers, when the fate of the
its police department was still pending.
Mayor Dorothy Shea Yazurlo said she
felt her hands had been tied by council
and she was unable to fulfill the mandate
of her office in regard to the police depart-
ment.
Yazurlo referred to a borough ordinance
which reads, “The mayor shall have full
charge and control of the chief of police
and the police force.”
“I haven’t been able to do my job,” said
Yazurlo, “or there would have been two
new part-time officers hired tonight.”
She said she found relying on state
police to fill the gap in police service was
unacceptable in regard to response time
and understanding of the needs of resi-
dents.
Councilman Thomas Parry said council
members were still in the process of evalu-
ating proposals from Jenkins Township
and the city of Pittston offering police
protection at a reduced cost.
“This council ran on the platform of
fiscal responsibility,” said Parry, “and we
intend to followthrough with it. With less
money available to us, we need to make
some difficult decisions.”
In another matter, Tony Pirro, County
Waste, addressed council saying he would
“love to win the trash collection and
recycling contract.” He said the single
stream method used by the company
would save the borough money and make
it more likely residents would participate
recycling.
The borough will again be trying to gar-
ner a Local Shared Grant for 2014 (gam-
ing monies). The deadline for the grant
request is Dec. 31.
The next meeting of Borough Council
will be on Oct. 14 at 6 p.m.
POLICE BLOTTER
Hughestown looks
for ways to reduce
speeding truck trafc
B. GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
HUGHESTOWN — Council discussed ways
to reduce speeding truck traffic within the bor-
ough during Monday’s meeting.
Officials plan to contact representatives from
PennDOT to add signage advising industrial
truck drivers to reduce speeds on Rock Street
due to an increase in complaints from residents
in the area about noise and possible hazards.
Rock Street is technically a state road and as
such is under the jurisdiction of the state.
Councilwoman Barbara Gatto added
Parsonage Street as another area of concern.
Similar worries about trucks also have been
expressed regarding that street during council
meetings in neighboring Pittston.
Mayor Paul Hindmarsh advised increased
monitoring of truck traffic in the borough so as
to possibly justify the hiring of a police officer
certified to inspect trucks that could be in viola-
tion of borough code.
In other matters, the council unanimously
approved Gatto’s motion to donate $100 to the
Pittston Library.
The next regular council meeting will be at
7:30 p.m. Oct. 14.
JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Walter Mitchell said he’s embrac-
ing his new temporary role as
Luzerne County controller and
hasn’t been shy about respectfully
voicing his views to the administra-
tion.
“This is intellectually stimulat-
ing,” said Mitchell, a Bear Creek
Village resident and 36-year owner
of an insurance and financial estate
planning firm.
One example of his approach
occurred when Don Lasoski recent-
ly resigned as sheriff lieutenant
after acknowledging he took $375
for a personal issue with plans to
repay it before anyone noticed.
Mitchell sought and obtained a
detailed explanation of the proce-
dures for removing money from this
fund and said Monday his office will
be issuing suggested policy addi-
tions that could prevent another
theft.
He didn’t stop there.
Mitchell said he has contacted
county District Attorney Stefanie
Salavantis, urging her to pursue
charges against Lasoski, who has
paid back the money and resigned.
If charges are not filed, other
employees with access to county
funds will believe they can “get away
with the same thing” by contending
they were borrowing the money
with plans to repay it, he said.
“As long as I’m here, we’re going
to make sure that that message gets
out that any violation of the pub-
lic trust and any misuse of public
funds is absolutely unacceptable
and needs to be treated to the full-
est extent of the law,” said Mitchell,
who will serve in the post until the
controller elected in November
takes office Jan. 3.
He said he also worked with the
administration to ensure the county
divested its ownership of the sheriff
canine handled by Lasoski. County
officials say two experts said the
aging dog had no financial value,
and ownership has been transferred
to Lasoski.
“My concern was as long as we
own the dog, if the dog tore some-
body’s face off, we were liable. I
didn’t like our exposure as a coun-
ty,” Mitchell said.
He plans to interview applicants
this week for a vacant auditor posi-
tion and is sorting through pending
and promised audits to determine
which should be completed or at
least initiated during his four-month
tenure.
Prior Controller Walter Griffith,
who resigned, potentially as part
of a plea agreement related to
pending wiretap charges against
him, told council earlier this year
his office planned to complete six
audits in 2013. Two were finished,
and a third was wrapped up but
not released. The remaining audits
include reviews of fuel usage and
purchasing department procedures
and controls.
The department’s two employees
are working on other audits not on
this list, including one required by
the state, Mitchell said.
He also has started a list of items
that warrant correcting. His list
includes a past practice that result-
ed in at least half of the employees
receiving paychecks for time not yet
worked. Employees are paid every
two weeks, and he suggests with-
holding pay for the prospectively
paid employees — with significant
warning so they can prepare — dur-
ing a month when there are three
paydays. The entire workforce
should be paid on the same sched-
ule for time already worked, he said.
He also has suggested a commit-
tee to create a fresh, comprehensive
policies and procedures manual and
said he welcomes input from county
taxpayers at 825-1629.
“It is for the taxpayers that I
work, and only for them. This is not
a Republican or Democratic posi-
tion,” he said.
LOCAL
BUTLERTWP.
Walton deaths
murder-suicide
Township police and Luzerne
County District Attorney’s Office
on Monday released their findings
on the deaths of John J. Walton, 51,
and his wife, Stacy A. Walton, 41, in
December 2012, determining that the
case as a murder-suicide.
The bodies of the couple were found
inside her home at 470 E. Butler Drive
on Dec. 17.
The 10-month investigation that
involved interviews and forensic analy-
sis determined John Walton killed his
wife before taking his own life, accord-
ing to a news release.
Stacy Walton had been separated
from her husband and had obtained a
protection from abuse order against him,
alleging he had threatened to kill her and
then himself, according to court records.
A .22 caliber handgun and two spent
cartridges were found inside the house.
PLAINS TWP.
VA to discuss
vets’ mental health
The Department of Veterans Affairs
Medical Center will host a Mental
Health Summit aimed at improving the
mental health of veterans today at The
Woodlands, Plains Township.
“This is an opportunity for us all to
sit at the same table, to listen and learn
from each other. We all want the same
thing — for our veterans and their
families to be well-cared for,” said Dr.
Timothy Lomauro, chief of psychology
and the coordinator of the summit.
The Mental Health Summit will
include breakout sessions and a net-
working fair. The summit will con-
clude from 12:15-12:30 p.m. with clos-
ing remarks from VA leadership.
SHICKSHINNY
Northwest hosts talks
about concussions
Northwest School District is having
panel discussions todayto promote
awareness for childhood concussions.
Students can attend the discussion
at 8 a.m. in the Jr./Sr. high school audi-
torium at 243 Thorne Hill Road; 10:45
a.m. in the primary school cafeteria at
417 Shickshinny Lake Road; and 2 p.m.
in the intermediate school cafeteria at
20 Sunset Lake Road. A discussion for
parents will be held at a later date.
A concussion happens when the
brain moves back and forth inside
the skull. Symptoms include altered
thinking, difficulty concentrating and
remembering new information, dizzi-
ness, vomiting and lack of energy, sad-
ness or irritability and more sleep than
usual or trouble falling asleep.
Special-education teacher Jennifer
Oiler is helping to coordinate the event
and said it’s important for parents to
know the signs of a concussion, espe-
cially during sports seasons. Quick
response to a head injury could mean
faster recovery time.
NANTICOKE
LCCC to hold 9/11
remembrance
Luzerne County Community College
will hold a Sept. 11 remembrance
ceremony on Wednesday at 11 a.m.,
at the college’s Walk of Honor at the
Regional Public Safety Training Center
in Nanticoke.
The event is free and open to the
public.
WILKES-BARRE
Three area schools
attain high rank
Ranked by Washington Monthly
magazine’s “2013 College Rankings”
edition, King’s College took 121st
place out of 684 U.S. schools to offer
master’s degrees.
The ratings were based on how the
schools interacted with their communi-
ties by way of public service initiatives
and how they contribute to the public
good.
This category also looked at research
programs and graduating and recruiting
students from low-income households.
Misericordia University ranked
264th in this category.
The magazine also identified schools
offering master’s degrees nationwide
that give the “Best Bang for Your
Buck,” or schools that offer quality
education at reasonable prices.
Misericordia ranked 97th in this cat-
egory, King’s earned the 100th spot and
University of Scranton took 140th place.
IN BRIEF
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 3A
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE —
Luzerne County Judge Joseph
Sklarosky Jr. likened the forg-
ery and harassment case of
Theresa Gordon Isabella to
the story of “Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
Hyde.”
Isabella, 76, had been a
nurse for years, raised a son
and has been a community
advocate, witnesses testified
Monday.
She’s also been convicted
of 29 charges on allegations
she sent unwanted mail to her
neighbor and his family.
Sklarosky sentenced
Isabella, formerly of Sugarloaf
and now living in Florida,
to seven years probation on
Monday.
Her case, Sklarosky said,
included some of the most
“nasty, vindictive and despi-
cable conduct” he’s ever seen.
“This is a bizarre case,” the
judge said. “It has a Jekyll and
Hyde quality.”
In August 2008, Sugarloaf
police began receiving com-
plaints from James and
Heather Yurick about their
neighbor, Isabella, on Prospect
Park Road. The complaints
spanned a number of years.
The couple told police
Isabella would walk her large
German Shepherd in front of
their son, bend over and slap
her buttocks in a “mooning”
fashion, place feces on their
property, throw walnuts at
their home and display her
middle finger.
The Yuricks also began
receiving anonymous mail in
the form of subscriptions, let-
ters and literature.
Police said Heather Yurick’s
parents also began receiv-
ing unwanted mail, as did
another neighbor in the com-
munity. Heather Yurick died
in October 2011 after a battle
with cancer.
Isabella was originally
charged in August 2011 and
was hit with additional charg-
es in November 2012 after
the Yuricks and several others
received additional unwanted
mail. Handwriting samples
pegged Isabella as the sender.
Isabella denies the allega-
tions. “Even though I have
been found guilty of these
charges, I am innocent,” she
said.
James Yurick said Monday
that Isabella’s actions caused
lost time between his wife and
three children — time wasted
on Isabella.
Yurick called Isabella’s
actions “pure evil” and “heart-
less,” noting that at one point,
after his wife lost her hair dur-
ing a sickness, Isabella began
mailing wig magazines.
Sklarosky said that if
Isabella violates her probation
even once, he would jail her.
“I have no patience … for
violations,” Sklarosky warned.
The judge ordered her to
pay several hundred dollars
in fines and almost $15,000 in
restitution costs.
Isabella must also undergo
a mental-health evaluation and
follow recommended treat-
ment.
Woman’s case bizarre, judge says
76-year-old gets 7 years probation in forgery, harassment
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE — A
Luzerne County jury was
selected Monday to hear
the trial of a man accused
of attacking a teen with a
machete outside GAR High
School in February 2012.
A jury of nine men and
five women, which includes
two alternates, was selected
Monday afternoon to hear
the case of Juan Borbon, 21,
with no last known address,
who faces seven charges
stemming from the attack
that nearly
s e v e r e d
the hand
of then-15-
y e a r - o l d
M a r q u i s
Allen.
C o u n t y
J u d g e
J o s e p h
Sklarosky Jr. said assistant
district attorneys Alexis
Falvello and Mamie Phillips
and Borbon’s attorney, Paul
Galante, will present their
opening statements this
morning before testimony
begins.
Before jury selection began
Monday, prosecutors told
Sklarosky that one of their
witnesses — 18-year-old
Yansy Abreu — did not abide
by a subpoena and appear
at the courthouse Monday
morning.
Falvello said investigators
had to go pick up Abreu and
bring him to the courthouse,
where Sklarosky warned him
he could be charged if he
does not appear as the sub-
poena requires.
Prosecutors say Borbon
pulled the machete from
Abreu’s backpack just before
the attack.
Falvello said Abreu is rep-
resented by attorney Cheryl
Sobeski-Reedy and he is
under supervision with the
county’s juvenile probation
department.
Phillips said that if Abreu
fails to show for court again,
the next step would be to
make him a material witness
— a process that puts a wit-
ness on bail to ensure appear-
ances in court.
Falvello said prosecutors
expect to call five witnesses
during the trial, which could
last until Thursday.
Wilkes-Barre police allege
Borbon was involved in a
fight in which he swung the
machete and nearly severed
Allen’s hand.
Allen testified at a prelimi-
nary hearing last year that he
was helping a black student
who was jumped by a group
after classes had ended for
the day.
The fight occurred off
school grounds on South
Grant and Lehigh streets.
Abreu previously testi-
fied the planned fight was
between students of African-
American and Dominican
heritages.
Borbon is jailed at the
Luzerne County Correctional
Facility.
Jury selected in case involving machete attack
Juan Borbon, 21, allegedly attacked teen outside GAR
Borbon
Mitchell dives into controller’s duties
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Luzerne County Controller Walter Mitchell discusses his plans Monday for audits and other work he wants to complete during his temporary term through Jan. 3.
PAGE 4A Tuesday, September 10, 2013 NATION & WORLD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
CAMP HILL, PA.
Pa. hospital systems
consider afliation
Two hospital systems in
Pennsylvania said Monday they are
examining whether there are ways
they can work together, a process
that’s beginning with a letter of intent.
Geisinger Health System of Danville
and Holy Spirit Health System in
Camp Hill said in announcing the deal
that the approval process was expected
to take at least six months.
Geisinger has about 19,000 employ-
ees and serves 44 counties in central
and northeastern Pennsylvania.
Holy Spirit runs 315-bed Holy Spirit
Hospital in Camp Hill. Its health sys-
tem has more than 2,900 employees
and some 500 physicians.
LAKE MARY, FLA.
Fla. police called on
George Zimmerman
George Zimmerman’s estranged wife
called police officers to her father’s
house in Florida Monday, saying the
former neighborhood watch volunteer
who was acquitted of murder threat-
ened her with a gun.
Shellie Zimmerman called police
shortly after 2 p.m. Monday, said Lake
Mary Police Chief Steve Bracknell.
Zimmerman hasn’t been arrested
and officers were at the house trying to
determine what happened, Bracknell
said.
Shellie Zimmerman in a divorce
petition filed last week she said she
and her husband separated a month
after Zimmerman was acquitted of any
crime for fatally shooting 17-year-old
Trayvon Martin last July in Sanford,
just a few miles away Lake Mary.
ANKARA
Kurdish rebels halt
withdrawal from Turkey
Kurdish rebels announced Monday
they are suspending their withdrawal
from Turkey into bases in northern
Iraq over what they say is the Turkish
government’s failure to advance peace
talks aimed at ending a nearly 30-year-
old conflict.
The Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK,
declared a cease-fire in March and began
withdrawing fighters from Turkey in
May as part of the peace efforts. Turkey
in turn was expected to enact reforms to
improve Kurdish rights.
But a statement from the PKK, car-
ried by the pro-Kurdish Firat news
agency, accused Turkey of failing to
honor its side of the bargain and called
on it to take steps toward “democ-
ratization and the resolution of the
Kurdish problem.” The group said the
cease-fire would stand.
TEHRAN
Iran’s president urges
gov’t on Facebook
Iran’s curious world of online politics
looked a bit more crowded Monday with
members of President Hasan Rouhani’s
Cabinet encouraged to open their own
Facebook pages — in a country where
authorities, at the same time, try to
block the public from social media.
The government-as-Facebook
Friends initiative, reported by the pro-
reform Shargh daily, is seen as part
of Rouhani’s efforts to give the presi-
dency a makeover as more accountable
and accessible after his combative pre-
decessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
EL-ARISH, EgYPT
Egyptian tanks, copters
push through Sinai
Egyptian troops and tanks backed by
helicopter gunships swept through vil-
lages in the northern Sinai Peninsula
near the border with the Palestinian
Gaza Strip on Monday, the third day
of a major offensive against Islamic
extremists, a military official said. So
far, some 20 suspected militants have
been killed and 20 captured in the
operation, he added.
Explosions rocked el-Mahdiya and
Naga Shabana, two of several villages
south of the town of Rafah, the official
said, where the military hit targets and
shelters used by militants wanted for
the killing and abduction of Egyptian
soldiers over the past year.
IN BRIEF
AP photo
Doggone it, summer’s over
Dogs leashed to a fence outside of PS234 in
NewYork watch as school children line up to
enter the school. The dogs were left outside
by owners who brought their children for
class. Monday was the first day back for New
York City’s 1 million public school students.
CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO — With the pro-
gram known as “Obamacare”
only weeks away from its key
launch date, hectic prepara-
tions are in motion in com-
munities across the country
to deal with one of its major
practical challenges: hiring
and training a small army
of instant experts who can
explain the intricacies of
health insurance to people
who’ve never had it.
More than 100 nonprofits
and related organizations,
which specialize in everything
from running soup kitchens to
organizing farm workers, have
been recruited by the federal
government to sign up “navi-
gators” to help the 30 million
uninsured people who can
now gain coverage.
Many of the groups have
little expertise in health insur-
ance. And the timeline for
training the workers is tight.
According to the new health
law, people can begin shop-
ping among the new policies
on Oct. 1. The enrollment
period lasts six months.
Coverage begins in January.
“I think there’s a lot of con-
cern about whether, with all
these state requirements, they
are goingtobe ready togo,” said
Katie Keith, a former research
professor at Georgetown
University, who has been track-
ing the heath care legislation.
“You want people out there edu-
cating consumers.”
Deploying the guides for the
uninsured is one of the first
hurdles for the new health
system as it transitions from
an abstract political debate
in Washington to a real-life
process in communities. It
is one of the steps govern-
ment officials are concerned
about as critics warn that the
Affordable Care Act could
become a “train wreck.”
The guides will be sent to
community events with lap-
tops to help people sign up
for insurance online. They
will work at food banks, shel-
ters, churches and free clinics
where the uninsured are likely
to be.
The short time available for
training raises questions about
how prepared the workers will
be to answer people’s ques-
tions about the different poli-
cies and government subsidies
available. Community groups
received the course materi-
als for the 20-hour training
only days ago. Many have just
begun to post the openings on
job boards.
A small scream came from
Tara McCollum Plese when
she was asked whether her
group, Arizona Alliance for
Community Health Centers,
has hired any of the 45 workers
authorized in its federal grant.
“Ack! No,” she said Thursday.
Her group has posted a job
description, she said, and is
now flooded with inquiries for
the positions, which pay about
$15 an hour. She’s since heard
one worker has been hired.
Not one navigator has been
hired yet under the $2 million
grant obtained by the Ohio
Association of Foodbanks.
The Illinois Eye Institute,
which will help with enroll-
ment in the Chicago area,
plans to train a dozen staffers
for the task.
Groups rush to hire ‘Obamacare’ guides
‘Navigators’ being employed to aid previously uninsured
ASIF SHAHZAD
and REBECCA SANTANA
Associated Press
ISLAMABAD — Pakistani
political leaders Monday endorsed
government efforts to negotiate
with militants in the tribal regions
while distancing themselves from
a war that they portrayed as being
foisted on them by the U.S. inva-
sion of Afghanistan.
Pakistan has been battling mili-
tants in the northeastern part of
the country for years who do not
recognize the authority of the gov-
ernment.
Thousands of civilians and mem-
bers of the security forces have
been killed in bombings and shoot-
ings carried out by the militants
but the war has been unpopular
with many in the country who
see it as a battle against their own
people at the behest of the U.S. and
Afghanistan.
The announcement came after
a meeting of politicians from
the major political parties at the
prime minister’s residence to
discuss the country’s precarious
security situation. The meeting
was also attended by the head of
the Pakistani army, Gen. Ashfaq
Parvez Kayani, and the head of
the Inter-Services Intelligence, the
country’s spy agency.
In a statement after the meet-
ing, the political leaders called
upon the government to “initiate
dialogue with all the stakeholders”
and authorize the government to
do what was necessary to bring
about negotiations.
“We declare that we shall our-
selves determine the means and
mode of fighting this war in our
national interest and shall not be
guided by the United States of
America or any other country in
this regard,” the statement said.
The statement also condemned
the U.S.’s use of drones in the trib-
al region to kill militants.
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif
came into office in June saying he
supported talks instead of military
operations to bring about peace.
Monday’s announcement gives
him the political backing he want-
ed to try to negotiate with the
militants.
Previously the Pakistani Taliban,
the main militant group fighting
in the tribal regions, had rejected
Sharif’s talk of negotiations. But a
spokesman for the group Monday
welcomed the announcement.
“It is for the first time that the
government has shown serious-
ness,” said Shahidullah Shahid.
He said the executive council of
the group would meet in the next
few days to discuss the announce-
ment and will issue a response
then.
Critics of talking with the
Taliban point out that militants
and the government have come
to numerous agreements over
the years only to see the militants
break their end of the deal. Many
accuse the militants of using the
negotiations as a way to buy time
while they consolidate their power.
The U.S. and Afghanistan insist
that clearing the tribal regions of
safe havens for militants is key to
securing peace in Afghanistan, but
the statement distanced Pakistan
from ownership of the military
campaign. It blamed the thou-
sands of deaths in part on “blow-
back from actions of NATO/ISAF
forces in Afghanistan.”
The announcement came the
same day that newly-elected
President Mamnoon Hussain was
sworn into office in a ceremony at
the presidential palace.
Pakistani
parties back
peace talks
AP photo
Former NBA player Dennis Rodman speaks to the media during a news conference in New York on
Monday.
BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer
NEW YORK — Dennis Rodman is
going back to North Korea, and bringing
a team of former NBA players with him.
Days after returning from his second
trip to visit Kim Jong Un — in which
he said he became the first foreigner
to hold the leader’s newborn daughter
— Rodman announced plans Monday
to stage two exhibition games in North
Korea in January.
The first will be Jan. 8 — Kim’s birth-
day — with another to follow two days
later.
Rodman’s friendship with the auto-
cratic leader has been criticized — and
led to a couple of testy exchanges dur-
ing his Manhattan news conference. But
Rodman insists Kim is a good person,
wants to have better relations with the
United States and that he’s the one who
can help make it happen with his plan for
“basketball diplomacy.”
“Why North Korea? It’ll open doors,”
Rodman said.
Touting his friendship with Kim and
taunting President Barack Obama for
not talking to him, Rodman said he will
go back to North Korea for a week in
December to help select local players for
the game. He hopes to have stars such
as former Chicago teammate Scottie
Pippen and Karl Malone.
“Michael Jordan, he won’t do it,
because he’s Michael Jordan,” Rodman
said.
Rodman, holding a cigar and wear-
ing the shirt of a vodka company and a
hat of a betting company that is funding
the event, said Kim has asked him to
train his players to compete in the 2016
Olympics and offered to allow the Hall of
Famer to write a book about him.
Though looking like a billboard,
Rodman said he’s not doing the event
for money. He said the Irish betting com-
pany Paddy Power would put up $3.5
million. Power later said finances hadn’t
been determined.
And Rodman, who joked that he hadn’t
drawn such a crowd in NewYork since he
wore a wedding dress to a book signing,
was adamant that this venture was seri-
ous — “groundbreaking,” in Rodman’s
words.
“People think this is a gimmick. I
would love to make this a gimmick … but
it’s not about the money,” he said.
He rarely referred to Kim by name,
frequently calling him “the marshal.”
Rodman first met Kim, a basketball
fan, when traveling to North Korea in
February for a film project.
Though saying he didn’t want to dis-
cuss politics, Rodman raised his voice
when answering a questioner about
Kim’s human rights record and por-
trayed himself as the person who could
make outsiders see the young leader as
different than his father and grandfather.
“He has to do his job but he’s a very
good guy,” Rodman said.
“If he wanted to bomb anybody in the
world, he would have done it.”
Instead, Rodman had harder words
for Obama, whom he spoke angrily of
while talking to reporters last week
after his trip. He talked around a
question about American citizen and
Christian missionary Kenneth Bae,
who was arrested in November and sen-
tenced to 15 years of hard labor for what
Pyongyang described as hostile acts
against the state. Kim has the power to
grant special pardons under the North’s
constitution.
Rodman said lobbying for the release
of a prisoner wasn’t his job, blaming the
president for not reaching out to ease
tensions between the countries.
Rodman returning to N. Korea, with others
Former NBAplayer speaks of
‘basketball diplomacy’ plan,
friendship with KimJon Un
AP photo
Cody Park exhales a cloud of marijuana smoke after taking a hit on a bong at the first day of Hempfest in Seattle. The three-day marijuana
festival is part party, part protest and part victory celebration after the legalization of pot in Washington and Colorado last fall.
Associated Press
DENVER — Hundreds of
people lined up in Denver
for a free marijuana cigarette
Monday as part of a protest
against a ballot proposal that
would impose high taxes on
the drug, which is now legal
in Colorado for recreational
use.
The measure on the
November ballot asks
Colorado voters to approve
a 15 percent excise tax plus
a 10 percent statewide sales
tax on all retail marijuana
purchases.
The marijuana was donat-
ed by a local attorney who
got it as part of a legal settle-
ment after authorities deter-
mined it was seized illegally,
according to Larisa Bolivar,
campaign manager for oppo-
nents of the ballot measure.
Littletree Oppy wore a
fake nurse cap while she
handed out the cigarettes
at Civic Center Park for
the campaign. She said she
opposes the proposed taxes
because people who can’t
afford to pay would be forced
to go to the black market.
People waiting in line for
the free pot shouted “We
want weed!” as the supply
dwindled.
Gulf War veteran Randy
Notz said he suffers from
a traumatic brain injury
and qualifies for marijuana
under Colorado’s medical
marijuana law. He said he
showed up and got a single
marijuana cigarette to show
his support for the campaign
to defeat the ballot measure
that would impose high
taxes.
“I paid for two hours of
parking and stood in line for
one joint because I’ve been
campaigning for this right
for a long time,” Notz said.
Activists give away pot to protest taxes
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 5A
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BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE —
John Halligan said his
first presentation Monday
at Hazleton Area High
School “really hit home”
with many students.
Scheduling conflicts
necessitated changes in
some appearance dates
that were published last
week.
Halligan, a nationally
known speaker, talked to
students,
t e a c h e r
and par-
ents about
his son,
Ryan, who
c o mmi t -
ted suicide
in 2003.
Halligan
will be in Luzerne County
for three weeks, speak-
ing to students at 16 high
schools and to several
adult audiences. The pro-
gram, called Bullying and
Suicide Prevention,” will
include presentations in
the evenings for parents
and the public.
The program was
conceived by county
District Attorney Stefanie
Salavantis, who said the
program is “costly,” but
no taxpayers’ dollars are
being used.
“I’d say the reaction
today was wonderful;
the students were very
engaged,” Halligan, 50,
said Monday. “Judging
from their comments after-
ward, I would say I got
through to a lot of them.”
Halligan said the stu-
dents told him that the
story of his son paralleled
some of the students.
“A few kids came up to
me and whispered that
Ryan’s story was their
story,” he said. “The dif-
ference was they are still
here.”
Halligan said hearing
Ryan’s story gave the stu-
dents a different perspec-
tive on life.
“They realized that
there are many people in
their world who care about
them and love them,”
Halligan said. “Sometimes
they get so caught up in
their own world that they
lose sight of those around
them who truly care.”
Salavantis said she found
the presentation very mov-
ing.
“I don’t think there was
a dry eye in the house,” she
said.
Salavantis said Halligan
gained much wisdom from
his experience with his
son, who endured the tor-
ment and ridicule associ-
ated with bullying before
taking his own life.
After losing their son,
Halligan and his family
made it their life’s mission
to educate others on bully-
ing and to help encourage
victims of bullying to seek
assistance. More informa-
tion about Halligan and his
son’s story can be found at
the website www.ryanpat-
rickhalligan.org.
Salavantis said the
program is paid for with
funding secured through
various investigations that
is earmarked for commu-
nity programs. Several
donations from several
corporate partners, such
as Mohegan Sun, Blue
Cross of Northeastern
Pennsylvania, Wilkes-
Barre Law & Library
Association and others
also helped pay for the
three-week program.
Halligan said he visits
about 200 high schools
every year to speak to
students and parents.
According to the Luzerne
County Coroner’s Office,
there were five teen sui-
cides in the county in
2012, three in 2011 and
two in 2010.
Anti-bullying program begins; schedule changed
REVISED BULLYING
PREVENTION PROGRAM
• High school presentations
Sept. 10 —Hazleton Area, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 11 —Greater Nanticoke Area, 8:30 a.m.
Wyoming Seminary, 7 p.m
Sept. 12 —Northwest Area, 8 a.m.
Sept. 13 —Crestwood, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 16 —Hanover Area, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 17 —Pittston Area, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 18 —Wyoming Valley West, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 19 —Lake-Lehman, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 20 —Dallas, 1:30 p.m. @High School; Middle School
morning TBA
Sept. 23 —West Side CTC, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 24 —GAR, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 25 —Meyers, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 26 —Coughlin, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 27 —Holy Redeemer, 9:15 a.m.
• Parents’ presentations (7 p.m.)
Sept. 10 —Hazleton Area
Sept. 12 —Northwest Area
Sept. 16 - Pittston Area
Sept. 19 —Wyoming Valley West
Sept. 23 —Misericordia University
Sept. 25 —Hanover Area High School
Sept. 26 —McCann School of Business
Halligan
Gogh my! Painting the real deal
AP photo
Van Gogh Museum director Axel Rueger, left, and senior researcher Louis van Tilborgh, right, unveil ‘Sunset at Montmajour,’ a long-lost painting by Dutch artist
Vincent Van Gogh. The discovery is the first full-size canvas that has been found since 1928. The painting sat in a Norwegian industrialist’s attic for six decades after
he was told it was a fake. Experts at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam authenticated the 1888 landscape with the help of Vincent Van Gogh’s letters, chemical
analysis of the pigments and X-rays of the canvas.
Man charged with DUI,
aggravated assault
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE — An
argument among drunken
co-workers
about who
was going to
drive a truck
resulted in
one of them
g e t t i n g
struck and
the other
d r i v i n g
away early Monday morn-
ing, according to charges
filed.
City police charged
Patrick R. Ramirez, 25,
of Blue Spring, Mo., with
intentionally striking Shane
Stewart, of Missouri, in the
parking lot of McDonald’s
on Kidder Street at 12:40
a.m.
Witnesses allegedly told
police Ramirez and Stewart
were arguing about who
was going to drive a truck
with a Missouri license
plate when the accident hap-
pened. Ramirez accelerated
the truck and hit Stewart,
got out and looked at his co-
worker on the ground. He
then drove away, police said
in the criminal complaint.
Police captured Ramirez
at the Host Inn on Kidder
Street, where the two men
were staying.
Police said Ramirez and
Stewart are employees of a
company constructing the
hotel at Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs casino in
Plains Township.
Ramirez was arraigned by
District Judge Martin Kane
in Wilkes-Barre on charges
of aggravatedassault byvehi-
cle, aggravated assault while
driving under the influence,
driving under the influence,
accidents involving injury
and careless driving. He was
jailed at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack
of $50,000 bail.
Police said Ramirez
refused to submit to a blood/
alcohol test at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center.
Arrest papers say Stewart
was taken to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley where he
was listed in critical condi-
tion Monday afternoon.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Sept. 19.
Ramirez
PAGE 6A Tuesday, September 10, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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Police Blotter
WINDHAM TWP. —
Statepoliceat Tunkhannock
charged Rachel Ferrara, 22,
of Sugar Run, on evidence
of drunken driving after
investigating a crash involv-
ing a 2000 Volvo on Sharps
Pond Road on July 31.
Ferrara was charged
with two counts of driv-
ing under the influence
of alcohol and two traffic
violations.
The charges were
recently filed with District
Judge John J. Hovan in
Tunkhannock. A prelimi-
nary hearing is scheduled
on Oct. 3.
WILKES-BARRE —
City police reported the
following:
• A man wanted on
charges he burglarized a
tavern on George Avenue
was captured last week.
City police allege Eric C.
Yale, 25, of Mill Street,
Wilkes-Barre, burglarized
The Great Escape on Aug.
11, and stole 12 bottles of
liquor, two large screen
televisions, 40 packs of
cigarettes and about $30
in coins, according to
the criminal complaint.
Yale remained jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $10,000 bail. A pre-
liminary hearing is sched-
uled on Thursday.
• Police cited Vincent
Dantzler, 60, of North
Sherman Street, with
harassment after inves-
tigating a disturbance
involving a former room-
mate on North Sherman
Street on Sept. 1.
BUTLER TWP. —
Township police charged
Steven Koch, 31, of White
Haven, on evidence of
driving a vehicle while
under the influence of a
controlled substance after
investigating a crash in
the area of East Butler
Drive and Prospect Road
on Aug. 7.
Nikki Bertolette, 23, a
passenger, was treated for
a head injury at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, police said.
Police allege heroin
packets were found in the
area of the crash.
Koch was charged with
two counts of driving
under the influence of a
controlled substance and
one count each of reckless
endangerment, driving
with a suspended license,
possession of a controlled
substance, possession of
drug paraphernalia and
two traffic violations.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Oct. 7 before
District Judge Daniel
O’Donnell in Sugarloaf.
HANOVER TWP. —
Township police charged
Andre Alexander Rosario,
19, of South Sherman
Street, Wilkes-Barre, with
possession of a small
amount of marijuana and
possession of drug para-
phernalia after he was
allegedly found sleep-
ing in a vehicle in a strip
mall’s parking lot on Carey
Avenue on Sept. 1.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Oct. 1 before
District Judge Joseph
Halesey in Hanover
Township.
HAZLETON — Three
children and a woman
were transported to
Hazleton General Hospital
after a three-vehicle crash
at state Route 924 and
Old Cranberry Road on
Sunday, city police said.
Police said Celines
Melendez, of Hazle
Township, turned left
onto Old Cranberry
Road and struck anoth-
er vehicle driven by
Jackson Montero, of West
Hazleton. The force of the
impact caused the two
vehicles to collide with
a third vehicle driven by
Patricia Pardi, of Freeland.
Melenedez and three
children, 2, 5 and 6, were
transported to Hazleton
General for injuries, police
said.
New manager takes over power line project
JoN o’coNNell
joconnell@timesleader.com
With about 30 miles
remaining of the 101-mile
power line project under-
way by PPL, the electric
utility company will change
the company managing
the Susquehanna-Roseland
line’s construction.
In 2012, PPL contracted
T&D Power Inc., a manage-
ment company with roots in
Mesa, Ariz., to oversee the
project. On Friday it was
announced PAR Electrical
Contractors LLC of Kansas
City, Mo., is taking over.
PAR has already completed
portions of the line and is
now coming on board to
oversee production in its
entirety, said PPL Electric
Utilities spokesman Paul
Wirth.
Wirth did not explain
the reason for the change
and called it a “transition of
management companies.”
“That was a business
decision that we are not dis-
cussing,” Wirth said.
Representatives from
T&D Power’s office in
Clarks Summit declined
comment and spokesmen
from EC Source, T&D’s par-
ent company, did not imme-
diately return calls Monday.
The project will upgrade
the northeast power grid
fromBerwick, norththrough
Lackawanna County, across
through Wayne County and
then south to end near the
Delaware Water Gap. PPL
promises the new line will
bring more reliable service
and lower distribution rates
for some who live near it.
PPL determined in 2008
that blackouts were soon
to be inevitable without the
grid upgrade.
Overall, the project is to
cost about $1.2billion. PPL’s
share on the Pennsylvania
side is about $630 million.
Public Service Electric &
Gas is paying for the last leg
from where it crosses the
eastern state line to where it
ends in Roseland, N.J.
Of the roughly 200
employees hired by T&D,
International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers Local
1319 President David
Blauer said, a majority of
themwere hiredthrough the
electrician’s union, though
he could not immediately
provide an exact number. To
his knowledge, most, if not
all, of the workers are to stay
on working through PAR.
“There are some other
people on the job that are
from other parts of the
country. The company
might bring them on for
some specific skill that they
might have. But all work-
ers went through the Local
1319,” Blauer said.
Wirth said PPL is
encouraging the new proj-
ect manager to retain the
seasonal workers to see the
job through to completion.
The power line is
complete from PPL’s
Susquehanna Nuclear
Power Plant in Salem
Township through
Scranton. Workers are now
forging toward the Lake
Wallenpaupack region.
Despite the change of
hands in management, the
project is on target to meet
its spring 2015 deadline, in
time to meet elevated elec-
tricity demands common in
the summer, Wirth said.
‘Gothic kitten’ case back in court
SHeeNA DelAZio
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE — A
Sweet Valley woman just
days away from completing
a sentence relating to
piercing the ears of
kittens and market-
ing them as “Gothic
kittens” will serve 90
more days on pro-
bation, a judge said
Monday.
Holly Crawford,
38, of Dobson Road,
appeared in Luzerne
County Court on allegations
she violated the terms of her
probation by filing to show
up for three meetings with
probation officers.
Crawford was convicted
by a jury of cruelty to ani-
mals for piercing the kit-
tens’ ears and docking their
tails in April 2010 and later
sentenced to one year in
the county’s Intermediate
P u n i s h m e n t
Program.
Crawford’s sen-
tence had been
extended due to
previous viola-
tions, including
testing positive
for marijuana
and alcohol. As
part of her new sentence,
Crawford was to complete a
program at the county’s Day
Reporting Center, where
she was scheduled for meet-
ings.
On Monday, Crawford
said she didn’t show up
for three meetings in early
August because she had car
trouble.
She tried to have the
issues resolved, she said,
but could not make it to
her meetings — the last
three before her sentence
was complete. She said
she didn’t have access to
another vehicle and she has
been suffering from serious
health issues.
Assistant District
Attorney Matt Muchler
said he was concerned with
Crawford’s actions, noting
it was “suspicious” the car
troubles arouse during the
last few days of her sen-
tence.
“I think … she’s getting
lazy and didn’t want to show
up,” Muchler said.
Crawford’s attorney,
Jonathan Blum, said his cli-
ent is eager to finish her sen-
tence and wants to put the
past three years behind her.
Judge Tina Polachek
Gartley said she was con-
cerned about future trans-
portation problems and
wondered why Crawford
didn’t just finish out her sen-
tence.
“This needs to be fin-
ished,” Polachek Gartley
said. “The only one who can
finish it is you.”
Polachek Gartley gave
Crawford an additional 90
days probation to be served
with the Day Reporting
Center.
Historical train ride to
beneft three facilities
Bill o’BoYle
boboyle@timesleader.com
PITTSTON — You can
travel one of the oldest rail
routes in the country and
help three charities while
enjoying the scenic train
ride from Duryea to Jim
Thorpe on Sunday.
The fourth annual Greater
Pittston Charity Train Ride
will be departing at 9 a.m.
on Stevenson Street in
Duryea and chugging to his-
toric Jim Thorpe in Carbon
County. Cost is $65 and tick-
ets are still available.
The train is made up of
1920s-era open coaches
pulled by a 1920s-era steam
locomotive owned by the
Reading Blue Mountain &
Northern Railroad Co., Port
Clinton.
This year’s Greater
Pittston Charity Train Ride
will benefit the Pittston
Memorial Library, Greater
PittstonYMCAandtheCare
and Concern Free Health
Clinic, also in Pittston.
Gloria Blandina, spokes-
woman for the event, said
the train can accommodate
600 people and the event is
usually sold out. She said a
diesel engine has been used
in past events, but this year
the steam locomotive will
pull the cars, adding to the
historical feel of the trip.
“Our conductor tells you
the history of every town
along the way — when
it was founded, the main
occupations, and more,”
Blandina said. “We travel
through White Haven,
Laura Run, Crestwood,
Penobscot Mountain and
the Lehigh Gorge. What’s
really neat is the number
of people who come out
to wave as the train passes
through these areas. The
train still commands grand
attention.”
Blandina said the event
usually raises around
$15,000 and the money will
be evenly split among this
year’s three recipients.
“With 600 people on the
train, everybody seems to
know somebody traveling
with them,” she said.
The train will roll straight
through to Jim Thorpe,
where passengers can get
out and walk through the
shops and see the sights,
such as the Jim Thorpe
Monument. She said the
stop in Jim Thorpe is about
four hours before the train
departs for home.
Photo submitted by the Reading Blue Mountain & Northern Railroad Co.
Steam locomotive No. 425, owned by the reading Blue Mountain
& Northern railroad co. of Port clinton will be there for the fourth
annual Greater Pittston charity train ride on Sunday.
crawford
PPl uPGrADeS elSewHere
Anew230-kVcircuit is to be added to 8 1/2 miles of existing
transmission towers starting fromthe Jenkins Substation in
Plains Township, travel through Wyoming Township, Exeter
Borough and end at the Stanton Substation in Exeter Township.
GreAter PittStoN cHAritY
trAiN riDe
• The railroad excursion to JimThorpe is Sunday.
• The train will depart at 9 a.m. from Stevenson Street, Duryea
and return at about 6:45 p.m.
• Upon arrival in JimThorpe, passengers will have an opportunity
to browse the many specialty shops and restaurants sprinkled
throughout this historic area.
• Tickets are $65 each and reservations may be made by calling
430-4244.
• To read more about the train, go to http://www.
readingnorthern.com/index.html
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 7A
BUSINESS
Tobyhanna Depot
reduces contractors
After a thorough review of workload
projections, Tobyhanna Army Depot
notified one of its support contractors,
URS Federal Support Services Inc., of
Oklahoma City, Okla., that workload
decreases necessitate the release of
48 skilled trade and logistics support
personnel.
This is the fourth release of a mul-
tiphased reduction plan for the fiscal
year ending Sept. 30 and took place on
Sept. 6.
Stocks rise on mergers,
homebuilder outlook
The stock market got a boost from
mergers, homes and phones.
Two big deals Monday suggested
growing confidence in the economy:
Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus was
sold for $6 billion, and Koch Industries
bought electronics component maker
Molex for $7.2 billion.
Apple rose a day ahead of a new
product announcement.
Homebuilding stocks rose after
Hovnavian Enterprises said home
prices are increasing.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose over 15,000 for first time since
Aug. 23. The Standard & Poor’s 500
and the Nasdaq composite also rose.
Four stocks rose for every one that
fell on the New York Stock Exchange.
Volume was average, 3 billion shares.
Mass. GOP calls for
repeal of sofware tax
Republican lawmakers and business
groups ramped up pressure Monday on
the Legislature to abolish a new sales
tax on computer and software services.
Rep. Brad Jones, minority leader of
the Massachusetts House, and Sen.
Bruce Tarr, the minority leader in the
Senate, filed a bill to eliminate the 6.25
percent tax that took effect July 31 as
part of a massive transportation financ-
ing law.
The tax has drawn sharp criticism
from technology companies that con-
tend it will hurt a critical sector of the
state’s economy.
Meanwhile, the Massachusetts
Taxpayers Foundation, which also
opposes the tax, released a new analy-
sis Monday that the business-backed
organization said supports its asser-
tion that Massachusetts now imposes
the highest tax in the nation on soft-
ware services.
According to the study, only four
other states, Connecticut, Hawaii, New
Mexico and South Dakota, tax com-
puter system design and all do so at a
lower rate than Massachusetts.
IN BRIEF
$3.62 $3.57 $3.84
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
MICHAEL LIEDTKE
APTechnology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO — Apple
is expected to unveil its latest
take on the iPhone today dur-
ing an annual ritual that will
probably cast a spotlight on
the gadget maker’s drive to
regain market share and its
sluggish pace of innovation.
In keeping with its tight-
lipped ways, Apple Inc. hasn’t
disclosed what’s on the agen-
da for the coming-out party
scheduled to begin at 10 a.m.
PDT at its Cupertino, Calif.,
headquarters.
But this is the time of year
that Apple typically shows
off the latest generation of
its iPhone, a device that has
reshaped the way people use
computers since its debut in
2007. Apple took the wraps
off the iPhone 5, the current
model, last September. The
company has never waited
longer than a year to update
the iPhone, which has gener-
ated $88 billion in revenue
during the past year.
Apple’s timetable for rolling
out products has vexed many
investors who have watched
the company’s growth slow
and profit margins decrease.
Meanwhile, a bevy of smart-
phone makers, most of whom
rely on Google Inc.’s free
Android software, release
wave after wave of devices
that cost less than the iPhone.
Those concerns are reflected
in Apple’s stock price, which
has declined nearly 30 per-
cent since peaking at $705.07
at about the same time the
iPhone 5 went on sale last year.
The Standard & Poor’s 500
index has risen about 14 per-
cent during the same stretch.
Even though Apple’s market
value of roughly $460 billion is
more than any other company
in the world, the deterioration
in its stock price is escalat-
ing the pressure on CEO Tim
Cook to prove he’s the right
leader to carry on the legacy of
co-founder Steve Jobs. Since
Cook became CEO two years
ago, Apple has only pushed
out new versions of products
developed under Jobs, rais-
ing questions about whether
the company’s technological
vision has become blurred
under the new regime.
In public appearances, Cook
has repeatedly said Apple is
working on some exciting
breakthroughs without reveal-
ing details. The company is
believed to be working on
a so-called “smartwatch”
that would work like a wrist-
bound smartphone. Samsung
Electronics, one of Apple’s big-
gest rivals, introduced its own
$300 smartwatch called Gear
last week, as did Sony and
Qualcomm Inc. It’s unclear
whether a smartwatch will be
on Apple’s Tuesday agenda.
The company isn’t expected
to reveal the latest model of
its tablet computer, the iPad,
until later in the fall. Apple
introduced a smaller, less
expensive version of the iPad
last year in response to the
success of more compact and
cheaper tablets running on the
Android system.
Apple expected to expand iPhone selection
RYAN NAKASHIMA
AP Business Writer
Microsoft is making its
Xbox Music streaming service
available for free on the Web
— even to those who don’t use
Windows 8.
The expansion beyond
Windows 8 devices and
Xbox game consoles start-
ing Monday is intended to
bring new customers into the
software giant’s ecosystem of
devices and services, and could
help it compete with other
digital music offerings such as
Pandora, Spotify and iTunes.
It’s also an acknowledgement
that the music service hasn’t
done much to drive sales of the
Windows 8 operating system.
The move represents anoth-
er step toward Microsoft’s
goal of becoming a company
that sells devices and services,
rather than primarily software,
said Michael Turits, an analyst
with financial advisory firm
Raymond James. It comes
on the heels of Microsoft
announcing it would buy the
mobile phone handset manu-
facturing business of Nokia
Corp. for $7.2 billion and that
CEO Steve Ballmer would
step down within 12 months.
“They’ve said they’re going
to be a devices and services
company. We know they want
to be a device company since
they’re buying the Nokia phone
division,” he said. “This kind of
thing gives more credibility to
the idea they’ll be more of a
services company as well.”
Most buyers of the new
Windows 8 operating sys-
tem discovered Xbox Music
because it’s the default player
for music files that people
have imported from else-
where, according to Xbox
Music general manager Jerry
Johnson. Opening it up to
the broader public would give
more people a chance to see
the benefits of having multiple
devices linked to Microsoft’s
platform. Its music service,
for example, will save favor-
ites and playlists across PCs,
Windows Phones and Xbox
game consoles.
“To actually build that eco-
system, we need to bring peo-
ple into it,” Johnson said.
Xbox Music allows people
to choose from 30 million
tracks and stream them for
free with ads. The service
sells downloadable tracks that
have been kept off streaming
services by artists or labels. A
radio service on Xbox Music
also generates song playlists
automatically along genres or
similar artists.
The thinking is if new con-
sumersenjoythefreeexperience
online, some might upgrade to
pay $10 a month for the Xbox
Music Pass, which allows play-
back on mobile phones and
Microsoft’s game console, Xbox
360, and its upcoming version,
Xbox One. Microsoft is also
launching apps for iPhones and
Android devices that will allow
paying subscribers to access
Xbox Music. Previously, you
had to have a device running
the Windows Phone 8 operat-
ing systemto access the plan on
the go.
Microsof launches free Xbox Music on Web
AP photo
Research technician Kris Niemann hooks up equipment that will measure the amount of
ammonia, carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases coming off a barnyard lined with
sand at the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center in Prairie du Sac, Wis.
M.L. JOHNSON
Associated Press
PRAIRIE DU SAC, Wis. — Cows
stand patiently in a tent-like cham-
ber at a research farm in western
Wisconsin, waiting for their breath
to be tested. Outside, corrals have
been set up with equipment to mea-
sure gas wafting from the ground. A
nearby corn field contains tools that
allow researchers to assess the effects
of manure spread as fertilizer.
Scientists based at the University
of Wisconsin-Madison have started
a slew of studies to determine how
dairy farms can reduce their green-
house gas emissions. They will look
at what animals eat, how their waste
is handled and the effects on soil,
water and air.
Their work is part of a govern-
ment-sponsored effort to help farm-
ers adapt to more extreme weather
and reduce their impact on climate
change. The studies also will support
a dairy industry effort to make farms
more environmentally friendly, profit-
able and attractive to consumers. The
Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy is
developing a computer program that
will allow farmers to compare water
consumption, energy use and green-
house gas emissions from their farms
to the national average and learn how
improving their practices could help
their bottom line.
“We like to say sustainability
makes cents — c-e-n-t-s,” said Erin
Fitzgerald, the center’s senior vice
president for sustainability.
Environmentally speaking, the big
issue for dairy farms for decades was
manure.
Karl Klessig remembers state
agents coming to his farm in 2002
and handcuffing him after an unex-
pected rain washed manure spread
several days earlier into nearby Lake
Michigan. Klessig was told that if
his family didn’t immediately till the
manure into the ground, tearing up
the grass that feeds their cows, he’d
soon be in jail.
It was a big loss, but it “jump-start-
ed” their environmental awareness,
Klessig said. The family welcomed
researchers from UW-Madison and
UW-Extension onto its property in
Cleveland, about 70 miles north of
Milwaukee, for tests that had some
unexpected results.
For example, the family had been
leaving its pastures untilled for up
to a decade to allow the grass to
build up density, feeding the cows
and reducing erosion. But scientists
found that also allowed phosphorus
to accumulate in the top layer of soil.
Klessig said his family has been able
to reduce phosphorus by tilling pas-
tures more often and growing corn,
which uses phosphorus to grow.
They also learned the farm was los-
ing hundreds of pounds of soil each
year through its drainage system and
wormholes were allowing manure to
run into those pipes. It was nerve-
racking to have researchers point out
these problems, Klessig said.
Scientists help create greener dairies
JohnJn 87.56 +.40 +24.9
JohnsnCtl 41.66 +.64 +35.8
Kellogg 60.26 +.03 +7.9
Keycorp 11.99 +.09 +42.4
KimbClk 93.61 +.55 +10.9
KindME 80.33 +.14 +.7
Kroger 37.69 +.29 +44.9
Kulicke 11.42 -.06 -4.8
L Brands 57.74 +1.29 +22.7
LancastrC 74.28 +2.00 +7.4
Lee Ent 2.95 -.03+158.8
LillyEli 52.54 +.13 +6.5
LincNat 44.23 +.50 +70.8
LockhdM 124.07 +.34 +34.4
Loews 45.48 +.79 +11.6
LaPac 16.89 -.10 -12.6
MDU Res 26.79 +.44 +26.1
MarathnO 36.24 +.55 +18.2
MarIntA 41.06 +.44 +10.2
Masco 20.47 +.84 +23.5
McDrmInt 7.66 +.15 -30.5
McGrwH 61.18 +1.15 +11.9
McKesson 124.25 +.68 +28.1
Merck 47.74 +.25 +16.6
MetLife 48.47 +.49 +47.1
Microsoft 31.66 +.50 +18.5
MorgStan 27.44 +.63 +43.5
NCR Corp 37.50 +.90 +47.2
NatFuGas 66.01 +.31 +30.2
NatGrid 58.14 +.35 +1.2
NY Times 11.33 +.27 +32.8
NewellRub 26.28 +.24 +18.0
NewmtM 30.38 -.05 -34.6
NextEraEn 80.23 +.22 +16.0
NiSource 29.28 +.17 +17.6
NikeB s 65.40 +.42 +26.7
NorflkSo 74.97 +.58 +21.2
NoestUt 40.66 +.41 +4.0
NorthropG 93.51 +.39 +38.4
Nucor 47.68 +1.07 +10.5
NustarEn 41.05 -.06 -3.4
NvMAd 12.04 -.05 -20.8
OGE Egy s 34.86 ... +23.8
OcciPet 89.70 +.70 +17.1
OfficeMax 11.24 +.26 +30.4
Olin 22.91 +.21 +6.1
ONEOK 51.92 +.64 +21.5
PG&E Cp 40.99 +.11 +2.0
PPG 161.64 +2.39 +19.4
PPL Corp 30.27 +.20 +5.7
PVR Ptrs 23.63 +.44 -9.0
PepBoy 11.52 +.19 +17.2
Pfizer 28.30 +.02 +12.8
PinWst 52.72 +.23 +3.4
PitnyBw 17.00 +.18 +59.8
Praxair 119.25 +1.14 +9.0
PSEG 32.12 -.04 +5.0
PulteGrp 16.63 +1.16 -8.4
Questar 22.15 +.23 +12.1
RadioShk 3.74 +.21 +76.4
RLauren 165.74 +.56 +10.6
Raytheon 75.85 +.24 +31.8
ReynAmer 47.56 +.15 +14.8
RockwlAut 102.25 +2.21 +21.7
Rowan 37.98 +.72 +21.5
RoyDShllB 67.54 +.04 -4.7
RoyDShllA 64.93 +.02 -5.8
Ryder 57.73 +.75 +15.6
Safeway 26.25 +.29 +45.1
Schlmbrg 86.45 +1.31 +24.7
Sherwin 174.91 +2.22 +13.7
SilvWhtn g 25.68 -.26 -28.8
SiriusXM 3.80 +.05 +31.5
SonyCp 21.61 +.59 +92.9
SouthnCo 41.23 +.11 -3.7
SwstAirl 13.27 +.17 +29.6
SpectraEn 33.15 +.36 +21.1
Sysco 32.22 +.18 +2.7
TECO 16.58 -.01 -1.1
Target 63.93 +.64 +8.0
TenetHlt rs 38.39 -1.47 +18.2
Tenneco 49.39 +.61 +40.7
Tesoro 46.16 -.62 +4.8
Textron 28.96 +.79 +16.8
3M Co 116.74 +1.70 +25.7
TimeWarn 62.24 +.79 +30.1
Timken 61.58 +.06 +28.7
Titan Intl 15.92 +.12 -26.7
UnilevNV 37.68 +.20 -1.6
UnionPac 156.63 +1.71 +24.6
Unisys 24.68 +.11 +42.7
UPS B 87.13 +.37 +18.2
USSteel 19.53 +.66 -18.1
UtdTech 104.48 +1.25 +27.4
VarianMed 72.45 +.58 +3.1
VectorGp 16.76 +.22 +12.7
ViacomB 80.39 +.10 +52.4
WestarEn 30.14 +.18 +5.3
Weyerhsr 28.95 +.44 +4.1
Whrlpl 135.62 +4.25 +33.3
WmsCos 35.60 +.48 +8.7
Wynn 145.35 +1.92 +29.2
XcelEngy 27.46 +.09 +2.8
Xerox 10.08 +.05 +47.8
YumBrnds 71.48 +1.87 +7.7
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 16.84 +.14 +20.5
GlblRskAllB m14.81 +.11 -3.5
American Cent
IncGroA m 32.74 +.29 +21.0
American Century
ValueInv 7.60 +.07 +20.1
American Funds
AMCAPA m 26.09 +.26 +22.9
BalA m 22.54 +.18 +11.4
BondA m 12.31 +.02 -3.5
CapIncBuA m55.81 +.39 +7.6
CpWldGrIA m41.62 +.42 +13.5
EurPacGrA m44.69 +.52 +8.4
FnInvA m 47.51 +.48 +17.2
GrthAmA m 41.21 +.44 +20.0
HiIncA m 11.16 +.01 +2.6
IncAmerA m 19.44 +.14 +9.5
InvCoAmA m 35.53 +.29 +18.8
MutualA m 32.71 +.26 +16.6
NewPerspA m35.57 +.40 +13.8
NwWrldA m 55.96 +.71 +2.7
SmCpWldA m47.42 +.71 +18.8
WAMutInvA m36.54 +.29 +18.3
Baron
Asset b 59.91 +.68 +22.6
BlackRock
EqDivI 22.19 +.16 +12.4
GlobAlcA m 21.13 +.14 +7.7
GlobAlcC m 19.64 +.14 +7.2
GlobAlcI 21.24 +.15 +7.9
CGM
Focus 36.34 +.89 +24.0
Mutual 31.53 +.66 +10.9
Realty 29.49 +.89 +1.0
Columbia
AcornZ 35.91 +.52 +19.4
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 19.09 +.38 -5.7
EmMktValI 27.91 +.62 -5.6
USLgValI 28.40 +.28 +24.9
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.23 +.03 -8.2
HlthCareS d 34.44 +.32 +32.1
LAEqS d 29.57 +.82 -9.5
Davis
NYVentA m 38.85 +.28 +20.7
NYVentC m 37.26 +.27 +20.1
Dodge & Cox
Bal 90.47 +.73 +17.1
Income 13.43 +.02 -1.7
IntlStk 39.50 +.45 +14.0
Stock 149.96+1.66 +24.1
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 40.31 +.44 +16.9
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.53 ... +3.7
HiIncOppB m 4.54 +.01 +3.2
NatlMuniA m 8.79 +.01 -11.5
NatlMuniB m 8.79 +.01 -11.9
PAMuniA m 8.58 ... -4.2
FPA
Cres d 31.89 +.18 +13.8
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.27 +.05 +2.0
Bal 22.26 +.18 +11.1
BlChGrow 57.67 +.72 +24.4
Contra 91.49 +.88 +19.0
DivrIntl d 33.48 +.37 +11.8
ExpMulNat d 25.08 +.23 +14.6
Free2020 15.17 +.09 +6.7
Free2030 15.57 +.12 +9.7
GrowCo 116.64+1.84 +25.1
LatinAm d 39.21 +.94 -15.3
LowPriStk d 45.86 +.48 +21.9
Magellan 88.25+1.03 +21.0
Overseas d 36.59 +.36 +13.2
Puritan 21.39 +.17 +11.1
TotalBd 10.42 +.02 -3.1
Value 93.97+1.08 +23.1
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 34.73 +.32 +18.0
Fidelity Select
Gold d 23.34 -.13 -36.9
Pharm d 18.27 +.02 +23.5
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 59.47 +.59 +18.9
500IdxInstl 59.48 +.59 +18.9
500IdxInv 59.47 +.59 +18.9
TotMktIdAg d 49.30 +.54 +19.9
First Eagle
GlbA m 53.14 +.53 +9.4
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.77 -.01 -7.3
Income C m 2.33 +.01 +7.1
IncomeA m 2.31 +.01 +7.6
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 33.28 +.23 +16.8
Euro Z 24.55 +.07 +16.3
Shares Z 26.54 +.20 +18.6
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.92 +.10 -1.1
GlBondAdv 12.88 +.11 -0.9
GrowthA m 22.87 +.23 +17.7
GMO
IntItVlIV 23.44 +.32 +12.8
Harbor
CapApInst 51.06 +.55 +20.1
IntlInstl 67.23 +.80 +8.2
INVESCO
ConstellB m 25.62 +.23 +20.7
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.50+.13 +18.6
PacGrowB m 21.36 +.44 +5.3
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 59.05 +.67 +11.2
AT&T Inc 33.63 +.22 -.2
AbtLab s 33.80 +.30 +7.8
AMD 3.69 +.12 +53.8
AlaskaAir 58.53 +1.15 +35.8
Alcoa 8.08 +.16 -6.9
Allstate 49.18 +.78 +22.4
Altria 34.59 +.19 +10.0
AEP 42.67 +.11 0.0
AmExp 73.66 +.31 +28.6
AmIntlGrp 49.19 +1.01 +39.3
Amgen 111.67 +.66 +29.5
Anadarko 94.02 +1.19 +26.5
Annaly 11.73 -.05 -16.5
Apple Inc 506.17 +7.95 -4.9
AutoData 73.79 +.66 +29.6
AveryD 43.81 +.83 +25.5
Avnet 40.86 +1.27 +33.5
Avon 20.06 +.24 +39.7
BP PLC 41.89 +.07 +.6
BakrHu 50.13 +1.14 +22.7
BallardPw 1.65 +.01+170.0
BarnesNob 13.32 -.16 -11.7
Baxter 70.70 +.69 +6.1
Beam Inc 64.43 +.68 +5.5
BerkH B 112.67 +.81 +25.6
BlockHR 27.07 +.16 +45.8
Boeing 107.19 +1.12 +42.2
BrMySq 42.30 +.41 +31.2
Brunswick 39.01 +.79 +34.1
Buckeye 66.56 +.19 +46.6
CBS B 53.58 -.04 +40.8
CMS Eng 25.94 -.04 +6.4
CSX 25.66 +.21 +30.1
CampSp 41.99 ... +20.3
Carnival 36.43 +.57 -.9
Caterpillar 85.59 +2.20 -4.5
CenterPnt 23.02 +.21 +19.6
CntryLink 32.02 +.12 -18.1
Chevron 122.22 +1.01 +13.0
Cisco 23.92 +.37 +21.7
Citigroup 50.09 +.87 +26.6
Clorox 83.32 +.99 +13.8
ColgPalm s 58.57 +.57 +12.1
ConAgra 33.56 -.14 +13.8
ConocoPhil 68.87 +.67 +18.8
ConEd 55.83 +.24 +.5
Corning 14.63 +.23 +15.9
CrownHold 44.08 +.53 +19.8
Cummins 129.38 +2.61 +19.4
CurtisWrt 45.30 +.80 +38.0
DTE 66.10 +.54 +10.1
Deere 83.88 +1.27 -2.9
Diebold 29.18 +.55 -4.7
Disney 61.59 +.20 +23.7
DomRescs 58.02 +.49 +12.0
Dover 88.15 +.55 +34.2
DowChm 38.81 +.25 +20.0
DryShips 3.09 +.21 +92.8
DuPont 57.50 +.39 +27.8
DukeEngy 65.57 +.12 +2.8
EMC Cp 26.73 +.34 +5.7
Eaton 66.75 +1.12 +23.2
EdisonInt 45.47 +.43 +.6
EmersonEl 62.50 +1.03 +18.0
EnbrdgEPt 30.20 +.26 +8.2
Energen 69.92 +1.74 +55.1
Entergy 63.03 +.11 -1.1
EntPrPt 59.15 +.50 +18.1
Ericsson 13.38 +.27 +32.5
Exelon 30.25 -.06 +1.7
ExxonMbl 88.04 +.79 +1.7
Fastenal 49.07 +1.18 +5.2
FedExCp 109.10 +.94 +18.9
Fifth&Pac 24.81 +.46 +99.3
FirstEngy 37.17 +.18 -11.0
Fonar 5.48 +.19 +26.6
FootLockr 33.14 +.49 +3.2
FordM 17.31 +.31 +33.7
Gannett 25.04 +.50 +39.0
Gap 41.14 +.75 +32.5
GenDynam 85.28 +.71 +23.1
GenElec 23.39 +.23 +11.4
GenMills 49.06 -.13 +21.4
GileadSci s 62.66 +1.54 +70.6
GlaxoSKln 50.46 -1.21 +16.1
Hallibrtn 50.26 +.72 +44.9
HarleyD 62.70 +.73 +28.4
HartfdFn 31.64 +.77 +41.0
HawaiiEl 24.69 +.03 -1.8
HeclaM 3.35 -.02 -42.5
Heico 63.21 +.28 +41.2
Hess 78.33 +1.03 +47.9
HewlettP 22.36 +.09 +56.9
HomeDp 73.58 +.88 +19.0
HonwllIntl 82.43 +.77 +29.9
Humana 95.44 -.20 +39.1
INTL FCSt 19.95 +.30 +14.6
ITT Corp 34.71 +.68 +48.0
ITW 73.56 +.68 +21.0
IngerRd 62.36 +.59 +30.0
IBM 184.98 +1.95 -3.4
IntPap 49.15 +1.29 +23.4
JPMorgCh 52.86 +.30 +21.0
JacobsEng 58.43 +.35 +37.3
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.00 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 105.74 +2.75 +25.9
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 39.43 +.15 +6.2
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 41.99 -.31 +8.4
28.12 19.25 AquaAm s WTR .61 24.43 +.03 +20.1
38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 36.11 +.32 +31.8
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 416.50 -1.03 +17.5
15.03 8.53 BkofAm BAC .04 14.48 +.12 +24.7
32.36 22.42 BkNYMel BK .60 30.79 +.33 +19.8
22.68 9.34 BonTon BONT .20 11.10 +.08 -8.7
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 58.77 +.14 +21.6
81.75 45.80 Cigna CI .04 80.67 -.16 +50.9
43.43 35.58 CocaCola KO 1.12 38.52 +.17 +6.3
46.33 34.03 Comcast CMCSA .78 42.30 -.19 +13.2
34.85 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.12 33.61 +.25 +22.8
51.29 26.33 CmtyHlt CYH .25 37.99 -1.69 +23.6
68.00 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 66.27 +.93 +40.0
62.91 47.10 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 62.50 +1.03 +18.0
68.39 41.72 EngyTEq ETE 2.62 64.55 +1.04 +41.9
11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 8.36 +.31 +19.8
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 13.01 +.13 -9.7
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.34 +.06 +1.3
21.30 15.09 Genpact G .18 19.50 -.10 +25.8
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 8.40 +.13 +42.4
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 91.20 +.46 +26.3
47.51 28.09 Lowes LOW .72 46.63 +1.03 +31.3
119.54 89.35 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 113.14 -1.84 +14.9
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 96.45 +.19 +9.3
32.91 24.50 Mondelez MDLZ .56 31.11 +.17 +22.2
23.25 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.82 +.27 +7.6
39.75 8.99 NexstarB NXST .48 34.44 +.92 +225.2
77.93 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 72.95 -.24 +25.1
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.27 +.20 +5.7
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 18.16 +.06 +2.9
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 79.38 +.12 +16.0
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 84.51 +.32 +1.0
82.54 65.83 ProctGam PG 2.41 78.16 +1.01 +15.1
83.67 48.17 Prudentl PRU 1.60 78.72 +1.17 +47.6
3.62 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 3.58 +.09 +163.2
26.17 15.56 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.69 +.54 +44.1
74.46 46.87 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 70.50 -.20 +33.0
54.66 40.08 TJX TJX .58 53.95 +.03 +27.1
43.24 30.15 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 38.29 -.05 +17.1
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.12 45.91 -.43 +6.1
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 73.51 +.92 +7.7
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 48.09 +1.47 +22.8
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 41.72 +.29 +22.1
USD per British Pound 1.5701 +.0068 +.43% 1.4936 1.6004
Canadian Dollar 1.0368 -.0031 -.30% 1.0287 .9782
USD per Euro 1.3259 +.0077 +.58% 1.3005 1.2795
Japanese Yen 99.60 +.37 +.37% 95.82 78.29
Mexican Peso 13.1077 -.0918 -.70% 12.6246 12.9896
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.28 3.26 +0.54 -6.19 -11.47
Gold 1386.80 1386.70 +0.01 -12.04 -19.78
Platinum 1483.00 1495.70 -0.85 -7.54 -7.53
Silver 23.67 23.84 -0.73 -18.13 -29.50
Palladium 681.40 695.45 -2.02 -12.71 +1.36
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.51+.03 -2.9
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.67 +.12 +8.9
LifGr1 b 15.22 +.16 +13.0
RegBankA m 17.68 +.13 +24.5
SovInvA m 18.12 +.15 +13.7
TaxFBdA m 9.43 -.01 -7.5
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 18.57 +.40 -5.0
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.90 +.07 +1.7
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.54 ... +0.1
MFS
MAInvA m 25.34 +.21 +18.2
MAInvC m 24.41 +.20 +17.6
ValueI 30.64 +.23 +21.5
Merger
Merger b 16.12 +.02 +1.8
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.45 ... -1.9
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.77 +.11 +19.1
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 25.07 +.39 +30.4
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.64 +.23 +14.5
Intl I 25.13 +.22 +20.1
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 48.62 +.50 +14.8
DevMktA m 35.74 +.64 +1.3
DevMktY 35.40 +.64 +1.5
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.06 +.07 -2.6
AllAuthIn 10.15 +.05 -6.9
ComRlRStI 5.73 -.01 -12.7
HiYldIs 9.42 +.01 +1.8
LowDrIs 10.21 +.02 -1.5
TotRetA m 10.61 +.03 -4.2
TotRetAdm b 10.61 +.03 -4.1
TotRetIs 10.61 +.03 -3.9
TotRetrnD b 10.61 +.03 -4.1
Permanent
Portfolio 47.65 +.27 -2.0
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.97 ... +10.9
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 36.49 +.44 +16.8
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.69 +.16 +20.7
BlendA m 22.36 +.24 +21.3
EqOppA m 19.49 +.19 +22.9
HiYieldA m 5.60 ... +2.5
IntlEqtyA m 6.93 +.10 +10.4
IntlValA m 21.86 +.30 +9.7
JennGrA m 25.00 +.27 +19.7
NaturResA m 48.52 +.62 +7.6
SmallCoA m 27.18 +.31 +21.2
UtilityA m 13.33 +.11 +14.2
ValueA m 19.23 +.21 +23.2
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.63 ... +21.0
IncomeA m 7.05 +.01 -0.9
Royce
LowStkSer m 15.08 +.20 +9.0
OpportInv d 15.18 +.22 +27.0
ValPlSvc m 16.64 +.30 +20.3
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 26.38 +.27 +18.9
Scout
Interntl 35.01 +.53 +6.0
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 55.76 +.66 +22.2
CapApprec 25.39 +.13 +14.1
DivGrow 30.78 +.27 +17.7
DivrSmCap d 22.42 +.36 +28.6
EmMktStk d 31.38 +.69 -7.9
EqIndex d 45.20 +.45 +18.8
EqtyInc 31.10 +.29 +18.6
FinSer 18.40 +.22 +23.2
GrowStk 45.67 +.56 +20.9
HealthSci 56.62 +.75 +37.4
HiYield d 6.96 +.01 +4.1
IntlDisc d 51.72 +.64 +12.2
IntlStk d 15.31 +.20 +6.3
IntlStkAd m 15.23 +.20 +6.1
LatinAm d 32.88+1.08 -13.6
MediaTele 65.75 +.62 +23.4
MidCpGr 70.47 +.89 +24.8
NewAmGro 43.22 +.53 +20.3
NewAsia d 15.78 +.26 -6.1
NewEra 45.79 +.45 +9.3
NewHoriz 44.46 +.67 +34.0
NewIncome 9.29 +.01 -3.9
Rtmt2020 19.60 +.17 +9.6
Rtmt2030 21.34 +.23 +12.8
ShTmBond 4.78 +.01 -0.4
SmCpVal d 46.05 +.60 +17.6
TaxFHiYld d 10.67 ... -7.8
Value 32.55 +.30 +23.4
ValueAd b 32.18 +.30 +23.2
Thornburg
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p p q q q q p p
q q p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$3.61
+.08
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
PAGE 8A Tuesday, September 10, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Funerals
THOMAS JENKINS, 94,
formerly of Bethlehem, passed
away peacefully on Saturday,
Sept. 7, 2013, at Cedarbrook
Nursing Home, Allentown. He
was the husband of the late Ruth
(Keil) Jenkins. Born in Wilkes
Barre, Thomas was a son of
the late David and Elizabeth
(Davies) Jenkins. He was a
Pennsylvania state trooper
for 28 years, retiring from the
Criminal Investigation Unit. He
also served as a deputy sheriff for
Northampton County, and was a
plumber for Philip Malozzi Sr.
and Stipe Plumbing of Easton.
Surviving are son Thomas R.
Jenkins and his wife, Linda,
of Allentown; grandchildren,
Christopher Jenkins and his
wife, Veronica; Rebecca Jenkins;
great-grandchildren, Travis and
Faith. He was predeceased by
his son William Jenkins and his
brothers, Richard and Arthur
Jenkins.
Funeral Services are private.
Arrangements are entrusted to
Long Funeral Home, Bethlehem.
YULIYA KOZUB, 74, of
East View Drive, Wilkes-Barre,
died Sunday, Sept. 8, 2013, sur-
rounded by her family at home.
Born in Ukraine, she was the
daughter of the late Andre and
Olena Aleksic Doma. She was
a member of Full Gospel Slavic
Church, Edwardsville. Surviving
are her husband, Ivan Kozub;
sons, Ivan, Vasiley, Victor;
daughters, Maria Bella, Nadia
Kozub, Yuliya Mesko, Tatiana
Charkadiy, Lyubov Krevenko,
Svetlana Svintozelskiy; brothers,
Yuri, Ivan, Vasiely; sisters, Maria
Pushkosh, Margarita Doma,
Martha Doma; 33 grandchil-
dren; three great-grandchildren.
Funeral will be at noon
Wednesday at the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains. Friends may call 7 to 9
p.m. today and 10 a.m. to noon
Wednesday. Interment will
be in in Maple Hill Cemetery,
Hanover Township.
LEAH KLOTT
SCHWARTZ, 96, of
Binghamton, N.Y., formerly of
Exeter, died Sunday, Sept. 8,
2013, in Bridgewater Nursing
Home, Binghamton, N.Y. Mrs.
Schwartz was preceded in
death by her husband, Harold
L. Schwartz, and son, Joseph
Schwartz. She is survived by her
daughter, Lynne S. Green, and
her husband, Howard Green,
Binghamton, N.Y.; daughter-in-
law, Sheila Schwartz, Nashville,
Tenn.; grandchildren, Jay and
Sandi Green; Pam and Lee
Furman; Brett and Wendy
Green; Mark Schwartz; Rae
Ellen and Jason Zurenda; 11
great-grandchildren, Alison,
Erica, Zachary, Dylan, Derek,
Hannah, Isaac, Ari, Grace, Eli
and Shira.
Graveside funeral service
will be held at 11 a.m. today in
Anshe Ahavas Achim Cemetery,
Wilkern Street, West Pittston.
Arrangements are by the
Rosenberg Funeral Chapel Inc.,
348 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre.
For more information, visit
www.rosenbergfuneralchapel.
com.
CHARLIE THOMAS, of
Hanover Township, passed
away Monday in Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Mamary-Durkin
Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
Obituary
pOlicy
The Times Leader
publishes free obituaries,
which have a 27-line
limit, and paid obituaries,
which can run with a
photograph. Afuneral
home representative can
call the obituary desk
at 570-829-7224, send
a fax to 570-829-5537
or email to ttlobits@
civitasmedia.com. If you
fax or email, please call to
confrm. Obituaries must
be submitted by 7:30
p.m. for publication in the
next edition. Obituaries
must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory,
or must name who is
handling arrangements,
with address and phone
number.
elynOre banasheFski
Sept. 8, 2013
Elynore Banashefski, 83, of
Wilkes-Barre Township, passed
away Sunday at Commonwealth
Hospice at St. Luke’s Villa,
Wilkes-Barre.
Born April 24, 1930, in the
Georgetown section of Wilkes-
Barre Township, she was the
daughter of the late John and
Mary Kostak Banashefski.
Elynore was a graduate of
Wilkes-Barre Township High
School, class of 1947, and she
worked as a secretary and
bookkeeper most of her life at
the Union Paper and Supply
Co. of Wilkes-Barre. She was
a life member of St. John the
Baptist Byzantine Church in
Georgetown, where she enjoyed
years of baking cakes and cook-
ies for the parish.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by
her brother, Joseph, and her
nephew, John Banashefski.
Surviving are sisters, Marge
Dorish of Plains, Pa., and Mary
Kish and her husband, Mike, of
Ocean City, Md.; brothers, John
Banashefski of Wilkes-Barre;
George Banashefski and his
wife, Loretta, of Wilkes-Barre
Township; and Leonard Bantel,
also of Wilkes-Barre Township.
Family and friends may call
8:30 to 10 a.m. Thursday in John
the Baptist Byzantine Catholic
Church, Chestnut Street,
Wilkes-Barre Township. Divine
Liturgy and Requiem Services
will be held at 10 a.m. with the
Rev. Mykhalo Prodanets, pas-
tor, officiating. Interment will
follow in St. Mary’s Byzantine
Catholic Cemetery, Lake Street,
Dallas. Arrangements are by the
Jendrzejewski Funeral Home,
Wilkes-Barre.
The family wishes to thank
the staff at Commonwealth
Hospice at St. Luke’s Villa,
General Hospital, Golden
Living Center (Summit) and
River View Ridge Assisted
Living for their loving care and
support.
to view
legacy
obituaries
online, visit
www.timesleader.com
bertha GlOria ciavarella
Sept. 8, 2013
Bertha Gloria Ciavarella, 81,
formerly of Wilkes-Barre, passed
away Sunday morning surround-
ed by her family at Keystone
Garden Estates, Larksville.
Gloria, as she was known
to many, was born in Wilkes-
Barre, Nov. 26, 1931, the daugh-
ter of the late Julius and Mary
Bodovich Roskowski. She was a
graduate of the former Wilkes-
Barre Township High School.
Gloria was a longtime mem-
ber of Holy Rosary Church in
Wilkes-Barre and was active in
the Altar & Rosary Society and
also was member of the Sons of
Italy. She was currently a mem-
ber of Our Lady of Hope Parish,
Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.
Gloria was a loving and
devoted wife, mother and grand-
mother, who cherished nothing
more in life than spending time
with and caring for her grand-
children.
She has been preceded in
death by her husband of 53
years, Michael A. Ciavarella, in
2007, and by brothers Julius,
Joseph, Peter and Charles; along
with sisters, Helen, Annie,
Verna, Sophie and Francy.
Surviving are her daugh-
ters, Linda Scarantino and
her husband, Lou, of Wilkes-
Barre Township, and Michele
Shaver and her husband, Mark,
of Trucksville; grandchildren,
Josh, Danielle and Dean Shaver;
Nataliya Scarantio; Andrea,
Michael and Louis Scarantino;
brother John Roskowski of
Florida and sister Terry O’Neil
of Wilkes-Barre. Also surviving
are numerous nieces and neph-
ews.
The family would like to
thank Dr. John Carey, M.D., and
his staff as well as the caregiv-
ers at Keystone Gardens and
Hospice of the Sacred Heart for
the tender and compassionate
care they administered to Gloria
while she was in their care.
Funeral services will be at 9
a.m. Wednesday at the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a funer-
al Mass to follow at 9:30 a.m.
in Our Lady of Hope Parish,
40 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
Interment will be in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
Online condolences may be
sent by visiting Gloria’s obitu-
ary at www.natandgawlasfuner-
alhome.com.
Mrs. Albina (Niznik)
Kuczynski, 90, a former resident
North End and more recently
of Edison Street, Wilkes-Barre,
entered into Eternal Life
Saturday evening in the Timber
Ridge Health Care Center, Plains
Township, following a lingering
illness.
Born Sept. 15, 1922, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was the daughter of
the late Peter and Mary (Doktor)
Niznik. She was educated in the
city schools.
Mrs. Kuczynski, until the time
of her retirement, worked for the
former Rickey Fashions of South
Main Street and formerly for the
Leslie Fay Co., Plains Township,
as a seamstress. She previously
attendedthe former St. Stanislaus
Kostka Roman Catholic Church,
North Wilkes-Barre, where she
was a member of the parish Altar
and Rosary Society. She also held
membership in the International
Ladies Garment Workers Union.
Albina is remembered as being
a loving mother and grandmoth-
er to her family who loved baking
her famous Christmas cut-out
cookies, and would spend many
hours crocheting various items
over the years. She also had a spe-
cial passion for cooking a variety
of beloved ethnic Polish foods for
her family and friends, and had
a special love for Polka music,
which she would often listen to.
In addition to her husband
Adam’s passing in 1988, she was
preceded in death by four broth-
ers and two sisters.
Surviving are her sons,
Richard J Sr. and his wife, Marsha
Kuczynski, of Plains Township;
and Jerry R. Kuczynski of
Swoyersville; daughter-in-law,
Lee M. Kuczynski of Hanover
Township; grandchildren, Tanya
Kohler and her husband, Gary;
Richard J. Kuczynski Jr.; Jerry
R. Kuczynski II and his wife,
Samantha; Kimberly Mercadante
and her husband, Randy; and
Adam J. Kuczynski; great-
grandchildren including Emily
Kuczynski, Randy Jr. and Rayna
Mercadante; brothers Stanley
and his wife, Rosemary Niznik,
of Wilkes-Barre; Edward and his
wife, Susan Niznik, of Mountain
Lake; numerous nieces, nephews,
great-nieces and great-nephews.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Kuczynski will be private and
at the convenience of her fam-
ily from the John V. Morris
Family Funeral Homes Inc. of
Wilkes-Barre with interment
in St. Mary’s Roman Catholic
Cemetery, South Main Street,
Hanover Township. There will be
no public calling hours.
To send her sons and fam-
ily online words of comfort, sup-
port and friendship, please visit
our family’s website at www.
JohnVMorrisFuneralHomes.
com.
tOm s. nickas
Sept. 7, 2013
Tom S. Nickas, 68, of East
Stroudsburg, passed away on
Saturday morning surrounded
by his family.
Born in Chicago on March
17, 1945, he was the son of the
late Theodore and Katherine
Nickas. He attended Amundsen
High School. He worked for 34
years at Mars Inc. as a project
manager. He retired in 1999
and was the current president
of the Mars Retirement Club.
He enjoyed photography, leath-
erworking, carpentry and cow-
boy shooting, and had many
other interests.
He was a man of many talents
and a member of many organi-
zations over the years. These
included the Boy Scouts, the
Blue Mountain shooting club,
the S.A.S.S. and the NRA.
He was a loving husband,
father, grandfather, uncle and
son-in-law, and will be truly
missed.
Tom is survived by his
wife of 48 years, Rose Mary
of Stroudsburg; son, Thomas,
and hiswife,Deanna Nickas,
of Laflin; daughters, Mary
and her husband, Dan Ulmer,
of East Stroudsburg, and
Susan Nickas of Stroudsburg;
his sister, Georgia Schryer
of Chicago; his eight grand-
children, Amberle, Rachel,
Karissa, Thomas II, Jennifer,
Kayla, Timothy and Erik;
his mother-in-law, Frances
Coniglio of Stroudsburg; his
brothers-in-law, Leonard and
his wife, Darlene Coniglio, of
Glen Ellyn; Vincent and his
wife, Michelle, of Delhi, and
John and his wife, Delores, of
Hoffman Estates; and many
nieces, nephews and cousins.
A Mass and Memorial ser-
vice will be held at a later date
due to family and friends who
are out of state. Anyone wish-
ing to attend can contact the
family or Desiderio Funeral
Home Inc. website at www.
desideriofh.com.
lOrraine s. harrisOn
Sept. 7, 2013
Lorraine S. Harrison, 95,
of Shickshinny, went home to
be with her Lord on Saturday.
She was a resident of Hampton
House, Hanover Township, for
the past six years.
She was born Aug. 25, 1918,
in Union Township, McKendree,
a daughter of the late Bowman
and Mary Hughes Hutchins
Sorber.
Lorraine was a member of the
McKendree United Methodist
Church, McKendree Grange
No. 722 and Pomona State
and National Grange. She was
employed at Wise Potato Chips,
Berwick, and Northwest Area
School District, Shickshinny.
Throughout her life, she
enjoyed Polka music, dancing,
dressing up for Halloween, her
cats and, most of all, spending
time with her family.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by
her brothers, G. William and
Robert Sorber.
Left to honor her memory
are her three children, Roxie
Hontz, Shickshinny; Ronald
Harrison, Newtown; and
Rhonda McGlynn and her hus-
band, Raynard, Shickshinny;
seven grandchildren, Jeffrey
Hontz and wife Lisa, Gambrills,
Md.; Jason Hontz and wife
Michelle, South Bound Brook,
N.J.; Jayleen (Hontz) Miller,
Orangeville; Jadell (Hontz)
Comitz and husband Richard,
Cornwall, N.Y.; Ryan McGlynn
and wife Kristen, Kingston;
Kristofer Harrison and wife
Marina, Mt. Pleasant, S.C.; and
Rachel (McGlynn) Woosman
and husband Michael, Dallas;
12 great-grandchildren, Corey
Campbell; Justin Hontz; Rayna,
Reese and Rowan McGlynn;
Hannah and Louis Comitz;
Erica and Logan Miller; and
Markayla, Delaney and Gavan
Harrison; numerous nieces,
nephews, cousins, friends, and
her grandcats and granddogs.
She was known as “Gram”
and “Grammy Too” by so many
who loved her.
The family wishes to thank
the Hampton House staff and
special friend Barbara Zielecki
for their love and caring.
Funeral services will be at
11 a.m. Friday at the Clarke
Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6
Sunset Lake Road, Hunlock
Creek, with her pastor the
Rev. Gail Kitchen officiating.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Thursday and at 10 a.m. until
time of service Friday at the
funeral home.
Interment will be in
Bloomingdale Cemetery, Ross
Township, Shickshinny.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial contributions may be
made in Lorraine’s memory to
McKendree United Methodist
Church, c/o Sandra Shaw, 8
Sunshine Road, Shickshinny,
PA 18655.
Jared spencer lane
Sept. 7, 2013
Jared Spencer Lane, 22, of
Jackson, Mo., died Saturday as
a result of an automobile acci-
dent in Jackson, Mo.
He was born June 14, 1991,
in Kingston, to Loren B. and
Christina N. Dymond Lane.
He graduated from Jackson
High School in 2010. Jared
had worked for Lodo Lounge
in Cape Girardeau and had
started a band playing music.
He was a member of Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints in Cape Girardeau.
Survivors include his par-
ents, Loren B. and Christina N.
Lane, of Jackson, Mo.; sister,
Chelsea L. Lane, of Jackson,
Mo.; brothers, Ryan M.
(Wanda) Lane, of Fall River,
Mass.; Andrew C. (Jordan)
Lane, of Jackson, Mo.;
Joshua C. Lane, of Jackson,
Mo.; maternal grandparents,
Carlton Dymond, of Falls, and
Lizbeth and Edward Pitcavage,
of Kingston; maternal great-
grandmother, Beatrice Ray, of
Chase; nieces, Tenley, Olivia
and Sophia Lane; nephew,
Colby Lane; several aunts,
uncles and cousins; close
friends, Kyle Capone, Garret
Richardson, Kevin Goodman,
Mike Craig, John Gabriel and
Ethan O’Conner.
He was preceded in death by
paternal grandparents, great-
grandparents and maternal
great-grandfather. Visitation
will be 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday
at Ford & Sons Mt. Auburn
Chapel in Cape Girardeau, Mo.
Celebration of Life will be at 11
a.m. Friday at Ford & Sons Mt.
Auburn Chapel with Bishop
Dennis Mouser officiating.
Burial will be at Cape County
Memorial Park Cemetery in
Cape Girardeau. Memorial
contributions may be given
to Jared Lane Memorial Fund
at any branch of The Bank
of Missouri. Online condo-
lences may be made at www.
fordandsonsfuneralhome.com.
Ford & Sons Funeral Home is
in charge of arrangements.
arlene sObOleski
Sept. 8, 2013
Arlene Soboleski, 92, of Sugar
Notch, passed away Sunday at her
home, surrounded by her family.
She was born in Sugar Notch
onJuly 19, 1921. She was a daugh-
ter of the late John and Helen
Savitski Skupski. Arlene was a
graduate of Sugar Notch High
School and the Empire Beauty
School, Wilkes-Barre. She was a
member of Holy Family Parish,
Sugar Notch. Arlene was a proud
former member of the Wyoming
Valley Elk Lodge, Wilkes-Barre.
She was the first woman locally to
be inducted into the lodge, where
she held various offices including
that of Exalted Ruler. She was also
named both Elk and Officer of the
Year.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Peter Soboleski, in
1989; sisters, Mary Boyek and
Regina Dudinski; and brother
Eugene Skupski.
Surviving are her daughter,
Marlene Munley, and her hus-
band, Greg, Sugar Notch; grand-
daughter, Tara Popowich, and
her husband, Tom, New Jersey;
great-grandchildren, whom she
adored, Peter and Alexandra
Popowich; and brother John
Skupski, Ashley.
Funeral services will be at 9
a.m. Thursday at the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105
N. Main St., Ashley. A Mass of
Christian Burial is at 9:30 a.m.
in Holy Family Parish, with the
Rev. Joseph Kakareka officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Family and friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday
and 8 to 9 a.m. Thursday.
The family would like to thank
Dr. Roy Gernhardt for his care,
understanding and guidance in
dealing with the difficult disease
of Alzheimer’s. Arlene’s family
would also like to extend a spe-
cial thank-you to the Associates
of Preferred Home Health Care
for their outstanding care and
compassion shown to Arlene
and her family throughout hese
very trying times. Their care was
exceptional.
shirleyJOan beatty
Sept. 8, 2013
Shirley Joan Beatty, 78, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Sunday evening at Guardian
Elder Care Center in Nanticoke.
Born in New York City on
March 31, 1935, Shirley was
a graduate of Julia Richmond
High School, and received her
nursing certificate from the
Hospital School Consortium,
New York City. In 1985, Shirley
received the Volunteer of the
Year award from the Woman’s
Resource Center in Honesdale.
She was preceded in death by
her mother, Sophie Lay; father,
William F. Lay Sr.; brother,
William F. Lay Jr.; and former
husband, Robert Ellis Beatty.
She is survived by sons,
Michael, Hanover Township,
and Mark, Allentown; and neph-
ews, William and Chris Lay,
Washington.
Private funeral services will
be held at the convenience of
the family. Arrangements have
been entrusted to the Daniel J
Hughes Funeral & Cremation
Service, 617 Carey Ave., Wilkes-
Barre.
Estate & Medicaid Planning; Wills; Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts: Estate
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Certifed As an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation
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anGelella —Magdalene,
funeral Mass 11 a.m. Sept. 21 in
Prince of Peace Parish, St. Mary’s
Church, West Grace Street, Old
Forge. Friends may call 10:30
a.m. until Mass.
bereZnak —Robert, funeral
11 a.m. Wednesday at Harman
Funeral Homes & Crematory
Inc. (East), 669 W. Butler Drive,
Drums. Friends may call 6 to 9
p.m. today at the funeral home.
ciavarella — Bertha, funeral
9 a.m. Wednesday at the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass
9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Hope
Parish, 40 Park Ave., Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today at the funeral home.
kreseski —Ann, funeral 9:30
a.m. Wednesday at the Bernard
J. Piontek Funeral Home Inc.,
204 Main St., Duryea. Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Duryea.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
mOOney —Holly, funeral 9:15
a.m. Wednesday at the Corcoran
Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main
St., Plains. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Theresa’s
Church, Shavertown. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
neare —Ray Sr., memorial
Mass 9:30 a.m. Saturday in
St. Joseph Marello Parish, 237
WilliamSt., Pittston.
rhOads —Dorene, memorial
services 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28 in
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. Friends may call 10 a.m.
to services.
simOncavaGe —Thomas,
Blessing Service 7 p.m. today at
the Grontkowski Funeral Home
P.C., 51-53W. Green St., Nanticoke.
Friends may call 4to 8p.m.
albina (niZnik) kucZynski
Sept. 7, 2013
pOlice blOtter
FORTYFORT—Asuspect arrested by Forty Fort police
for allegedly breaking into vehicles also was arrested for sim-
ilar offenses in five other communities, borough police said.
Jarod James Hospodar, sometimes previously identified
as Jared Hospodar, and a juvenile accomplice were charged
by Forty Fort officer Peter Lakkis with theft from a motor
vehicle, loitering and prowling at night time, receiving sto-
len property and criminal trespass, police said.
The investigation into the thefts began on July 9, when
police were alerted by a newspaper carrier that there were
two suspicious males on Durkee Street in Forty Fort. The
paper carrier reported the pair took off running through
back yards after they saw him.
Police eventually located the juvenile suspect, who admit-
ted that the pair were breaking into vehicles and that they
had stolen two bicycles while attempting to elude police.
Police located Hospodar on July 19, and he to admitted
that he stole a bicycle while trying to elude police during the
incident, police said.
Forty Fort police were assisted by officers from
Swoyersville, Kingston and Edwardsville in trying to locate
Hospodar and the juvenile. Police recovered two stolen bicy-
cles that allegedly were taken by Hospodar and his accom-
plice from residents of Swoyersville as well as U.S. currency.
Police from Ashley, Edwardsville, Courtdale, Larksville
and Newport Township have also charged Hospodar with
charges including, burglary, theft by unlawful taking, crimi-
nal trespass, defiant trespass, receiving stolen property,
criminal conspiracy, criminal mischief, possessing instru-
ments of crime, corruption of minors, endangering welfare
of children and aiding in the commission of a crime.
During a preliminary hearing before District Judge David
Barilla of Swoyersville on Thursday, Hospodar waived the
charges of theft froma motor vehicle andloitering andprowl-
ing at night time. Police withdrew the charges of receiving
stolen property and criminal trespass as part of a plea agree-
ment. Hospodar was released on $5,000 unsecured bail.
HARRISBURG— A Lehigh County doctor was charged
last month with conspiring to unlawfully prescribe more
than 10,000 Oxycodone pills for resale, acquiring themfrom
pharmacies in at least eight counties including Luzerne
County.
Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane identified the defen-
dant as John Manzella, M.D., 49, Allentown. Kane noted
that Robert Kosch, a co-defendant in the
case, has already been charged.
Investigators say Manzella conspired
with Kosch to fill Oxycodone prescriptions
in fictitious names. Text messages alleg-
edly show warnings sent from Kosch to
Manzella about a pharmacy that would be
calling to verify a prescription.
Prescriptions for Oxycodone from
Manzella were filled in at least eight
Pennsylvania counties including, Bucks, Carbon, Lehigh,
Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Northampton and
Schuylkill, according to investigators. Agents believe more
than 10,000 pills with an estimated street value of $300,000
were dispensed.
Manzella was charged with 48 counts of unlawfully
administering/prescribing a controlled substance, 48 counts
of acquiring a controlled substance by misrepresentation,
two counts of criminal conspiracy and one count of identity
theft.
He was arraigned before Jim Thorpe Magisterial District
Judge Edward Lewis and released on $500,000 unsecured
bail. He waived his right to a preliminary hearing and relin-
quished his license to write prescriptions for scheduled
drugs.
manzella
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 9A
Editorial
Luzerne County is fast approach-
ing the anniversary of twin tragedies
that capped a season of teen suicides
so startling it could not help but grab
public attention and spur debate.
In a matter of days, two Pittston
Area School District teens took their
own lives separately, on Sept. 21 and
24. They were the fourth and fifth
teen suicides of the year. And most
had been credited, at least in part, to
bullying.
Those claims were never substanti-
ated and even refuted by officials in
different school districts the teens
attended. Indeed, experts warned
blaming suicide on a single cause
such as bullying is a dangerous over-
simplification of a complex prob-
lem. Suicide is third-leading cause
of death for those 15 to 24 in the
country, according to the National
Institute of Mental Health.
“What seems to happen is stress-
ors accumulate … (leading) to isola-
tion, hopelessness, anger and nega-
tive self-image,” Widener University
Associate Professor of Psychology
Dr. Philip Rutter told The Times
Leader last September. “Is bullying
directly related to suicide? It’s not
totally legitimate to say that. It is fair
to say some young people who are
bullied become depressed and feel
helpless.”
None of which diminishes the very
real problem bullying presents, made
worse through social media that
allows a bully to berate a victim 24
hours a day from anywhere.
Not that you’d know it from the
state’s annual School Safety Reports.
Districts provide a tally of a wide
range of offenses, including bullying,
yet it rarely shows up on the reports.
At the height of the tragedies last
year, The Times Leader reviewed
school safety reports for five years
and found that, countywide, bullying
comprised as little as 0.75 percent of
total incidents to no more than 3.9
percent in any given year.
Yet last year’s tragedies prompted
widespread public meetings, often
heavy on personal testimony from
victims. Several argued that bullying
goes unreported or under-reported
because the allegations are not taken
seriously, or that bullies go unpun-
ished and merely double down on
their abhorrent behavior.
All of this is important context
when considering news that Luzerne
County District Attorney Stephanie
Salavantis has arranged for anti-
bullying speaker John Halligan to
bring his presentations to students
in 14 area high schools and West
Side Career and Technology Center,
as well as seven presentations geared
for parents.
Salavantis deserves praise for such
a concerted effort to keep the issue
front and center at a time when many
may have forgotten the outcry of last
summer. Halligan’s crusade stems
from his own son’s suicide in 2003 at
age 13, and while he does not blame
bullying, he believes it contributed.
Even without the shocking poten-
tial of teen suicide in the mix, bully-
ing can be as devastating as it is dev-
astatingly pointless, and efforts to
curb it must be persistent and broad.
By bringing Halligan to so many set-
tings, Salavantis provides a timely
reminder that the problem remains
long after the headlines die down.
Colorado is poised to deliver an
object lesson in the chaos Democrats
create when they have a free hand to
“reform” election law.
The state Legislature passed
the Voter Access and Modernized
Elections Act in May without a
single Republican vote. Its first test
comes this week in Colorado Springs
and Pueblo, with recall elections of
Democrat state senators who sup-
ported sweeping gun-control legisla-
tion.
The new election law doesn’t
require photo ID. At least one dead
voter has been mailed a special
recall-voting registration card, The
Washington Times reports. But it
gets worse.
All that’s now required to vote
in Colorado, says the free-market
Independence Institute of Denver via
its Bring in the Vote website, is being
18 or older; living in Colorado for
at least 22 days; having an address,
even if it’s a hotel or homeless shel-
ter; and affirming intent to make that
address one’s permanent home.
“Because both recall elections
allow early voting, Colorado vot-
ers could declare their intent to live
in Colorado Springs on Monday,
then declare their intention to live
in Pueblo on Tuesday, which would
allow them to cast ballots in both
elections,” The Times says.
“I believe the winner … will be the
candidate who has the most buses” to
bring in what are being called “gypsy
voters,” says Jon Caldara, the insti-
tute’s president.
If Democrats intended their new
law to make Colorado balloting a
mockery of electoral integrity, they’re
succeeding.
Pittsburgh Tribune Review
OUR OPINION: BULLYING
OTHER OPINION: VOTER ID
District attorney brings
timely reminder for all
NewColorado voter law
is mockery of elections
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
Conference set
for grandparents
This year marks the continuation of
grandparents day, which was Sunday,
Sept. 8. However, the celebration should
be all year round. Grandparents, more
and more, are being asked to raise their
grandchildren, and this is as true in the
Pocono-Northeast as it is across the
United States.
Literally millions of children are being
raised by their grandparents, and in this
region, the celebration is headed by the
forthcoming 7th annual conference to be
held at the Woodlands on Friday, Sept.
13, 8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m., with a series of
panel presentations and a keynote speak-
er, the Honorable Judge Jennifer Rogers
from the Luzerne County Family Court
system.
Among the panel presenters are four
attorneys who currently practice family
law. Other notable presentations include
the role of Children and Youth, healthy
power in parenting, drawing boundaries
between parents and custodial grand-
parents, parenting 101, post-permanent
adoption, HELPLINE, and final remarks
by Rabbi Larry Kaplan of Temple Israel.
Conference chair is Brenda Saba,
a grandparent raising a grandchild
with her husband and a member of the
Coalition. This 7th annual conference
follows a number of activities of the
Coalition, which produced several years
ago a Directory of Services, had a paid
Coordinator for several years, and began
a process of either answering questions
from grandparents or referring the
request to an appropriate agency.
The Coalition recognizes the role that
all grandparents play, and that is why the
celebration on September 8th and the
Conference on September 13th are just
two days of a year round celebration that
honors all grandparents in this region
and elsewhere.
The objectives of the Coalition
include ensuring that families and
community organizations obtain basic
knowledge of available community
resources, understand community sys-
tems, missions, programs and eligibility
requirements, and to educate families
and providers with ways to access infor-
mation, ensure families and community
organizations have the opportunity to
be exposed to new ideas and develop
new skills as grandparents, family care-
givers and providers, and explore core
issues and concerns of grandparents.
To make a reservation free to grand-
parents, contact Susan Harding at
the Area Agency on Aging at 1-800-
252-1512 0r 570-822-1159, ext. 2429.
Professionals pay a fee of $35 to regis-
ter but can receive continuing educa-
tion credits through the Family Service
Association of Wyoming Valley. You
can e-mail Susan at sharding @aging.
luzerne-wyoming.org
The challenges facing grandparents
either raising grandchildren or just
being a grandparent cause the need
to celebrate their participation in fam-
ily life 365 days a year. Come to the
Conference and learn more about their
role.
Howard J. Grossman,
Chair
NEPA Intergenerational Coalition
Pittston Memorial Library
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR
SEND US YOUR OPINION
Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
• Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
• Fax: 570-829-5537
• Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
In her first
remarks as head of
the Environmental
Protection Agency
(EPA), Gina McCarthy
pledged to use carbon
standards as a “way to
spark business inno-
vation.” Her decision
on carbon standards
for coal-fueled power
plants will test whether
this is a real promise or
just rhetoric.
Over the past few decades, new tech-
nologies have made the process of pro-
ducing electricity from coal far cleaner
and more efficient. If she proposes rea-
sonable, achievable carbon standards,
McCarthy can encourage clean-coal
innovation in a way that’s good for the
environment and our economy.
If you’ve flipped on a light or
plugged in your cellphone today, the
energy you consumed likely came
from coal. Last year alone, this nat-
ural resource — one of the nation’s
most abundant — was responsible
for producing more electricity here
in the United States than any other
energy source.
Despite competition with fuels such as
natural gas, the U.S. Energy Information
Administration predicts that coal will
remain America’s chief source of electric-
ity for decades to come.
The reason for coal’s popular-
ity is simple: The energy generated
from coal is exceedingly affordable,
abundant and reliable. Electricity
prices in states that rely on coal are
more than 10 percent lower than
the national average, and within our
nation’s borders, we have over 250
years’ worth of coal to fuel America
for generations to come.
But beyond these advantages, the
coal sector’s most significant achieve-
ments have involved clean-coal tech-
nologies. To date, the industry has
spent $110 billion on clean-coal inno-
vation, and this hefty investment has
paid off. Since 1970, over a dozen
different technologies have enabled
coal-fueled power plants to reduce the
emissions rate of pollutants like nitro-
gen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and par-
ticulate matter by almost 90 percent.
In the next 15 years, the industry is
likely to invest another $100 billion
to build on this progress.
Coal’s future as an affordable and
increasingly clean energy source
will depend on the EPA. President
Obama has instructed the agency to
propose carbon standards for future
coal-fueled power plants within a
few weeks. But new regulations are
always a cause for concern. A 2012
analysis found that complying with
a handful of EPA regulations would
cost the electric sector roughly $200
billion in compliance costs.
These rules also would eliminate
nearly 550,000 jobs each year, while
reducing the disposable income of the
average U.S. household by as much as
$500. In fact, EPA regulations have
already contributed to the scheduled
closure of nearly 300 coal-fueled units,
and the impact on those local commu-
nities’ economies, not to mention our
national economy more broadly, will be
unquestionably severe.
Robert M. Duncan is CEO of the American Coali-
tion for Clean Coal Electricity.
EPAhead can set path for cleaner coal
COMMENTARY: ROBERT DUNCAN
Robert
Duncan
Contributing
Columnist
Aimee Dilger | Times Leader file photo
Luzerne County District Attorney Stephanie Salavantis talks to the media outside Pittston
Area School District administration offices in September 2012.
PAGE 10A Tuesday, September 10, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
89/70
Chihuahua
73/59
Los Angeles
80/63
Washington
90/73
New York
85/73
Miami
88/79
Atlanta
87/69
Detroit
94/71
Houston
93/74
Kansas City
94/69
Chicago
96/73
Minneapolis
82/63
El Paso
82/67
Denver
70/57
Billings
79/56
San Francisco
74/59
Seattle
83/62
Toronto
91/64
Montreal
72/64
Winnipeg
78/53
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
today’s weather.
Temperatures are
today’s highs and
tonight’s lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
WED FRI
SAT SUN
THU
MON
TODAY
87°
67°
A p.m.
t-storm in
spots
92° 67°
Partly
sunny and
cooler
67° 45°
Bright and
sunny
67° 44°
Sunny and
nice
73° 52°
Show-
ers, heavy
t-storms
87° 55°
Partial sun-
shine
70° 44°
Partly
sunny;
breezy,
warmer
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 0
Month to date 29
Year to date 731
Last year to date 860
Normal year to date 548
Anchorage 58/51/r 61/49/r
Baltimore 91/69/pc 94/71/t
Boston 80/71/pc 91/71/pc
Buffalo 90/71/pc 86/66/t
Charlotte 89/68/pc 89/66/pc
Chicago 96/73/pc 89/65/t
Cleveland 91/72/s 89/68/t
Dallas 96/74/s 96/74/s
Denver 70/57/t 74/57/t
Honolulu 89/74/pc 89/73/s
Indianapolis 93/72/s 90/68/pc
Las Vegas 91/73/t 92/77/t
Milwaukee 91/69/pc 82/60/t
New Orleans 90/75/pc 90/74/pc
Norfolk 86/71/pc 88/72/pc
Okla. City 93/68/s 94/70/s
Orlando 90/73/pc 89/73/t
Phoenix 93/79/t 98/83/t
Pittsburgh 90/70/s 87/68/t
Portland, ME 75/66/t 84/66/pc
St. Louis 96/76/s 96/73/pc
San Francisco 74/59/s 72/57/pc
Seattle 83/62/s 87/61/s
Wash., DC 90/73/pc 93/74/t
Bethlehem 1.83 -0.04 16
Wilkes-Barre 2.55 -0.74 22
Towanda 1.52 -0.38 16
Port Jervis 2.87 -0.07 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Monday.
Today Wed Today Wed Today Wed
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Sept 12 Sept 19
Sept 26
First Full
Last New
Oct 4
6:39 a.m.
12:05 p.m.
7:21 p.m.
10:18 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 79-85. Lows: 62-68. Partly sunny, breezy and warmer today.
Partly cloudy tonight. A shower or thunderstorm in spots tomorrow.
Highs: 77-83. Lows: 67-73. Partly sunny, breezy and humid today.
Mainly clear and humid tonight. Partly sunny and humid tomorrow.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 87-93. Lows: 67-73. Partly sunny, breezy and warmer today.
Partly cloudy, warm and humid tonight.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 85. Low: 73. Partly sunny, breezy and warmer today. Partly
cloudy tonight. A thunderstorm in spots tomorrow.
High: 90. Low: 71. Partly sunny, breezy and warmer today. Partly
cloudy tonight. A thunderstorm in spots tomorrow.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Monday
High/low 75°/44°
Normal high/low 75°/55°
Record high 95° (1959)
Record low 39° (1956)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.10"
Normal m-t-d 1.14"
Year to date 18.47"
Normal y-t-d 26.17"
87/67
87/68
90/71
87/68
86/67
86/67
88/68
88/67
89/68
87/66
87/69
90/70
85/69
85/67
85/73
Summary: Heat will reach from the southern Plains to the East Coast and build
over the Northwest with sunshine today. Showers and storms will reach from the
deserts to the Great Lakes and will dot the Gulf Coast.
it easier for the district to
test teachers for illegal drug
use if there is a reasonable
suspicion, Wendolowski
said.
Board member Lynn
Evans had to leave due to
an emergency call and was
not present for the vote,
Wendolowski said, while
members James Susek and
Phillip Latinski were not
present. Of the voting mem-
bers, only Maryanne Toole
voted against.
Ney said the delay in sign-
ing is a logistical question,
and that the deal should be
completed on Wednesday,
once all the necessary par-
ties can sit down together
in the same room. The pact
will be retroactive to Sept.
1, he said.
In other action Monday:
• Citing publicly-avail-
able statistics, Felton told
the board and the public that
while minority students —
including blacks, Hispanics,
Asians and mixed-race
youth — make up 45 per-
cent of the district’s popula-
tion, at 3,100 pupils, there
are only six minority teach-
ers in the district, and none
of them is a man.
Felton and other mem-
bers of the NAACP met
with district officials earlier
in the day to discuss strate-
gies to increase the ranks
of minority teachers, and
Felton said he was optimis-
tic about their commitment
to hold regular talks on the
issue. He also said his con-
cern was about providing
role models who can help
minority students peform
better, not merely boosting
numbers.
“I don’t want an unquali-
fied minority teacher teach-
ing my child any more than
I would want an unqualified
white teacher teaching my
child,” Felton said.
Superintendent Bernard
Prevuznak said he was
struck by Felton’s message,
including the realization
that Wilkes-Barre Area
students can go through
12 years of school without
coming into contact with a
minority teacher.
“I pledge my support to
you, sir,” Prevuznak said,
adding that he felt the ear-
lier meeting was productive.
• The board heard from
families concerned with
two different transportation
issues they felt were not
being adequately addressed.
Gail Nasser saidone elemen-
tary bus run has consistent-
ly been using vehicles too
small for the number of stu-
dents on the route, includ-
ing a 64-passenger vehicle
for 75 students. Byron and
Tina Dixon, meanwhile,
said their 12-year-old daugh-
ter, who travels from North
Main Street to Meyers High
School for special educa-
tion, is being forced to stand
at a dangerous intersection
when students fromanother
school are allowed to board
at a safer corner nearby.
Prevuznak said he would
seek answers and work with
both families.
NAACP
From page 1A
Syria
From page 1A
Collapse
From page 1A
were a potentially positive
development.
At the same time, he
said they were yet another
reason for lawmakers to
give him the backing he is
seeking.
“If we don’t maintain
and move forward with a
credible threat of military
pressure, I do not think we
will actually get the kind
of agreement I would like
to see,” he said on CNN.
In a separate interview
with NBC, the president
took the step — unusual
for any politician — of
conceding he may lose his
campaign in Congress for
legislation authorizing a
military strike.
“I think it’s fair to say
that I haven’t decided” on
a next step if Congress
turns its back, the presi-
dent said in an NBC
interview, part of a furi-
ous lobbying campaign
aimed at winning support
from dubious lawmakers
as well as a war-weary
public.
Casey: Case for Syria strike being made
Senator discusses
Mideast trouble, jobs
and other issues
BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
WASHINGTON, D.C. —
U.S. Sen.
Bob Casey
on Monday
said that
as the
evi de nc e
comes in
— the facts
that have
been made
public and the classified
data — a “clear and con-
vincing case” is being made
that the U.S. “can’t just walk
away” without taking action
against the Syrian regime of
Bashar al-Assad.
“You have to consider the
gravity of the crime against
humanity,” Casey said in a
telephone interview from
his Washington, D.C. offce.
“More than 1,400 people,
including children, have
been killed with the use of
chemical weapons. This is
an ongoing threat to our
security as well.”
Amember of the National
Security Working Group
and co-chair of the Weapons
of Mass Destruction
Terrorism Caucus, he said
a “good deal of debate”
remains in Congress, but
he said the more data that
comes in makes the case of
action stronger.
Casey, D-Scranton, visit-
ed a Syrian refugee camp in
the spring and said he saw
hundreds of children hoping
for a bright future.
“Last month, Assad
unconscionably killed hun-
dreds of children with chem-
ical weapons,” Casey said.
“When a dictator or a terror-
ist organization uses chemi-
cal weapons in violation
of international law, there
must be a direct response.
We cannot simply condemn
this crime —it is in the U.S.
interest to act.”
He said Iran, the terrorist
organization Hezbollah and
North Korea are watching
the U.S. response closely. “It
is imperative that we send a
message,” he said. “I believe
it is important that all
aspects of our Syria policy
be thoroughly debated with
national security interests in
mind.”
Casey said President
Barack Obama will address
the nation tonight and make
his case for taking action.
Obama is asking Congress
to support his plan for lim-
ited military strikes against
the Syrian regime.
Casey on other issues
Minimum wage:
Casey, chairman of
the Subcommittee on
Employment and Workplace
Safety in the Senate
Health, Education, Labor
and Pensions (HELP)
Committee, has called on
Congress to raise the nation-
al minimumwagebypassing
the Fair MinimumWage Act
of 2013. Casey said increas-
ing the minimum wage and
indexing it to inflation will
offer a lift up the ladder to
the middle class and boost
the economy by stimulating
new spending
“Six years have passed
since the last minimum
wage increase was enacted,”
he said. “Pay for the middle
class is stagnant while the
gap between the haves and
have-nots widens.”
Casey said raising the
minimum wage would be
“a reasonable way” to help
jump-start the economy, but
more important, it would
enable families to keep up
with the rising inflation
where fixed expenses con-
tinue to rise yearly.
He said he hopes
Congress will vote on the
issue later this year.
Debt spending: Casey
said Democrats and
Republicans “have to get
together” and soon — by
the end of the federal fiscal
year Sept. 30 — to come
up with a plan. He said a
budget needs to be passed
and the country needs to
begin paying down its debt.
He also said Congress must
“turn off the sequester”
before it results in devastat-
ing cuts.
“Some people in
Washington think default is
the right approach, but it’s
not,” Casey said. “We also
need to take a hard look at
tax reform.”
debris to make “a mound”
and “a ramp” to get the
machine closer to the top
of the steeple.
Galion,
who was
part of an
asbest os
a b a t e -
m e n t
t e a m ,
said the
s t e e p l e
s w a y e d
for several seconds.
“It looked like he was
making a ramp, pulling
wood, steel and bricks
to get higher to the
top when the steeple
swayed,” Galion said.
“The excavation was
going well and when they
came up on the steeple,
they stopped and they
brought in the excava-
tor and started pulling,
pulling and pulling, and
it was wiggling. You saw
the steeple wiggle. There
was no chance for him to
back out. When it came
down it just crushed
him,” Klem said.
Other witnesses said the
wind was gusty at the time
of the collapse.
“If they kept going
with the crane, I think it
would have been fine,”
Klem said. “When I saw
what he was doing with
the machine, I said to my
friend ‘Something is going
to go wrong,’ and it did.”
Crews began razing
the church from the back
and worked their way to
the front. Electrical and
other utility lines directly
in front of the church pre-
vented crews from demol-
ishing the steeple from
Shoemaker Street, which
remained open during
demolition but was closed
during the emergency.
A representative from
the Occupational Safety
and Health Administration
arrived at the site at about
2 p.m.
Officials praise Brdaric
S w o y e r s v i l l e
Councilman Christopher
Concert called Brdaric’s
death a “total loss for the
entire Wyoming Valley.”
“He did a lot for this
community and neigh-
boring communities,”
Concert said. “I’m in
shock. He was good to so
many people.”
Concert said he was at
the church before sunrise
to watch the demolition.
He praised police officers
and emergency respond-
ers for their efforts.
“When we realized
what happened, we
started to pray. I can-
not say enough for the
Swoyersville Police
Department, ambulance
and fire department
and his workers who
were digging to get him
out,” Concert said. “Our
prayers go out to his fam-
ily and the people who
work for him. He treated
his employees like fam-
ily.”
Wilkes-Barre Mayor
Tom Leighton also was
“deeply saddened” by
Brdaric’s loss.
Brdaric had just razed
the Hotel Sterling at
North River and West
Market streets in Wilkes-
Barre less than two
months ago. It took the
company four days to
level the historic struc-
ture at the end of July;
removal of debris took
nine more days. Still, the
job went much faster than
the two months Wilkes-
Barre officials had pre-
dicted.
“John was dedicated to
his business and always
made sure he did his job
well,” Leighton said in a
prepared statement. “He
was well respected in the
community and by his cli-
ents.”
Diocese expresses
sympathy
Officials with the
Diocese of Scranton also
expressed their sympathy
on Brdaric’s loss.
“On behalf of the St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton
Parish community, the
Diocese of Scranton is
grateful for the efforts of
first responders and oth-
ers who immediately ren-
dered aid to Mr. Brdaric.
We offer our sympathies,
thoughts and prayers
to family members and
friends of Mr. Brdaric,
and to the employees of
Brdaric Excavating, Inc.,”
the diocese said in a news
release.
The diocese reorga-
nized parishes in the mid-
1990s, turning St. Mary’s
of Czestochowa into
Holy Name/St. Mary’s
Parish when the Holy
Name of Jesus Church in
Swoyersville closed. Holy
Name/St. Mary’s closed
in June 2012, joining
with Holy Trinity Church
to become St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton Parish under
another consolidation
plan by the diocese.
Brdaric had previous
experience in church
demolition. His company
razed the 96-year-old
Sacred Heart Church in
Luzerne in 2000 after a
consolidation plan closed
that building.
Brdaric has been a well-
known name in the local
construction and demoli-
tion industry for decades.
Brdaric Jr.’s father,
John P. Brdaric Sr., also
met an untimely death
while working in the
trade.
According to Times
Leader archives, Brdaric
Sr. was 59 when he
refused to jump from an
40-ton steamroller that
went out of control while
being unloaded from a
truck in Dallas Township
in 1999. The roller, which
was determined to have
had inoperable brakes,
sped down a hill, struck
a tree, threw Brdaric Sr.
off and ran over him. He
died of multiple traumat-
ic injuries.
Times Leader staff
writer Steve Mocarsky
contributed to this story.
Photo courtesy of WNEP
The steeple at St. Mary’s Church during demolition on Monday.
Brdaric
Volunteers came from as
far away as Seattle, Wash.,
to assist in the recovery,
performing functions from
serving meals to helping
dig mud from basements to
hanging new drywall. The
faith-based community was
instrumental in securing
volunteers from across the
country, he said.
Zimmerman said
local organizations were
“quick to respond” after
the Susquehanna River
crested at a record 42.66
feet and inundated com-
munities unprotected by
the Wyoming Valley levee
system. But they “ran into
some issues” because they
had “no idea” what they
were doing when it came to
helping secure such massive
funding quickly.
“It was no easy task, but
we did manage to put it
together,” he said.
Zimmerman, whose orga-
nization ran case manage-
ment for the coalition and
helped coordinate other
functions, said that for the
past couple decades, there
had been no functioning
disaster recovery organiza-
tion for Luzerne County.
He said previous attempts
to get a coalition going
years before the flooding
splintered, and it “never
became a functional unit. I
think what we have now is
highly functional.”
In the first phase of recov-
ery, the coalition identified
308 homes that sustained
more than $11,000 in dam-
age and the homeowner
was over 60 and/or dis-
abled. A second phase tar-
geted homes with less than
$11,000 in damage whose
owners were 60 or under
and failed federal income
test requirements for assis-
tance.
Repairs to 67 homes in
Luzerne County have been
completed to date because
of the work of the coalition,
Zimmerman said.
Charles Barber, of the
Luzerne Foundation, said
the organization distributed
about $450,000 in funds
raised through grants and
donations. And money is
left over in a fund in the
event of a future disaster in
the county.
County EMA director
Steve Bekanichsummarized
the federal and state recov-
ery processes and identi-
fied the monetary thresh-
olds that had to be met for
disaster declarations. He
also spoke about the efforts
of individual towns such
as Shickshinny and West
Pittston to rebuild with
federal planning experts to
help guide volunteer com-
mittees.
And while the federal and
state government provided
significant aid, Bekanich
said recovery would have
been much slower without
the work of the coalition.
“We from county govern-
ment deeply appreciate the
services you provided,” he
said.
Bekanich said it’s impor-
tant that member agencies
continue to meet regularly
and keep information updat-
ed.
Coalition
From page 1A
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Stephen Bekanich, Luzerne County Emergency Management
Agency director, addresses the audience Monday during a recep-
tion and presentation of the Disaster Recovery Coalition of
Luzerne County at the county EMA building in Wilkes-Barre.
Casey
K
sports
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Tuesday, September 10, 2013
SECTION B
TERRY COLLINS
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO — NFL
opening day excitement was
tarnished with the death of
one fan who fell from a pedes-
trian overpass outside the big
game in San Francisco, and
injuries to two others from
falls inside the Indianapolis
stadium.
Early indications suggest
32-year-old Kevin Hayes of
Hayward fell accidentally, San
Francisco Police Chief Greg
Suhr said.
“Alcohol may or may not
have played a role to some
varying degree, but right now,
it looks like a very sad, tragic
accident,” Suhr said.
Hayes fell while walking with
his brother on a bridge over
four lanes of traffic outside the
stadium, police said. Off-duty
medics and police officers gave
him first aid until an ambu-
lance arrived, but authorities
said he was declared dead from
his injuries.
“We would like to express
our deepest condolences to
the family during this difficult
time,” 49ers spokesman Bob
Lange said in an email.
The death came just after
kickoff in what was eventu-
ally San Francisco’s 34-28 win
over Green Bay. Multiple wit-
nesses reported that Hayes
Excitement
falls when
NFL fans
take tumbles
33
Eagles
27
Redskins
AP photo
Clint Bowyer gets sideways on the front stretch during the NASCAR race at
Richmond International Raceway on Saturday.
JENNA FRYER
APAuto Racing Writer
CONCORD, N.C. — Ryan
Newman replaced Martin
Truex Jr. in the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship on
Monday night when NASCAR
penalized Michael Waltrip
Racing for manipulating the
outcome of last weekend’s race
at Richmond.
Michael Waltrip Racing was
fined $300,000, and general
manager Ty Norris received an
indefinite suspension. Truex,
Clint Bowyer and Brian Vickers
were docked 50 points apiece —
but Bowyer’s deduction does not
affect his position in the Chase,
which begins Sunday at Chicago.
“We penalize to not have
this happen again,” NASCAR
President Mike Helton said.
“It’s a message from the league
saying ‘You can’t do this.’”
Newman was leading with
seven laps remaining Saturday
night at Richmond, where a vic-
tory would have given him the
final spot in the 12-driver Chase
field. But Bowyer spun to bring
out a caution, setting in motion
a chain of events that ultimately
led to Newman losing the race
and Bowyer teammate Truex
earning the final Chase berth.
While examining the situa-
tion, NASCAR reviewed com-
munication between Bowyer
and his Michael Waltrip Racing
crew that seemed to indicate
the spin was deliberate, as well
as additional evidence that sug-
gested MWR had Bowyer and
Vickers take a dive over the
final three laps so Joey Logano
would knock Jeff Gordon out of
Chase contention in yet another
attempt to help Truex.
Hello, Newman! Truex bumped fromChase
MWR receives fne, suspension afer fxing race at Richmond
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAguE
See NEWMAN | 6B
AP photo
Rafael Nadal reacts after defeating Novak Djokovic during the
men’s singles final of the u.S. Open on Monday in New York.
HOWARD FENDRICH
APTennis Writer
NEW YORK — Hard to believe
this is the same Rafael Nadal who
was home during the U.S. Open a
year ago, nursing a bad left knee.
Hard to believe this is the guy
sent packing in the first round of
Wimbledon in June, losing against
someone ranked 135th.
Looking fit as can be and maybe
even better than ever, the No.
2-ranked Nadal pulled away from No.
1 Novak Djokovic 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 on
Monday in a taut, tense U.S. Open
final for his 13th Grand Slam title.
“Very, very emotional, no?”
Nadal said during the on-court tro-
phy presentation. “Probably only
my team knows how much (this)
means for me.”
They started in sunlight and fin-
ished at night, a 3-hour, 21-minute
miniseries of cliffhangers and plot
twists and a pair of protagonists
who inspired standing ovations in
the middle of games.
“Probably nobody brings my
game to the limit like Novak,” said
Nadal, who collected $3.6 million
in prize money, including a $1 mil-
lion bonus for results during the
North American hard-court circuit.
There was no quit in either of
them, during points that lasted
15, 25, even more than 50 strokes.
Those rallies went so long, rarely
over when they appeared to be, and
spectators often shouted out during
the course of play, prompting Nadal
to complain to the chair umpire.
This was their 37th match against
each other, the most between any
two men in the Open era, and Nadal
has won 22. It also was their third
head-to-head U.S. Open final in the
last four years. Nadal beat Djokovic
for the 2010 title, and Djokovic won
their rematch in 2011.
They know each other’s games so
well, and play such similar hustle-
to-every-ball styles, but in the end,
it was Nadal who was superior.
“He was too good. He definitely
deserved to win this match today
and this trophy,” Djokovic said.
“Obviously disappointing to lose a
match like this.”
Nadal improved to 22-0 on hard
courts and 60-3 overall in 2013
with nine titles, including at the
French Open, which made him the
first man with at least one Grand
Slam trophy in nine consecutive
seasons. The 27-year-old Spaniard’s
total of 13 major championships
ranks third in the history of men’s
tennis, behind only Roger Federer’s
17 and Pete Sampras’ 14.
“Thirteen Grand Slams for a
guy who is 27 years old is incred-
ible,” said Djokovic, who owns six
himself. “Whatever he achieved so
far in his career, everybody should
respect, no question about it.”
Nadal no longer wears the strips
of white tape he once did to bolster
his left knee, and the way he cov-
ered the court against Djokovic —
Nadal needs four sets to down Djokovic
Spaniard wins his 13th Grand Slamtitle
See NADAL | 6B
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Danielle grega maneuvers around Dallas goalie Lily Amadio and scores the
winning goal in overtime of Monday’s WVC field hockey game at Spartan
Stadium in Kingston. grega scored three times in the 3-2 victory.
JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
KINGSTON —In case you weren’t there
Thursday, Danielle Grega and Julia Usefara
made sure to work their magic again.
Grega scored in overtime with an assist
from Usefara for the second consecutive
game, this time lifting Wyoming Valley
West over Dallas 3-2 at Spartan Stadium
on Monday in Wyoming Valley Conference
field hockey.
The pair created the same finish last week
in a 2-1 OT triumph over Wyoming Area.
“Me and Julia were up on the forward line
again,” Grega said. “And the last game we
had the same type of situation happen. We
know what to do with it.”
The Valley West senior finished the day
with three goals, giving her five on the sea-
son. It was her first hat trick since Oct. 1,
2012, in a victory over Abington Heights.
Grega had two goals in a six-minute span
early in the first half to give the Spartans
the early advantage. The first came as Alex
Gonda centered the ball and Grega dove
to reach it, swinging a reverse stick and
launching the ball high over Dallas goal-
keeper Lily Amadio.
The next capped a Startans rush, as
Kaylee Caprari sent a pass to Gonda, whose
blast from just inside the circle was redi-
rected by Grega for a 2-0 lead in the ninth
minute.
“I’ve played against her a lot, so I know a
bit about how she plays,” Grega said of fac-
ing Amadio, who made eight saves. “You’ve
got to hit your corners on her.”
There’s no quit in the Mountaineers,
though, as Dallas suddenly tilted the field
in its favor. The visitors had the next four
Hats of to WVW’s Grega
Senior nets OTwinner to down Dallas
See GREGA | 3B
Philadelphia Eagles coaches use large flash cards to signal
plays during the second half Monday against the Washington
AP photos
Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean McCoy celebrates has he crosses the goal line for a touchdown during the second half
Monday against the Washington Redskins in Landover, Md.
JOSEPH WHITE
AP Sports Writer
LANDOVER, Md. —Just try tokeepupwithMichael
Vick, LeSean McCoy and the Philadelphia Eagles this
season. Robert Griffin III and the Washington Redskins
sure couldn’t.
Playing at a frenetic pace that left the Redskins
bumbling and stumbling, the Eagles unleashed coach
Chip Kelly’s offense on the NFL and
crammed 77 plays into 60 minutes of
football. They had their share of mis-
cues, of course, but they held on for a
33-27 upset of the defending NFC East
champs.
Vick, running the don’t-take-a-breath
attack that won 87 percent of the
time during Kelly’s four years at the
University of Oregon, completed 15 of
25 passes for 203 yards and two touch-
downs, and he ran nine times for 56
yards and a score. McCoy had 31 car-
ries for 184 yards, including a 34-yard
TD. DeSean Jackson piled up 104 yards
on seven catches.
Vick hit Jackson for a 25-yard touch-
down and Brent Celek for a 28-yard
score, then found the end zone himself on a 3-yard run
— and that was just the first half. It would have been a
bigger rout if Vick hadn’t missed three open receivers
in the first quarter, or if his sideways lateral on first-
and-goal at the 4 hadn’t been tipped by linebacker Ryan
Kerrigan and returned 75 yards for a Redskins touch-
down.
Perhaps the most remarkable accomplishment by
Vick, McCoy, Kelly and the Eagles: They managed to
upstage Griffin. The game was played eight months to
the day since the Redskins quarterback had major knee
surgery, and his return Monday was the culmination
of a dedicated, high-profile rehab that included a pub-
lic clash with Washington coach Mike Shanahan that
barely put a dent in the fans’ fervent adoration for their
franchise player.
As it turned out, they didn’t have much of a chance
to chant “R-G-3!” — because the Redskins offense
couldn’t stay on the field. Their first seven plays: lost
fumble by Alfred Morris, 3-yard loss by Morris, penal-
ty for illegal shift, screen to Morris that got back some
yards, interception thrown by Griffin into triple cover-
age, pass dropped by fullback Darrel Young, safety that
occurred when Morris bobbled a pitch in the end zone.
The Redskins were trailing 33-7 late in the third
quarter before three consecutive touchdowns — the
last coming with 1:14 to play — made the score more
respectable.
Wearing a brace on his right knee, Griffin completed
30 of 49 passes for 329 yards, but 169 yards came in the
fourth after the Eagles had taken control. He was also
intercepted twice — the first multi-interception game
of his career. He ran only five times for 24 yards. He
reached down to touch his knee after he was slammed
down by Mychal Kendricks late in the second quarter
— Griffin was flagged for intentional grounding on the
play — but the quarterback remained in the game.
Washington didn’t run a play in Philadelphia territo-
ry until the second half. At one point, the Eagles were
outgaining the Redskins 146-3. There was a moment
Chip wins his
Eagles debut
Vick throws two TDs,
McCoy runs for 184 yards
See EAGLES | 5B See FANS | 5B
PAGE 2B Tuesday, September 10, 2013 scoreboard www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
National League
at Cincinnati -180 Chicago +170
Atlanta -160 at Miami +150
Washington -145 at NewYork +135
at Los Angeles -155 Arizona +145
at San Francisco -125 Colorado +115
American League
at Baltimore -130 NewYork +120
at Cleveland -110 Kansas City +100
Los Angeles -160 at Minnesota +150
Detroit -140 at Chicago +130
at Seattle -160 Houston +150
Interleague
at Texas -180 Pittsburgh +170
NCAAFOOTBALL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Thursday
TCU 6 3½ (65) at Texas Tech
at Louisiana Tech 7½ 7½ (52) Tulane
at Arkansas St. 10 10 (67) Troy
Friday
at Boise St. 24 23 (52) Air Force
Saturday
at Rutgers 34 27½ (49) E. Michigan
Stanford 30 28½ (48) at Army
at West Virginia 38 38½ (56) Georgia St.
Louisville 7½ 12½ (61½) at Kentucky
Marshall 6 7 (71) at Ohio
at Michigan 35½ 37 (58) Akron
at Indiana 4 2½ (64½) Bowling Green
Virginia Tech 7 7½ (55) at East Carolina
Maryland 7 7½ (47) at UConn
at Pittsburgh 20½ 21 (52) NewMexico
at Wake Forest 3½ 3 (56) Louisiana-Monroe
W. Kentucky 7½ 10½ (51) at SouthAlabama
Fresno St. 10 9½ (70) at Colorado
at Florida St. 35 32 (66) Nevada
at Nebraska 4 5 (69) UCLA
Georgia Tech 10 8 (55½) at Duke
at Oregon 20 25½ (72½) Tennessee
at Texas 3½ 4½ (62) Mississippi
at Southern Cal 17½ 14 (43) Boston College
Iowa 3 1½ (45) at Iowa St.
Alabama 7 8½ (63½) at Texas A&M
N. Illinois 24 27½ (61) at Idaho
at Auburn 7 6 (53) Mississippi St.
Washington-x 7½ 10½ (60) Illinois
at Penn St. 3 5 (50½) UCF
Ball St. 2½ 3 (65) at NorthTexas
at Middle Tenn. 3½ 4½ (49½) Memphis
at Arkansas 19 22 (50½) Southern Miss.
at South Carolina 11 12½ (48½) Vanderbilt
at Oklahoma 28 26 (47½) Tulsa
at California OFF OFF (OFF) Ohio St.
at Kansas St. 35½ 38½ (52½) UMass
at South Florida 10½ 10 (42) FAU
at Rice Pk 5 (59) Kansas
at LSU 38 37½ (55) Kent St.
Notre Dame 23 20½ (52) at Purdue
UTEP 6 6½ (53) at NewMexico St.
at Northwestern 35 31½ (60½) W. Michigan
at Arizona 24½ 25½ (63½) UTSA
at Utah +3 2 (51) Oregon St.
at UNLV 16 7 (56½) Cent. Michigan
at Arizona St. 4 5½ (55) Wisconsin
x-at Chicago
OfKey
Ohio St. QB questionable
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Thursday
at NewEngland 10 13 (44) N.Y. Jets
Sunday
at Philadelphia OFF OFF (OFF) San Diego
at Baltimore 6 6½ (43½) Cleveland
at Houston OFF OFF (OFF) Tennessee
at Indianapolis Pk 3 (42½) Miami
Carolina 2½ 3 (44½) at Bufalo
at Atlanta 6 7 (47) St. Louis
at Green Bay OFF OFF (OFF) Washington
at Kansas City OFF OFF (OFF) Dallas
at Chicago 5½ 6½ (41) Minnesota
NewOrleans 3 3 (46) at Tampa Bay
Detroit Pk Pk (47) at Arizona
at Oakland 3½ 5½ (39½) Jacksonville
at N.Y. Giants OFF OFF (OFF) Denver
at Seattle 3 3 (44½) San Francisco
Sept. 16
at Cincinnati 6 6½ (40½) Pittsburgh
OfKey
San Diego plays Sept. 9
Philadelphia plays Sept. 9
Houston plays Sept. 9
Washington plays Sept. 9
Dallas played late game Sept. 8
N.Y. Giants played late game Sept. 8
LATEST LINE BULLETIN BOARD
hOLES IN ONE
local calendar
auto raci ng
local golf
bowli ng
what’ s on tv
baseball
transacti ons
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
(x-if necessary)
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Durham3, Indianapolis 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Durham2, Indianapolis 0
Thursday, Sep. 5: Durham6, Indianapolis 5
Friday, Sep. 6: Durham2, Indianapolis 1
Pawtucket 3, Rochester 2
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Rochester 7, Pawtucket 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Pawtucket 7, Rochester 2
Friday, Sep. 6: Pawtucket 5, Rochester 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Rochester 9, Pawtucket 1
Sunday, Sep. 8: Pawtucket 3, Rochester 0
Championship
(Best-of-5)
Durhamvs. Pawtucket
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Pawtucket at Durham,
7:05 p.m.
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Pawtucket at Durham,
7:05 p.m.
Friday, Sep. 13: Durhamat Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Durhamat Pawtucket,
7:05 p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 15: Durhamat Pawtucket,
1:05 p.m.
EASTERN LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
(x-if necessary)
Wild-Card
(Best-of-5)
Trenton 3, Binghamton 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Trenton 6, Binghamton 5,
10 innings
Thursday, Sep. 5: Trenton 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Trenton 3, Binghamton 0
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Harrisburg 3, Erie 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Harrisburg 5, Erie 4
Thursday, Sep. 5: Erie 2, Harrisburg 1, 12 innings
Friday, Sep. 6: Harrisburg 4, Erie 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Harrisburg 5, Erie 1
Harrisburg 3, Trenton 0
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Harrisburg at Trenton,
7:05 p.m.
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Harrisburg at Trenton,
7:05 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 12: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
x-Friday, Sep. 13: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
NEWYORK - PENN LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
(x-if necessary)
First Round
(Best-of-3)
State College 2, Jamestown 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Jamestown 6, State College 5
Saturday, Sep. 7: State College 12, Jamestown 4
Sunday, Sep. 8: State College 6, Jamestown 0
Tri-City 2, Aberdeen 0
Friday, Sep. 6: Tri-City 1, Aberdeen 0
Saturday, Sep. 7: Tri-City 3, Aberdeen 0
Championship
(Best-of-3)
State College vs. Tri-City
Tuesday, Sep. 10: State College at Tri-City,
7:05 p.m.
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Tri-City at State College,
7:05 p.m.
x-Thursday, Sep. 12: Tri-City at State College,
7:05 p.m.
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
(x-if necessary)
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Salt Lake 3, Las Vegas 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Thursday, Sep. 5: Salt Lake 5, Las Vegas 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Las Vegas 3, Salt Lake 2
Saturday, Sep. 7: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 6
Championship
(Best-of-5)
Salt Lake vs. Omaha
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Salt Lake at Omaha, 8:05 p.m.
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Salt Lake at Omaha,
8:05 p.m.
Friday, Sep. 13: Omaha at Salt Lake, TBA
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Omaha at Salt Lake, TBA
x-Sunday, Sep. 15: Omaha at Salt Lake, TBA
SUNDAY’S LATE BOxSCORE
Reds 3, Dodgers 2
Los Angeles AB R h BI BB SO Avg.
C.Crawford lf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .289
Puig rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .344
Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .291
H.Ramirez ss 4 1 2 2 0 1 .339
Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .271
Ethier cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273
A.Ellis c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .248
M.Ellis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .271
Kershawp 3 0 0 0 0 2 .169
Withrowp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Belisario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 32 2 6 2 0 12
Cincinnati AB R h BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 1 0 1 0 2 0 .291
Heisey lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .235
Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .303
B.Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .265
Bruce rf 4 2 2 2 0 2 .268
Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Cozart ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .254
Hanigan c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .214
H.Bailey p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .154
a-N.Soto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
A.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 29 3 6 3 3 9
Los Angeles 000 100 100—2 6 0
Cincinnati 010 100 001—3 6 1
One out when winning run scored.
a-struck out for H.Bailey in the 7th.
E—Frazier (8). LOB—Los Angeles 4, Cincinnati
7. 2B—C.Crawford (27), H.Ramirez (23), Hanigan
(8). HR—H.Ramirez (17), of H.Bailey; Bruce 2
(29), of Kershaw 2. RBIs—H.Ramirez 2 (52),
Bruce 2 (93), Hanigan (21). S—Hanigan.
Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles
2 (Ad.Gonzalez, Kershaw); Cincinnati 3 (B.Phillips
2, Heisey). RISP—Los Angeles 0 for 3; Cincinnati
1 for 5.
GIDP—Ad.Gonzalez.
DP—Cincinnati 1 (B.Phillips, Cozart, Votto).
Los Angeles IP h R ER BB SO NP ERA
Kershaw 7 4 2 2 3 7 104 1.92
Withrow 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 2.96
Belisario L, 5-7 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 8 3.52
Cincinnati IP h R ER BB SO NP ERA
H.Bailey 7 6 2 2 0 9 99 3.39
Duke 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 7.50
Hoover 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.85
A.ChapmanW, 4-5 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.62
HBP—by Kershaw (Heisey, Choo), by H.Bailey
(Puig). Balk—Kershaw.
Umpires—Home, Jim Wolf; First, Ed Hickox;
Second, JimJoyce; Third, Jef Nelson.
T—2:57. A—34,041 (42,319).
NASCAR SPRINT CUP POINTS
LEADERS
Through Sep. 7
1. Matt Kenseth, 2,015.
2. Jimmie Johnson, 2,012.
3. Kyle Busch, 2,012.
4. Kevin Harvick, 2,006.
5. Carl Edwards, 2,006.
6. Joey Logano, 2,003.
7. Greg Bife, 2,003.
8. Clint Bowyer, 2,000.
9. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,000.
10. Kurt Busch, 2,000.
11. Kasey Kahne, 2,000.
12. MartinTruex Jr., 2,000.
13. Jef Gordon, 750.
14. Ryan Newman, 741.
15. Jamie McMurray, 721.
16. Brad Keselowski, 720.
17. Paul Menard, 698.
18. Aric Almirola, 664.
19. Juan Pablo Montoya, 656.
20. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 644.
21. Marcos Ambrose, 638.
22. Jef Burton, 628.
23. Tony Stewart, 594.
24. Casey Mears, 544.
25. David Ragan, 489.
26. Denny Hamlin, 485.
27. Danica Patrick, 473.
28. David Gilliland, 462.
29. Mark Martin, 457.
30. Dave Blaney, 396.
31. David Stremme, 362.
32. David Reutimann, 353.
33. Travis Kvapil, 352.
34. Bobby Labonte, 343.
35. J.J. Yeley, 340.
36. AJ Allmendinger, 337.
37. Timmy Hill, 127.
38. Michael McDowell, 122.
39. Michael Waltrip, 102.
40. Scott Speed, 99.
41. Ken Schrader, 92.
42. Terry Labonte, 77.
43. Boris Said, 48.
44. Ron Fellows, 31.
45. Alex Kennedy, 21.
46. Justin Marks, 14.
47. Victor Gonzalez Jr., 10.
48. Scott Riggs, 10.
49. Brian Keselowski, 9.
50. Tomy Drissi, 8.
BASEBALL
American League
HOUSTON ASTROS — Recalled INF Brandon
Laird, OF Jimmy Paredes and RHPs David Marti-
nez and Rhiner Cruz fromOklahoma City (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS —Recalled SS Tommy
Field fromSalt Lake (PCL).
MINNESOTA TWINS — Recalled RHPs Michael
Tonkin and Cole De Vries, LHPScott Diamond, OF
Chris Parmelee and INF Eduardo Escobar from
Rochester (IL). Selected the contracts of C Eric
Fryer and RHP Shairon Martis from Rochester.
Transferred RHP Samuel Deduno and OF Wilkin
Ramirez to the 60-day DL.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Recalled C Christian
Bethancourt fromMississippi (SL).
NEW YORK METS — Recalled OF Mike Baxter
fromLas Vegas (PCL).
Can-AmLeague
QUEBEC CAPITALES — Released RHP Jamie
Richmond.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Promoted
player development coach David Adelman to
assistant coach. Named Bobby Jackson player
development coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGOBEARS —Signed OTJonathan Scott
toa one-year contract. SignedQBJerrodJohnson
to the practice squad. WaivedTE KyleAdams. Ter-
minated the practice squad contract of G Derek
Dennis.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Named Tom Garfnkel
president and CEO.
NEWYORKJETS —Re-signed QBBrady Quinn.
Released LB Danny Lansanah. Signed WR Rah-
saanVaughn to the practice squad.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Placed LB Larry
Foote, C Maurkice Pouncey and RB LaRod Ste-
phens-Howling on the injured reserve list. Signed
RBJonathan Dwyer, C/GFernando Velasco and K
Shayne Graham.
hOCKEY
National hockey League
CALGARY FLAMES — Announced the retire-
ment of GMiikka Kiprusof.
OTTAWA SENATORS — Signed F Colin Green-
ing to a three-year contract extension through
2016-17.
American hockey League
CHICAGO WOLVES — Signed RW Shane
Harper.
GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS — Named Alan
Cross public relations manager.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
NEW YORK CITY FC — Named Tim Pernetti
chief business ofcer.
TORONTOFC—Traded FMaximiliano Urruti to
Portland for F Bright Dike.
National Women’s Soccer League
WASHINGTONSPIRIT—Selected D Nikki Mar-
shall fromthe waiver draft.
COLLEGE
CONNECTICUT — Suspended men’s senior
basketball F Tyler Olander indefnitely for violat-
ing unspecifed teamrules.
GRU AUGUSTA — Named Mark Mortimer as-
sistant baseball coach and Robbie Wachman
pitching coach.
MIAMI — Hired Kelley McCallum as assistant
swimming coach.
RICE — Named Joe Karlgaard director of ath-
letics, recreation and lifetime ftness.
SAINT FRANCIS (PA) — Named La’Tavia Rorie
women’s assistant basketball coach.
TUESDAY
hIGh SChOOL FIELD hOCKEY
Berwick at Meyers
Hanover Area at PittstonArea
Tunkhannock at GAR
hIGh SChOOL GOLF
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Seminary
hIGh SChOOL BOYS SOCCER
Berwick at WyomingArea
HazletonArea at Dallas
Meyers at Crestwood, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area
hIGh SChOOL GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Crestwood at GAR, 4:30 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Hanover Area
HazletonArea at North Pocono
Lake-Lehman at Holy Redeemer, 4:30 p.m.
COLLEGE FIELD hOCKEY
Misericordia at Alvernia, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE MEN’S SOCCER
PSUMont Alto at PSUHazleton, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE CO-ED SOCCER
PSU Worthington Scranton at PSU Wilkes-
Barre, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN’STENNIS
Misericordia at Keystone, 3:30 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN’SVOLLEYBALL
PSU-Hazleton at King’s, 7 p.m.
Wilkes at Susquehanna, 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
hIGh SChOOL CROSS COUNTRY
Dallas/Coughlin/MMI Prep/Wyoming Semi-
nary/Crestwood at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m.
hIGh SChOOL FIELD hOCKEY
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Nanticoke at Crestwood
WyomingArea at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin
WyomingValley West at Delaware Valley
hIGh SChOOL GOLF
Crestwood at Berwick, 3:30 p.m.
Hanover Area at WyomingArea
HazletonArea at WyomingValley West
Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Seminary
MMI Prep at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Nanticoke at Meyers
PittstonArea at Coughlin
Tunkhannock at Dallas
hIGh SChOOL BOYS SOCCER
GAR at Holy Redeemer
hIGh SChOOL GIRLS SOCCER
Berwick at Meyers
Crestwood at Tunkhannock
WyomingArea at HazletonArea
Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin
hIGh SChOOL GIRLSTENNIS
Coughlin at Berwick
Crestwood at WyomingValley West, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary
Hanover Area at Tunkhannock
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
Holy Redeemer at MMI Prep, 4 p.m.
GAR at WyomingArea
hIGh SChOOL GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Dallas at Coughlin
MMI Prep at Meyers
PittstonArea at Wyoming valley West
Tunkhannock at WyomingArea
COLLEGE FIELD hOCKEY
King’s at Muhlenberg, 7:30 p.m.
COLLEGE GOLF
PSU-Hazleton at Penn College, 11 a.m.
COLLEGE MEN’S SOCCER
Misericordia at Susquehanna, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN’S SOCCER
King’s at Alvernia, 7 p.m.
Marywood at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN’SVOLLEYBALL
PSUYork at PSUWilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
ThURSDAY
hIGh SChOOL FIELD hOCKEY
Berwick at Hanover Area
GAR at Elk Lake
Meyers at PittstonArea
Northwest at Tunkhannock
hIGh SChOOL BOYS SOCCER
Coughlin at Wyoming Seminary
Crestwood at Tunkhannock
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
MMI at Nanticoke
WyomingValley West at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
hIGh SChOOL GIRLS SOCCER
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Lake-Lehman at WyomingValley West
MMI Prep at Nanticoke
PittstonArea at Hanover Area
hIGh SChOOL GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Berwick at HazletonArea
Crestwood at North Pocono, 4:30 p.m.
GAR at Hanover Area
Holy Redeemer at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m.
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
COLLEGE GOLF
King’s at Moravian (Woodstone), 1 p.m.
COLLEGE MEN’S SOCCER
Wilkes at Baptist Bible, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN’S SOCCER
LebanonValley at Wilkes, 4:30 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN’SVOLLEYBALL
PSUHazleton at Penn College, 1 p.m.
PSU-York at PSUWilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
WilliamPaterson at King’s, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY
hIGh SChOOL FOOTBALL
Abington Heights at Williamsport
Carbondale at GAR
Hanover Area at Lakeland
HazletonArea at Delaware Valley
Holy Cross at Northwest
Lake-Lehman at WyomingArea
Meyers at Lackawanna Trail
Montrose at Tunkhannock
PittstonArea at Crestwood
WyomingValley West at Scranton
hIGh SChOOL FIELD hOCKEY
Nanticoke at WyomingValley West, 4:15 p.m.
hIGh SChOOL GOLF
Hanover Area at MMI Prep
Holy Redeemer at GAR, 4:15 p.m.
Meyers at Wyoming Seminary
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
hIGh SChOOL BOYS SOCCER
Berwick at GAR
Hanover Area at Meyers
Tunkhannock at HazletonArea
hIGh SChOOL GIRLS SOCCER
Crestwood at Lake-Lehman
Tunkhannock at HazletonArea
hIGh SChOOL GIRLSTENNIS
Berwick at HazletonArea
Holy Redeemer at Hanover Area, 4 p.m.
MMI Prep at GAR
PittstonArea at Dallas
Tunkhannock at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m.
WyomingArea at Coughlin
Wyoming Seminary at WyomingValley West
COLLEGE FIELD hOCKEY
Wilkes at Widener, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMEN’STENNIS
Wilkes at Marywood, 4 p.m.
MLB
7 p.m.
CSN—San Diego at Philadelphia
MLB —Boston at Tampa Bay
SNY—Washington at N.Y. Mets
WQMY, WWOR —N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore
8 p.m.
ROOT—Pittsburgh at Texas
SAILING
3:30 p.m.
NBCSN —America’s Cup, race 5 and 6, at San
Francisco
SOCCER
8 p.m.
ESPN — Men’s national teams, World Cup
qualifer, United States vs. Mexico, at Columbus,
Ohio
GLENMAURANATIONAL
GOLF CLUB
2013 Junior Club Championship (2 Rounds)
Winner: Chris Cerminaro (140).
Runner-ups: Nick Johnson (145), Dominick
Mancinelli (145).
IREMCOUNTRYCLUB
Fab 4s Women’s Golf Association Winners
First Flight: JoannWanyo.
Second Flight: Nancy McAndrew.
Third Flight: Joan Moran.
Birdies: Gretchen Watters (Hole 4), Joann
Freeman (Hole 1).
Chip-ins: Mary Ann Stelma (Hole 8), Nancy
McAndrew (Hole 13), Ruth Roberts (Hole 8),
Gretchen Watters (Hole 11), Joanne Bittner (Hole
14), Joann Freeman (Hole 10).
Putting Prize: Joann Freeman (25).
harper sinks hole-in-one
Mike Harper aced the 164-yard
seventh hole at Wilkes-Barre Golf
Club with a 6 iron. John Rosick,
Bob Barney and Steve Stiller
witnessed the hole-in-one.
hunsinger holes fifth hole
Jerry Hunsinger aced the 124-
yard ffth hole at the Wyoming
Valley Country Club. TomMerlie,
George Potsko and George
Reimiller witnessed the hole-in-
one.
Evans makes ace
Christopher Evans aced the 150-
yard fourth hole at the Blue Ridge
Trail Golf Club with a 7 iron. Pete
and Anthony Beczek witnessed
the hole-in-one.
Rosati sinks hole-in-one
Louis Rosati aced the 115-yard
11th hole at the Fox Hill Country
Club with a 9 iron.
Endler makes ace
Bailey Endler aced the 156-yard
15th hole at the Wyoming Valley
Country Club. Jason Mustapich,
Jefrey Mutchler, Dalton Lentini,
Bobby Shoemaker and Colin
McAndrewwitnessed the hole-
in-one.
Yascur aces Lehman 8
JimYascur, of Dallas, had a hole
in one on the par 4 eighth hole
at Lehman Golf Club. He used a
driver to record the sixth hole in
one of his career. His shot was
witnessed by Denny Titus and
Michael Morgan.
Mchugh hits hole-in-one at
Lehman
Sean McHugh had a hole in one
on the 135-yard sixth hole at
Lehman Golf Club. His shot was
witnessed by Rich Smith. He used
a 9 iron to record the frst ace of
his career.
Van Santen sinks ace
Bill Van Santen aced the second
hole at the Newberry Estate
Country Club with a 9 iron. Claire
Evans witnessed the hole-in-one.
MODERN LANES
Thursday 6 p.m. League
Team Standings: 1. Mark’s Pro Shop, 4-0; 2.
Team 10, 4-0; 3. Team 4, 4-0; 4. Team 12, 3-1; 5.
Team 8, 3-1; 6. Number 2, 2-2; 7. Susquehanna
Build, 2-2; 8. Bean’s Pro Shop, 1-3; 9. Team12, 1-3;
10. Dan’s Drywalls, 0-4; 11. Instigators, 0-4; 12.
The Donkeys, 0-4.
high Scratch Game: 1. Dolphus Teart, 300; 2.
Mark Mancini, 269; 3. Dave Kern, 267.
high Scratch Series: 1. Ed Polons, 746; 2.
Mark Mancini, 739; 3. Dave Kern, 701.
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
NewEngland 1 0 0 1.000 23 21
Miami 1 0 0 1.000 23 10
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 18 17
Bufalo 0 1 0 .000 21 23
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 21 17
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 16 9
Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 2 28
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 21 24
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 9 16
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 10 23
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 28 2
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 17 21
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 31
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 27
Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 33
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 36
South
W L T Pct PF PA
NewOrleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34
West
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27
Thursday’s Game
Denver 49, Baltimore 27
Sunday’s Games
NewOrleans 23, Atlanta 17
Chicago 24, Cincinnati 21
NewEngland 23, Bufalo 21
Tennessee 16, Pittsburgh 9
N.Y. Jets 18, Tampa Bay 17
Kansas City 28, Jacksonville 2
Seattle 12, Carolina 7
Miami 23, Cleveland 10
Detroit 34, Minnesota 24
Indianapolis 21, Oakland 17
San Francisco 34, Green Bay 28
St. Louis 27, Arizona 24
Dallas 36, N.Y. Giants 31
Monday’s Games
Philadelphia 33, Washington 27
Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 12
N.Y. Jets at NewEngland, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 15
Dallas at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
NewOrleans at Tampa Bay, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 16
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:40 p.m.
Eagles-Redskins Stats
Philadelphia 12 14 7 0—33
Washington 7 0 7 13—27
First Quarter
Was—Hall 75 fumble return (Forbath kick),
11:54.
Phi—FGHenery 48, 9:15.
Phi—Jackson 25 pass fromVick (Henery kick),
8:59.
Phi—Cole safety, 4:50.
Second Quarter
Phi—Celek 28 pass from Vick (Henery kick),
6:10.
Phi—Vick 3 run (Henery kick), :58.
Third Quarter
Phi—McCoy 34 run (Henery kick), 13:26.
Was—Morris 5 run (Forbath kick), :06.
Fourth Quarter
Was—Hankerson 10 pass from Grifn III (pass
failed), 12:24.
Was—Hankerson 24 pass from Grifn III (For-
bath kick), 1:14.
A—82,743.
Phi Was
First downs 26 25
Total Net Yards 443 382
Rushes-yards 49-263 18-74
Passing 180 308
Punt Returns 0-0 2-14
Kickof Returns 2-37 3-56
Interceptions Ret. 2-1 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 15-25-0 30-49-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-23 3-21
Punts 6-42.3 3-42.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-1
Penalties-Yards 8-65 10-75
Time of Possession 32:39 27:21
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUShING—Philadelphia, McCoy 31-184, Vick
9-54, Brown 9-25. Washington, Morris 12-45, Grif-
fn III 5-24, Helu 1-5.
PASSING—Philadelphia, Vick 15-25-0-203.
Washington, Grifn III 30-49-2-329.
RECEIVING—Philadelphia, Jackson 7-104,
Celek 2-56, Cooper 2-14, Avant 2-13, Ertz 1-11,
McCoy 1-5. Washington, Garcon 7-64, Hankerson
5-80, Moss 5-54, Reed 5-38, Morgan 4-51, Davis
2-22, Helu 1-11, Morris 1-9.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Washington, Forbath
40 (WR).
football
SUNDAY’S LATE SUMMARY
Giants-Cowboys Stats
N.Y. Giants 3 7 7 14—31
Dallas 3 10 14 9—36
First Quarter
Dal—FGBailey 30, 13:04.
NYG—FGJ.Brown 20, 2:02.
Second Quarter
Dal—FGBailey 38, 10:02.
Dal—Witten 15 pass from Romo (Bailey kick),
2:55.
NYG—Cruz 70 pass from Manning (J.Brown
kick), 1:50.
Third Quarter
Dal—Church 27 fumble return (Bailey kick),
12:31.
Dal—Witten 4 pass from Romo (Bailey kick),
4:55.
NYG—Cruz 18 pass from Manning (J.Brown
kick), 1:44.
Fourth Quarter
Dal—FGBailey 45, 12:10.
NYG—Cruz 10 pass from Manning (J.Brown
kick), 8:47.
Dal—Carr 49 interception return (pass failed),
1:50.
NYG—Myers 4 pass from Manning (J.Brown
kick), :11.
A—85,348.
NYG Dal
First downs 21 22
Total Net Yards 478 331
Rushes-yards 14-50 23-87
Passing 428 244
Punt Returns 5-20 2-19
Kickof Returns 1-26 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 1-91 3-62
Comp-Att-Int 27-42-3 36-49-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-22 2-19
Punts 3-54.7 6-45.8
Fumbles-Lost 3-3 2-0
Penalties-Yards 6-52 5-40
Time of Possession 22:50 37:10
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUShING—N.Y. Giants, Scott 5-23, Wilson
7-19, Manning 2-8. Dallas, Murray 20-86, Tanner
1-2, Romo 2-(minus 1).
PASSING—N.Y. Giants, Manning 27-42-3-450.
Dallas, Romo 36-49-1-263.
RECEIVING—N.Y. Giants, Myers 7-66, Cruz5-118,
Nicks 5-114, Randle 5-101, Scott 5-51. Dallas, Austin
10-72, Witten 8-70, Murray 8-39, Bryant 4-22, Wil-
liams 2-32, Harris 2-12, Tanner 1-9, Escobar 1-7.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
CAMPS/CLINICS
Sem Cradle Lacrosse is
ofering a clinic for boys and
girls ages 4-8 at Wyoming
Seminary Upper School in
Kingston. Programsessions
will be held Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. at Klassner
Field on North Maple Street
beginning Saturday, Sept.
21 and continuing through
Nov. 2. Cost is $120. The
programprovides all necessary
equipment with no additional
feel. The curriculumis
designed to teach the basics of
lacrosse. It will be directed by
Semcoach Catie Kersey. For
more information or to register,
contact Kersey at ckersey@
wyomingseminary.org.
MEETINGS
Crestwood Football Booster
Club will have a meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m.
at Tony’s Pizza. Parents of all
junior high and varsity players
are welcome to attend.
hughestown Sports Club
will have a meeting at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18, at
Granteed’s, Parsonage St. in
Pittston. Game tickets and
season tickets are available
and can be purchased at the
meeting or by contacting
any club member. For more
information, call Barbara
Kapish at 457-5705.
Nanticoke Area Little
League will meet Sept. 11
at 7 p.m. Location will be
announced soon. Elections for
all positions will take place at
end of meeting.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Back Mountain Bandits
Boys and Girls Lacrosse
Registration for 2014 season
will be Saturday Sept. 21 from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dallas
American Legion. The league
is for boys in age groups U9
to U15 and girls in grades
3-8. Family Discounts apply
and there are no mandatory
fund raisers. Registration
fee includes U.S. Lacrosse
registration, U.S. Lacrosse
Magazine and a team uniform.
The league is also looking
for volunteers for board
positions and all aspects of
the organization. For more
information, visit www.
laxteams.net/bmylax/ or
email bmtlax@gmail.com.
Dallas Youth Basketball
is holding registration for
its winter youth basketball
leagues on Tuesday, Sept.
10 and Thursday, Sept. 12.
The registrations will be held
from 6-9 p.m., both nights
at Wycallis Elementary
school cafeteria. Boys and
girls who live in the Dallas
School District who attend
third though eighth grade are
eligible to participate. Call
Scott at 570-690-2190 for
more information.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OThER
Assembly 59 will have a golf
tournament Saturday, Sept. 21
at the Hollenback Golf Course
on North Washington Street in
Wilkes-Barre. The tournament
begins at 9 a.m. The cost is
$40 per person. For more
information, call Butch at
829-3398 or 825-3584.
Refreshments will be served
afterwards at the North End
Slovak Club.
Bass Fishing Tournament will
be held Sept. 21 at Blytheburn
Lake on Blytheburn Rd. in
Mountain Top. Boats in the
water at 6:30 a.m. and out at 11
a.m. The fee is $40 per team.
The tournament is limited to 10
boats. Reserve early. This is a
fundraiser for the Blytheburn
Lake Association. For more
information, call 868-6895 or
678-5261.
Commonwealth Medical
College will have its ffth
annual golf tournament
Monday, Sept. 30, at Huntsville
Golf Course in Shavertown.
Registration is at 9 a.m. and
the tournament begins at
10 a.m. All proceeds beneft
The Commonwealth Medical
College scholarships. For more
information, call 504-9619.
Dallas Rotary Club’s
30th Annual Golf Classic,
to support Dallas Rotary
charities, will be held at the
Irem Country Club on Monday,
Sept. 23. The tournament
starts at 12:30 p.m. The
sponsorship donation is $100
and the player entry fee is
$110. The format is captain
and crew. Individuals are
welcome and will be teamed
up with others in a group. For
more information or an entry
form, call Kevin Smith at 696-
5420. Sponsors and players
should respond by Sept. 12.
harper Family will have its
annual event Saturday, Sept.
21 at Blue Ridge Trail Golf
Course. The tournament
starts at 1 p.m. and will be
a captain and crew format.
The cost is $95 per person,
which includes the golf, a gift
for each golfer and dinner
to be held at Blue Ridge Trail
following play. Awards will be
given to three fight winners.
There will also be prizes for
closest to the pins and a pot
of gold hole. There will also
be door prizes. All proceeds
will beneft the American
Heart Association. For more
information, call Paul F. Harper
at 592-5191 or email him at
harperpunar@yahoo.com. The
deadline for entry is Sept. 14.
holy Rosary Golf
Tournament is set for Sept.
15 at Pine Hills Country Club in
Taylor. Registration is at noon
for a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
Cost is $90 per player, $360
for a foursome, and includes
lunch and dinner. Contact
Debbie at 451-1762 or Holy
Rosary School at 457-2553 for
information, registrations and
sponsorships.
King’s Softball will have
a golf tournament Sunday,
Sept. 29, at Four Seasons Golf
Course. The cost is $75 per
golfer, which includes 18 holes
of golf, cart, beverages and a
meal. The format is captain
and crew. Reservations are
required by Sept. 20. For more
information, email softball@
kings.edu or call 208.5855.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little
League Board of Directors
has nominations for all
positions. In order to submit
your name for nomination,
please email bbordow@ptd.
net indicating your interest.
Nominations for all positions
will be submitted at the KFF
Board meeting on Monday,
Sept. 16. A detailed description
of these positions are
available on our website- www.
kfl.org.
Knights of Columbus
Pittston Council No. 372
local level soccer challenge
will be held at noon Sept.
22 at the James Clark Park
located along Curry Street
in Pittston for all area boys
and girls ages 10-14. Winners
progress through local, district
and state competitions.
Participants will compete in
their respective age groups.
There is no cost for admission.
Participants are required to
have proof of age and written
parental consent to compete.
For more information, call Don
Mac Rae at 815-4454 or Mitch
Megliola at 335-3002.
Luzerne County Special
Olympics Golf Tournament
will be held Sunday, Sept. 22
with a noon check-in and a
1 p.m. shotgun start at Four
Seasons Golf Course in Exeter.
The tournament will beneft
Luzerne County Special
Olympians’ fall/winter/spring
training. To register or to
donate, please email Frank at
fvt315@netzero.com or call
510-5600.
Northwest Area hoopster
Classic Golf Tournament
will be held Sept. 21 at Mill
Race Golf Course in Benton.
The cost is $75 per person,
which includes 18 holes of
golf, a cart, door prizes, a
meal, drinks and snacks.
Registration is at 7:30 a.m.
and the tournament starts at
8 a.m. The format is four-
man scramble. For more
information, call Lisa at
256-3412.
Shavertown United
Methodist Church 7th
Annual Golf Tournament
will be held at the Mill Race
Golf and Camping Resort
in Benton Saturday, Oct. 5.
Registration starts at 9 a.m.
and the tournament begins
at 10 a.m. Entry fee is $80,
which includes green fees,
carts, free use of driving range
with unlimited balls, snacks,
barbecue chicken dinner
following the tournament,
souvenirs and prizes. Hole
sponsorships are available
for $80, which gives sponsors
a sign at the tee box and a
listing in the program. To
donate prizes for the golfers,
call the church. Make checks
payable to SUMC and include
the names of those in your
foursome. Singles will be
paired. Mail checks and entry
form to Shavertown United
Methodist Church 163 N.
Pioneer Ave., Shavertown, Pa.
18708.
Step By Step Inc.’s golf
outing will be Sept. 16 at the
Huntsville Golf Club. The
tournament will beneft the
Step By Step, Inc. Foundation.
The Foundation has been
established to provide
community education
regarding developmental
disabilities, autism, and
mental health services. For
more information, call Bob
Blazaskie at 829-3477, ext.
158, or Marbee Sulitka at 829-
3477, ext. 308.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com sports Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 3B
Maryland Athletics
Former Crestwood standout Anna Dessoye
has played in every game in her young
college career. The sophomore has helped
Maryland to a No. 2 ranking in the latest
national poll, scoring four goals and add-
ing five assists in four games this season.
BILL ARSENAULT
For The Times Leader
The University of Maryland field
hockey team is 4-0 and ranked sec-
ond in the nation and keying the
effort is sophomore Anna Dessoye.
Dessoye (Crestwood) leads the
Terps in points (13) and assists
(five) and is tied for first in goals
scored (four). She had the first two
goals in a recent 3-0 victory over No.
8 Old Dominion.
“Anna’s just done a tremendous job
being our most prolific goal scorer,”
coach Missy Meharg said. “She has the
highest number of shots on the team.”
Dessoye played in all 24 games
and started 20 and had five goals and
three assists as a freshman.
“I think Anna’s opportunity to
compete in the Junior World Cup
this past summer has helped her to
take her game to a whole new level,”
Meharg said.
The coach also likes Dessoye’s ver-
satility.
“Last year she was a significant
part of our success but this year she
has come in and she’s been a pleasure
to coach,” Meharg said. “We’re really
excited about her flexibility and her
ability to play in the front three as
well as in the midfield.”
SOTOSEES ACTION—It didn’t
take long for Shakir Soto to get onto
the field with the Pittsburgh football
team. Defensive tackle Soto (GAR
Memorial) played in the season-
opener against Florida State and col-
lected three tackles, two for losses,
as the Panthers made their Atlantic
Coast Conference debut with a 41-13
loss to the Seminoles.
“Shakir is a true freshman but
we thought he did one heck of a
job against Florida State,” Pitt head
coach Paul Chryst said. “He has been
a worker from the time he arrived in
January.”
The 6-foot-3, 255-pound Soto, a
two-time All-Pennsylvania selec-
tion while at GAR, finished his high
school career with 52 sacks and was
one of the top recruits in the state.
“We were excited when we signed
him and his performance in practice
and against the Seminoles only served
to reinforce that feeling,” Chryst said.
“I expect Shakir to continue to prog-
ress and be an important contributor
on our defensive front.”
The Panthers, idle last weekend,
return to the field in a non-league
game against New Mexico Saturday
in Pittsburgh.
WATCH LIST FOR SCHMID
— Joseph Schmid (Wyoming
Valley West) is into his final season
playing with the Monmouth men’s
soccer team. He’s coming off a big
junior season when he was named
to the All-Region and All-Northeast
Conference first team.
“Joseph is an outstanding player,”
coach Bob McCourt said. “He has
been named to the Hermann Award
(college soccer’s Heisman Trophy)
because he is one of the top midfield-
ers in the country.”
Schmidhasn’t scoredinMonmouth’s
first three games, but has scored 11
goals with nine assists in his first three
seasons, including a freshman year at
Villanova. He had five goals and three
assists last season.
“Joseph is our captain and is the
leader of the team,” McCourt said.
“He is the epitome of the term stu-
dent-athlete. He does very well in the
class room as well as on the field.”
The Hawks are 1-2 in the early
going but are contenders for the
NEC title.
BIG GAME FOR NEWAK —
Sophomore Jess Newak had a goal
and an assist on the game-winner as
her Wake Forest field hockey team
defeated No. 8 Michigan 2-1 in the
Atlantic Coast Conference-Big Ten
Challenge last Sunday in Iowa City,
Iowa. Newak (Crestwood) is in her
second season as a starter, having
scored five goals with three assists
as a freshman. The points against
Michigan were her first this season.
“I think Jess’ discipline has
improvedthis season,” coach Jennifer
Averill said. “Her understanding of
the college game has improved along
with her awareness both offensive
and defensively.”
Averill, who recorded her 300th
victory in a season-opening triumph
over Miami, puts Newak’s game in
perspective.
“Last year, she was just a quick
hockey player and now her hockey
skill level is catching up with her
quickness,” the coach said.
DUO HELPING EAGLES —
Sophomores Kelcie Hromisin
(Wyoming Valley West) and
AshLeigh Sebia of Plains (Wyoming
Seminary) are solid performers for
the Boston College field hockey
team.
Hromisin has scored two goals and
had a key score in a 5-4 victory over
Maine.
“Kelcie has one of the best work
rates I have seen in my career,” veter-
an coach Ainslee Lamb said. “She is
coachable, focused and determined.
She takes every opportunity to get
better and she uses every minute —
every second for that matter — on
the field to make a difference for the
team.”
Sebia has a goal and an assist and
had the first goal in a 2-1 triumph
over Rutgers.
“AshLeigh also has an incredible
work rate and a passion for Boston
College,” Lamb said. “She is an
impact on the field in both practice
and game situations. Her pride to
represent our programs in all aspects
is admirable and her desire to be the
best she can be to contribute to the
success and level of play for the team
is awesome.”
The Eagles, ranked 19th in the
country, are 4-1 after a 4-2 loss to No.
14 Massachusetts last Sunday.
PIERCE CHIPPINGIN— Senior
Kevin Pierce (Dallas) continues to
be a key reserve for the 25th-ranked
Carnegie Mellon men’s soccer team.
The 6-foot-1 forward hasn’t scored
to date this season, but picked up an
assist in 13 games off the bench last
season.
“Kevin has been an integral part
of our success during his time here,”
coach Arron Lujan said. “This sea-
son, we expect him to play a signifi-
cant role. He has been playing well
thus far due to his improved move-
ment without the ball. He definitely
is an important player for our team.”
The Tartans are 3-1 after a 1-0 vic-
tory over Elizabethtown last Sunday.
The only loss was a 2-1 double over-
time setback against Dickinson last
Saturday.
HILLMAN KNOWS THE
SCORE —Senior Leigh Hillman
(Lake-Lehman) scored the first two
goals as the Bucknell field hockey
team posted a 3-2 overtime victory
over Ohio State Sunday in Columbus,
Ohio. She now has a team-high three
goals, an assist and a team-high seven
points on the season. She had seven
goals and an assist for 15 points last
season.
“Leigh has a contagiously opti-
mistic personality and is one of the
hardest working student-athletes on
our team,” coach Jeremy Cook said.
“She has made tremendous on-field
progress since her arrival here and
has been a big part of our progress as
a program during that time.”
The Bison are 2-2 and face Drexel
Friday in Philadelphia.
REXER STEPPING UP — After
a solid freshman season, sophomore
Hallie Rexer (Holy Redeemer) has
become a key performer for the St.
Francis, Pa., women’s soccer team,
which is currently 3-2-1 on the sea-
son. Rexer, a 5-foot-6 midfielder, has
played in all six games and started
two and has taken five shots but is
still looking for her first points. She
had two goals and an assist off the
bench as a freshman.
“Hallie worked hard over the
spring and summer and she’ll help
our team accomplish our goals this
fall,” coach Brenda van Stralen said.
“With a year under her belt, she will
step in at a higher level than last year.
She understands what our expecta-
tions are for her in the midfield.”
Local stars back in action at college
ON CAMPUS
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Athlete of the Week Brea Seabrook of GAR field hockey scored five goals in two games for the Grenadiers last week.
School: GAR
Grade: Junior
Sport: Field hockey
Position: Midfelder
All in the Family: Brea, fromWilkes-
Barre, is the daughter of KimGrady
and Nate Seabrook.
Stats: Seabrook opened the season
by scoring all fve of her team’s goals
over two games last week, the frst a
victory and the second a defeat.
Shooting star: The Grenadiers got an
emotional lift and hoisted themselves
past old nemesis Hanover Area when
Seabrook scored the tying goal in
the second half and then added the
game-winner in a 2-1 victory. Then
Seabrook, who received a rare honor
at GAR by being named captain as a
junior before the season, gave GAR
a shot the next time out. Despite
fghting of multiple defenders the
entire game, Seabrook scored all
three goals for the Grenadiers in a
tough 4-3 defeat to Berwick.
Coach’s corner: “Brea’s an
athlete, she’s a hard worker, she’s
determined,” GAR coach Sue Woznock
said. “She has been developing as a
leader. We were really proud of her
after the Berwick game. Berwick
triple-teamed Brea the whole game.
She kept her head through the entire
thing and found other ways to help
—passing, carrying. Brea started
playing with us at the Sports Dome in
sixth grade. We knewwe were going to
have something special in Brea.”
Did you know? During her down
time, Seabrook - who’s also a
basketball standout at GAR - can be
found fipping TVchannels between
MTVand the home and garden
station. “I like HGTV,” she said. “My
momthinks I’mso weird. But I think
it’s really cool to see all the diferent
houses.”
From her angle: “I feel like I’ve
always been a natural goal scorer,”
Seabrook said. “That’s just what I
mostly do. That’s just me.” It’s the
leadership part she’s had to work at.
“Me being captain, I don’t like to yell
at my teammates. We’re all friends
and it’s like, ‘Brea’s yelling at me!’ But
I kind of stepped it up a little bit.”
Week in review: Time to take
of. Lake-Lehman’s Dominic
Hockenbury opened the Wyoming
Valley Boys Cross Country season
with a winning time of 17:02, while
Coughlin’s David Sadvary wasn’t
far of that pace with a 17:22 in the
same meet. …On the girls side,
Dallas senior Regan Rome returned
froma preseason groin injury to win
a dual meet with a time of 20:31,
while Tunkhannock’s Maggie Toczko
captured another race in 20:10.
…It seems Tunkhannock’s Aiden
Cronin would win any race to the
cage. He scored four goals in a boys
soccer victory over Meyers, then
added three more goals in a win
over MMI. Lake-Lehman’s Austin
Harry scored all three goals in a
3-2 victory over Wyoming Seminary
and GAR’s Anthony Tlatenchi
duplicated the feat in a 3-2 win over
Berwick. Wyoming Valley West’s
Eddie Thomas also had three of the
Spartans’ four goals against Meyers.
…Keeping with the scoring spree,
Berwick’s Gabby Kishbaugh netted
three goals and made four assists
in a girls soccer victory over MMI.
Lake-Lehman’s Shoshana Mahoney
made four goals and an assist against
Wyoming Seminary. Berwick’s Abby
Kemp had four goals and an assist
against MMI while Pittston Area’s
Allie Barber had four goals and an
assist against Sem. …If it’s assists
you’re looking for, Olivia Jankowski
of Crestwood had 25 of themin a girls
volleyball victory over Lake-Lehman.
Berwick’s Courtney Soboleski
served 12 aces against Wyoming
Valley West and Lehman’s Lexi
Opplinger served 17 points, including
10 aces, in a win over Hanover
Area. Holy Redeemer hitter Nicole
Slovasky made 15 kills in a win over
Wyoming Area and Crestwood’s Emily
Sipple fnished with 14 kills against
Lehman. …Sticking with net play,
Holy Redeemer’s Megan McGraw,
Coughlin’s Dana Schneider anbd
Wyoming Seminary’s Nathalie
Joanlanne all won girls tennis
matches at No. 1 singles without
dropping a single game. Crestwood’s
Kristi Bowman posted a 6-1, 6-0
victory against Pittston Area and
Valley West’s Laura Monto won
6-1, 6-1 for the team’s only point in
a loss to Wyoming Area. …It was
a hard-luck loss in feld hockey for
Nanticoke Area goal keeper Maddie
O’Donahue, who made 22 saves
against Wyoming Area in a 1-0 defeat.
Valley West’s Julia Usefara just
wouldn’t accept defeat, as she tied
the game with a goal with 1:56 to play
in regulation and then assisted on
Danielle Grega’s overtime winner
to beat Wyoming Area 2-1. Holy
Redeemer’s Melanie Kusakavitch
had two goals and two assists against
Nanticoke Area. Wyoming Seminary’s
Mallory Lefkowicz had three goals
and an assist against Hazleton Area.
And Crestwood’s Ashleigh Thomas
scored three goals in a victory over
Dallas and her Comets teammate
Elizabeth Dessoye had two goals and
an assist in a victory over Delaware
Valley. Coughlin got a big assist, er,
three of themfromKyra Wozniak
during a victory over Wallenpaupack.
…Crestwood running back Tanner
Kahlau ran for four touchdowns - all
of themgoing for 15 yards or more
- on the football feld against North
Pocono. Coughlin’s Paul Cole rushed
for 182 yards against Hazleton Area,
Northwest’s Austin Mazonkey
darted for 173 against Susquehanna
and Meyers’ Matt DeMarco had
153 rushing yards in a loss to Old
Forge. Berwick wide receiver Andrew
Force must have lost the coverage,
because he caught 147 yards worth
of passes - a 38-yard touchdown
and gains of 66 and 43 yards on
his three catches. Holy Redeemer’s
Jimmy Strickland threwfor 258
yards and three touchdowns on 13
completions and Berwick quarterback
C.J. Curry passed for 250 yards on
nine completions. …It was complete
domination for Holy Redeemer again
on the golf course, where both Ryan
Crossin and Chase Makowski shot
3-under par 33s in a victory over
Lake-Lehman.
— Paul Sokoloski
Athlete of the Week
Brea Seabrook
shots, with Vanessa Parsons
finally finding the back of
the cage on a give-and-go
with Jenny Cave, making it
2-1 nearly midway through
the first half.
“Once they got that goal,
we knew we had to work to
keep possession of the ball
and move it around better,”
Grega said.
Play evened out through
the rest of the first half and
well into the second, with
Dallas killing off a pair of
shorthanded situations with-
out allowing a Valley West
shot — thanks in part to
nice plays by Morgan Morris
and Emma Niznik. Finally, a
well-executed penalty corner
knotted the score as Michelle
Thompson stepped into a set
up fromParsons to fire a shot
past Spartans keeper Alicia
Moore (nine saves).
Nina Magnotta made a
nifty defensive save on a
Parsons rush with four min-
utes left in the first half for
the Spartans. Usefara added
a defensive save with 19 min-
utes remaining as Parsons
led a rush upfield and spun
around a challenging Moore
before releasing a shot
that the Valley West junior
slapped away at the goal line.
***
Wyoming Valley West 3, Dallas 2
Dallas 1 1 0 — 2
Valley West 2 0 1 — 3
First half — 1. WVW, Danielle Grega (Alex
Gonda), 27:23; 2. WVW, Grega (Gonda), 21:42; 3.
DAL, Vanessa Parsons (Jenny Cave), 17:24. Sec-
ond half —4. DAL, MichelleThompson(Parsons),
17:03. Overtime —5. WVW, Grega (Julia Usefara),
12:30.
Shots — DAL 13; WVW 16. Saves — DAL 8
(Lily Amadio); WVW 9 (Alicia Moore). Defensive
saves — WVW, Nina Magnotta, Usefara. Penalty
corners —DAL5; WVW5.
***
Lake-Lehman 2,
Holy Redeemer 2 (OT)
The Black Knights
tied the Royals, thanks
to goals by Korri Wandel
and Kirsten Cope. Alyssa
Adams and Sarah Sabaluski
added assists.
Holy Redeemer received
a goal and assist from Greta
Ell. Melanie Kusakavitch
also netted a Royals goal.
Goalkeepers Holly Slowik
and Tiffany Malinowski
each had seven saves for the
Royals and Black Knights,
respectively.
Delaware Valley 2,
Nanticoke 1 (OT)
Grace Farrell hammered
the game-winning goal
with six minutes remaining
in overtime to lift Delaware
Valley past Nanticoke.
Farrell scored both of the
Warriors’ scores.
Becca Margis scored the
lone goal for the Trojans
with an assist from Carly
Grabowski. Nanticoke’s
Maddy O’Donahue made
22 saves.
Wyoming Seminary 7,
Abington Heights 0
Mallory Lefkowicz
scored a hat trick for
the Blue Knights. Alexis
Quick posted a goal and
two assists, and Becca
Weinstock tallied a goal
and an assist.
Honesdale 7, Wallenpaupack 1
Honesdale received
a hat trick from Stacey
Hart. Janie Murphy had
two goals. Bailey Martin
totaled three assists, and
Megan Benson notched
two assists.
Courtney Stevens scored
for the Buckhorns.
Northwest 2, Hanover Area 1
Rachel Zultevicz scored
a goal to carry Northwest
to a victory over Hanover
Area. Maggie Murphy also
recorded a score for the
Rangers off a Michaela
Weber pass in the second
half. Olivia Piestrak took
the win with three saves.
Brexy Pena tallied a goal
for the Hawkeyes. Regina
Deno made six saves.
Crestwood 5, Wyoming Area 0
Elizabeth Dessoye
pitched a hat trick to guide
the Comets to a shutout.
Casey Cole produced a
goal, and Ashleigh Thomas
gathered four points (goal,
two assists). Dallas Kendra
made 16 saves for the clean
sheet.
The Warriors’ Christina
Granteed thwarted 15
shots.
***
Crestwood 5, Wyoming Area 0
Crestwood 3 2 — 5
Wyoming Area 0 0 — 0
First half — 1. CRE, Casey Cole (Ashleigh
Thomas), 15:30; 2. CRE, Elizabeth Dessoye
(Thomas), 9:49; 3. CRE, Dessoye, 3:40. Second
half — 4. CRE, Thomas, 23:10; 5. CRE Dessoye,
15:04.
Shots —CRE 18, WA16. Saves —CRE 16 (Dal-
las Kendra); WA 15 (Christina Granteed). Penalty
corners —CRE 11, WA4.
Lake-Lehman 2, Holy Redeemer 2 (OT)
Lake-Lehman 2 0 0 — 2
Holy Redeemer 2 0 0 — 2
First half — 1. LL, Korri Wandel (Alyssa Ad-
ams), 29:00; 2. HR, Melanie Kusakavitch (Greta
Ell), 20:52; 3. HR, Ell, 19:00; 4. LL, Kirsten Cope
(Sarah Sabaluski), 6:46.
Shots — LL 13, HR 28. Saves — LL 7 (Tifany
Malinowski); HR 7 (Holly Slowick). Penalty cor-
ners —LL9, HR 7.
Delaware Valley 2, Nanticoke 1 (OT)
Delaware Valley 0 1 1 — 2
Nanticoke 1 0 0 — 1
First half — 1. NAN, Becca Morgis (Carly
Grabowski), 18:40. Second half — 2. DV, Grace
Farrell (Marielle Cavallarco), 8:40. Overtime —3.
DV, Farrell, 6:05.
Shots — DV 48, NAN 4. Saves — DV 2 (Eileen
D’Auria); NAN 22 (Maddy O’Donahue). Penalty
corners —DV13, NAN1.
Wyoming Seminary 7, Abington Heights 0
Abington Heights 0 0 — 0
Wyoming Seminary 4 3 — 7
First half — 1. SEM, Mallory Lefkowicz (Alexis
Quick), 12:52; 2. SEM, Lefkowicz (Becca Wein-
stock), 18:08; 3. SEM, Molly Turner (Morgan
Malone), 21:42; 4. SEM, Quick (Turner), 25:44.
Second half —5. SEM, Lefkowicz (Malone), 1:41;
6. SEM, Weinstock (Quick), 11:20; 7. SEM, Lauren
Anderson (Abby Straub), 22:28.
Shots —AH 2, SEM27. Saves —AH 13 (Eileen
D’Auria); SEM 0 (Mackenzie Gagliardi, Alexis So-
koch). Penalty corners —AH1, SEM13.
Honesdale 7, Wallenpaupack 1
Wallenpaupack 0 1 — 1
Honesdale 2 5 — 7
First half — 1. HON, Janie Murphy (Megan
Benson), 27:37; 2. HON, Stacey Hart (Bailey Mar-
tin), 22:37. Second half —3. HON, Hart (Martin),
18:24; 4. HON, JamieRosencranse(ClayreSmith),
15:03; 5. HON, Murphy (Benson), 14:09; 6. HON,
Heaven Houck (Rosencranse), 12:30; 7. HON, Hart
(Martin), 3:15; 8. WAL, Courtney Stevens, 1:00.
Shots — WAL 3, HON 24. Saves — WAL 17
(Laura Bibbs); HON 2 (Mackenzie Jackson). Pen-
alty corners —WAL3, HON11.
Northwest 2, Hanover Area 1
Northwest 1 1 — 2
Hanover Area 0 1 — 1
First half — 1. NW, Rachel Zultevicz, 14:33.
Second half —2. NW, Maggie Murphy (Michaela
Weber), 14:33; 3. HAN, Brexy Pena, 1:59.
Shots — N 9, H 4. Saves — N 3 (Olivia Pies-
trak); H 6 (Regina Deno). Penalty corners — N
14, H1.
Haley Gayoski, left,
of Wyoming Valley
West and Jenny
Cave of Dallas
duel for the ball in
Monday’s WVC field
hockey game at
Spartan Stadium in
Kingston.
Pete G. Wilcox |
The Times Leader
Grega
From page 1B
PAGE 4B Tuesday, September 10, 2013 sports www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
The Times Leader staf
BERWICK — Aiden
Cronin scored three goals
and Pat Cronin added two
assists as Tunkhannock
blitzed Berwick, 8-1 in a
boys soccer game Monday.
Pat Casey added two
goals in the second half to
ice the game for the Tigers.
Jose Mona scored
Berwick’s lone goal at the
25-minute mark of the sec-
ond half.
By that time, Cronin
had put up three goals in a
17-minute span of the first
half, and Damian Williams
and Adam Billings scored
goals to give the Tigers a
5-0 halftime lead. Billings
also added an assist on
Cronin’s third goal.
Holy Redeemer 1, Wyoming
Area 0
Holy Redeemer’s
Brandon Povilitis scored
the game’s only goal in the
61st minute on a header
in the box with an assist
from Robert Dougherty.
Ian McGrane made 14
saves to pick up a win
despite the Royals being
outshot 15-5.
Aaron Carter stopped
four shots for the Warriors.
Crestwood 3, Lake-Lehman 0
John Andrews totaled
two goals for Crestwood
in a shutout. Kyle Gegaris
kicked the Comets’ other
goal in the 72nd minute.
Lance Slysiak earned a
clean sheet with two saves.
Lake-Lehman goalkeeper
Collin Masters had 13 saves.
Pittston Area 11, MMI Prep 0
Matt Tavaglione scored
the first goal of the game
and also contributed two
assists. Colin Tracy scored
twice and added an assist.
Jordan Consagra added a
three-point effort with a
goal and an assist.
***
Tunkhannock 8, Berwick 1
Tunkhannock 5 3 — 8
Berwick 0 1 — 1
First half — 1. TUN Aiden Cronin (Dan Tinna),
23:07; 2. TUN Damian Williams (Patrick Cronin),
18:48; 3. TUN Aiden Cronin, 8:30; 4. TUN Aiden
Cronin (Adam Billings), 6:02; 5. TUN Billings
(Sean Andress), 3:04. Second half —6. TUN Pat
Casey (Brian Ly), 33:46; 7. BER Joe Mona (Chris-
tianWatts), 25:00; 8. TUNCasey (Patrick Cronin),
19:30; TUNLuke Cruver (Avery Newhart), 9:00.
Shots — TUN 30; BER 10. Saves — TUN 4
(ZackDaniels), BER10(MorganBroyan). Corners
kicks —TUN3; BER 1.
Holy Redeemer 1, Wyoming Area 0
Holy Redeemer 0 1 — 1
Wyoming Area 0 0 — 0
First half — No Scoring. Second half — 1.
HR Brandon Povilitis (Robert Dougherty), 61st
minute.
Shots — HR 5; WA 15. Saves — HR 14 (Ian
McGrane), WA 4 (Aaron Carter). Corners kicks
—HR 3, WA2
Crestwood 3, Lake-Lehman 0
Crestwood 1 2 — 3
Lake-Lehman 0 0 — 0
First half — 1. CRE John Andrews (Casey
Ritsick), 10th minute. Second half — 2. CRE
Kyle Gegaris (Sammy Skonieczki), 72nd; 3. CRE
Andrews, 77th.
Shots —CRE 18, LL 5. Saves —CRE 2 (Lance
Slysiak), LL 13 (Collin Masters). Corners kicks —
CRE 12, LL2
Pittston Area 11, MMI Prep 0
MMI Prep 0 0 — 0
Pittston Area 5 6 — 11
First half — 1. PA Matt Tavaglione (Colin
Tracy), 9th; 2. PA Tracy (Tavaglione), 12th; 3. PA
Jordan Consagra (Tracy), 12th); 4. PA Brandon
Shannoski, 34th; 5. PA Consagra, 35th. Second
half — 6. PA Shannoski (Tavaglione), 44th; 7. PA
Consagra (Nick Allardyce), 47th; 8. PAJulian Kes-
ter (Consagra), 48th; 9. PAJimmy Pliska, 50th; 10.
PAMike Barney, 71st; 11. PASteve Pugliese, 77th
Shots — MMI 10, PA 27. Saves — MMI 18
(Jankouskas), PA 8 (Roberts). Corners kicks —
MMI 2, PA7
Cronin sparks Tigers
to win over Bulldogs
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Hazleton Area’s Josie Zapotosky and Coughlin’s Martha Bonilla
struggle for control of the ball during a Wyoming Valley Conference
girls soccer match Monday.
Photos by Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Hazleton Area’s Madison Polumbo and Coughlin’s Megan Lercara battle for the ball during their WVC
matchup Monday. Coughlin won 6-0.
The Times Leader staf
WILKES-BARRE —
Nora Fazzi assisted on
four Coughlin goals
as the Crusaders top-
pled Hazleton Area 6-0
Monday in Wyoming
Valley Conference girls
soccer action.
The Crusaders (2-2)
received two-goal efforts
from Mary Tona and
Emma Sukowaski. Hailee
Dumont and Bre Georgetti
also found the back of the
net.
Paige Davis earned a
shutout with two saves.
Hazleton Area’s Hayley
Wilkinson stopped 10
shots.
Dallas 5,
Wyoming Valley West 1
Talia Szatkowski
contributed two goals
and an assist for the
Mountaineers. Ashley
Strazdus generated a goal
and two assists. Courtney
Wagner made it past the
keeper twice.
The Spartans’ Carisa
Devani scored an unas-
sisted goal in the 69th
minute.
Lake-Lehman 7, Nanticoke 1
L a k e - L e h m a n ’ s
Shoshana Mahoney
yielded a hat trick. Emily
Sutton generated four
points with two goals and
two assists. Aleha Blazick
also struck goal.
Nanticoke’s lone goal
came from Riley Kleepedo.
Pittston Area 14, MMI Prep 2
Ten different Pittston
Area players scored goals
against the Preppers. Allie
Barber came through
with four of her own, and
Maddy Mimnaugh collect-
ed a goal and three assists.
Joey Kress and Mikyla
Dave scored for MMI
Prep.
Holy Redeemer 9,
Wyoming Area 0
Lydia Lawson and
Emily Schramm found
each other on four of the
nine Royal goals. Lawson
finished with five goals
and an assist. Schramm
posted two goals and three
assists.
Crestwood 6, Meyers 0
The Comets rushed out
to score in the first minute
off a Natalie Sulkowski
goal. Gabby Termini
enjoyed a two goal, one
assist performance. Her
sister Olivia Termini
tabbed two goals.
Berwick 2, Tunkhannock 1
Berwick held off a
late effort by the Tigers.
Gabby Kishbaugh scored
six minutes in for the
Bulldogs. Brianna
Floryshak tallied an insur-
ance goal in the 39th off a
direct kick.
T u n k h a n n o c k ’ s
Cheyenne Brown cut the
lead in half with a direct
kick goal in the 43rd. Traci
Kromko had 15 saves.
GIRLS SOCCER
Coughlin 6, Hazleton Area 0
Hazleton Area 0 0 — 0
Coughlin 3 3 — 6
First half —1. COU Bre Georgetti (Megan Ler-
cara), 8th minute; 2. COUMary Tona (Nora Fazzi),
22nd; 3. COU Tona (Fazzi), 40th. Second half —
4. COU Emma Sukowaski (Tona), 47th; 5. COU
Sukowaski (Fazzi), 55th; 6. COU Hailee Dumont
(Fazzi), 76th.
Shots — H 2, C 18. Saves — H 10 (Hayley
Wilkinson); C 2 (Paige Davis). Corners kicks —H
0, C8
Dallas 5, Wyoming Valley West 1
Wyoming Valley West 0 1 — 1
Dallas 2 3 — 5
First half — 1. DAL Ashley Strazdus (Sydney
Emershaw), 17th minute, 2. DAL Talia Szatkowski
(penalty kick), 29th. Second half —3. DAL Szat-
kowski (Strazdus), 41st; 4. DAL Courtney Wagner
(Strazdus), 44th; 5. DAL Wagner (Szatkowski),
59th; 6. WVWCarisa Devani, 69th.
Shots —W7, D 13. Saves —W6 (Paige Heck-
man); D 7 (Sydney Emershaw, Allison Rismondo).
Corners kicks —W7, D3.
Lake-Lehman 7, Nanticoke 1
Lake-Lehman 2 5 — 7
Nanticoke 2 3 — 5
First half — 1. LL Shoshana Mahoney (Emily
Sutton), 1st minute; 2. LL Sutton, 2nd. Second
half —3. NANRiley Kleepedo (Jordan Norton); 4.
LL Mahoney (Sutton); 5. LL Mahoney; 6. LL (Own
Goal); 7. LLSutton; 8. LLAleaha Blazick
Shots — LL 22, NAN 9. Saves — LL 8 (Kaylee
Kishbaugh), NAN15(AlexisSeery,AlyssaGurzynski).
Pittston Area 14, MMI Prep 2
Pittston Area 12 2 — 14
MMI Prep 1 1 — 2
First half — 1. PA Allie Barber (Carly Fil-
ipski) 3rd minute; 2. PA Sara Ruby, 3rd; 3.
Barber (Maddy Mimnaugh), 5th; 4. PA Bar-
ber, 7th; 5. PA Barber (Jenny Meck), 7th; 6.
PA Jenny Meck (Mimnaugh), 12nd; 7. PA Sam
Mayers, 14th; 8. PA Megan Karuzie, 18th; 9.
PA Tiffany Tubioli, 18th; 10. PA Jordan Levan-
dowski (Mimnaugh), 21st; 11. PA Olivia Giam-
bra, 30th; 12. PA Levandowski, 35th; 13. MMI
Joey Kress, 26th; Second half — 14. MMI Mi-
kyla Dave, 45th; 15. PA Shannen Brady, 60th;
16. PA Mimnaugh, 76th
Shots —PA36, MMI 4. Saves —PA2 (Mindina
Lieback), MMI 8 (Mikyla Dave 5, Alyssa Famalette
3). Corners kicks —PA9, MMI 0
Holy Redeemer 9, Wyoming Area 0
Wyoming Area 0 0 — 0
Holy Redeemer 5 4 — 9
First half — 1. HR Lydia Lawson (Emily Sch-
ramm), 4th minute; 2. HR Schramm (Lawson),
5th; 3. HR Lawson (Schramm), 15th; 4. HR Law-
son (Nicole Cavanaugh), 17th; 5. HR Schramm
(Nina Paolini), 29th. Second half —6. HRLawson
(Schramm), 44th; 7. HR Lawson (Olivia Gregorio),
44th; 8. HRAlbert (Webby), 51st; 9. HR Gabby To-
masura (Cavanaugh), 80th
Shots —WA 7, HR 28; Saves —WA 9 (Butch-
ko), HR 6 (Gabby Tomasura/Gobla). Corners
kicks —WA1, HR 3
Crestwood 6, Meyers 0
Crestwood 4 2 — 6
Meyers 0 0 — 0
First half — 1. CRE Natalie Sulkowski (Gabby
Termini), 1st minute; 2. CRE Gabby Termini, 6th;
3. CRE G. Termini, 8th; 4. CRE, Olivia Termini 19th.
Second half —5. CREAlyssa Cuono, 57th; 6. CRE
O. Termini 65th.
Shots —CRE 28, MEY5. Saves —CRE 5 (Meg
White), MEY 22 (Gia Skaf, Sarah McCann). Cor-
ners kicks —CRE 4, MEY3
Berwick 2, Tunkhannock 1
Berwick 2 0 — 2
Tunkhannock 0 1 — 1
First half —1. BERGabby Kishbaugh, 6th min-
ute; 2. BER Brianna Floryshak 39th. Second half
—3. TUNCheyenne Brown, 43rd.
Shots — BER 26, TUN 5. Saves — BER 3 (Al-
lison Rinehimer), TUN15 (Traci Kromko). Corners
kicks —BER 7, TUN3
Fazzi assists Coughlin’s victory over Cougars
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
The Times Leader staf
DALLAS TWP. —
Olivio Musto made seven
kills and registered seven
digs, one block, five ser-
vice points and three aces
to lead Dallas to a 3-0
sweep and its first girls
volleyball victory in four
matches this season, a
25-16, 25-15, 25-21 win
over Pittston Area.
Amy Bolton added 10
service points, including
six aces in the victory
while Dallas’ Mallory Faux
made five kills and two
blocks.
Kaitlyn Simyian had 10
kills and Jackie Rabender
made 11 assists for the 0-4
Patriots.
Nanticoke 3, Wyoming Area 0
Celeste Deslish had
seven kills and six digs to
lead the Trojans. Lauren
Rinehimer garnered 18
digs.
Aubrey Hiedacavage
boasted 25 assists for the
Warriors.
MMI Prep 3, Coughlin 0
MMI Prep defeated
Coughlin by scores of
25-4, 25-14, 25-17. The
Preppers were led by
Kristen Purcell’s 12 kills
and four aces. Amber
Ferry had 22 assists.
Arianna Warnagaris
posted five aces for the
Crusaders.
Tunkhannock 3,
Wyoming Valley West 1
Tunkhannock defeated
Wyoming Valley West in
four sets by scores of 25-21,
23-25, 25-12, 25-14. For
Tunkhannock, Erin Smith
had 18 assists, 20 points and
12 aces. Alison Leiser had
four kills and two blocks.
For Wyoming Valley
West, Gavyn Giza had five
kills, nine blocks, six ser-
vice points and three aces.
***
Dallas 3, Pittston Area 0
Dallas 25 25 25
Pittston Area 16 15 21
DAL: AmyBoltonsix assists, 10servicepoints, six
aces; Olivia Musto seven kills, one block, seven digs,
fve service points, three aces; Mallory Faux fve kills,
twoblocks, sevenservicepoints, threeaces.
PA: Kaitlyn Simyian 10 kills, two aces; Jackie
Rabender three kills, 11 assists, fve service points;
Marley O’Brien seven service points, three aces,
three kills.
Nanticoke 3, Wyoming Area 0
Wyoming Area 16 24 18
Nanticoke 25 26 25
WA: Audrey Hiedacavage 25 assists; Mallory
Bohan 8 kills, 5 digs, 3 assists; Hope Crawn 8 digs.
NAN: Celeste Deslish 7 kills, 1 assist, 2blocks, 6
digs; DeannaThomas 5kills, 3aces, 5digs; Lauren
Rinehimer 2 aces, 5 kills, 18 digs
MMI Prep 3, Coughlin 0
Coughlin 4 14 17
MMI Prep 25 25 25
COU: Liz Ellsworth 6 digs, 4 service points,
2 aces; Carmen Garcia 8 digs, 3 kills; Arianna
Warnagaris 2 digs, 7 service points, 5 aces.
MMI: Kristen Purcell 12 kills, 11 service points,
4 aces, 2 blocks; Paige Darrow 17 service points,
5 aces; Sandy Bluth 19 service points, 4 aces;
Amber Ferry 22 assists, 11 service points, 3 aces.
Tunkhannock 3, Wyoming Valley West 1
Wyoming Valley West 21 25 12 14
Tunkhannock 25 23 25 25
WVW: Gavyn Giza 5 kills, 9 blocks, 6 service
points, 3 aces; Alexa Vargo 6 service points, 4
aces.
TUN: Amanda Hardy 5 kills, 6 points; Erin
Smith 18 assists, 20 points, 12 aces; Alison Leiser
4 kills, 2 blocks
Musto leads Dallas to frst volleyball win
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
The Times Leader staf
DALLAS — Ryan Georgetti
earned medalist honors, card-
ing a 40, as Dallas defeated
Wyoming Valley West 176-183
in Wyoming Valley Conference
golf Monday at Irem Country
Club.
Jon Wilson added a 42
on the par-36 layout for the
Mountaineers.
Tyler Yankoski posted a 43,
and Leanne Dellarte and Dave
McCue each had a 44 to lead
the Spartans.
Lake-Lehman 179,
Wyoming Area 185
Nick Egan’s 40 earned
him medalist honors at
Huntsville, and Black
Knights teammate Adam
Motovidlak added a 43 in
the victory.
Maddy Wharton (43) and
Courtney Melvin (44) paced
the Warriors.
Holy Redeemer 151,
Nanticoke 205
Mariano Medico and Ryan
Crossin shared medalist hon-
ors with even-par rounds of
36 at Edgewood to lead the
Royals.
Chase Markowski added a
38 for Holy Redeemer. Mike
Malshefski paced Nanticoke
with a 47.
Coughlin 163, Berwick 170
Alex Anderson shot a 2-over
38 to lead the Crusaders to vic-
tory. Daulton Lentini added a
40 for Coughlin.
Top scorers for Berwick
were Ryan Stashko, with a 40,
and Ty Morzilla, who posted a
41.
***
Dallas 176, Wyoming Valley West 183
at IremCC, par 36
WVW (183) — Tyler Yankoski 43, Leanne Dellarte 44,
Dave McCue 44, Derrick Hefelfnger 52, TimWalter 52.
DAL (176) — Ryan Georgetti 40, Jon Wilson 42, Justin
Brojewski 45, Brendan Baloh 49.
Lake-Lehman 179, Wyoming Area 185
at Huntsville GC, par 36
WA (185) — Maddy Wharton 43, Courtney Melvin 44,
Gavin Kross 48, RyanWrubel 50.
LEH (179) — Nick Egan 40, Adam Motovidlak 43, Ben
Pilch 47, Joe Wojick 49.
Holy Redeemer 151, Nanticoke 205
at Edgewood in the Pines, par 36
HR (151) — Mariano Medico 36, Ryan Crossin 36,
Chase Markowski 38, Mike Boland 41.
NAN (205) — Mike Malshefski 47, Joe Olszyk 49, Eric
Grodzicki 54, Drinton Ball 55.
Coughlin 163, Berwick 170
at Wilkes-Barre Muni, par 36
BER (170) — Ryan Stashko 40, Ty Morzilla 41, Matt
Dalo 42, Tyler Evans 47.
COU (163) — Alex Anderson 38, Daulton Lentini 40,
Ryan Keyes 42, Collin Krokos 43.
***
COLLEGE GOLF
Misericordia tops local trio
Mike Gottstein’s 75 was tops
as Misericordia won a tri-meet
against King’s and Wilkes.
The Cougars scored 318 at
par-72 Huntsville Golf Club.
King’s tallied a 353, and
Wilkes posted a 364 team
score.
Josh Green (78), Nick Kenna
(80) and Adam DePorter
(85) all placed in the top-five
for MU. Michael Daubert’s
82 paced Wilkes and Steven
Kondracki recorded an 86 to
lead King’s.
Georgetti powers Mountaineers to victory; Lehman downs WA
LOCAL GOLF
The Times Leader staf
T U N K H A N N O C K
— Dallas edged
Tunkhannock 3-2
in Wyoming Valley
Conference girls tennis by
sweeping all three singles
matches. Kajal Patez and
Maddie Ross won each of
their singles matches by
6-0, 6-0 scores.
Tunkhannock’s Ellie
Kuzma and Jamie Smith
claimed the second dou-
bles by a 6-4, 1-6, 10-8
score.
Holy Redeemer 4,
Hazleton Area 1
Holy Redeemer’s
Emily Kabalka won the
second singles by a 6-0,
6-0 score. The Royals’
Natalie Coffee also swept
the third singles. Megan
McGraw held on to a 6-0,
6-3 win at No. 1.
Berwick 5,
Wyoming Valley West 0
Berwick won all
five matches over the
Spartans. Xiomara
Salazar took No. 1 singles
by a 6-3, 6-4 score. Linda
Thelemaque secured a
6-0, 6-0 victory at the
third singles.
Wyoming Seminary 5,
Coughlin 0
Megan Obeid and Alex
Cuddy claimed victory at
first singles by a 6-0, 6-2
score. The Blue Knights’
Jacqui Meuser won third
singles 6-4, 6-4; and
Madison Nardone swept
second singles.
MMI Prep 4,
Hanover Area 1
Stephanie Pudish won
over Emily Rinehimer
at first singles (6-2,
6-3). The Preppers also
received help at third sin-
gles by Claire Sheen (6-2,
6-1).
Shelby Tencza and
Sara Biller supported the
Hawkeyes with a second
doubles win (6-1, 6-3).
Crestwood 4,
Wyoming Area 1
The Comets swept
the singles events en
route to a match victory.
Kristi Bowman continued
her success with a 6-2,
6-1 win at first singles.
Brittany Stanton (6-0,
6-2) and Jennie Snyder
(6-0, 6-1) also won their
singles meets.
Wyoming Area received
its only victory from Julia
Banas and Lauren Perry,
6-4, 7-6 (8-6) in first dou-
bles.
GIRLS TENNIS
Dallas 3, Tunkhannock 2
SINGLES — 1. Grace Schaud (DAL) d. Haley
Puterbalaugh 6-4, 6-0; 2. Kajal Patez (DAL)
d. Kaitlyn Markovicz 6-0, 6-0; 3. Maddie Ross
(DAL) d. Miraude Donovan 6-0, 6-0.
DOUBLES — 1. Jill Patton/Brianna Grey
(TUN) d. Maddie Jones/Caitlin London, 6-3, 6-3;
2. Ellie Kuzma/Jamie Smith (TUN) d. Michelle
Leonard/Maddie Fannick 6-4, 1-6, 10-8.
Holy Redeemer 4, Hazleton Area 1
SINGLES — 1. Megan McGraw (HR) d. Alexa
Austin 6-0, 6-3; 2. Emily Kabalka (HR) d. Mira
Wise 6-0, 6-0; 3. Natalie Cofee (HR) d. Rachel
Ferguson 6-0, 6-0.
DOUBLES — 1. Grazia Dezita/Hifza Saeed
(HAZ) d. Hannah Thornton/Annie Cosgrove 7-5,
6-4; 2. Libby Pinto/Thea Seasock (HR) d. Daisy
Cabral/Caitlin Kennedy 6-4, 6-0
Berwick 5, Wyoming Valley West 0
SINGLES — 1. Xiomara Salazar (B) d. Laura
Monto 6-3, 6-4; 2. Kayla Davis (B) def. Emily
Coslett 6-2, 6-3; 3. Linda Thelemaque (B) def.
Boyden Peters 6-0, 6-0
DOUBLES — 1. Zoe Zajack/Mary Kramer (B)
d. Courtney Borland/Alyssa Stelmack 6-1, 6-3; 2.
Bennett Lipski/Jaycee Carrathers (B) def. Helia
Hosseinpour/Nada Elbattah 6-2, 6-3
Wyoming Seminary 5, Coughlin 0
SINGLES — 1. Nathalie Joanlanne (SEM) d.
Dana Schneider 6-0,6-4; 2. Madison Nardone
(SEM) d. Alia Sod 6-0,6-0; 3. Jacqui Meuser
(SEM) d. Grace Hao 6-4,6-4
DOUBLES — 1. Megan Obeid/Alex Cuddy
(SEM) d. Jade Matusiek/Kassie Cebula 6-0,6-
2; 2. Christina Regis/Chloe Xing (SEM) d. Erin
ODay/Teagan Bigelow6-4,6-0
MMI Prep 4, Hanover Area 1
SINGLES — 1. Stephanie Pudish (MMI) d..
Emily Rinehimer 6-2, 6-3; 2. Gaby Becker (MMI)
d. Elise House 6-4, 6-1; 3. Claire Sheen (MMI) d.
Gabrielle Keating 6-2, 6-1.
DOUBLES — 1. Kelsy Donaldson/Jessica
Smith (MMI) d. Lauren Richmond/ Marissa Kre-
menic 6-1, 1-6, 6-4; 2. Shelby Tencza/Sara Biller
(HAN) d. Soprina Guarneri/Haylee Kirschner
6-1, 6-3
Crestwood 4, Wyoming Area 1
SINGLES — 1. Kristi Bowman (CRE) d. Anna
Thomas 6-2, 6-1; 2. Brittany Stanton (CRE) d.
Kierstin Grillo 6-0, 6-2; 3. Jennie Snyder (CRE) d.
Julia Gober 6-0, 6-1
DOUBLES — 1. Julia Banas/Lauren Perry
(WA) d. Stephanie Maichin/Christine Maichin
6-4, 7-6 (8-6); 2. Rebecca Price/Stacie Snyder
(CRE) d. Maddie Ambruso/Samantha Williams
6-2, 6-2.
Dallas sweeps singles to defeat Tunkhannock
H.S. GIRLS TENNIS
WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
PITTSBURGH —
Maurkice Pouncey limped
through the Pittsburgh
Steelers practice facility on
Monday, the torn ligaments
in his knee wrapped in ban-
dages and his season over.
The three-time Pro Bowl
center remained in high spir-
its —as always —though he
might have been one of the
fewin the building.
The long road back for
Pouncey will begin later this
weekwhenheundergoes sur-
gery. The same for lineback-
er Larry Foote, who is also
done for the year after rup-
turing his right biceps while
trying to tackle Tennessee’s
Chris Johnson in the fourth
quarter of a 16-9 loss.
For a team that preach-
es “next man up” when
faced with adversity, at the
moment “next man left”
might be more appropriate.
While the Steelers will
have somebody snap the ball
to Ben Roethlisberger next
Monday when they play at
Cincinnati, whoever it is will
be a significant downgrade
over a player considered one
of the NFL’s elite.
Kelvin Beachum filled in
after Pouncey was carted
off the field eight plays into
the season, the first time in
Beachum’s football career
he’s worked at center dur-
ing an actual game. Though
Beachum is arguably the
most versatile player left on
the line — he saw time at
both tackle and guard during
the preseason—the Steelers
signed veteran Fernando
Velasco to a one-year con-
tract on Monday according
to agent Brian Ayrault.
The 28-year-old Velasco
started 16 games for
Tennessee last season,
including 13 at center. He’ll
be given every opportunity
to take over for Pouncey on
a line that will try to regroup
without its emotional leader.
“It’s going to be tough,”
running back Isaac Redman
said. “Pouncey is the heart of
our offensive line. We’ve got
to have guys step up.”
Even if Redman isn’t one
of them. Handed the starting
job out of camp after rookie
Le’Veon Bell sprained his
right foot, Redman fumbled
twice — including once into
the end zone — and man-
aged just nine yards on eight
carries.
Pittsburgh coach Mike
Tomlin grewso frustrated he
sent third-down back LaRod
Stephens-Howling into
the game, only to have
the return specialist tear
the ACL in his knee.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com baseball Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 5B
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 87 58 .600 — — 8-2 L-1 47-25 40-33
Tampa Bay 78 64 .549 7½ — 3-7 W-1 44-26 34-38
Baltimore 77 66 .538 9 1½ 6-4 W-1 42-30 35-36
NewYork 76 68 .528 10½ 3 5-5 L-1 44-31 32-37
Toronto 67 76 .469 19 11½ 8-2 W-3 35-34 32-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 82 61 .573 — — 5-5 L-2 44-27 38-34
Cleveland 77 66 .538 5 1½ 6-4 W-1 45-28 32-38
Kansas City 75 69 .521 7½ 4 6-4 L-1 40-35 35-34
Minnesota 62 80 .437 19½ 16 5-5 W-1 29-39 33-41
Chicago 57 85 .401 24½ 21 1-9 W-1 32-34 25-51
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 83 60 .580 — — 8-2 W-3 47-27 36-33
Texas 81 62 .566 2 — 3-7 L-1 39-30 42-32
Los Angeles 67 76 .469 16 11½ 6-4 L-2 35-40 32-36
Seattle 65 78 .455 18 13½ 5-5 L-1 33-39 32-39
Houston 47 96 .329 36 31½ 3-7 L-3 23-49 24-47
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 86 57 .601 — — 5-5 W-1 51-20 35-37
Washington 74 69 .517 12 7 6-4 W-3 40-31 34-38
Philadelphia 66 77 .462 20 15 5-5 W-3 39-33 27-44
NewYork 64 78 .451 21½ 16½ 4-6 L-1 28-39 36-39
Miami 53 89 .373 32½ 27½ 4-6 L-3 30-42 23-47
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 83 60 .580 — — 5-5 W-3 44-25 39-35
Pittsburgh 82 61 .573 1 — 5-5 W-1 45-25 37-36
Cincinnati 82 63 .566 2 — 7-3 L-1 47-25 35-38
Milwaukee 62 80 .437 20½ 18½ 4-6 W-2 31-40 31-40
Chicago 61 82 .427 22 20 5-5 W-1 29-46 32-36
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 83 59 .585 — — 6-4 L-4 43-28 40-31
Arizona 72 70 .507 11 8½ 4-6 L-1 40-31 32-39
Colorado 66 78 .458 18 15½ 4-6 L-3 41-31 25-47
San Diego 65 77 .458 18 15½ 6-4 W-3 41-33 24-44
San Francisco 64 79 .448 19½ 17 5-5 W-1 36-37 28-42
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 3
N.Y. Mets 2, Cleveland 1
ChicagoWhite Sox 4, Baltimore 2
Kansas City 5, Detroit 2
Toronto 2, Minnesota 0
Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3
Oakland 7, Houston 2
Tampa Bay 4, Seattle 1
Monday’s Games
Cleveland 4, Kansas City 3
Baltimore 4, N.Y. Yankees 2
Minnesota 6, L.A. Angels 3
Pittsburgh 1, Texas 0
Detroit at ChicagoWhite Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Kansas City (Guthrie 13-10) at Cleveland (McAl-
lister 7-8), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 8-4) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonza-
lez 9-7), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Williams 6-10) at Toronto (Buehrle
11-7), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Dempster 8-9) at Tampa Bay (Price 8-7),
7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 15-7) at Texas (M.Perez 9-3),
8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 11-8) at Chicago White Sox (Er.
Johnson 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (J.Parker 11-6) at Minnesota (Hendriks
1-2), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 6-7) at Seattle (J.Saunders 11-13),
10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Mets 2, Cleveland 1
Washington 6, Miami 4
Philadelphia 3, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 2
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 3, Arizona 2, 11 innings
San Diego 5, Colorado 2
Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Monday’s Games
Atlanta 5, Miami 2
Chicago Cubs 2, Cincinnati 0
Washington 9, N.Y. Mets 0
Pittsburgh 1, Texas 0
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
San Diego (Cashner 8-8) at Philadelphia (Cloyd
2-3), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 11-7) at Miami (Koehler 3-9),
7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 7-15) at Cincinnati (Cin-
grani 7-3), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 16-8) at N.Y. Mets
(Gee 11-9), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 15-7) at Texas (M.Perez 9-3),
8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (W.Peralta 9-14) at St. Louis (S.Miller
12-9), 8:15 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 6-10) at L.A. Dodgers (Volquez
9-11), 10:10 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 16-6) at San Francisco
(Vogelsong 3-5), 10:15 p.m.
MLB STANDINGS • STATS
Orioles 4, Yankees 2
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Gardner cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .275
A.Rodriguez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .294
Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .308
A.Soriano lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248
Granderson dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243
Nunez ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .257
Overbay 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .252
I.Suzuki rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .268
Au.Romine c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .209
a-Z.Almonte ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .258
J.Murphy c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667
Totals 32 2 5 2 0 12
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Markakis rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .273
Machado 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .293
A.Jones cf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .295
C.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .293
Valencia dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .305
b-B.Roberts ph-dh1 0 0 0 0 0 .237
Hardy ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .262
Morse lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .223
Ch.Dickerson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243
Wieters c 1 1 0 1 1 0 .232
A.Casilla 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .220
Totals 28 4 7 4 2 6
NewYork 100 000 010—2 5 1
Baltimore 100 020 10x—4 7 0
a-struck out for Au.Romine in the 8th.
E_Sabathia (2). LOB_New York 3, Baltimore 5.
2B_Markakis (22), Machado (49), A.Jones (32),
Hardy (22). HR_A.Rodriguez (5), of Tillman;
Overbay (14), of Tillman. RBIs_A.Rodriguez (11),
Overbay (56), Markakis (54), Machado (69),
A.Jones (102), Wieters (70). SB_A.Casilla (9).
S_Machado. SF_A.Jones, Wieters.
Runners left in scoring position_Baltimore 2
(Morse, A.Jones). RISP_New York 0 for 0; Balti-
more 2 for 8.
Runners moved up_Morse. GIDP_Markakis.
DP_NewYork 1 (Nunez, Cano, Overbay).
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Sbthia L, 13-12 71-3 7 4 3 2 6 115 4.82
Warren 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.61
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
TillmanW, 16-5 7 4 2 2 0 9 110 3.66
Tom.Hunter H, 19 1 0 0 0 0 3 11 2.74
Ji.Johnson S, 43-521 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.23
Tillman pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
IBB_of Sabathia (Hardy). WP_Sabathia.
Umpires_Home, Ed Hickox; First, Jim Joyce;
Second, Jef Nelson; Third, JimWolf.
T—2:36. A—17,456 (45,971).
Indians 4, Royals 3
Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf 5 2 2 2 0 0 .272
Bonifacio 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239
Hosmer 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .303
B.Butler dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .291
S.Perez c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .287
1-Getz pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .225
Moustakas 3b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .230
2-Ciriaco pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222
L.Cain rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .257
a-Lough ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .283
J.Dyson cf 3 0 2 0 0 1 .269
b-C.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207
A.Escobar ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .235
c-Kottaras ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .179
Totals 34 3 10 3 2 12
Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .258
Swisher 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .240
Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .280
C.Santana dh 3 1 1 1 0 1 .262
Brantley lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276
As.Cabrera ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .234
Y.Gomes c 3 1 1 1 0 2 .303
Jo.Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .500
Aviles 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267
Stubbs rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .231
Totals 28 4 5 3 0 8
Kansas City 000 001 020—3 10 1
Cleveland 011 010 10x—4 5 1
a-sacrifced for L.Cain in the 9th. b-struck out
for J.Dyson in the 9th. c-walked for A.Escobar in
the 9th.
1-ran for S.Perez in the 9th. 2-ran for Mousta-
kas in the 9th.
E_Hosmer (8), Jo.Ramirez (1). LOB_Kansas
City 7, Cleveland 0. 2B_J.Dyson (9), A.Escobar
(18). HR_A.Gordon (18), of Allen; As.Cabrera
(11), of E.Santana; Y.Gomes (10), of E.Santana;
C.Santana (18), of E.Santana. RBIs_A.Gordon 2
(78), Hosmer (74), C.Santana (64), As.Cabrera
(54), Y.Gomes (34). SB_A.Gordon (10). CS_L.Cain
(6), J.Dyson (6). S_Lough.
Runners left in scoring position_Kansas City 3
(Bonifacio, A.Gordon 2). RISP_Kansas City 2 for 8;
Cleveland 0 for 0.
Runners moved up_A.Escobar, Stubbs.
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.Santana L, 8-9 7 4 4 3 0 7 97 3.35
W.Davis 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 5.50
Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
U.Jimenez W, 11-9 7 7 1 0 0 10 99 3.62
Allen H, 9 1-3 2 2 2 0 1 14 2.71
Rzepczynski H, 21-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 1.29
J.Smith H, 22 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.38
C.Perez S, 23-27 1 1 0 0 2 1 27 3.62
Umpires_Home, Doug Eddings; First, Dana
DeMuth; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Paul
Nauert.
T—2:39. A—9,794 (42,241).
Cubs 2, Reds 0
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
St.Castro ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239
Valbuena 3b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .229
Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .230
D.Navarro c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .304
Schierholtz rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .255
Sweeney cf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .289
Bogusevic lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .276
Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .213
Tr.Wood p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .233
Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Gregg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 33 2 7 2 2 8
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .291
B.Phillips 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .266
Votto 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .304
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266
Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233
Ludwick lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253
Cozart ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .256
Hanigan c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .209
Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .077
a-N.Soto ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
Simon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
b-Paul ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232
Totals 34 0 7 0 1 8
Chicago 011 000 000—2 7 0
Cincinnati 000 000 000—0 7 0
a-fiedout for Arroyo in the 7th. b-groundedout
for Simon in the 9th.
LOB_Chicago 6, Cincinnati 9. 2B_Valbuena
(14), Schierholtz (27), Choo (32), Ludwick (4),
Cozart 2 (26). HR_Sweeney (6), of Arroyo;
Valbuena (11), of Arroyo. RBIs_Valbuena (35),
Sweeney (18).
Runners left in scoring position_Chicago 2
(Sweeney, Barney); Cincinnati 7 (Frazier 2, Bruce,
Hanigan, Votto, Cozart, Paul). RISP_Chicago 1 for
5; Cincinnati 0 for 10.
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Tr.WoodW, 9-11 7 6 0 0 0 7 100 3.05
Strop H, 11 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 2.93
Gregg S, 31-36 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.00
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Arroyo L, 13-11 7 7 2 2 0 6 89 3.58
Ondrusek 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 4.43
M.Parra 11-3 0 0 0 2 2 28 3.32
Simon 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.28
Inherited runners-scored_Simon 2-0. HBP_by
Tr.Wood (Choo). WP_Strop.
Umpires_Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Paul Em-
mel; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Ted Barrett.
T_2:48. A_22,920 (42,319).
Nationals 9, Mets 0
Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Span cf 5 2 3 1 0 1 .282
Zimmerman 3b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .276
1-Z.Walters pr-3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Werth rf 5 1 2 3 0 2 .324
Desmond ss 4 1 0 0 1 3 .283
Ad.LaRoche 1b 2 1 0 0 3 1 .235
W.Ramos c 5 1 1 3 0 2 .278
T.Moore lf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .224
C.Brown lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286
Rendon 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259
G.Gonzalez p 4 0 0 0 0 1 .098
Totals 35 9 9 9 7 11
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255
Dan.Murphy 2b 1 0 0 0 1 1 .284
Aardsma p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Henn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Z.Lutz ph-1b 1 0 1 0 1 0 .300
A.Brown rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246
Duda 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .239
Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Atchison p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Germen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ju.Turner ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266
Lagares cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .266
Flores 3b-2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211
T.d’Arnaud c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .136
C.Torres p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100
Burke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Satin 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .281
Totals 28 0 1 0 2 8
Washington 203 130 000—9 9 0
NewYork 000 000 000—0 1 0
a-singled for Henn in the 7th.
1-ran for Zimmerman in the 8th.
LOB_Washington 6, New York 3. 2B_T.Moore
(7). HR_Span (4), of C.Torres; Zimmerman (21),
of C.Torres; Werth (22), of C.Torres; T.Moore (4),
of C.Torres; W.Ramos (12), of Burke. RBIs_Span
(40), Zimmerman (69), Werth 3 (69), W.Ramos 3
(45), T.Moore (21).
Runners left in scoring position_Washington 2
(Rendon, Desmond); New York 1 (Duda). RISP_
Washington 2 for 4; NewYork 0 for 1.
Runners moved up_A.Brown. GIDP_W.Ramos.
DP_NewYork 1 (Ju.Turner, Flores, Duda).
Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
G.Gonzalez W, 10-69 1 0 0 2 8 110 3.31
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
C.Torres L, 3-4 4 5 6 6 2 4 75 3.53
Burke 1 2 3 3 2 2 39 5.64
Aardsma 1 2 0 0 0 1 22 4.67
Henn 1 0 0 0 2 0 22 0.00
Byrdak 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 6.75
Atchison 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 4.58
Germen 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.28
Inherited runners-scored_Atchison 1-0.
Umpires_Home, Bob Davidson; First, John
Hirschbeck; Second, James Hoye; Third, Jim
Reynolds.
T—2:47. A—20,174 (41,922).
Braves 5, Marlins 2
Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
J.Schafer cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .268
J.Upton rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .258
F.Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .304
Gattis lf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .245
Ayala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
McCann c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .263
C.Johnson 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .329
Janish 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .189
Simmons ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249
El.Johnson 2b-lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .256
Medlen p 2 0 0 0 1 2 .184
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Uggla 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182
Totals 31 5 5 4 4 5
Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Coghlan rf 4 0 4 0 0 0 .283
D.Solano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .249
Yelich lf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .282
Ruggiano cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .226
Polanco 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247
Morrison 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .254
B.Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Pierre ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .247
Da.Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Marisnick ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .184
Hatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Hechavarria ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .230
Mathis c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .196
Brantly c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .219
H.Alvarez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .350
Lucas 1b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .233
Totals 34 2 8 2 2 11
Atlanta 000 500 000—5 5 1
Miami 000 000 200—2 8 0
a-doubled for B.Hand in the 7th. b-struck out
for Da.Jennings in the 8th.
E_El.Johnson(1). LOB_Atlanta3, Miami 7. 2B_J.
Upton (24), F.Freeman (25), Gattis (16), Pierre
(10), Lucas (8). RBIs_Gattis 2 (52), C.Johnson
(60), El.Johnson(4), Lucas 2(23). SB_El.Johnson
(3).
Runners left in scoring position_Atlanta 2
(J.Schafer, McCann); Miami 2 (Polanco, Yelich).
RISP_Atlanta 4 for 9; Miami 3 for 9.
Runners moved up_F.Freeman, Simmons.
GIDP_C.Johnson, Polanco.
DP_Atlanta 1 (C.Johnson, Uggla, F.Freeman);
Miami 1 (Hechavarria, Morrison).
Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
MdlnW, 13-12 61-3 6 2 2 2 6 108 3.46
Avilan H, 23 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 12 1.48
Ayala H, 6 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 2.10
Kimbrel S, 45-48 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.92
Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
H.Alvarez L, 3-4 4 5 5 5 3 2 63 4.34
B.Hand 3 0 0 0 1 2 33 0.00
Da.Jennings 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.04
Hatcher 1 0 0 0 0 0 1013.50
Inherited runners-scored_Avilan 1-0. WP_H.
Alvarez.
Umpires_Home, Rob Drake; First, Joe West;
Second, SamHolbrook; Third, Andy Fletcher.
T—2:46. A—18,503 (37,442)
Twins 6, Angels 3
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Cowgill lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .279
Aybar ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .268
Trout cf 4 1 1 0 1 3 .338
Trumbo 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .237
J.Hamilton dh 4 0 2 1 0 2 .239
Iannetta c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .218
Calhoun rf 4 0 3 1 0 1 .287
G.Green 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .241
Field 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .150
Totals 38 3 12 3 1 9
Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Presley cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .333
Pinto c 4 2 3 1 1 0 .565
Dozier 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .245
Arcia lf 5 1 0 0 0 2 .252
Thomas lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223
Doumit dh 4 1 2 1 1 0 .240
1-Bernier pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .245
Ploufe 3b 4 0 2 3 0 1 .250
Colabello 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .201
Parmelee rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .221
a-Mastroianni ph-rf1 0 0 0 0 1 .216
Florimon ss 3 1 2 1 1 1 .228
Totals 35 6 11 6 6 8
Los Angeles 000 210 000—3 12 1
Minnesota 001 020 21x—6 11 0
a-struck out for Parmelee in the 7th.
1-ran for Doumit in the 8th.
E_G.Green (4). LOB_Los Angeles 9, Minnesota
12. 2B_Cowgill (3), Aybar (28), J.Hamilton 2 (30),
Calhoun (5), Pinto 3 (5), Doumit (24), Ploufe
(21). RBIs_J.Hamilton(63), Calhoun(21), G.Green
(12), Pinto(4), Doumit (51), Ploufe 3(49), Florim-
on (40). SB_Dozier (11), Florimon (14). SF_Ploufe
Runners left in scoring position_Los Angeles 7
(Trout 2, Field, Iannetta 2, Cowgill, G.Green); Min-
nesota 10 (Doumit 4, Presley 3, Colabello, Pinto,
Ploufe). RISP_Los Angeles 2 for 12; Minnesota
4 for 19.
Runners moved up_Aybar, G.Green, Field, Ar-
cia, Colabello. GIDP_Cowgill.
DP_Minnesota 1 (Florimon, Dozier, Colabello).
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Weaver 6 9 3 3 2 5 89 3.38
Cor.Rasmus L, 0-11-3 0 2 0 3 0 21 4.50
Boshers 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 16 4.35
J.Gutierrez 1 2 1 1 0 2 17 4.28
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
P.Hernandez 42-3 8 3 3 1 3 89 5.25
Pressly 11-3 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.44
FienW, 4-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.92
Duensing H, 15 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.62
Burton H, 26 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 3.94
Perkins S, 33-37 1 2 0 0 0 1 22 2.54
Inherited runners-scored_Boshers 3-1, Pressly
2-0, Burton 1-0. IBB_of Cor.Rasmus (Doumit).
Umpires_Home, Laz Diaz; First, Mark Wegner;
Second, Cory Blaser; Third, D.J. Reyburn.
T—3:19. A—21,826 (39,021).
Pirates 1, Rangers 0
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Tabata lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .275
Pie lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211
N.Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255
McCutchen cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .324
Morneau 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222
1-S.Marte pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282
G.Sanchez 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Byrd rf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .288
P.Alvarez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .232
R.Martin c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .237
G.Jones dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Barmes ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .219
Totals 30 1 6 1 1 7
Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .270
Andrus ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .267
Rios rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .281
A.Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .317
2-Rosales pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .193
Pierzynski dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .280
Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .239
G.Soto c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .231
Adduci lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .300
Dav.Murphy lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .221
a-Gentry ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253
L.Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .266
Totals 30 0 4 0 2 9
Pittsburgh 000 000 100—1 6 0
Texas 000 000 000—0 4 0
a-grounded out for Dav.Murphy in the 8th.
1-ran for Morneau in the 9th. 2-ran for A.Beltre
in the 9th.
LOB_Pittsburgh 4, Texas 5. 2B_Byrd (32),
P.Alvarez (19). 3B_McCutchen (5). RBIs_P.Alvarez
(88). SB_Andrus 2 (39), Rios (35). CS_Tabata (1).
Runners left in scoring position_Pittsburgh 1
(R.Martin); Texas 3 (Adduci, A.Beltre 2). RISP_
Pittsburgh 1 for 3; Texas 0 for 2.
GIDP_Tabata, P.Alvarez.
DP_Texas 2 (Moreland, Andrus, Moreland),
(Andrus, Moreland).
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cole W, 7-7 7 3 0 0 2 9 92 3.48
Watson H, 18 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 2.57
Melancon S, 12-14 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 0.85
Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Darvish L, 12-8 7 4 1 1 1 6 81 2.84
Scheppers 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 1.98
Cotts 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 1.15
Soria 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 2.76
Inherited runners-scored_Soria 1-0. HBP_by
Darvish (Byrd). WP_Cole.
Umpires_Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Jef
Kellogg; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Paul
Schrieber.
T_2:24. A_33,243 (48,114).
AP photo
Pittsburgh Steelers center Maurkice Pouncey (53) is taken off the
field with team doctor James Bradley after being injured in the
first quarter Sunday against the Tennessee Titans. Pouncy will
miss the remainder of this season with torn knee ligaments. The
Titans won 16-9.
It’s last man standing for Steelers
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Gio Gonzalez
was inches from a no-hitter and the
Washington Nationals hit five home
runs Monday night, including long
balls by their first two batters, in a 9-0
rout of the New York Mets.
Gonzalez held the overmatched Mets
hitless into the seventh before pinch-
hitter Zach Lutz broke up the bid with
a soft single for New York’s only hit.
Lutz swung at the first pitch of the
inning and hit a looper that landed on
the first base line, taking out a chunk of
chalk well behind the bag.
First baseman Adam LaRoche made a
diving attempt as the ball hit the dirt,
but it squirted by and into foul terri-
tory along the right field line.
First base umpire John Hirschbeck
correctly called it fair, and Gonzalez
(10-6) paused behind the mound to
stare in his direction.
Braves 5, Marlins 2
MIAMI — Evan Gattis drove in two
runs to highlight Atlanta’s highest-scor-
ing inning in more than a month, and
the Braves snapped a four-game slide
by beating the Miami Marlins.
Justin Upton, Freddie Freeman and
Gattis all doubled to lead off what
became a five-run fourth, Atlanta’s big-
gest inning since a five-run fifth against
Philadelphia on Aug. 2. Kris Medlen
(13-12) was the beneficiary that night
against the Phillies and again on
Monday, getting the win after allowing
six hits and two runs in 6 1-3 innings.
Atlanta (86-57) passed idle Boston
(87-58) for baseball’s best record.
Chris Coghlan tied a career high with
four hits for Miami, which lost for the
24th time in its last 34 games. Ed Lucas
added a two-run double in the seventh
for the Marlins.
Cubs 2, Reds 0
CINCINNATI — Left-hander Travis
Wood beat Cincinnati for the first time
in his career, repeatedly pitching out
of threats for seven innings, and the
Chicago Cubs stalled the Reds’ week-
long surge.
Wood (9-11) finally beat the team
that traded him after the 2011 season.
He was 0-4 in his career, including
three losses this season.
He allowed six hits and fanned seven.
Kevin Gregg gave up a double in the
ninth while earning his 31st save in 35
chances.
Ryan Sweeney and Luis Valbuena
homered off Bronson Arroyo (13-11),
who had won his last four starts against
the Cubs.
The Reds were coming off a refresh-
ing week — six wins in seven games
against the rival Cardinals and the NL
West-leading Dodgers.
Gonzalez’s tosses 1-hitter vs. Mets
NATIONAL LEAGUE ROUNDUP
AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP
The Associated Press
BALTIMORE — Chris Tillman took
a three-hitter into the eighth inning and
the Baltimore Orioles beat the New York
Yankees 4-2 on Monday night in a game that
featured an on-field confrontation between
the teams’ managers.
With the victory, the Orioles movedwithin
1 1-2 games of idle Tampa Bay for the second
AL wild card. The Yankees fell three games
behind Tampa Bay. Tillman (16-5) allowed
two runs and four hits in seven-plus innings.
He walked none and struck out nine, match-
ing his career high.
Both dugouts emptied briefly after the
first inning, when Orioles manager Buck
Showalter angrily exchanged words with
Joe Girardi after the Yankees manager appar-
ently said something to Baltimore third base
coach Bobby Dickerson. Showalter had to be
restrained by home plate umpire Ed Hickox.
Alex Rodriguez and Lyle Overbay hit
home runs for the Yankees. Rodriguez’s first-
inning blast to right-center was the 652nd of
his career, leaving him eight short of tying
Willie Mays for fourth place all-time.
CC Sabathia (13-12), who came into the
game with an 18-5 career record against the
Orioles, yielded four runs —three earned —
and seven hits over 7 1-3 innings. He walked
two and struck out six. Tommy Hunter
relieved Tillman and struck out the side in
the eighth. Jim Johnson got the last three
outs for his AL-leading 43rd save.
Indians 4, Royals 3
CLEVELAND — Ubaldo Jimenez struck
out 10 in seven innings and Asdrubal
Cabrera, Yan Gomes and Carlos Santana
each hit solo homers, leading the Cleveland
Indians to a win over the Kansas City Royals.
The Indians, who won despite having
only five hits, stayed even with Baltimore,
1½games back of Tampa Bay for the second
wild-card spot. The Royals dropped to four
games behind the Rays.
Jimenez (11-9) allowed one unearned run
and didn’t walk a batter. The right-hander
left with a 4-1 lead after throwing 99 pitches,
but Alex Gordon hit a two-run homer off
Cody Allen in the eighth. Chris Perez sur-
vived a shaky ninth for his 23rd save, retiring
Gordon on a fly ball with the bases loaded
to end the game. The Indians have won six
of eight.
INTERLEAGUE
Pirates 1, Rangers 0
ARLINGTON, Texas — Clinching their
first winning season since 1992, rookie right-
hander Gerrit Cole had a career-high nine
strikeouts over seven innings to outpitch Yu
Darvish and lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to a
victory over the Texas Rangers.
The Pirates (82-61) didn’t get a runner
to second base against Darvish (12-8) until
Marlon Byrd’s two-out double in the sev-
enth. He came home when Pedro Alvarez
followed with a double. Pittsburgh had lost
a season-high four games in a row since
getting their 81st victory last Tuesday at
Milwaukee to guarantee their first non-
losing season in more than two decades.
They finally have their winning season after
taking the opener of a three-game inter-
league series between wild-card leaders.
Tillman pitches O’s past Yanks 4-2
AP photo
Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter, center back to camera, argues with New York Yankees
manager Joe Girardi, center right, at the end of the first inning Monday in Baltimore.
Eagles
From page 1B
Fans
From page 1B
appeared to be intoxicated
and having trouble walking
before he fell over the rail to
a sidewalk below.
“It certainly marred what
otherwise is a very happy
day for fans who know this
is the last opening game we
will see in Candlestick,” San
Francisco Mayor Ed Lee
said. Also Sunday, a rail-
ing collapsed at the Colts
game against the Raiders in
Indianapolis, injuring two
unidentified fans who were
leaning against the barrier
above a tunnel leading to
Oakland’s locker room.
One person was taken
away on a stretcher, while
another left in a wheelchair,
witnesses said.
After the Colts’ 21-17 vic-
tory, Barney Levengood,
executive director of the
Indiana Convention Center
and Lucas Oil Stadium,
issued a statement that
said one of the people was
released after receiving
medical attention at the sta-
dium. The other person was
treated at the stadium and
transported to Methodist
Hospital for additional eval-
uation. Levengood said the
second fan did not appear to
be seriously injured.
Fan Dalton Tinklenberg
of Kokomo., Ind., told
The Indianapolis Star on
Monday the railing that col-
lapsed appeared to be wob-
bly. Stadiumofficials did not
immediately return phone
messages and emails from
The Associated Press seek-
ing comment.
in the second quarter when
the weary defense had
more cramps (two) than
the offense had first downs
(one). Even Kai Forbath,
who made 17 of 18 field
goals in his rookie year, was
wide right in the third quar-
ter. Shanahan’s team also
committed 10 penalties for
75 yards. Kerrigan left in the
fourth quarter with concus-
sion symptoms.
The first-half stats resem-
bled something from an
Oregon opener against a cre-
ampuff, not a game between
NFC East rivals. Total yards:
322-75. First downs: 21-3.
Time of possession: 20:20-
9:40. Philadelphia’s 53 plays
were the second-most in a
first half by any NFL team
since 1991.
Both teams entered the
season with concerns about
pass defense. The Eagles,
with three new starters in
the secondary, fared well in
the debut of their new 3-4
scheme. The Redskins, again
without safety Brandon
Meriweather (groin) and
with two rookies getting
extended playing time, have
much work to do.
As for Griffin, he was the
undisputed star of the show
— at least until kickoff. He
arrived at the stadium wear-
ing an autographed T-shirt
from Les Dauphins de Nice,
the American football team
in France that welcomed him
for a workout during his hon-
eymoon in July.
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PAGE 6B Tuesday, September 10, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Kansas City Chiefs outside line-
backer Tamba Hali (91) runs in
the end zone for a touchdown
after intercepting a pass from
Jacksonville Jaguars quarter-
back Blaine Gabbert (11) dur-
ing the second half Sunday in
Jacksonville, Fla.
AP photos
Dallas Cowboys linebacker Sean Lee (50) tackles New York Giants
wide receiver Hakeem Nicks (88) during the first half Sunday in
Arlington, Texas.
JOE SOPRANO
jsoprano@timesleader.com
Some former Penn State
defenders had big days in
the first week of the NFL
season.
Dallas Cowboy line-
backer Sean Lee (Class of
2009), Kansas City Chief
linebacker Tambi Hali
(’05) and Dolphins defen-
sive end Cameron Wake
(’04) each were instru-
mental in their teams’ vic-
tories.
Lee, while only record-
ing four solo tackles and
an assist in the Cowboys’
36-31 victory over the
New York Giants on
Sunday night, still was
enough of the force on
the field to be recog-
nized by the NBC crew
broadcasting the game.
Lee, along with Cowboys
quarterback Tony Romo,
was awarded a game ball.
His and Romo’s face will
adorn the side of the NBC
truck for the rest of the
season.
Hali had a rare treat
for a defensive player,
scoring a touchdown as
the Chiefs defeated the
Jaguars, 28-2. Hali inter-
cepted a Blaine Gabbert
screen pass in the fourth
quarter Sunday and
returned it 10 yards for
a touchdown. He also
had two tackles, but did
not get in on any of the
Chiefs’ six sacks.
A fact that left him none
too happy.
“I feel like I struggled,”
Hali told the Topeka
Capital-Journal. “When I
don’t get a sack, I feel like
I’ve struggled. At least my
partner (Justin Houston)
got three of them. That’s
pretty big, too.”
Miami Dolphins’ defen-
sive end Cameron Wake
had 2 1/2 sacks and two
additional tackles for loss
in the Dolphins’ 23-10
victory over the Browns.
Penn State fans may bet-
ter remember him as
Derek Wake, the name he
used when he played for
the Nittany Lions.
Here’s how the other
Penn Staters in the NFL
fared in Week 1.
• Lee’s former Penn
State teammate didn’t
have as good a night.
Giants linebacker Dan
Connor (’07) had a tack-
le and an assist but was
forced to leave the game
during the first half with
an injury.
• Against the Chiefs,
Jaguars linebacker Paul
Posluszny (’06) had 10
tackles.
• Miami defensive line-
man Jared Odrick (’09)
had one tackle.
• Chicago Bears place
kicker Robbie Gould
(’04) had hit on his only
field goal attempt of the
day — a 58-yarder —
against the Bengals. He
also was a perfect 3-for-3
on extra points. Defensive
lineman Devon Still (’11)
saw action in the game for
the Bengals but did not
record a tackle.
• Defensive lineman
Jordan Hill sat out the
Seahawks opener at
Carolina with a bicep
injury.
• San Francisco 49ers
linebacker NaVarro
Bowman (’09) started
against the Green Bay
Packers and recorded two
tackles in the 49ers’ 34-28
victory. San Francisco
linebacker Nate Stupar
(’11) was inactive. Tight
End Andrew Quarless
(’09) saw action for Green
Bay but did not catch a
pass.
• Minnesota Vikings
linebackers Gerald
Hodges (’12) and
Michael Mauti (’12)
were both inactive against
the Detroit Lions.
• Pittsburgh receiver
Derek Moye (’11) played
but did not have a recep-
tion in the Steelers’ 16-9
loss to Tennessee.
• Matt McGloin (’12)
was inactive for the
Oakland Raiders opener in
Indianapolis. Meanwhile,
Raiders defensive line-
man Jack Crawford (’11)
had a tackle and Stefen
Wisniewski (’10) was at
his usual position, start-
ing at center.
• Arizona Cardinals left
tackle Levi Brown (’06)
started in the Cardinals’
27-24 loss to the Rams.
• On Thursday night,
offensive lineman A.Q.
Shipley (’11) saw action
for the Baltimore Ravens
against Denver.
• San Diego Chargers
linemen Johnnie
Troutman (’11) and Rich
Orhnberger (’08) and
Washington Redskins run-
ning back Evan Royster
(’10) teams were in action
Monday night.
Lee, Hali, Wake have
big opening days
STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer
BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina — With two
big votes out of the way,
the IOC awaits another
critical decision: electing a
new president to lead the
Olympic body into the next
decade.
Thomas Bach of Ger-
many goes into today’s
International Olympic Com-
mittee vote as the strong
favorite among the field of
six candidates vying for the
most powerful job in world
sports. Bach, a 59-year-old
lawyer and IOC vice presi-
dent who heads Germany’s
national Olympic body, has
long been considered the
front-runner to succeed
Jacques Rogge, the 71-year-
old Belgian who is stepping
downafter 12 years inoffice.
Richard Carrion, a Puerto
Rican banking executive
who heads the IOC’s finance
commission, and vice
president Ng Ser Miang of
Singapore are viewed as the
top challengers.
Also on the ballot are
executive board members
Sergei Bubka of Ukraine and
C.K. Wu of Taiwan and for-
mer board member Denis
Oswald of Switzerland.
The campaign headed
into its final, frantic hours
with candidates trying to
line up votes. The lobby, cor-
ridors, restaurants and bars
of the IOC hotel were swirl-
ing with rumors, gossip,
speculation and whispers of
deals, alliances and voting
counts. With Bach’s sup-
porters confident of secur-
ing a first-round victory, his
rivals were privately discuss-
ing possible voting alliances
to try to stop the German.
If Bach is elected, he
would continue Europe’s
hold on the presidency. Of
the IOC’s eight leaders, all
have come from Europe
except for Avery Brundage,
the American who ran the
committee from 1952-72.
Bach man to beat in IOC election
The Associated Press
STILLWATER, Okla. —
Oklahoma State athletic
director Mike Holder apol-
ogized to his fellow athletic
directors around the Big 12
Conference on Monday in
advance of what’s expected
to be a scathing expose of
the football program by
Sports Illustrated.
“I apologize to all the
athletic directors in the
conference for what’s about
to happen, for what’s about
to be said about a mem-
ber institution,” Holder
said at a news conference
without taking questions.
“That reflects on every-
one, all our brothers and
peers, we’re very remorse-
ful about that.”
The school announced
over the weekend that
SI had notified it of the
upcoming series, which
details transgressions by
the football program start-
ing in 2001. Oklahoma
State said it has notified
the NCAA and launched its
own investigation.
Sports Illustrated, in a
news release sent Monday,
gave highlights of the five-
part series that will begin
Tuesday with a posting on
SI.com. The magazine says
it conducted interviews
with more than 60 former
Oklahoma State players
who played for the school
from 2001-10.
Among the allegations of
misconduct and potential
NCAA violations are:
• An Oklahoma State
assistant coach paid cash
bonuses to players of up to
$500 for performance.
• Oklahoma State boost-
ers and at least two assis-
tant coaches funneled
money to players and pro-
vided sham jobs for which
players were paid.
• Tutors and other
school personnel complet-
ed school work for players
and professors gave pass-
ing grades for little or no
work.
• The program’s drug
policy was selectively
enforced, allowing some
star players to go unpun-
ished for repeated positive
tests.
• Some members of a
hostess program used by
the football coaching staff
during the recruitment
of players had sex with
recruits.
LSUcoachLes Miles was
head coach at Oklahoma
State from 2001-04, when
the program began to
emerge from years of
mediocrity. Current coach
Mike Gundy took over in
2005 and the Cowboys
have grown into a Big 12
power.
Oklahoma St. braces
against allegations
PENN STATERS INTHE NFL: WEEK 1 ROUNDUP
NASCAR did not adjust
the standings to put
Gordon into the Chase —
he was in before Bowyer’s
spin — because Helton
said it was impossible to
address all the scenarios.
“We know from expe-
rience, if you try to look
at ripple effect, you can’t
cover all bases that’s equi-
table and credible across
board,” said Helton, who
also said NASCAR was
unable to prove Bowyer
spun intentionally. “There’s
a lot of chatter, but we
didn’t see any conclusive
evidence.”
Gordon’s reaction
Monday night focused on
Truex, who did nothing
to land in his teammates’
mess, and Bowyer, who
escaped unscathed.
“Feel bad for Truex. He
got in under controversy
now out due to it. But the
guy who started all of this
not effected at all??? Don’t
agree!” Gordon posted on
Twitter.
Bowyer denied Saturday
night he intentionally spun
and Truex was an unwit-
ting participant. There was
silence from MWR officials
until Waltrip tweeted after
NASCAR’s announcement.
“This wasn’t a master
plan or about a spin. It’s
about a split-second deci-
sion made by Ty to try to
help a teammate. I stand
by my people,” he posted
on Twitter.
The controversy sur-
rounding Saturday’s race
put a damper on Newman’s
Monday announcement
that he had reached a deal
with Richard Childress
Racing to replace Jeff
Burton next season in the
No. 31 Chevrolet.
“What happened to
me Saturday night is the
toughest thing that I’ve
ever gone through in any
kind of racing in my 30
years of driving because of
the way everything went
down,” Newman said. “I
knew this announcement
was coming, but in the end,
I don’t think it’s anything to
compare or contrast or say
that the positive outweighs
the negative or even com-
pensates for it.”
Now Newman gets the
chance to compete for the
title in his final races with
Stewart-Haas Racing. He
won the Brickyard this
year and has 17 career vic-
tories overall.
“Obviously, we’re very
pleased with NASCAR’s
decision to provide Ryan
Newman’s rightful place in
this year’s Chase,” SHR co-
owner Tony Stewart said
AP photo
NASCAR drivers celebrate their making the Chase after the
NASCAR race at Richmond International Raceway on Saturday.
Fromleft, Martin Truex, Jr., Kyle Busch, Clint Bowyer, Matt Kenseth.
Truex is no longer in the Chase.
Newman
From page 1B
Nadal
From page 1B
switching from defense to
offense in a blink — proved
that while he says he still
feels pain in that leg, he def-
initely does not have prob-
lems moving around.
These are the same two
who played the longest
Grand Slam final in history,
a nearly six-hour struggle
that left both needing to
sit in chairs during the cer-
emony after Djokovic’s vic-
tory at the 2012 Australian
Open.
This time, when it ended
with a forehand into the
net by Djokovic, Nadal
dropped to his back on the
court, saluted by an Arthur
Ashe Stadium crowd that
included the Queen of
Spain.
Nadal was relentless
from shot to shot, yes, and
from point to point, too,
but what might have been
most impressive was the
way he stayed steady when
Djokovic recovered from
a rough start and began
asserting himself.
At the outset, Djokovic
was his own worst enemy
on many points, a touch
or two off the mark. Nadal
claimed 12 of the last 14
points in the first set, with
Djokovic looking almost
bored.
The world saw this
sort of listless, lackluster
Djokovic two months ago
in the final at Wimbledon,
where Nadal had exited a
Grand Slam tournament
in the opening round for
the only time in his career.
That time, Djokovic went
through a difficult semifi-
nal — at 4:43, the longest
in Wimbledon history —
and barely put up much
resistance in a straight-set
loss to Andy Murray two
days later.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 1C
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF LUZERNE
COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA CIVIL ACTION-LAW NO. 2013-
6223 NOTICE OF ACTION IN MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE
The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as
Successor Trustee for JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee
for the Benefit of the Certificateholders of Popular ABS, Inc.
Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-B, c/o Ocwen
Loan Servicing, LLC, Plaintiff vs. Sean P. Reilly, Personal Rep-
resentative of the Estate of David E. Rowlands, Unknown Heirs,
Successors, Assigns and All Persons, Firms or Associations
Claiming Right, Title or Interest From or Under David E. Row-
lands, Deceased and Estate of David E. Rowlands, c/o Sean P.
Reilly, Personal Representative, Defendant(s)
TO: David E. Rowlands, Deceased and Unknown Heirs, Suc-
cessors, Assigns and All Persons, Firms or Associations Claim-
ing Right, Title or Interest From or Under David E. Rowlands, De-
ceased, Defendant(s), whose last known addresses are 27-29
West Grand Street, Nanticoke, PA 18634 and 95 Manhattan
Street, Ashley, PA 18706. COMPLAINT IN MORTGAGE FORE-
CLOSURE You are hereby notified that Plaintiff, The Bank of
New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as Successor
Trustee for JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the Be-
nefit of the Certificateholders of Popular ABS, Inc. Mortgage
Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-B, c/o Ocwen Loan Servi-
cing, LLC, has filed a Mortgage Foreclosure Complaint en-
dorsed with a Notice to Defend, against you in the Court of Com-
mon Pleas of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, docketed to NO.
2013-6223, wherein Plaintiff seeks to foreclose on the mortgage
secured on your property located, 27-29 West Grand Street,
Nanticoke, PA 18634, whereupon your property would be sold by
the Sheriff of Luzerne County. NOTICE YOU HAVE BEEN SUED
IN COURT. If you wish to defend against the claims set forth in
the notice above, you must take action within twenty (20) days
after this Complaint and Notice are served, by entering a written
appearance personally or by attorney and filing in writing with the
Court your defenses or objections to the claims set forth against
you. You are warned that if you fail to do so the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be entered against you by
the Court without further notice for any money claimed in the
Complaint or for any other claim or relief requested by the
Plaintiff. You may lose money or property or other rights import-
ant to you. YOU SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR LAW-
YER AT ONCE. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A LAWYER GO TO OR
TELEPHONE THE OFFICE SET FORTH BELOW. THIS OF-
FICE CAN PROVIDE YOU WITH THE INFORMATION ABOUT
HIRING A LAWYER. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE A
LAWYER, THIS OFFICE MAY BE ABLE TO PROVIDE YOU
WITH INFORMATION ABOUT AGENCIES THAT MAY OFFER
LEGAL SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT A REDUCED
FEE OR NO FEE. LAWYERS REFERRAL SERVICE, Legal Ser-
vices of Northeastern, PA, Inc., 410 Bicentennial Bldg., 15 Pub-
lic Sq., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701, 570.825.8567. Mark J. Udren,
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Ste. 200, Cherry Hill, NJ 08003, 856.669.5400.
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entire bid process including blue print take offs, solicitation of
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Special Notices
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Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
MEETING NOTICE
The Dallas Borough Zoning
Hearing Appeals Board will
meet on Tuesday, September
24, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. in the
Dallas Borough Council Cham-
bers at 25 Main Street, Dallas
PA 18612. The purpose of the
meeting is to hear the follow-
ing application(s).
Dallas Borough Zoning Hear-
i ng Appeal #5- 2013, Dr .
Watkins & Dr. Medura, 1 Tar-
leton Avenue regarding prop-
erty located at 21 Tarleton Av-
enue in Dallas Borough, PA
18612, requesting a hearing
for Special Exception and/or
dimensional variance for prop-
erty located in the B-2 High-
way Business District:
-Special Exception for exten-
sion, expansion or enlarge-
ment for a non-conforming sign
in accordance with Article 8,
Section 805 (4); and/or
-Variance for relief from di-
mensional regulations con-
tained in Article 8, Section
801(8)(a) Signs: General Reg-
ulations and (c) Signs: Signs in
Business and Industrial Dis-
tri cts regardi ng a si gn for
Watkins & Medura Family and
Cosmetic Dental Center in Dal-
las Borough.
A complete copy of the above
referenced application is avail-
able for public inspection at the
Dallas Borough Zoning Office
25 Main Street, Dallas, PA
18612. Inquiries can be made
by calling the Dallas Borough
Zoning Office at (570) 675-
1389.
Tracey M. Carr
Dallas Borough
Zoning Enforcement Officer
C.J. Bufalino, III
Dallas Borough
Zoning Board Solicitor
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
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Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
CERTIFICATE OF
ORGANIZATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT a Certificate of Organiz-
ati on for Babe' s Bagel s, a
Pennsylvania limited liability
company, either has or will be
filed with the Secretary of the
Commonweal th on the the
14th day of August, 2013, in
accordance wi th the provi -
sions of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania Limited Liability
Law of 1994, 15 PA C.S.A.,
Section 8901, as amended.
ZAYDON & ZAYDON
Attorneys
ESTATE NOTICE
LETTERS TESTAMENTARY
have been granted to Anita
Wi sdo of 905 State Court,
Hazle Township, PA 18202 Ex-
ecutrix of the Estate of Agnes
B. Mitchell, late of 1000 West
27t h St r eet , Haz l et on ,
Pennsylvania, who died Au-
gust 6, 2013. All persons in-
debted to said estate please
make payment, and those hav-
ing claims present the same to:
ATTORNEY
RICHARD I. BERNSTEIN
GIULIANI & BERNSTEIN
101 W. Broad St.- Suite 301
Hazleton, PA 18201-6328
LAKE-LEHMAN
SCHOOL DISTRICT
LEHMAN, PENNSYLVANIA
18627-0038
PHONE- (570) 675-2165
FAX - (570 675-7657
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
FOR SCHOOL YEAR
2013-2014
Sealed bids are solicited by the
Lake Lehman School District,
Lehman Pennsylvania 18627
for the following:
Rubbish & Garbage Removal
& Recycling
Spring Sports Supplies (Base-
ball, Boy's Volleyball, Softball,
Track)
Winter Sports Supplies (Boy's
Basketball, Girl's Basketball,
Wresting, Swimming)
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
Bi d speci fi cati ons may be
picked up in the Administra-
tion Office of the Lake-
Lehman School District loc-
ated in the Junior/Senior High
School, 1128 Old Route 115,
Lehman, Pennsylvania 18627-
0038 or by calling Mrs. Carol
Everett at 570-255-2703.
Bids will be accepted at the Of-
fice of the Board Secretary of
the School District location in
the Junior/Senior High School
B u i l d i n g , L e h m a n ,
Pennsylvania 18627-0038 up
t o 2: 00 PM, Thur s day,
September 19, 2013. Bids will
be publicly opened at that time
in the District Administrative
Office of the Lake-Lehman Ju-
nior/Senior High School.
The envelope containing the
bid shall be marked "Bid for
_____- 2013-2014 School
Year"...
The School Board reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and all bids or any part of any
bid, or to order any item from
any bid, and to waive any and
all informalities in connection
with them at its discretion.
LAKE-LEHMAN SCHOOL
DISTRICT
MARY JO CASALDI,
SECRETARY
BOARD OF SCHOOL
DIRECTORS
Lost & Found
FOUND. White binder, con-
t e n t s s e e m i mp o r t a n t .
Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter. on
8.5.13. Call 332-2786
Notices
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Gino’s
570-288-8995
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult-Payment Plan!
Atty Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
BANKRUPTCY
DUI-ARD
Social Security-Disability
Free Consultation
Attorney
Joseph M. Blazosek
570-655-4410 or 570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
CAREGIVER
Experi enced 24 hour mal e
caregi ver. Speaks Sl ovak.
$800 monthly with 2 days off.
570-814-9880
COMPANION/CARE GIVER
Reliable, Pleasant, Experi-
enced Woman seeking posi-
tion as companion. Appts, er-
rands, etc. 570-823-8636.
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fish-
ing & tranquility at itʼs finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
Travel Entertainment
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
KINKY BOOTS
WED. NOV. 6TH
$165. (MID MEZZ SEATS)
CINDERELLA
WED., NOV 6TH
$159 (ORCHESTRA SEATS)
JERSEY BOYS
WED., OCT 16TH
$129 (FRONT MEZZ
SEATS)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
MON DEC. 2ND
$99 (Orchestra Seats)
A CHRISTMAS STORY
SAT., DEC. 14TH
$165 (FRONT MESS SEATS)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
OCT. 5 & 6 SAT/SUN
CALL NOW LIMITED
SEATING AVAILABLE
F.L. Wright's
Fallingwater /Clayton/911
Memorial @ Shanksvillle
NOV.. 3 SUN
Chocolate World Expo
White Plains,
Lyndhurst Castle,
Tarrytown
Empire City Casino, Yonkers
NOV. 14 THURS. NYC
Vermeer Exhibit
@ the Frick
Dinner @ Four Seasons
Restaurant
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
FUN GETAWAYS!
Giants/Eagles 10/6
Yankees vs
SF Giants 9/22
Broadway:
"Newsies" 9/14
Matilda 9/14
Salem & Boston
Halloween, Oct. 18-21
1-800-432-8069
NEW
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Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
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CALL
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TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
“We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyʼve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Itʼs a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Child/Elderly Care
FAMILIES
URGENTLY NEEDED
More children than ever
before can no longer live in
their own homes. You can
help by becoming a foster
parent. Call FCCY at
1-800-747-3807. EOE
CHILD CARE AIDE
Part time position for after
school program avai l abl e.
Pl ease cal l 570-735-9290
Clerical
Administrative/
Personal
Assistant
Multi-Corporation CEO seeks
qualified individual to assist
on a number of tasks related
to said corporations and oth-
er duties. These duties in-
clude but are not limited to:
- Appointment setting
- Phone/E-mail
correspondence
- Clerical tasks
- Minor accounting work
- Errands
Position will begin as part-
time and will develop into full-
time as candidate acclimates
themself into role. Qualified
candidate must possess a
warm and charming person-
ality, be able to speak in front
of a group, must dress for
success, be able to type 40+
wpm, must be proficient in
Microsoft Office suite + Apple
computers and must have a
val i d dri vers l i cense and
automobile. Please submit
resume to sherry@posi t-
i veresul tsmarketi ng.com.
Automotive
Claims
Assistant
The Claims Team Leader is
responsible for directing a
team of claims assistants.
The Team Lead delegates
and distributes claims to the
team. They provide guid-
ance and training to assist-
ants during the claims pro-
cess. They assist with escal-
ated calls and customer is-
sues and works to resolve
problem situations. The posi-
tion requires extensive auto-
motive service experience
and superior customer ser-
vice skills.
Applicant must be well or-
gani zed, have excel l ent
phone skills, able to commu-
nicate effectively. Basic typ-
ing skills preferable. Full
time position Monday – Fri-
day. E-mail resumes to
jennifer.davailus@
pennwarrantycorp.com
Help Wanted General
TAX
PREPARER
Free Tax School. Earn extra
income after taking course.
Flexible schedules. Small fee
for books & supplies.
LIBERTY TAX
Edwardsville & West Pittston
570-288-4007
Pittston & Plains
570-883-7829
Dallas 570-675-2240
Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp
570-208-1096
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
OUTDOOR
POWER
EQUIPMENT
(OPE)
TECHNICIAN/
MECHANIC
Minimum 5 years experience
diagnosing / repairing small
engi ne power equi pment ,
plows, tractors, mowers, etc.
Will have OPE factory training
on motors, transmissions, hy-
draulics, electrical, pneumat-
ics or other components. Must
have your own tools. Call Bri-
an at Harvis HR Service 570-
542-5330 or send resume to:
hilbertsequipment.jobs
@gmail.com
IT/Software Development
WORDPRESS
WEB
DESIGNER
PRM, Inc. l ocated i n Ol d
Forge, PA is looking for a
qualified individual to assist
in Web Design and creation
using Wordpress. This indi-
vidual will create 5-10 page
websites for clients using a
Wordpress template or cus-
tom design. Full-Time with
benefits. Please e-mail re-
sume to Sherry@positiveres-
ultsmarketing.com.
Logistics/Transportation
ASSISTANT
DISPATCHER
Trucking Company with 24/7
operation seeks individual to
assist Dispatch office in fast
paced environment with
scheduling assignments,
drivers, etc. Exprience help-
ful, but will train the right can-
didate. Health & Life Insur-
ance, 401(k), plus. Reply to
hr@nichlostrucking.com
Maintenance / Domestic
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
PRM, Inc. located at 102 N.
Main St., Old Forge, is look-
ing for a part time mainten-
ance person to handle main-
tenance in and around our
7,500 sq. ft. building. Can-
didate must have reliable
transportation and be willing
to work a flexible “on-call”
schedule as an independent
contractor. Please contact
Sherry @570-457-7020 for
more details and to set up
an interview. Wage is $10
per hour. 1099 issued at
year end.
Medical/Health
CAREGIVERS
Looking for compassionate
people to assist the elderly in
their homes. Personal care
and transportation required.
All shifts and flexible hours
available. Call 338-2681
or visit homeinstead.com/494
to apply.
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Part time 20-24 hours per
week. Computer ski l l s a
must. Send resume to:
POSITION # 4510
c/o Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871
RSA's
Cook
Dishwasher
LPN, Part-time 11-7
Apply in Person
No Phone Calls.
TIFFANY COURT
700 Northampton St.
Kingston, PA
Technical Trades
Experienced Heavy
Equipment Mechanic
Class B CDL required. Must
have 3 years experience &
own tools. Working on
engines, electrical, hydraulics,
power train, welding.
Machine Shop experience a
plus. Apply in person:
703 S Township Blvd, Pitt-
ston, PA 18640
Commercial
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
Get all the
advertising
inserts withthe
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
PAGE 2C Tuesday, September 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, side–by-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve
570-474-6307, ex. 2772
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
SWOYERSVILLE
Great i nvestment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major high-
ways & conveniences. Bring all of-
fers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done. MLS #13-1983.
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901 or 696-2468
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOUʼLL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
For Sale By Owner
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
PITTSTON
251 Broad Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath. Cape Cod
Home. With many upgrades,
finished basement, 2 fire-
places, sun room, pool and
deck, 2 car garage. $176,500
570-883-0412
For Sale By Owner
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
OPEN HOUSE
Thurs., 9/5 4pm-7pm
Sun, 9/8 10am-3pm
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage
on 1.09 acre. Finished base-
ment with laundry room.
Hardwood floors and
carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located
on a quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
ASHLEY
8-10 E. Hartford Street
Well cared for home/invest-
ment property. Move in
ready. 2 spacious bedrooms
on each side with additional
3rd floor living/storage space.
Full basement, large back-
yard. Quiet area on
dead end street.
Pre-qualified Buyers
/Principal Only
$56,500
Call 570-287-2073
BEAR CREEK
Spaciously satisfying from the
open kitchen/eating area, im-
pressive. Fireplace in great
room to an expanded family
room, you will enjoy life more
in this picturesque 4 bedroom
in Laurel Brook Estates.
MLS 13 1587
$372,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
TO SETTLE ESTATE
Two family, with garage, large
fenced yard, needs some
updating, new boiler,
water heaters & roof.
570-735-1058
570-704-8099
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied.
MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
40 CLAUDE ST.
5 year “young” ranch home in
the Dallas Sch. Dist. Conveni-
ent 1-floor living includes
large modern kitchen with tile
floor & countertops, dining
area, LR, 3BRs & 2 full BAs.
For additional living space,
the LL is finished with a fam-
ily room & space for a gym,
playroom hobby room, etc. An
attached deck & a large level
yard provides ample space
for outdoor cooking & activit-
ies. OSP. For more details &
to view the photos online go
to: www.prudentialrealestate.com
and enter PRU9Y5P8 in the
Home Search. This home is
also for rent. #13-3371.
$199,900
Mary Ellen or Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
45 OLD GRANDVIEW AVE.
Make your new home a me-
ticulously maintained bi-level
in the Dallas Sch. Dist. This
property offers 3BRS, 2 mod-
ern baths, modern kitchen,
LR, and formal DR. For relax-
ation and entertaining there is
a 3-season room off the kit-
chen and a large FR in the LL
wi th Berber carpet and a
wood-burning fireplace. All
appliances and window treat-
ments remain, so it is truly
“move-in ready”. Call today
for your private showing.or
more details and to view the
phot os onl i ne, go t o:
www.prudenti al real estate.com
and enter PRU3J2D2 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3552
$196,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
Beautifully decorated, open
floor plan, excellent location,
this home features gorgeous
Amish wood floors, tile floors
in kitchen & baths, huge fam-
ily room built for entertaining,
inviting deck & yard.
MLS #13-3665
$299,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
Cozy, comfortable home with
3 bedrooms, living room with
cathedral ceiling & fireplace,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, screened in porch &
laundry room. Includes lovely
studio apartment with deck,
perfect for family member. 2
car garage.
$239,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
DALLAS/LEHMAN
2 bedroom, 1 bath, New
Windows, Roof, porches and
siding. Remodeled kitchen.
5 Acres. $159,000 NEG.
570-675-0498
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
DUPONT
Very nice 2 story, move in con-
di t i on. Ori gi nal woodwork,
stained glass windows, hard-
wood under carpet, fenced
yard on corner lot.
MLS#13-2310
$95,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
EXETER
206 Cedar Street
$88,900
Neat & tidy low maintenance
home with three bedrooms,
large unfinished basement,
rear carport. No grass to cut.
MLS #13-1914
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
New Price!!!
$58,900
Commercial or Residential
Great opportunity to live and
work in the same building, or
keep current tenant and use
the storefront for your busi-
ness. Former storefront fea-
tures open concept w/original
wood floors. Spacious resid-
ence features 3 bedrooms,
back porch and yard.
Call Christine
for a showing!
(570)332-88832
570-613-9080
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$87,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor family room, Large
master bedroom (15x16) with
lots of closet space.
Aluminum siding.
Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$117,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 3C
Medical/Health
Full Time- Community
Support Worker
Seeking a gentleman for a full-time position working with an
adult in a community oriented, developmental disabilities, day
program setting. The position requires a valid PA driverʼs
license and a high school diploma or equivalent. The ideal
candidate will be creative, energetic, and flexible.
Previous experience is a preferred.
Hours are 7:30 to 3:30,
M-F. Benefit package included.
Step By Step, Inc. Cross Valley Commons
744 Kidder St. Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702
www.stepbystepusa.com
skauffman@stepbystepusa.com
(570) 829-3477 EXT. 605 EOE
Sales / Business Development
SALES
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED COMMISSION
SALES PERSONS
WANTED TO SERVICE NEW AND EXISTING
ACCOUNTS. COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID TRAINING.
IF YOU WANT A CAREER AND NOT A JOB
CALL RICK AT 675-3283
TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW MON-FRI
OR VISIT WWW.CMSEAST.COM
Mechanics
EQUIPMENT MECHANIC
Permanent full time position for repairing and installing of
automotive equipment, includes A/C lifts equipment, brake
lathes, tire changers and wheel balancers.
Experience as a automotive technician would be helpful.
Full benefits program.
To apply please send your resume to:
PANZITTA SALES AND SERVICE
72 George Ave, Wilkes Barre, PA 18705
or email bwas@panzittasales.com
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
52 Ransom Street
Recently renovated and up-
dated this double block is cur-
rently 100% occupied. Little
exterior maintenance or yard-
work for landlord. Current
rents $700 and $750 per
month plus utilities. Corner
lot. Off street parking for each
tenant. Granite kitchens,
hardwood floors, Living
Room, Dining Room, 3 Bed-
rooms and bath in each unit.
MLS# 13-809.
$114,900
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
PRICE
REDUCED!
3 Prince St.,
Hanover Green
Great Location, near schools,
Industrial Park, I-81.
Quality-Construction
3 BR, 2+ Bath, Ranch Home.
Immaculate, Move in immedi-
ately. Freshly-Painted Interi-
or & Exterior. Features:
Large Eat-In Kitchen with
New Flooring, plenty of stor-
age, Plaster Walls, Hard-
wood Floors, Refurbished
Tile Baths. Newer Roof, Gut-
ters, Windows, Doors.
Covered Patio, Finished
Basement with Laundry
Room, Workshop & Outside
Entrance. Plenty Off street
parking Lot 100' X 150' Level
& Fenced with Stucco Shed.
Economical 2-Zone Gas
Heat, inc. all gas appliances.
Reasonable Taxes.
One owner,
Selling to settle estate.
Reduced for quick sale:
$143,300Call/Text for
details 570-466-9843.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP
Newer construction offers open
concept between ultra-modern
kitchen, eat-in area w/sliders &
FR; light & bright throughout!
Formal LR & office or den. 2nd
fl r l ends to MBR w/WIC &
MBA, 3 additional BRs & 2nd
fl r bath. Rear deck, huge
fenced yard, gas FWA & cent-
ral A/C, 2 car garage. Con-
venient to shopping, bus stop,
walking path, restaurants.
MLS# 13-3541
$260,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must
see, home with many desirable
features. Lower level remodeled in
2009 is A-1 grade including family
room with fantastic gas fireplace,
wet bar, 3/4 bath & additional 4th
bedroom. Home also includes
new on demand tank less water
heater, securi ty system & i n
ground lawn sprinkler. Owners
have enjoyed this home for many
years, now it's your turn. Come &
take a look!
MLS# 13-2335
$259,900
Call Jim Banos
Call or text 570-991-1883
For appointment
jim.banos@
coldwellbanker.com
Town & Country
Real Estate
570-474-2340
HANOVER TWP.
Very neat & clean 2 story
single family home with 3
bedrooms, 1st floor bath, eat-
in kitchen, pantry, & formal
DR. Fenced yard. Gas
f orced ai r heat .
$59,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
BERWICK
Lovely 2-Story Home in Nice
Residential Neighborhood!
Features Living Room, Din-
ing Room, Kitchen/Adjacent
Family Room, 3 Bedrooms,
2.5 Baths with Gas Heat &
Central Air + 2-Car Attached
Garage.
MLS 20 52633
Price: $210,000
Call Patsy @ 570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
MOUNTAIN TOP
A 1.17 acre serene setting &
a l arge pi cni c grove wi th
stream makes this move in
ready 3 BR bi level a must
see property! Thereʼs an eat
in kitchen with breakfast bar,
a formal DR with sliders to a
private deck, ample LR with
picture window, Master BR
suite, 25ʼ LL Rec Room with
¾ bath, oversized 2 car gar-
age with large paved drive.
MLS 13 3516
$259,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
570-287-1196
Houses For Sale
HUNTINGTON TWP.
Looking for that country living
while your still close to town?
Only 25 minutes from town.
Come live in this cozy 2 story
Cape Cod nestled in a coun-
try setting on a .99 acre lot.
Very well maintained, move in
condition, with lots of closet
space, a 11' x 21' deck and a
Florida room with a knotty
pine ceiling. Don't worry about
losing power, home comes
w/a portable generator w/its
own transfer box.
MLS 13 3364
$149,000
Call Michael Nocera
696-5412
696-1195
KINGSTON
Great location - This 3 bed-
room 2 bath home is waiting
for i ts new owners. Entry
opens to living room/dining
room combo – lovely large
rear yard – garage with lots of
storage.
MLS #13-2659
$124,000
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room & re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
counter tops. Tile floor in foy-
er and kitchen, master bed-
room and master bath with a
whirlpool tub. The home has
Pella windows throughout.
MLS#13 3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
283 REYNOLDS ST.
Spacious four bedroom home
with plenty of charm. Hard-
wood floors, leaded windows,
accent fireplace and built-in
bookshelves. First floor laun-
dry/power room, three-sea-
son porch and a 16x32 in-
ground pool. Move-in condi-
tion with newer roof, siding
and windows, ductless air, all
appliances and alarm system.
#13-3406
$189,900
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
KINGSTON
Roomy, bright & cheery de-
scribes this 3 story home with
traditional charm. 5 BR, 2.5
BA, 2 stairways , wood fire-
place, solid wood doors, 3rd
fl. would make a great in-law
suite. One Year Home War-
ranty Included!
MLS 13-3669
$229,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$268,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL ROAD
Spacious Modern Tri-Level,
4 bedroom with 3.5 bath,
Large Kitchen, family room
with fireplace, dining room
and living room. Attached 3
car garage, gas heat, cent-
ral air, central vac-system.
Closet and Storage Space.
Second lot included. Minutes
from I-81 and Pennsylvania
Turn pike. $374,900.
570-237-0101
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$54,900
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
MLS 13-3293
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570 592 3966
MOUNTAIN TOP
Well cared for 2 story on quiet
street. Eat in kitchen, dining
room, living room along with
sun room comprise the first
floor. 2 generous bedrooms w/
closets and full bath on 2nd
floor. Walk up attic provides
easy storage. Hardwood floors
and beautiful wood. 2 addition-
al buildings on lot offer many
possibilities and Storage! 1
year Home Warranty to buyer.
MLS 13 2817
$124,900
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
Penn Lake
Lakefront Cottage
(pennlake.org).
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
large living room, large en-
closed heated porch, eat-in
kitchen, laundry room, at-
tached shed, wood burning
stove, electric baseboard
heat, 1300 sq. feet, public
sewer. Beautiful views and
wonderful lake community.
Some furniture negotiable.
No realtors please.
Call 856-217-9531
or 610-357-3338
or email preedys@aol.com
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
PRICE REDUCED!!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
centl y pai nted & move-i n
r eady. Thi s 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
l evel l ot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
t o s o n l i n e , g o t o .
www.prudenti al real estate.
com & enter PRU7R4L5 in
the Home Search.
MLS #13-3363
$139,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
NANTICOKE
Rear 395 E.
Washington St.
Double Block Home,
Each Side:
Large Living Rm., Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Vinyl Sid-
ing, Brand New Roof New:
Berber Carpets, Paint, Floor-
ing, With Backyard Deck
length of House Have In-
come Tomorrow or Live for
Free! Appraised at $65,000
listing at $47,950 or
BEST OFFER!!!
570-916-2043
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
PITTSTON
47 Wine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $47,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
PAGE 4C Tuesday, September 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Other
Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
• KINGSTON
• SWOYERSVILLE
• WILKES-BARRE
• LEE PARK
• PLYMOUTH
• WAPWALLOPEN
• SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
• TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
• Trucksville
• Shavertown
• Lehman/Harveys Lake
• Lee Park
• Hilldale
• Wyoming
• Glen Lyon
• South Wilkes-Barre
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
''Busy People Compatible''.
Enjoy the daily convenience of
living in the vicinity of what's
happeni ng ' ' Woodcrest Es-
tates''. Move in ready, finished
lower level, relax on rear deck
with view of Mohegan Sun.
MLS 13 1110
$115,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto Gir-
ard Ave; home is on the left.
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto
Girard Ave; home is on the left.
PLYMOUTH
Classic 3 story brick home of-
fers spacious living on 3 floors.
Many areas nicely detailed
w/HW floors. Professional use
possible as separate entrance
leads to FR which could be an
office. New roof & soffets done
in 2011. 4 ductless heat/air
uni ts i mprove effi ci ency of
house. 2nd floor bedroom con-
verted to large laundry - easily
converted back. Large WI attic.
MLS 13 893
$125,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral décor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor.
MLS #13-2814
New Price $45,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained Home, Great
location in Dallas School Dis-
trict. 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths,
vaulted ceilings, finished base-
ment with wood burning fire
place. Over sized 2 car gar-
age. Gas heat, mature land-
scaping. Must see. $259,000.
All buyers agents welcome.
Call for App. 704-906-6165
SHAVERTOWN
2103 Hillside Road
Recently renovated two story
on large lot features modern
kitchen with granite counters,
Living room and Dining room
with hardwood floors, large
treated deck overlooking level
yard. 3 Bedrooms, one on
first floor. Master Bedroom
upstairs with full master bath.
Oversized Detached 2 car
garage. Gas heat. Well water
and public sewers.
Great opportunity.
MLS#13-27
$157,500
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazing, well maintained.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049.
$59,000
Vieve 570-474-6307, ext.
2772
474-6307
Houses For Sale
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
SWOYERSVILLE
221 Kossack St.
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x
188 lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
276 High Street
Very Affordable property lov-
ingly cared for and ready for
you to move in! Heat-a-lator
fireplace provides cozy win-
ters and you can enjoy the
patio in the summer. Newer
kitchen, replacement win-
dows, new 200 amp electric
and low taxes. MLS#13-3212
$38,500
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
New Price $82,000
Carl Georinger
696-5429
696-1195
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
Houses For Sale
WAPWALLOPEN
895 Hobbie Road
Wonderful Country Living de-
scribes the location of this
Well-Maintained 2-Story
Home. Features Remodeled
Kicthen, LR/DR Combo,
Den/Office, 3 Bdrms., 1.75
Baths, Enclosed Sunroom +
4-Car Detached Garage.
MLS# 13-2816.
$149,900.
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
WEST PITTSTON
Great value in this totally ren-
ovated 2 story, spacious living
room with brick fireplace and
hardwood floors. Beautiful kit-
chen and very nice size dining
room. Pl enty of storage i n
wal k-up atti c.
MLS# 13-2116
REDUCED TO $90,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
WYOMING
Room for your business 7 2
incomes from the apartments
upstairs. first floor commer-
cial space is updated beauti-
ful l y wi th 4-5 offi ces, ki t-
chenette & lower level confer-
ence room. Plenty of parking.
MLS #13-3565
$135.900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Houses For Sale
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road. Single family
two story - a place for kids!
Four bedrooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has formal din-
ing room, living room, family
room & laundry room. Master
bedroom & bath added to the
1st floor. Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre.
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict.
$115,000
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
218 Warren St.
$159,900
Move in ready and wonder-
fully renovated. Hardwoods,
Granite, Stainless and char-
acter- this corner lot in West
Pittston has it all!
MLS# 13-3310
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
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with the
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to start your
home delivery.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 5C
Commercial
THE OFFICE CENTERS
5 Kingston Locations
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovation • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information call 570-287-1161
Apartments /Townhouses
Immediate efficiency occupancy
Located near shopping & transportation. Temple Apartments
offers efficiencies & one bedroom apartments for income quali-
fied individuals ages 62 or older and/or needing the features of
a mobility impaired unit.
Apartment amenities include:
Accessible features-fully equipped kitchen-Wall to wall carpet-
ing-Ceramic tiled baths-On-site management-On-site mainten-
ance with 24-hour emergency response-On-site laundry-Inter-
com entry system-Social services coordinator on-site
Leasing office located at:
5 Heisz Street- Edwardsville, PA 18704
T: 570-283-2275-TDD 1.800.545.1833 x646
PENNROSE
Apartments /Townhouses
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
Apartments /Townhouses
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
Houses For Sale
WHITE HAVEN
178 West Woodhaven Drive
Relax on deck watching sun
rise over Woodheaven Lake -
- Home has 4 bedroom, 2 1/2
baths, living room with fire-
place, dining room with split
system wall A/C. And spiral
stair to 4th bedroom or office
& walk-in huge attic, family
room great stone fireplace
leads to patio, pool
room/game room features
split system in wall AC, Over-
size garage, with workshop,
matching shed, double lot 1/2
acre, Two paved driveways
one on each side of home.
Basketball court (26x40)
paved with Lights and ad-
justable basket, shared Dock,
and small helicopter pad
presently covered by double
swing facing lake. Appoint-
ment only.
MLS#13-3189
$314,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
WHITE HAVEN
178 Woodhaven Drive
Relaxing views on 200 ft.
lakefront, 2 fireplaces, 2 split
system A/Cs, 2 driveways.
Whole house generator. Over-
size garage with workshop.
Shed, paved and lit basketball
court. Walk in attic. Don't
Miss! 13-3189. $314,900
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WYOMING
Completely redone 3 bed-
room Cape Cod in lovely
neighborhood. Beautiful
woodwork throughout. Cent-
ral air, new windows,new car-
pet with hardwood floors un-
derneath, new electrical, new
hot water heater, the list goes
on! Nothing to do but
move in and enjoy.
$135,000
Call Christine
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
83 Lawrence Street
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer
appl i ances and gas heat.
Nice level backyard and off-
st reet parki ng. Mot i vat ed
sel l er!
MLS #13 2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
Two story home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths & modern eat-
in kitchen. Double lot with
fenced in yard with flowers &
off street parking for 3-5 cars.
Gas heat. Near bus stops,
churches & schools. Small
12 X 16 house in rear with 2
picnic tables for entertaining.
$69,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH RIVER ST.
Modern 1 or 2 bedroom
home. Locat ed cl ose t o
Luzerne County Courthouse
and Kingʼs College. Great
rental property potential New
carpeti ng throughout. 2nd
floor bath with laundry area.
Freshly painted. Walk-out to
backyard. Call to set-up an
appointment!
MLS #13- 2849
$39,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Located on Madison St.
between Linden & Maple.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
MLS# 13-2431
REDUCED TO $84,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
PLYMOUTH
308 Stephanie Drive
Attractive Brick Front Ranch
with 3 Bedrooms, gas heat,
Sunroom (heated), attached
garage, large yard, 8x10
shed. Hardwood floors under
rugs. Great location. Most
windows on main floor are
Newer Triple Pane & double
pane in basement. Basement
can easily be finished (some
areas already sheet rocked &
electric installed)
Well-Maintained. $115,000.
MLS#12-1911
call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
WILKES-BARRE
486 Main Street N.
Nice, spacious 3 bedroom
with large walk-up attic. One
full and one half bath, large
bedrooms with closets, gas
heat, central air on first floor,
nice fenced yard,
3 season porch.
MLS#13-3324
$49,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
589 Franklin Street N.
Nice residential home across
from Wilkes-Barre General
emergency room. Quiet zone.
Two parking permits. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, good
room sizes, fenced yard,
North End. of Wilkes-Barre.
MLS# 13-3115.
$49,900
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bed-
room, 1/1/2 bath with separate
driveway on a quiet street .
Lower level was finished for
former business - has separ-
ate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not in-
cluded in total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING/FRANKLIN TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
1705 W. 8TH ST.
This charming home in the
Dallas Sch. Dist. is waiting for
new owners to settle in and
celebrate the upcoming holi-
days with family and friends.
Relax on the deck and watch
t he l eaves change col or
around your large country lot.
Plan for great times next sum-
mer in your 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. This well main-
tai ned 2-story has 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 modern baths, a
modern kitchen with break-
fast nook, formal DR, large
LR and an added FR with
vaulted ceiling and fireplace.
2-car detached garage. De-
t a i l s a n d p h o t o s a t :
www.pruentialrealestate.com.
Ent er PRU7W7A3 i n t he
SEARCH f i el d.
MLS#13-2539
$227,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
Bui l d your dream home i n
Goodleigh Manor. Beautiful
Views - Your choice of builder
– All underground utilities. 2.02
acre corner lot - MLS #13-2090
priced at $152,500 or 2.06
acre lot MLS 13-2088 priced at
$135,000 The neighborhood
has over 2 acres of walking
trails – Great place to live. Call
Rhea Simms at 570-696-6677.
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000ʼ
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
• 61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
• 46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
• Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
• Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
• Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HUNLOCK CREEK
297 MIZDAIL Road
6 ACRES
Septic, well, electric, 2 story
barn, carport & shed. $60,000.
570-506-5986
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100ʼ frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 ʻ frontage 158ʼ deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
WHITE HAVEN
Middleburg Road
Fabulous 5 acre flat wooded
lot. Public sewer. Old rock
wall along south property line.
Zoned rural agriculture.
MLS#12-3503. $57,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
Lots
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lots
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. 1st, last & se-
curity. No pets. Available
9/1/13. Water & sewer i n-
cl uded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DUPONT
4 room apartment for rent.
$450+utilities, No Pets. Refer-
ences required. Available Oct. 1.
570-241-6038
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, newly
remodeled. Refrigerator &
stove. Big yard.
$700 month + utilities.
570-842-0740 before 8 pm
EDWARDSVILLE
2 Bedroom, recently
remodeled, hardwood floors
throughout, microwave, dish-
washer, washer, dryer, stove,
refrigerator. Water included.
No Pets. $550/month.
570-709-5178. Bit Keller LLC
FORTY FORT
Newly renovated. Great neigh-
borhood. Non-smoking. Oak
composite floors, new wall to
wall carpeting in bedrooms,
new windows. 3 paddle fans,
bath with shower. Stove, refri-
gerator, dishwasher. OSP.
Coin-op laundry. $600/mo. +
gas, electric & water. Refer-
ences required. No pets.
Available Oct. 1st!
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2
nd
floor 2 bdrm, 5
room apt. on River St. In-
cludes stove, frig, washer/dry-
er hook-up in basement, off-
street parking. $595/mo + util-
ities. 1 mo security deposit re-
quired. No Pets. Non-
smoking. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor +
attic, new stove & refrigerator,
wash/dryer hook-up, off-street
parking. Water & heat in-
cluded. No pets. No Smoking.
1 year lease, $485/mo + secur-
ity, credit & background check.
570-947-8097
FORTY FORT
All utilities included. Clean, 4
room, 2nd floor. Appliances.
Covered parking. Non
smoking, cat considered,
starting at $700/month.
570-714-2017
Apartments /Townhouses
FORTY FORT
BEDFORD ST.
Nice 1st floor. Off street park-
ing. $700 month + utilities &
lease. Call 570-814-8876
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
Hanover Township
West End Road
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3029 South Main st.
2nd floor very large 3 bed-
rooms, wall to wall carpeting
central air, eat in kitchen with
appliances. Off street parking.
Washer & dryer hookup. Heat
& cooking gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities.
1st, last & security. Available
Now! Garbage & sewer in-
cluded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
Immaculate 4 room, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath 1st floor apart-
ment overlooking park. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up. Stove &
fridge included. No pets. Non
smoking. $575/ month +
utilities & security. Call
(570) 457-2227
KINGSTON
1st floor, 2 bedroom. Off
street parking, freshly
painted, new carpet, bath-
room & kitchen. Water &
Sewer included. No pets.
$650/month, 1st month &
security. 570-332-4400
KINGSTON
287 Pierce Street
Corner of Pierce & Warren
1 bedroom, ki tchen, l i vi ng
room, bath, cl oset storage
area. Refrigerator & stove in-
cluded, off street parking. Ref-
erences, no pets. $400/month
+ security. Call 570-655-6743
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom, 2nd
floor, 1.5 baths & office. All appli-
ances, washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
Prime location, Poplar Street,
near Nesbitt Hospital. Modern
2nd floor, 1 bedroom/den,
open design. Dishwasher,
washer/dryer. No Pets. No
Smoking. References.
$650+utilities. 570-709-4360
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PAGE 6C Tuesday, September 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Autos For Sale
OFFERS END 7/31/13
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
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*Tax and Tags Additional
OFFER ENDS 9/18/13
USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ANNUAL
BLOWOUT
SALE!
ANNUAL
BLOWOUT
SALE!
It’s the most highly acclaimed sale of the season! Don’t miss out on these steller deals.
LIMITED TIME ONLY!
2010 CHEVY SILVERADO EXT CAB 4X4.........
$
26,500
*
1/2 TON LTZ
2010 JEEP WRANGLER 2DR SPORT 4X4 ....
$
21,500
*
2011 CHEVY SILVERADO 4X4 CREWCAB LT.
$
29,750
*
LEATHER
2013 CHEVY CAPTIVA LTZ.........................
$
21,750
*
14K MILES,4 CYL.
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX LS..........................
$
18,999
*
4 CYL.
2013 CHEVY CAPTIVA LT...........................
$
19,999
*
10K MILES,4 CYL.
2009 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT FWD.................
$
17,999
*
V-6
2010 CHEVY TAHOE LTZ............................
$
39,500
*
DVD, SUNROOF
2011 MERCEDES BENZ E350 AWD..............
$
39,999
*
10K MILES, 6 CYL.
2011 CHEVY CAMARO 2LS COUPE...............
$
19,999
*
AUTO, 6 CYL.
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT FWD.................
$
22,999
*
3RD ROW SEATING
2012 CADILLAC CTS AWD.........................
$
39,750
*
ONE OWNER, OFF LEASE
2012 CHEVY COLORADO CREWCAB 4X4 LT..
$
23,500
*
2011 CHEVY SILVERADO...........................
$
23,500
*
2010 CHEVY MALIBU...............................
$
14,800
*
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE LTZ......................
$
30,500
*
ONLY 9800 MILES
2012 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ....................
$
39,999
*
WHITE DIAMOND
2012 CHEVY IMPALA LT............................
$
17,900
*
10K MILES
2012 FORD FOCUS SE STICK.....................
$
13,999
*
ONLY 9500 MILES
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO LT CREWCAB 4X4.
$
29,999
*
6.2L V-8, LEATHER PACKAGE, WITH CAP
2010 GMC SIERRA CREWCAB SLE 2WD
$
22,999
*
2010 CHEVY AVALANCHE 4X4
SUPER CLEAN! PRICED RIGHT
$
27,999
*
2004 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 H.D. 4X4 EXT CAB
WITH SNOWPLOW, 56K ORIG. MILES
$
16,999
*
2007 CHEVY IMPALA LS
FULL POWER,4 WHEEL DISC BRAKES
$
9,900
*
2007 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT 4X4
LEATHER, ROOF, DVD
$
19,999
*
#7565
#7568
#7569
#7574
#7557A
#7564
#13828A
#7559
#13035A
#12059A
#7550
#7552
#7548
#13585A
#13274B
#7537
#13214A
#12175A
#7518
#7513
#13444A
#13338A
#13373A
#13610A
#13849A
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
KINGSTON
Nice neighborhood, close to
schools, shopping & parks. One
modern 5 room, 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Dining & living rooms,
ample closets, front & back porch
and yard. Washer/dryer hookup.
$575, includes fridge, stove water
& sewer. Non smoker preferred.
570-545-6057
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
“A Place To Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $570
+ utilities, security &
references. No pets.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON TOWNSHIP
1605 West 8th Street
1 bedroom over a garage, Kit-
chen, Living room, Bathroom,
closed in porch. Stove, refri-
gerator, washer/dryer in-
cluded. Newly Remodeled.
$575+Security. No Pets.
570-333-4005
Apartments /Townhouses
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstonʼs Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed, Cent-
ral Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. Ar-
chitecturally designed. Cent-
ral air. Off street parking.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LARKSVILLE
1 bedroom end unit apt. Wash-
er/dryer hookup. No pets. Se-
curity & lease required $450
month. 570-288-7753
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
DALLAS
Meadows
Senior Living
Community
200 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-9336
One Bedroom
Apartment Available!
Included: All utilities, air
conditioning, maintenance,
and free parking.
Restaurant and Beauty Shop
on site.
Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
MINERSMILLS
2 bedroom, 1st floor, $550/
month plus $550 security. Pay
your own utilities. Gas heat.
Fridge & stove. background &
credit check. NO PETS.
570-825-2306
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
Apartments /Townhouses
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
S. Hanover Street
1.5 bedrooms, 2nd floor, no
pets, washer/dryer hook-ups,
attic. $469 mo. 2 Car Garage,
$159 mo. INCLUDES HEAT,
WATER. 570-824-8786
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up. No pets. $475/month + se-
curity & utilities. 822-7657
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644.
NANTICOKE
EFFICIENCY
1 bedroom. $325 month.
Tenant pays electric.
570-735-2516
NANTICOKE
Large 1 bedroom. Hardwood
floors, full kitchen, large dining
room. No pets, no smoking.
$465. Water, sewer & trash in-
cluded. 570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom Eat-in kitchen,
living room, full bath, stove
/fridge, washer/dryer, $500. +
utilities. No Pets. 570-760-
3637 or 570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Nice, clean 1 bedroom. heat,
hot water, electricity, fridge,
st ove, ai r condi t i oni ng,
washer/dryer availability all in-
cluded. Close to town. No pets
o r s mo k i n g . S e c u r i t y
$525/month. 570-542-5610
Apartments /Townhouses
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, washer/dryer hook
up 1 year lease. $385 + utilit-
ies. 570-237-0968.
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1 bedroom
apartment. Newly renovated,
off street parking, washer/
dryer hook up. $700 heat, wa-
ter and sewer included.
570-443-0770
PITTSTON
3 room apartment, 2nd floor,
wall to wall carpet, off street
parking. Enclosed porch.
$450/month + electric heat &
security. No pets.
570-655-1222
PITTSTON
3RD FLOOR
Available Now! 3 bedroom.
$600 + security. Sewer &
garbage included. 574-4380
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Clean & inviting 2nd floor, 2
bedroom apartment. Recently
renovated with new, modern
kitchen & bath, carpeting &
windows. Features bright liv-
ing room, small fenced back
yard & shed. $550/month +
utilities & security. Call Lynda
at 262-1196
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable.. ,
new appliances, off street
parking & sewer included. No
smoking inddoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570-855-3329.
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom on 2 floors.
$650/mo. 570-760-0511
WILKES-BARRE
63 ELIZABETH ST.
Remodeled 1st floor apt.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, rear
porch. Gas heat, washer/dryer
hook- up, fridge, stove & dish-
washer. Absolutely no pets.
$600/month
+ utilities & 1 month security.
Reference check.
570-472-9453
Apartments /Townhouses
SUGAR NOTCH
2nd floor contains 1,215 sq. ft.
of very spacious & sprawling
living space. 6 rooms. Numer-
ous closets. Bathroom is a
generous 10' x 11'. Gas heat,
water, sewer bill & cooking gas
- all included. Has washer/dry-
er hook ups. Only 2 miles to
Wilkes-Barre & close to I-81 &
Wyoming Valley Mall. Lease.
Credit & background checked.
$685 monthly .
570-650-3803
WARRIOR RUN
Close to Hanover Ind. Park.
Remodeled 1 bedroom, fridge,
stove, eat in kitchen. Sewer,
water & garbage paid, electric
by tenant. $425/mo + lease &
security. 570-301-8200
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom efficiency apart-
ment. No pets. $325 + utilities
& security deposit. Call
570-333-5499
WEST PITTSTON
1 or 2 bedrooms, washer/dry-
er hookup. Air conditioning.
Heat, water & sani tary i n-
cl uded.
570-430-3095
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
ROOM
FOR RENT
1 room. Back ground check.
$350 month plus security de-
posit. 347-693-4156
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIV
CAMPUS
1, 2, 3, or 4 bedrooms. Wood
floors, no pets, starting $450.
all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
Wilkes-Barre
2 bedroom townhouse, end
unit. Near VA, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, sewer, water &
garbage included. $800/
month + security.
570-817-4475
WILKES-BARRE
2 BEDROOMS
Heat & hot water included,
$625./month + Security re-
quired. 973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
Large 3 bedroom apartment on
two floors IN GOOD CONDI-
TION.Section 8 welcome. No
pets. $525 + utilities & security.
606-9917
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13ʼ x 21ʼ living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE
STUDIO-Short Term Available
Excellent Wilkes University
neighborhood, wood floors, park-
ing. $425, all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled single home. 3
bedroom, hardwood floors.
No pets. 215-932-5690
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 7C
08 Chrysler Sebring Convertible
Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry
#AU4015
$
9,990
05 Buick LaCrosse CXL Sedan
AU3641,
Leather,
Key Entry
$
9,990
09 Mercury Mountaineer Premier
ONLY 13K MiLES
Leather, Moonroof, Memory
Seat Position, All Wheel Drive
$
22,990
06 infiniti M35 Sport AWD Sedan
AU4208
Leather, Moonroof,
Heated Seat, Keyless Entry
$
16,990
12 Chevrolet Colorado Work Truck
AU4044,
Automatic
$
15,990
08 Mercury Sable Premier
AU3838-Leather,
Parking Sensor, Heated Seats,
Power Driver’s Seat, Memory Seat
$
16,990
07 Towncar Signature LMTD
AU3116- Memory Seat,
Pwr. Leather Seats,
Parking Sensor
$
16,990
08 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer Edition SUV
AU3640-
Air Conditioning, Cruise
Control, Moonroof
$
17,990
08 Lincoln MKZ AWD
All Wheel Drive, Leather,
Moonroof, Heated Seats,
Memory Seat w/power Seats
$
16,990
2
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
Starting at
11 Toyota Prius iii Hybird Hatchback
AU4096, Leather,
Moonroof, Navigation System,
Satellite radio
$
23,990
$
21,990
2
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
Starting at 3AU4097, AWD, Moonroof,
Power Memory Seats, Parking
Sensor
09 Lincoln MKS Sedan
Free State inSpection aS Long aS
You own the car!
$22,990
1.9
%
APR
to choose from
08-11 f150
supercab & crew
XLT & FX4's & Lariat
10
September 9, 2013.
to choose from
2
1 1
07 mercurY mouNtaINeer premIer
Navigation, Memory Seats, Moonroof, Heated Seats
$
10,990
08 Chevrolet impala
Front Wheel Drive, Air
Conditioning, Cruise Control
#AU4335
$
9,990
Starting at
06 Mitsubishi Outlander SE
AU4183
All Wheel Drive
$
10,990
07 Hyundai Azera GLS
ONLY 40K MiLES
AU3198-Pwr. Driver’s
Seat, Keyless Entry
$
11,990
11 Hyundai Sonata GLS
Balance of Factory
Warranty, Keyless Entry
#AU4303
$
14,990
06 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer
AU4075- Leather, Power
Driver’s Seat, Four Wheel
Drive, roof rack
$
12,990
08 Jeep Liberty Sport
AU2962-
CD, PM, PL, rear
Defogger
$
13,990
06 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo
AU4007
Keyless Entry,
Four Wheel Drive
$
12,990
03 Ford ranger FX4 4WD
Keyless Entry
#AU4354
$
13,490
07 FOrD FrEESTYLE LiMiTED VAN
AWD-LEATHEr- 3rD rOW
SEATS- HEATED SEATS-
#AU4133N
$
12,990
12 TOYOTA PriUS FiVE
HATCHBACK- NAViGATiON
SYSTEM - rEVErSE CAMErA
-#AU4198
$
24,590
12 Toyota Tundra Crewmax FWD
ONLY 16K MiLES, AU4308
Leather, Moonroof, Bedliner,
Navigation System, Parking Sensors,
reverse Camera, running Boards
$
43,990
12 Ford E-350 Van
$
21,990
4
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
Starting at
12 & 15 PASSENGEr
Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry
11 Ford ranger XL
Front Wheel Drive, Air
Conditioning, Bedliner
#AU4285
$
10,990
11 Ford F-150 Supercrew 4WD Lariat Limited
AU4178
Navigation, running Boards,
Leather, Moonroof, Heated Seat
$
36,990
11 rAM 1500 Laramie FWD
ONLY 24K MiLES
AU4292
Leather
$
36,990
08 Chrysler ASpen Limited
3rd row, running Boards,
Leather, Moonroof, Heated
Seat, 4WD, Tow Package
$
22,990
12 Ford Explorer Limited AWD
ONLY 12K MiLES AU4370,
Leather, Moonroof, 3rd row Seating,
Navigation System, Parking Sensors,
Power Adjustable Pedals, reverse Camera, SYNC
$
36,990
11 Kia Sorento EX
AU4099- Front Wheel Drive,
Leather, Satellite radio, Bluetooth,
3rd row Seating, Parking Sensors
$
19,990
06 Mercury Mountaineer Luxury
AU3531-
AWD, Leather, 3rd row Seating,
running Boards
$
11,990
11 Mazda MAZDA 3 S Sport Hatchback
Moonroof,
Keyless Entry
#AU4307
$
16,990
03 Toyota Tundra Double Cab
Four Wheel Drive,
Tow Package
#AU4264
$
16,990
12 Ford Focus SE Hatchback
AU4248-
Leather, Heated Seat,
Satellite radio
$
14,990
04 Mercury Grand Marquis LS
AU3891, Leather,
Keyless Entry,
Traction Control Sytem
$
7,990
$10,590
4
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
2011
72
06-12 Fusions
& Milans
to choose from
10
STARTING AT
$11,990
$21,990
09 LINCOLN MKS
Some have Moonroofs,
Adaptive Cruise Control,
Some with Navigation
to choose from
5
$16,990
Leather, SYNC,
Some with Moonroofs
07 Lincoln MKX
Navigation, rear View, Panoramic
Vista roof, Leather, Front Air
Conditioned Seats, Power and
Memory Seats
$
17,990
Moonroof, Keyless,
Satellite
08-11 F150
SUPERCAB & CREW
08-11 EDGE SE,
SEL & LIMITEDS
MOSTWITHLOWMILES!!
MOSTWITH
LOWMILES!!
SOLD
SOLD
PAGE 8C Tuesday, September 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Apartments /Townhouses
Saint John Apartments
419 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre
Stress free living in a
secured building for seniors
age 62 and older.
Now you have it all! A lovely
3 room apartment that
includes all utilities and full
size appliances.
Personal storage room area.
No need to worry about rain
or snow, parking is included
in our indoor spacious
underground garage.
Laundry room/24 Hour
Emergency Maintenance.
570-970-6694
Handicap Accessible/Equal
Housing Opportunity
Income limits apply.
WILKES-BARRE
KIDDER STREET
2 bedroom balcony apt., living
room, kitchen, bath, new car-
peting, freshly painted. $600
month + uti l i ti es. Cl ose to
Home Depot. 570-540-5312.
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
•Equipped Kitchen
•Free Cable
•Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, very
clean, recently remodeled.
Washer & dryer hookup. Off
st r eet par ki ng. No pet s.
$550/mo. includes water &
sewer. 570-714-7272
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
WEST PITTSTON
1 CAR
GARAGE/STORAGE
FOR RENT
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
Condominiums
DALLAS
Private Senior Community,
1st floor, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
attached garage, window treat-
ments & appliances included.
C/A, deck, snow removal &
lawn care included. No pets.
References. $1,200 + utilities &
security. 570-371-8666
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 760- 5095
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-889-8432
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath, $1,000
month. Month to month lease.
Not section 8 approved. Non
smokers. No pets. 2 car gar-
age. Outdoor woodburner for
heat & hot water.
570-506-5986
NANTICOKE
6 room house for rent call for
details.(570)735-2236
Houses For Rent
LEHMAN
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths,
$800/month.
570-477-3827
LEHMAN
IDETOWN ROAD
2 bedrooms, laundry facilities
on site. No pets. $900 month.
1st month & security required.
Available now. 570-639-0967
or 570-574-6974
LUZERNE
392 Bennett St.
2 BEDROOM
HOUSE
Gas heat. Washer/ dryer hook-
up, dish-washer, stove & refri-
gerator. Fenced in yard, par-
tially new carpet. Off-street
parking, yard. $680 + utilities.
(570) 288-3438
MOUNTAIN TOP
Mobile home
2 bedroom, 2 full baths, eat in
kitchen, living room, walk in
cl oset, deck, washer/dryer,
di shwasher & ref ri gerat or,
cent r al ai r on 2 acr es.
$600/month. + 1 & 1/2 month
security & 1st month rent.
570-592-5764/ 973-271-0261
EXETER TWP.
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
PITTSTON
Available Oct. 1st. very nice
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Move in
condition. Gas range, fridge,
dishwasher, washer &dryer
included. Large yard. Beauti-
ful front porch. Corner lot with
2 car driveway parking. Nice
neighborhood. No pets. No
Smoking. $800/mo plus utilit-
ies, security & references.
570-655-4950
PITTSTON
Single home sale or rent. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath, move in
condition, nice yard.
570-540-0198
SHAVERTOWN
Immaculate, 2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in kitchen, hard-
wood floors, gas heat and de-
tached garage. $950/
month+utilities and security
deposit. 570-675-3178
WILKES-BARRE
40 Dexter Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath single
home. $600 + utilities & se-
curity. Section 8 Approved.
Call
357-2809 or 826-1795
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
Wyoming Street
Unfurnished house for rent.
$750 + utilities,
security required
570-961-3162
Storage
FORTY FORT
GARAGE FOR RENT
11ft. 6"x 23 ft. Cinder block
walls, interior walls, steel studs
with sheet rock. Concrete floor,
Steel overhead door with lock,
overhead lighting. $110/month.
1 year lease and security.
570-655-0530
Half Doubles
FORTY FORT
4BR, 1 BA, fridge & stove,
washer/dryer hook up. Shared
yard. Non smokers. $950 +
utilities, security, references &
credit check. Available 10/1/13.
570-751-1600
GLEN LYON
15 minutes from Power Plant
or W-B. 2 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/dryer hook up,
electric heat, new paint & car-
pet, non smoker. $625/month
+ security, references & 1 year
lease. Pet on approval.
570-218-2320
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
HANOVER
LYNDWOOD AREA
1/2 double, very spacious, 3
bedrooms, 1.5 baths with all
neutral decor, large eat-in kit-
chen with oak cabinets, new
countertop & all appliances,
ample closets, full walk out
basement f or st orage, of f
street parking, spacious back
yard deck. $750/mo + utilities,
security & lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
KINGSTON
SPRAGUE AVE. 2 bedroom, 1
bath, 1st floor duplex. New car-
peting & hardwood floors. Con-
veni ent t o Wyomi ng Ave.
B a s e m e n t s t o r a g e .
Washer/dryer hookup. $525
month + uti l i ti es, securi ty,
l ease. NO PETS.
EAST BENNET ST. Charm-
i ng 3 bedroom, hardwood
floors, new carpeting in bed-
rooms, laundry room off spa-
cious kitchen, stained glass
windows, off street parking,
convenient to Cross Valley.
$650. + ut i l i t i es, securi t y,
l ease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
WILKES-BARRE/
PARSONS
3 b e d r o o m, 1 . 5 b a t h ,
$700/month, security, utilities &
lease. No Pets. 570-288-7753
Half Doubles
KINGSTON
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerat-
or and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, off-street parking. No
Smoking, No Pets. $650+
utilities & security.
570-639-1796
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled older
charm, stained glass win-
dows, front & rear porches,
Living /dining room combo,
eat-in kitchen with laundry
alcove, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LARKSVILLE
2 BR, refrigerator, stove &
dishwasher, washer/dryer hook
up. Private driveway. No pets,
$650 + utilities & security.
570-954-5903
NANTICOKE
185 W. Church St,
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, oil heat,
washer/dryer hookup. Small
yard. $550 + utilities & secur-
ity. No pets. Available 10/1/13.
570-270-3139
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, stove & refrigerat-
or, washer/dryer hook up. heat
& water included. $575/month
+ security. 570-906-7614
PITTSTON
Half-Double, freshly painted,
2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath,
washer/dryer hookup, cable
& satellite ready, enclosed
back porch & yard. Private
parking. $650 + utilities, se-
curity & references. No pets
or smoking. 570-239-4293
PITTSTON
ELIZABETH STREET
1 bedroom with neutral decor,
t i l e bat h, ampl e cl oset s,
screened in porch and private
yard. $350 month + utilities,
security, lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLAINS
HALF-DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, all gas. No dogs.
$495/month. 570-417-5441
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, Living room, dining
room, off-street parking.
Security and Lease. No Pets.
$700 a month.
Includes Sewer and Trash.
570-675-4424
TRUCKSVILLE
1/2 RANCH
2 bedrooms, living & dining
rooms, kitchen, washer/dry-
er, basement, yard, Security,
references & lease. No Pets.
$700/month. Sewer & trash in-
cluded.
Call 570-474-9321
or 570-690-4877
WEST WYOMING
3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, quiet
area, off street parking. ABSO-
LUTELY NO PETS. $650/mo +
security and references. Utilit-
ies by tenant. 570-430-3851
leave message.
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Redman Trailer, 56'x14',
Located in park. 4 rooms,
2 bedrooms, 1.5 bath.
Screened in porch. $15,500.
Very Good Condition
570-706-5201
Resort Property For Rent
CANCUN MEXICO
ROYAL SANDS RESORT
TIMESHARE VILLA
2 bedrooms, 2 bath, week
16, 2nd floor ocean view,
overlooks pool. See
www.royalresorts.com
for general info.
Call 570-674-8927
for details.
Horses
HORSE BOARDING
Full care or Field board, Lay-
ups, rehab, retirement, local
transport. Springdale Farms
925-5323 or 441-2288
Redrock Area
Pets
BEAGLE PUPPIES
AKC registered. Males and
Females, Tri-color, shots,
wormed and vet checked.
$250 each. 570-467-3683
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
12, registered, both parents
on site. Males $400, Females
$450.. Contact Ang at
570-441-7826 or
accolie@yahoo.com.
Huskies, Poms,
Yorkies, Chihuahuas,
German Shephards & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
Pets
KITTENS free Persian mix, 8
weeks old, 2 females, 1 male
All eating kitten chow, litter
trained, ready to go. 855-1232
Autos Under $5000
CHEVY '99
PRISM LSI
137,000 HYW miles, adult
owned, green/grey. Clean,
very good condition, depend-
able, excellent mileage. 4
speed automatic, A/C, all
power, rear window defroster,
tachometer, tilt steering wheel,
cruise control, am/fm/CD ste-
reo, air bags, ABS brakes, al-
loy wheels. $2,200. OBO 570-
417-7671 or 570-474-9828.
Autos For Sale
ACME
AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 NISSAN AKTIMA SL
grey, grey leather, sunroof
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE
Brown tan leather, 85k miles
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
blue3, V6, 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS
Black, V6, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS
Bluem V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS
Silver, V6, 3rd seat 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 CHEVY TRACKER LT
white V6 4x4 54k miles
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
98 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB
V8, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
BUICK '10 ENCLAVE
45k mi l es, si l ver/ l eat her,
captains seats, rear back up
camera, third row. $25,200.
570-814-0749
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Gino’s
570-288-8995
CHEVY '00 MAILBU
Dark blue. Automatic, loaded,
power sun roof, V6, new tires.
Very good condition. 106k.
$3,200, OBO. 570-822-0832
TOYOTA
'12 SCION
TC COUPE
Dual sun roofs, 6 speed auto,
too many options to mention.
Asking $17,000. 570-472-1149
Autos For Sale
Chevrolet Impala LT 13'
25K, USA
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 08 COLORADO
5 cyl., auto, air, power steer-
ing, power brakes, AM/FM,
bedliner & fiberglass
bed cover.SPECIAL $7,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY ʻ10 MALIBU LS
Air, all power, cruise, tilt, CD.
Very economical..like
new..Sporty. Balance GM
warranty. SALE PRICE
$11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
DODGE '10 JOURNEY
Light grey, 4 cylinder, all
power, cruise, tilt, alloys,
Sirius radio, 56k. Balance of
factory warranty. Very
clean..very economical.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
FORD F150 04'
4X2. Nice Truck!
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD ‘12
FUSION SE
Auto, all power, cruise, tilt,
alloys. Black. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
HONDA ACCORD
EXL 10' 31,000K
Leather and well Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDA CRV 10'
Low Miles, AWD.
2 Available, starting at
$17,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
NISSAN '11
ALTIMA
Auto, air, power steering,
power brakes, ABS, cruise,
tilt, power cloth seats. CD.
Much More! Like New!
Special $13,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
PONTIAC GRAND AM
02' $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOTOTA '11
CAMRY LE
4 door, auto, dark bl ue
metallic color. Original own-
er . Onl y 18, 900 mi l es!
Looks and drives like a new
car! ! ! Pri ce reduced t o
$14,400 for quick sale. Loc-
ated in the Back Mtn. Call
570-674-5673
to schedule an appointment.
SUBARU OUTBACK 11'
Station Wagon, AWD.
43K Miles!
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2002 Z06 Coupe 13295 ........................................$27,778
2003 BMW Z43.0i ConvertiBle 53232 ...............$13,999
2003 SilverADo XCAB 4X4 lt eXt. 46582 ..............$15,999
2004 S2000 roADSt ConvertiBle 87617 ..........$16,495
2004 venture lS eXt. 97840 ............................$4,500
2004 Corvette Coupe 17167 .............................$26,986
2005 MuSt Gt ConvertiBle 32500 ...................$18,999
2005 tACoMA 4X4 CreW 87132 ........................$18,898
2006 F150XCAB 4X4 Xl 62084 .........................$15,999
2006 HuMMer H3 Suv 50591 ...........................$18,999
2006 350Z tourinG ConvertiBle 22128 ...........$19,495
2007 MuSt Gt Coupe 32569 ........................$16,999
2007 GXp v8 SeDAn 82306 ...............................$11,495
2007 MerC C350 SeDAn 59231 ........................$16,990
2007 HArley 883 SportSter 5353 ......................$6,000
2007 F350 XCAB 4X4 lAriAt 91235 .................$21,999
2008 MuSt Gt Coupe 3012 ..........................$23,898
2008 F150 KinG rAnCH CreW 50457 ..................$27,980
2008 SilverrADo lt2 74414 ..............................$18,999
2009 Cr-v eX Suv 42978 .................................$16,990
2009 HonDA Si SeDAn 45585 .............................$17,495
2010 MuSt v6 ConvertiBle 40332 .................$15,999
2010 tiGuAn Se Suv 22065 ...........................$17,499
2011 ForD FuSion i4 Se 82321 .........................$10,989
2011 MitSu outlAnDer 4X4 Se Suv ...................18124
2012 vW Gti 4 Door 12199 ...........................$21,999
2012 JettA Se SeDAn 32392 ............................$14,999
2012 Beetle 2.5l 30751 ...................................$14,999
2012 iMpreZA SeDAn 33059 .............................$17,495
2012 SCion tC 7.0 21125 ................................$19,898
We Buy CArS
TOYOTA COROLLA 03'
5-Speed. $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Motorcycles
STRATUS 17'
Pleasure/
Fishing Boat
150HP Johnson motor, new
canopy Trolling motor, also.
Moving , Must Sell! $4,995.
570-498-9599
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
SUZUKI ʻ12 SX4
5 door AWD, 6 speed, black,
all power, cruise, tilt, CD, al-
loys. Like new. Balance of
factory warranty. Sporty.
SPECIAL PRICE $11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Air Conditioners
AI R CONDI TI ONER 6000
BTUs EER 9. 9 $35.
570-574-6416
AIR CONDITIONERS, (1) Fri-
gidaire, 5450 BTU.
$50. 570-693-1454
Antiques & Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES $
$ BUYING $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BASEBALL/football cards '90
Fleer baseball $3. '91 Score
Baseball $3. '92 Topps base-
ball $5. '92 Pinnacle football
$3. '90 Fleer football $3. '90
pr oset f oot bal l $3. 570-
3135214 or 570-3123-3859
COCA COLA holiday caravan
truck $20. Linden hump back
clock Westminster chimes $75.
Hess '02 truck $20. Sight vise
for sighting guns USA $35.
Brown jug 2 gal. $30. Bolt cut-
ters $25. Humble toy gas truck
boxed $15. 571-735-1589
MATCH BOX models Yester
years 6 items $91. Days Gone
By 2 items $22. 571-287-6912
NASCAR variety 1.24 scale
cars 10 for $30. 15 trailers
$7.50 each. Bobby Labonte &
Rusty Wallace autographed
cars $75. each. Bud steins '93
- '03 $10. each. 570-239-2266
Appliances
DISHWASHER Kenmore Model
665-13743K601 stainless steel, 3
years old, energy star $250.
570-868-6018
GAS FRYER, commerci al
heavy duty, like new, Cecil-
ware 43lb. Asking $400.
570-574-2967
HD TV (32" Sony Vega) in per-
fect condition - $50.00.
570-406-7607
REFRIGERATOR white, top
freezer G.E. 18.1 cu. ft. 6
months ol d $500. Hotpoi nt
electric dryer, white 6.8 cu. ft. 6
months old with little use $300.
570-675-0667
STOVE, gas Tappan, still us-
ing, white with black oven door
L o o k s & wo r k s g r e a t !
Nanticoke. $125. 831-5778
Appliances
TELEVISION, 19" with DVD
p l a y e r . P O R T A B L E
WASHER/DRYER with attach-
ment s, Mi cr owave oven.
Ever yt hi ng i s $200.
215-224-2913.
Baby Items
CRIB BEDDING by Pottery
Barns, boys blue, includes,
sheets, dust ruffle, bumpers,
seldom used, like new $70.
Also included 3 crib rail pro-
tectors. 570-287-9701.
Building Materials
DECORATI VE STONE 6
boxes. Fl at s. $500.
570-709-5178
FLOORING 20 sq. ft. 3/4" pre-
finished red oak flooring, short
lengths, tongue & groove 4
sides, 3 1/4 wide Bruce Dun-
dee. $50. CARPET PADDING
14'x14' room $45. 570-403-
0494
LADDERS aluminum extension
ladders. 32' $25. 36' $50., 40' $60.
24' 25. Pressure Washer Sand
Blasting Kit $20. Set of aluminum
ladder jacks $20. Wood extension
ladder FREE. 570-510-2436
Clothing
COAT men' s wi nt er coat ,
Dockers XXL wool blend, char-
coal grey,plaid scarf, like new
$30. 570-287-6155
JEANS gi rl s si ze 12
Faded Gl or y, Jones
Sport , Bill Blass 5 pair
@ $ 2. each. 570-735-
6638
Exercise Equipment
EXERCISE MACHINE. Pro-
Form PF 803030. Like new.
Paid $650, selling for $350.
570-498-9599
GYM Impex Tech rod gym,
similar to Bow Flex. Great con-
dition $99. 570-829-4776
Furnances & Heaters
HEAT YOUR ENTIRE
HOME water, and more
wi t h a n OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C Out-
door Wood Furnace, LLC.
570-477-569
Furniture & Accessories
BED, Craftmatic, single, com-
plete, motor, lifts & vibrator.
Excellent condition. $275.
474-6947
BEDROOM SET 4 pc. by Bas-
sett, double bed, maple finish
$550. DINING ROOM table, 4
chairs, solid pine, very good
condition $200. LOVESEAT
$50. Pecan COFFEE TABLE
with matching end tables $150.
570-735-6527
BEDROOM SET sol i d oak,
Pi er wal l uni t wi t h mi rror,
queen size bed & 12 drawers,
cabi net has 2 encl osed
shelves. Excellent condition
$400. 570-675-0502
CHAIRS 4 highback kitchen
chairs $25. George Forman
grilling machine $10. Call Bill
570-825-8256
CHAIRS, 4 High back, wooden
kitchen, $25 for all 4. Call Bill
825-8256
CHINA CABINET Ethan Allen,
lighted, very good condition.
$500. 570-690-6451
DESK Broyhi l l Wood Student
Desk, 4-drawers, Dark Wood Stain.
$65 Padded Wood desk chair $25.
Both pieces in Excellent Condition.
$75 for both. call 570-696-6986
after 3pm or leave message
DESK/COMPUTER & swivel
chair $50. Antique Cavalier ce-
dar chest $300. Used Compaq
computer, keyboard, speakers
$25. Accent table & matching
mirror $40. Oak coffee table
$50. Sony hand held Playsta-
tion $50. 570-829-2599
DESKS Sauder - desk with
hutch $25. Desk with side door
$15. Desk with drop leaf $15.
Desk wi t h 2 shel ves $15.
Bookcase $8. 570-654-2967
DINETTE SET Raymour &
Flanagan, drop leaf table, 4
upholstered chairs, like new
condition. Paid $660. sell for
$325. 570-287-6327
DI NI NG ROOM HUTCH
Cherry finish. Good condition.
78" tall by 32" wide. $125. for
details 570-868-5683
DINING ROOM SET table, 6
chai r s, br eakf r ont $150.
Double bed frame $50. Twin
bed frame $50. Microwavw
stand $25. 3 TVs 29" color
$25, 5 drawer oak dresser $35.
570-823-8442
DINING ROOM SET, dark
wood with 4 chairs & 2 exten-
sions, $60. Piano, Henry Miller
upright $250. 406-5661
FUTON complete metal frame,
floral cover, excellent condi-
tion $200. 570-287-3056
LAMPS with shades, $30. Dry
sink, oak, $50. Dining room
oak, with hutch, $100. Book
case, 3 tier with bottom doors,
$25. 954-4715
LIFT CHAIR electric, good
condition, works gret, bl ue
$200. COUCH l i ght green,
sturdy, good condition $50.
570-823-9635
LIVING ROOM SET rattan, 2
sofas, 1 end table, 1 coffee ta-
ble with glass top $400, Rock-
er/recliner, dark green $50. Ex-
cellent condition.
570-654-4112
RECLINERS 2 matching wing
back recliners, claw feet, cran-
berry color $50. for both. 1
mauve swivel rocker recliner
$35. 1 dark green recliner $35.
570-740-2892
SECTIONAL taupe l eather
double hideabed, recliner &
chai se l ounge. Measur es
14'wx11' like new $900 OBO,
West Bend muffin toaster, 4
wide slots + egg cooker, warm-
er $45. Belgique stainless steel
skiller 6 quart $30. 852-9029
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 9C
CALL AN
E
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P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all major
brands.
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME SHOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan Sun
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
By E-mailing Office Manager:
officemanager@bianepa.com
Or Call:
570-287-3331
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PAT’S
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-235-1840
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
Residential & Commercial
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, Insured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA Masonry, Inc.
Stonework - stucco -
concrete - patios - pavers -
brick - block - chimneys
www.nepamasonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
Concrete & Masonry
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-793-1391
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
GUTTER
RESTORATION &
ROOF REPAIRS
Clean, Seal, Refinish
10 Year Warranty
570-417-1538
Handyman
DO IT ALL
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Licensed & Insured
570-704-8759
DAVE'S HANDY MAN
SERVICES
30 years experience
Full-Time-Affordable quality repairs,
Remodeling and Painting.
570-299-1127
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics,
cellar, garage, one piece or whole
Estate, also available 10 & 20
yard dumpsters.
655-0695, 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
Mikeʼs $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from
Houses, Garages, Yards, Etc.
826-1883 704-8846
Hauling & Trucking
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Gino’s
570-288-8995
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Small Excavating New landscapes,
retaining walls/patios. Call:
570-760-4814
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups, landscaping, mow-
ing, mulching, trimming, plant-
ing. Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
•Lawn Cutting
•Shrub Trimming, •Mulching
•Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Canʼt Lose! 570-822-3943
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Canʼt Lose! 570-822-3943
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
JOHN’S PAINTING
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S
ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Plumbing
D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING
Specializing in boilers,
furnaces & water heaters.
10% Sr. discount. Licensed,
insured & 24 hour service
570-793-1930
Pressure Washing
PJʼs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
Furniture & Accessories
SOFA & love seat, beige floral
colors, very good condition
$100. 570-674-9716
SOFA & love seat, dark green,
gold & ivory $100. Gold swivel
rocking chair $40. Small end
tables with glass tops, white
wash wood (3) $60. Custom
drapes tan with gold tassels &
tie backs $100. Microwave
$25. 570-819-4951
SOFA 97" Bernhardt wi t h
down & 4 pillow, made in USA,
medium sage khaki color, ex-
cellent condition, like new, can
help with delivery $750.
570-905-7427
SOFA BED queen, very good
condition. $500 OBO.
570-655-0103 10am-4pm
SOFA floral 81" $110. Sharp
audio system, 4 features re-
mote & speakers $55. Polar-
oi d retro 60' s camera $20.
Juicer veg & fruit Omega $30.
Wesl o treadmi l l heart rate
sensor, $135. 570-740-1392
STOVE, gas Hotpoint $250. Gas
Dryer, Maytag $150. 4 pc. bed-
room solid wood, $300 Sofa hide a
bed, matching Loveseat & 2 end
tables. $225. 570-905-6574
TABLE solid oak, high pub
style 60" round with 2 swivel
high oak chairs.paid $650. sell
$200 firm. Excellent condition.
570-262-6283
TV Flat Screen 19"50; Entertain-
ment Center $10; Pi nk Wi cker
Chest $20; Black area rug $20; Mi-
crowave $30; Tiled kitchen table
w/2 chairs $50; Bed 2/frame, dress-
er, night table and mirrored dress-
er $40; 2 small dressers $25 each;
Queen size futon/bed $150; Roper
Washer $135 570-709-7076.
WOW! Beautiful Sealy & Serta
Mattress box-spring sets
W/Warranty in plastic bags,
cost over $900 each sell for
only $75 for full, All Sizes avail-
able. Pillow tops just $25 extra,
We Deliver
570-614-3877
Landscaping & Gardening
WEED WACKER, gas, needs
primer $25. 570-693-1454
Miscellaneous
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
AQUARI UM 35 gal . f i l t er,
hood, some accessories $50.
570-823-8157
BAR 5' entertainment bar, sol-
id wood $200. Washer/dryer
set good condition $300.
570-574-0028
BEVERAGE AIR BEER TAP,
good condi ti on. Runs wel l
$350. 570-696-1501
BIKE Vintage 1977 Schwinn
Varsity 10 speed, lime green,
excellent condition $265. 8'
fluorescent light fixture, 2 bulbs
& extra ballast $15. OBO.
Jake 570-829-7859
HANDHELD ORGANI ZER
Palm Pilot Vx with extras $29.
Cordless telephone, new bat-
tery $15. Call 570-283-2552
rick@wyomingvlley.net
Miscellaneous
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
CHAIR Queen Ann green $40.
Wooden snack bar stools $30.
End table with cane top $5.
Radio, under couter $20. TV
11" Not HD novelty $20. Other
misc items buy all for one price
$100. 570-881-0877
LINER REPLACEMENT KIT
complete for 15x35 above
ground pool. Includes full prin-
ted liner, foam underlay, sides,
ski mmer basket & gaskets
/ accessor i es. Pai d $800.
sel l i ng f or $350. OBO.
570-881-2311
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
DVD/ VCR/ CD pl ayer $75.
TREADMILL Li festyl er Ex-
panse $100.
Call 5710-654-5141
EXERCISE machine ski/rower,
$10. Barbie books with book
bag $10. Lil Bratz comforter
$8. Melanie's mall sets $10.
Sponge Bob basketball game
$10. Pink bunny chair $5. Jazz
shoes size 5 + 6.5 $10 each.
570-696-3368
FISH TANK 25 gal. with wood cab-
inet stand $50. Hamilton Beach
food processr FP03 Model 70212
$25. 570-868-6018
FLEA MARKET/Yard Sal e
items. Moving must go $50.
takes all 570-824-8586
FREE AD
POLICY
The Times Leader will
accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
GAZEBO 11x13 2 canvas
tops, decorative metal railing, 2
sets zippered mosquito netting
$70. 570-479-3707
GRILL George Forman holds 4
burgers $6. 2xl mens j ean
jacket $4. Purses 42. each.
VCR tapes $1. each. Box flea
market items $5.
570-735-0821
Miscellaneous
GRILLS (2) 1 with side burner
%50. 1 smoker $75, 24" moun-
tain bike $30. 570-239-2266
GYM LOCKER 7', 6 sections
each 18"Dx12"Hx10"W solid,
no dent s, $100. MOWER
Craf t sman sel f propel l ed,
needs simple minor repair $25.
40+ skeins of assorted colors,
weights & sizes, includes some
needles $35 for all. 735-5916
J OGGI NG S T ROL L E R
Schwinn $90. Lawnmower self
propel l ed, Toro, si de di s-
charge runs good $80. Poulan
mower, side discharge, runs
good $60. After 3 pm call
570-655-3197
LCI AB 2000 pro series laser
with tripod, ro & receiver. $500.
570-388-6812
SUITCASES Samsonite, cran-
berry color, garment bag & me-
dium bag, wheeled fldable lug-
gage cart $50. 693-1454
MAGAZINES, National Geo-
graphic, 200, up to 8/13 $25,
OBO. 474-6947
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
MUFFLER '88 Chevy Berretta
$25. Tilted trailer handmade
49.5wx8'l, lights, new rims &
tires & spare $200. 740-1081
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
PICK YOUR OWN
RASPBERRIES
Limited number of PYO
Blackberries available
8 am to 1 pm
Closed Mon. & Thurs.
Rt. 29, Noxen
Call for availability 298-0962
WhistlePigPumpkin.com
PUNCH BOWL SET, Never
used, i n ori gi nal box. 18
pi eces, $10. 570-693-1454
PUNCH BOWL beaut i f ul l y
carved with 10 matching gob-
lets & ladle. Like new. $20.
570-332-3341
RADIATORS 3 cast iron &
hoods. Different sizes. $ 25-
$30 each. CANES & WALK-
ING STICKS 20 avai l abl e.
Made from Sl i ppery Mapl e
trees. Different sizes, shapes &
heights. $5 and $6. each.
570-735-2081.
RIMS 4 16" alloy Toyota rims
$140. 570-945-2302
Miscellaneous
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
RECORD PLAYER Detrol a
combo record player, am/fm
radio, cassette player & DVD
player,like new asking $45.
Sauder light brown TV stand
47x28.5wx15deep $20.
570-287-1913
SEWING MACHINE Si nger
Vintage, cast iron, has cabinet,
works well $100.
570-862-2919
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
TOTE metal hitch tote expand-
able $50. Karaoke singing ma-
chine $50. White TV tray $10.
570-592-2549
TV Zenith 36" HDTV & stand
$75. Rust plush electric lift
chair $100. Deluxe fine china
service 8 $50. Propane gas
heater $50. Golf cart $20. 3 pc
Early American living room set,
3 tales $200. 693-3978
XBOX 360 Rockband 1 & 2
games with drum set, 2 gui-
tars & microphone, $60. Sony
17" flat screen monitor LCD
1xDVI/1AGP port $25. HP
Photo Smart C4280 all in one
printer/scanner/copier, $25.
406-5661
Musical Instruments
SPEAKER CAB Mar shal l
1960A $399. AMPEG 412
speaker cabinet $249. Call
570-283-2552 ri ck@wyom-
i ngvl l ey.net
Photo Equipment
C A M C O R D E R C a n o n
mini/DVD recorder with ac-
cessories $79. Digital camera
Kodak 3x zoom with telephoto
wide angle & close up lenses
$59. Cal l 570- 283- 2552
r i ck@wyomi ngvl l ey. net
Pools & Spas
POOL 24' round compl ete
wedding cake steps, solar cov-
er hangars ,Hayward sand fil-
ter, 3 yrs old, 1 1/2 HP Hay-
ward pump power flo 1 yr old,
Hercules pool wall & liner heat-
er, lighthouse 100,000 BTUs 7
yrs old. $650. 570-574-6953
Sporting Goods
BICYCLE boys 20" orange X
Factor Rampage $40. Very
good condition 570-675-1277
BOW PSE Stinger compound
bow, 6 new arows, hard case
& extras. Valued over $500.
Used one season asking $300.
570-823-5063
GOLF CLUBS Pi ng G15
graphite iron set, 7 clubs new
$450. 2 Ti tl ei st 60 degree
wedges $20. each. 1 Adams
sandwedge $25. Call Frank
570-262-7318
ROLLER BLADES 1 pair mens
Europa mondel 1-221 size 12
$20. 1 pair women's Europa
size 8 $20. 570-735-1225
Sporting Goods
MOTORCADDI E Model
EC1000 series, electric hand-
cart with portable battery char-
ger & caddy basket $250.
570-735-3886
POOL TABLE 8' oak Wind-
song, 2 pc. slate, ball return in-
cludes ping pong removable
top 2 pc. paid over $2,000. sell
for $475. 570-954-1882
Stereos /Accessories
SATELLITE RADIO, XM, (1)
Delphi SA 1001 Boombox with
remote. (1) AC Adapter (also
battery operated) (1) Delphi
Receiver. In Box. $100. Leave
a message, 570-693-1454
Tools
LADDER, Gorilla Fiberglass
professional 4 in. 1,300 lb.
working load, 3' to 6' exten-
sion, like new $100.00.
570-696-2008
SNOWBLOWER sel f pr o-
pelled, used once, has bent
blade Paid $529 asking $150.
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PAGE 10C Tuesday, September 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
When it comes to
managing our health, we all
know it’s a numbers game.
We count calories, watch our
weight and track how many
miles we run. We obsess
about the stats that keep us
fit but are clueless about the
kinds of numbers that reveal
how healthy — or unhealthy
— we truly are.
“These are simple things
for us to look at,” said Dr.
David Delaney Elsner, a
family physician at the
HealthEast Roseville (Minn.)
Clinic. “Being aware of these
things sooner rather than
later can be very helpful
for preventing long-term
problems.”
In these digital times,
checking your blood pressure
and body mass index has
never been easier. There are
blood-pressure apps and
even home monitors you
can hook up to your iPhone.
Online calculators for BMI
and kiosks at pharmacies
and grocery stores make it
convenient to get readings.
Still, health experts
recommend a physical
exam once a year, at which
time these very important
numbers can be discussed.
What you need to know
Want to take charge of
your health? Get to know
these five barometers of
wellness:
Blood pressure: less than
120/80
What it is: Measures the
pressure of blood flowing
through your arteries. “Think
of it as a garden hose,” said
Tasha Gastony, a physician’s
assistant at the Park Nicollet
Clinic in Eagan. “The higher
the pressure, the more risk
there (is for) damage to that
blood vessel and damage to
the organs that those vessels
feed.”
Why it’s important:
People with high blood
pressure often don’t feel
any symptoms. Untreated
high blood pressure, over
time, greatly increases the
chances of having a stroke,
heart disease or kidney
failure.
Total cholesterol: below
200 mg/dL
What it is: This number
is a combination of high-
density lipoproteins (HDL),
low-density lipoproteins
(LDL) and other fats in your
blood.
Why it’s important: If
there’s too much cholesterol
in your blood, it keeps
circulating and that bad
cholesterol can eventually
enter the blood-vessel walls.
A buildup of fatty deposits in
the arteries can block blood
flow.
Fasting blood sugar: less
than 100 mg/dL
What it is: Tells you what
the sugar content is in your
blood.
Why it’s important:
Helps screen for diabetes.
BMI: less than 25
What it is: Stands for
body mass index. It’s a
formula that takes your mass
(in kilograms), divided by
height (in meters squared). It
helps determine if you’re at a
normal weight, underweight,
overweight or obese.
Why it’s important:
People who are overweight or
obese are at a much higher
risk for health problems
such as high blood pressure,
coronary vascular disease,
diabetes, obstructive
sleep apnea and arthritis.
A BMI that’s under 18.5 is
considered underweight and
might indicate an eating
disorder.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 1D
HEALTH
Five wellness numbers everyone should know
Waist size: less than 35
inches (women); less than 40
inches (men).
What it is: The
circumference around your
belly — the area above your
hipbone and below your
ribcage.
Why it’s important:
People with large waistlines
have too much abdominal
fat, putting them at a high
risk for Type 2 diabetes, high
blood pressure and coronary
vascular disease.
— Allie Shah
Minneapolis Star-Tribune
Reach for the qi
Multitasking meets its enemy in tai-chi
Even if she didn’t have arthritis,
Romaine Stout said, she’d want to
sign up for the new series of tai chi
classes Mark Reinhart is teaching at
the Irem Clubhouse in Dallas.
“Taking the class has made me
more calm,” she said. “I’m a goer,
and this slows you down a bit. It
makes you relax. It’s a benefit just to
slow things down.”
Stout, 60, of Plains Township,
who does have arthritis in her neck
and lower back, has taken previous
classes with Reinhart and enjoyed
them so much she returned for last
week’s introduction to a “Tai Chi
for Arthritis” program he’ll lead on
Wednesday afternoons through Dec.
18.
“This is part of our Healthy Aging
Series,” said Joy Hubshman, director
of sales and marketing at Masonic
Village in Dallas. “You don’t have
to live here (to take the class.) You
don’t have to be a member. We want
people to see us as a resource.”
Another returning student,
71-year-old Margaret Kistler of Lake
Silkworth, said she appreciates the
way Reinhart advises people to keep
their bodies in alignment.
“One of the best tips he gave us is
to keep your ears over your shoul-
ders, for good posture,” she said.
“That’s better advice than the ‘stand
up straight’ they tell kids.”
The slow, smooth movements of
tai chi, which began as a martial art
thousands of years ago in China, do
good things for your body and mind,
whether or not you have arthritis,
Kistler said. “I like the way we learn
about Chinese meditation and cul-
ture, too.”
Chinese philosophy runs counter
to the American tendency to hurry
and attempt to do several things
simultaneously, Reinhart said as he
began his introduction. “If you want
to get more stuff done, slow down,”
he said. “None of this multi-tasking
nonsense.”
As he demonstrated a sequence
Photos by Charlotte Bartize|For The Times Leader
Romaine Stout and and Barbara Kolchin, behind her, take part in an introductory tai chi class at the Irem Temple Clubhouse in Dallas.
MARYTHERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
Rare form of early-onset Alzheimer’s colors a family’s life through the generations
AUSTIN, Texas — Alzheimer’s disease has
stalked Paula Acosta Marks of Austin, Texas,
since birth, and now she knows: She will be
the last member of her immediate family left
to remember what it did to them.
Alzheimer’s first attacked her mother, whose
death in 1982 was attributed to a form of mad-
cow disease. Paula was just 5. Now, she is
watching her two older sisters, ages 38 and 48,
lose their memories to the same rare, inherited
form of Alzheimer’s disease.
Paula, 36, doesn’t have the genetic mutation
that is certain to cause Alzheimer’s. She is the
main caregiver to her unmarried 38-year-old
sister, Lori Acosta, and copes with the sad-
ness of losing her, bit by bit, by living in the
moment and celebrating their time together.
“Don’t waste a day,” she said. “Tell people
you love them, every day.”
At a time when Americans are living longer,
Alzheimer’s is considered an epidemic and one
of medicine’s most daunting puzzles.
Experts predict a nearly threefold increase in
diagnoses by 2050. Today, early-onset patients
— those younger than 65 — represent 200,000
of the 5.2 million who have Alzheimer’s dis-
ease.
The very early-onset Alzheimer’s in Paula’s
family shows the disease at its cruelest. It
steals the lives of adults in their prime — their
30s and 40s. It devastates caregivers.
But it is also a focus of researchers who
hope to answer a burning question: If a person
destined to get Alzheimer’s receives a drug
therapy before symptoms emerge, can the dis-
ease be prevented in all kinds of patients or, at
least, forestalled?
“If one could intervene earlier, you would be
able to exert a much stronger effect at delay-
ing the disease,” said Dr. Clifford Jack Jr., a
professor of radiology at the Mayo Clinic, in a
written statement.
Paula has enrolled in a study of early-onset
Alzheimer’s conducted by the Easton Center for
Alzheimer’s Disease Research at the University
of California, Los Angeles. Researchers want
to learn how Alzheimer’s disease works, and
families affected by one of three gene muta-
tions, like Paula’s, can provide important clues.
“In most ways, it’s the same disease” regard-
MCT Photo
Paula Marks, center, shares a plate of chicken fried steak with her sister, Lori Acosta, 38, right, who has early-onset
Alzheimer’s disease, as their niece, Taylor Critendon, looks on during a lunch date in Austin, Texas.
MARYANN ROSER
Austin American-Statesman
Jean Parrs follows the movements as tai chi instructor Mark Reinhart demonstrates.
If you want to accomplish a lot, slow down,
Mark Reinhart said as he proceeded to dem-
onstrate the slow, smooth movements of tai
chi.
See TAI-CHI | 2D
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of tai chi movements that
looked like a graceful,
choreographed dance,
Reinhart said it’s best to
do them slowly.
“Some people call this
a moving meditation,” he
said.
“It looks hard,” one
woman commented.
“But you’ll have 15
weeks to learn that,” one
of the returning students
assured her.
“Tai chi is based on
the Chinese philosophy
of qi,” Reinhart said,
explaining qi is a kind
of life energy that flows
through the body. “If
qi is flowing correctly,
you have good health. If
it’s blocked or if there’s
an excess you can have
problems. What we want
to do is get the body back
to what I call our factory
settings.”
Reinhart has been
studying Chinese arts
since the 1960s, appre-
ciating its balance and
“understanding of the
cyclical, as depicted in
the yin-yang symbol.”
But he still appreci-
ates Western medicine as
well.
“If I’m in a car acci-
dent and my kidneys are
hanging out, take me
to an emergency room,
not an herbalist,” he
said. “But for mainte-
nance, for prevention,
for staying healthy, that’s
where Chinese philoso-
phy comes in … observe
nature and live according
to your observation.”
After he led the
dozen or so participants
through a warm-up exer-
cise, Reinhart pointed
out how the task had
commanded their atten-
tion. “You weren’t think-
ing about anything else,
were you?” he said. “You
weren’t thinking, ‘What
should I have for dinner
tonight?’ or ‘Did I pay
the cable bill?’ “
“In most ways, it’s the
same disease” regardless
of onset, said Dr. John
Ringman, a clinical profes-
sor of neurology involved
in the study. That’s why
the study, which contin-
ues to enroll patients, is
so important, he said.
Previous trials that
focused on people who
already have symptoms
failed because the inter-
vention was too late. But
with new tools, including
brain scans, researchers
are hoping to prevent the
disease before symptoms
appear.
Treatment isn’t part of
the study Paula is involved
in, Ringman said, but he
and the other research-
ers in the Dominantly
Inherited Alzheimer
Network, or DIAN study,
hope it will inform future
therapies.
Paula, a newly gradu-
ated registered nurse, has
the same hope. She also
hopes her family’s story
will raise awareness about
the study and about early-
onset Alzheimer’s.
“You can get real angry
about this, but if you give
back, you get a little con-
trol,” she said.
Paula doesn’t ques-
tion why her family has
been so deeply affected
by Alzheimer’s disease.
“It’s the roll of the genetic
dice,” she said, sitting
on a couch in the small
South Austin duplex she
shares with husband,
Barton Marks, 42, and
their 2-year-old daughter,
Joslyn.
The numbers
Children of a par-
ent with early-onset
Alzheimer’s have a
50-50 chance of inherit-
ing the disease. Paula’s
20-year-old niece, Taylor
Critendon, isn’t sure she
wants to be tested. Her
mother, Pam Critendon,
can no longer talk and
doesn’t always know who
Taylor is. Getting tested
“is something I think
about every day,” Taylor
said, “but I’m not ready
right now.”
As Lori’s main care-
giver, Paula never has
enough time for her
husband, daughter and
sisters, not to mention
herself. She makes count-
less calls seeking help for
Lori; Medicare will pay
for drugs and doctor vis-
its starting this month.
And she makes sure she
visits Lori every day or
has someone else lined up
to come.
At times, she struggles
with survivor’s guilt. At
other times, Paula feels
blessed, she said, hugging
Joslyn. The Alzheimer’s
trouble has slowed her
down, shown her what’s
important in life and made
her grateful for all she has,
she said: “There’s been a
lot of tragedy in my life,
but I’m so lucky to have
a great husband, a great
daughter and all of these
wonderful things.”
In the past four years,
she has pieced together
her family’s unusual genet-
ic destiny. Her mother’s
death is no longer mys-
terious. Barbara Acosta
started showing signs of
memory loss at age 38,
before Paula was born,
she said. Two or three
years later, the mother of
three girls and an adopted
son was moved to a nurs-
ing home.
Paula has no memory
of her mother’s presence,
only a gnawing sense of
absence.
Her mother’s death cer-
tificate says she died from
a rare and fatal brain dis-
order, Creutzfeldt-Jakob
encephalitis, Paula said.
Her father, Pete Acosta,
coped with the loss by
drinking, Paula said.
Two-and-a-half years
after her mother died,
Pete Acosta was dead
from a heart attack at age
52. Pam, then 20, became
the sole parent to Paula,
then 8, Lori, 10, and
David, 16.
With Social Security
benefits and a trust their
father had set up, they
were able to stay in the
family home. Pam married
her high school sweet-
heart, Kevin Critendon,
and he became a father
to the three younger chil-
dren.
At 17, Paula moved
into an apartment with a
friend. She attended the
University of Texas, as
well as Austin Community
College, on and off for six
years. When she was 19,
her brother, who had been
depressed, killed himself.
“Death is one thing,
but it (kept) happening
to these young people,”
she said. “I didn’t know
anyone who grew old and
died.” Not even her par-
ents.
Five years ago, Paula
and Barton were plan-
ning their wedding when
Barton noticed something
was wrong with Pam, then
a schoolteacher. “She’s
telling a story and, every
sentence, there was a
word she couldn’t remem-
ber,” he said.
Lori also noticed. “I’m
worried about Pam,” she
told Paula.
Lori and Paula had been
relieved after Pam turned
38, the age at which their
mother began losing her
memory. The two had
long suspected something
else — something genetic
— had killed their moth-
er. They hoped they were
wrong.
“I thought she was hav-
ing mini-strokes,” Barton
said of Pam. “I was freaked
out and said, ‘She has got
to go to the doctor. Right
now.’ ”
The tests confirmed
Paula’s and Lori’s fears:
Pam had Alzheimer’s.
The diagnosis came in
February 2009.
“I remember thinking,
‘That’s the worst thing
that could happen,’ ” said
Taylor Critendon, who
was 16.
Paula figured out that
her mother must have had
Alzheimer’s and started
to wonder: Did she have
it, too?
“The anxiety of not
knowing was causing
me anxiety,” Paula said.
“Every time I tripped on
a word, I was worried.” It
didn’t matter to Barton.
“I was afraid she was
going to get sick, but
there never was a doubt I
was going to marry her,”
he said. “There was no
way I was going to leave
her.” They married in
May 2009.
Paula spent every
Monday with Pam for
four years. “We did all
these bonding things. She
helped me shop for my
wedding dress. She helped
me through the pregnan-
cy, and we shopped for
Joslyn’s first outfit,” Paula
said
In February 2011, Pam
had a genetic test con-
firming that she had the
rare, familial form of the
disease. And then Paula
noticed her other sister,
Lori, was acting strangely.
Lori lost her job as
a massage therapist in
2010 and was having a
hard time finding work.
Her personal life was a
jumble of unpaid bills
and unstable boyfriends.
Lori had been savvy on
Facebook, but now she
couldn’t fill out an online
job application. She didn’t
have health insurance and
couldn’t pay her rent. She
resisted Paula’s insistence
that she see a doctor.
“Nobody wanted to
believe she was sick,”
Paula said. “She was only
36.” Lori made excuses
for her problems but later
confessed: She didn’t
want to know. “She said,
‘If I know, I’m going to kill
myself,’ ” Paula recalled.
Lori finally went to Dr.
Ronald DeVere, an Austin
neurologist, in June 2012.
She was the youngest
patient he had ever seen
with Alzheimer’s, he said.
Paula also got tested
in January 2012 as part
of the DIAN study in
which she is enrolled. She
waited a long three weeks
for the results. When she
heard she didn’t have
the gene, “I immediately
started crying,” she said.
“I jumped up and grabbed
Barton and Joslyn.” The
news also meant Joslyn
wouldn’t inherit the dis-
ease.
Lori is losing her abili-
ties quickly, and psychi-
atric problems — which
occur in some Alzheimer’s
patients — have emerged.
Such an aggressive course
is more common in early-
onset disease and has
been distressing to Paula.
If Lori feels paranoid or
anxious — which can
happen in loud, crowded
places — Paula will usher
her out.
“You have to be
extremely flexible and
very patient,” Paula said.
Lori lived with Paula
and Barton in July, but
she moved to an assisted-
living home early this
month. It was too hard
being around an energetic
toddler.
Living with Paula’s
family “was really good,”
Lori said earlier this
month, “but I hated it
sometimes.” Paula lives
modestly and pays for a
second caregiver for Lori,
who is unable to work or
care for herself, in addi-
tion to paying for a chunk
of Lori’s living expenses.
When DeVere first saw
Lori, he said, she scored
an 11 out of 30 points
on a cognitive test. Last
month, she scored an
8. Barton said he sees
declines from week to
week.
Paula sees Lori almost
every day and takes her
swimming, out to eat and
for walks. She’s not sure
how she will juggle that
once she starts a new job
next month as a full-time
hospital nurse, but she is
determined that Lori have
the best quality of life pos-
sible.
As Paula has watched
Pam decline, she cries
when she thinks about
Lori’s future. Lori has
struggled all of her life,
but she still had big plans.
“She wanted to find love.
She wanted to get mar-
ried again. She wanted to
travel. She wanted to get
a new career,” Paula said.
“Now she won’t have any
of that.” Instead, Lori will
soon need a more restric-
tive environment. “When
am I going to take every-
thing away?” Paula asked.
“I have guilt over taking
all of her freedoms away
while I get to have the
love of my life and a beau-
tiful daughter.”
Paula knows she can’t
avoid it: “These is no else
but me. I am IT for her.”
She holds back tears and
continues, “I have to talk
about things. I have to
see the positivity. She
will leave this Earth, and
I know we will have said
all of these things that
we needed to say to each
other.” That tightened
bond with Lori and Pam
are bright spots, Paula
said. So is the DIAN
study. All of the tragedies
in her life have brought
her to this moment. She
knows and appreciates
what is most important:
life, love, family. She has
learned to live in the
moment, she said, and
now, she can make peace
with Alzheimer’s.
“All of this colored my
life,” Paula said, “in a
beautiful way.”
PAGE 2D Tuesday, August 10, 2013 HEALTH www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Charlotte Bartizek/For The Times Leader
Jean and George Parr practice some warm-up exercises.
Tai-Chi
From page 1D
Alzheimer’s
From page 1D “You can get real angry about this, but if you
give back, you get a little control.”
Paula Acosta Marks
On her family’s struggles with early-onset Alzheimer’s
MCT Photo
Paula Marks, right, and her sister, Lori Acosta, 38, exercise on
the treadmills of the YMCA Communities Branch in Austin, Texas.
Paula spends as much quality time taking Lori, who has early-
onset Alzheimer’s disease, out on daily errands to exercise, shop
and eat out.
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EDWARDSVI LLE:
Edwardsville Active
Adult Center, 57 Russell
St., is hosting blood
pressure screenings
presented by Manor
Care at 10:30 a.m. on
Wednesday.
Active Aging Day
will be celebrated on
Thursday on Public
Square in Wilkes-Barre.
Flu shots will be
administered by Superior
Healthcare at 11 a.m. on
Monday.
A speaker from Visiting
Angels will be at the cen-
ter at 11 a.m. on Sept.
18 to speak about “PA
Ready.” There will also
be a special lunch to cel-
ebrate Hispanic Heritage
Month on Sept. 18.
The birthday of the
month celebration will
take place on Sept. 20
and will include cake and
ice cream.
Golden Living Center
will provide blood pres-
sure screenings on Sept.
25.
Wyoming Valley Drug
and Alcohol will host a
guest speaker at 11 a.m.
on Sept. 26. A staff mem-
ber from Rep. Gerald
Mullery’s office will also
be available from 10 a.m.
to noon on Sept. 26.
Farmers market vouch-
ers are still available at
the center.
EXETER: The
Cosmopolitan Seniors
will meet at 1 p.m. on
Sept. 17 at St. Anthony’s
Center.
A casino trip is planed
for Wednesday to Mount
Airy with pick ups in
Exeter and Pittston.
Membership is not
required for trips. Call
Johanna at 655-2720.
FALLS: The Falls
Active Adult Center,
state Roue 92, is host-
ing Active Aging Day
on Thursday at Public
Square in Wilkes-Barre.
The event is sponsored
by the Area Agency on
Aging.
There will be an art
show and bake sale
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
Saturday and 11 a.m. to
5 p.m. on Sunday at the
center. The public is wel-
come. Meet and greet the
artist at the reception
from 3-5 p.m. The Falls
Lions Club will be selling
hot dogs and hamburgers
on Sunday only.
Master Gardener
Roberta Troy will give a
presentation at 11 a.m.
on Sept. 24 entitled
“Gardening is for the
Birds.”
A representative from
Golden Living Center
will give a presentation
on fall prevention at 11
a.m. on Sept. 26. A free
blood pressure screening
will also be available on
Sept. 26.
LUZERNE/
WYOMING
COUNTIES: The Area
Agency on Aging is spon-
soring its annual “Active
Aging Day” from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Thursday
on Public Street Square,
Wilkes-Barre.
There will be Zumba
Gold demonstrations,
belly dancers, and
Stankey and the Coal
Miners. Bag checks for
purchases, coffee, dough-
nuts, bathroom facilities
and early bird bingo will
be held at the Charles
T. Adams Active Adult
Center, 5 East Market
Street. Flu shots will
be available under the
auspices of the National
Council on Aging Flu
and You Program and the
Wilkes Barre City Health
Department under the
direction of Ted Cross.
Members of the active
adult centers may pre-
arrange to order a bag
lunch to enjoy by con-
tacting their local active
adult center prior to
the event. Contact your
local center or the Area
Agency on Aging at 822-
1158.
MOUNTAIN TOP:
The Mountain Top Social
Club will meet today
Sept. 10 in the Father
Nolan Day Room at St.
Jude Church. Doors open
at 3:15 p.m. New mem-
bers are welcome. Hosts
are Carol Ann Lengel,
Elizabeth McCloskey and
Bobett McDade. A trip is
scheduled for Oct. 7 to
Ace In The Hole, Wayne,
N.J., for October Fest
dinner and show. For
more information call
Otto at 570-407-0056.
WILKES-BARRE: An
AARP driver refresher
course will be given
from 10 a.m. to 2:15
p.m. on Monday on the
fourth floor in Boscov’s
Community Room. This
course is open only to
individuals who have
completed either the
two-part basic course or
a refresher course within
the past three years.
The two-part basic
course will be held from
10:15 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.
on Oct. 8 and Oct. 10
for individuals who have
not completed a two-part
basic or refresher course
within the last three
years. Attendance at
both sessions is required.
Those who complete
either of these courses
and are 60 years of age
or older may be eligible
for a five percent car
insurance discount for
the next three years. The
cost for each course is
$14 per person or $12
for AARP members. The
course needs to be taken
every three years.
Students should bring
pens, a driver’s license
and a check payable to
AARP to the first class.
AARP membership cards
should also be brought,
if applicable. Class size
is limited to 25 partici-
pants. Call Les Loomis
at 570-885-0572.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER COMMUNITY NEWS Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 3D
Photographs and informa-
tion must be received two
full weeks before your child’s
birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-gener-
ated. Include your name and
your relationship to the child
(parent, grandparent or legal
guardians only, please), your
child’s name, age and birthday,
parents’, grandparents’ and
great-grandparents’ names
and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Don’t forget to include a
daytime contact phone
number. Without one, we may
be unable to publish a birthday
announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return
of birthday or occasions
photos and do not return
community-news or publicity
photos.
Please do not submit pre-
cious or original professional
pho tographs that require
return because such photos
can become damaged, or
occasionally lost, in the pro-
duction process. Email your
birthday announcement to
people@timesleader.com
or send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
You also may use the form
under the People tab on www.
timesleader.com.
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16)
will be published free of charge
GUIDELINES
Isabelle G. Carlin
Isabelle Grace Carlin, daughter
of Brandon and Laurene Carlin,
Mountain Top, is celebrating her
sixth birthday today, Sept. 10.
Isabelle is a granddaughter of
Harry and Marsha Kocylowski,
Kingston, and Stuart and Sally
Carlin, Summerville, S.C. She is
a great-granddaughter of Helen
Rowski, Knigston; the late William
Rowski; Martha Turon, Greenville,
N.Y.; and the late George Turon.
Isabelle has a sister, Gabrielle, 4.
Alivia and LilyWujcik
Alivia and Lily Wujcik, twin daughters of Jill and Andy Wujcik, Dallas, are
celebrating their second birthdays today, Sept. 10. Alivia and Lily are
the granddaughters of Robert and Gina Adams, Luzerne, and Annette
Wujcik and the late Larry Wujcik, Shavertown. They are the great-
granddaughters of Nancy Adams and the late Harold Adams, Larksville;
the late Mark and Muriel Gushanas, Luzerne; Dorothy Wujcik and the late
Leonard Wujcik, Plymouth; and Lena Gresko and the late Thomas Gresko,
Norristown.
Zoe E. Pecuch
Zoe Elizabeth Pecuch, daughter
of Lisa andWilliamN. Pecuch,
Hanover Township, is celebrating
her fifth birthday today, Sept. 10.
Zoe is a granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. JosephWasilewski, Hanover
Township, and Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas
E. Pecuch, Old Forge. She is a great-
granddaughter of Florence Herchick
and the late Michael Herchick and
the late Joseph and Catherine
Wasilewski, all of Wilkes-Barre,
and the late Williamand Margaret
Rosser and the late Dr. Nicholas M.
and Irene Pecuch, all of Old Forge.
Joshua B. Custard
Joshua Brian Custard, son of Brian
and Cheryl Ann Aleo Custard,
Stroudsburg, is celebrating his
10th birthday today, Sept. 10.
Joshua is a grandson of Vincent
and Barbara Aleo, Wilkes-Barre,
and Bill and Barbara Custard,
Melbourne, Fla. He is a great-
grandson of Anna Bohinski,
Wilkes-Barre Township. Joshua has
a brother, Ethan, 7, and a sister,
Elizabeth, 2.
Michael A. Shotto III
Michael Anthony Shotto III, son
of Mike and Angela Shotto, is cel-
ebrating his first birthday today,
Sept. 10. Michael is a grandson of
Barbara Mascali, Lowell Cragle and
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Shotto. He
has two sisters, Ashley Louise and
Julia Francesca.
KorriLeigh M. Davis
KorriLeigh Marie Davis, daughter
of Trista Sims and Corrie Davis,
Wilkes-Barre, is celebrating her
second birthday today Sept. 10.
KorriLeigh is a granddaughter
of Christine and Bob Benussi,
Kingston, and Joy Davis and
the late Corrie McGahee, both
of Wilkes-Barre. She is a great-
granddaughter of James Lewis,
West Nanticoke, and Sandra Roe,
Lebanon, Ore. KorriLeigh has two
sisters, Ameerah, 1, and Tiarra, 9,
and a brother, Baseer, 5.
Emma L. Kairo
Emma Lacey Kairo, daughter of
Scott and Alicia Kairo, Mountain
Top, is celebrating her sixth
birthday today, Sept. 10. Emma is
a granddaughter of Richard and
Julianna Zarzycki and Jimand
Terry Kairo, all of Nanticoke. She
has a brother, Michael, 22.
Karsyn Miner
Karsyn Miner, daughter of Ryan
and Jen Miner, Huntington Mills,
celebrated her eighth birthday
Sept. 8. Karsyn is a granddaugh-
ter of Jimand Lorraine Miner,
Hunlock Creek, and Rick and Deb
Boyer, Benton. She is a great-
granddaughter of Clyde and Betty
Boyer, Dallas, and Gerald and
Jean Conger, Benton. Karsyn has
a brother, Ryan, 6, and a sister,
Kendyl, 3.
PETS OF THE WEEK
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
How to adopt: The SPCA of Luzerne County,
524 East Main St., Plains Township. For more infor-
mation call 825-4111. Adoption hours are 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday
and from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.
Visit the SPCA of Luzerne County online at http://
spcaluzernecounty.org.
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Sex: male
Age: 7 years
Breed/type: terrier
mix
About this dog: medi-
um, black and brown,
neutered
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WHAT IT’S ABOUT:
As the sixth season begins,
SAMCRO (the motorcycle
club) is in disarray. Tara
Knowles (Maggie Siff)
and Clay Morrow (Ron
Perlman) are in jail; treacher-
ous Gemma Morrow (Katey
Sagal) is watching over Tara’s
kids, and Jackson “Jax” Teller
(Charlie Hunnam) is club
president and trying to make
sense of the chaos he has
inherited.
MY SAY: At the end of
Tuesday night’s opener, a
boy — probably 12 or 13 —
calmly removes a high-caliber
semiautomatic from his back-
pack, then walks into his
school and opens fire.
You don’t see the slaughter
(that’s what imagination is
for), but youdohear theshots
inrapidsuccession, thebursts
of light on the windows from
the muzzle, a teacher scream-
ing, “Oh my God.” Kids are
killed. That is obvious.
With the first anniversary
of the Newtown shootings
three months away, the hor-
ror of that day remains fresh,
but until now, TV has mostly
pretended nothing ever hap-
pened.
The on-screen mayhem
continues. So, why of all
shows, is “SOA” the one to
break the embargo? I’d like
to think it’s to confront that
monkey on its back. “SOA,”
typically among TV’s bloodi-
est hours, has longbeenimpli-
cated in America’s culture of
violence — that images, as
well as actions, may have real-
world consequences. Asked
about the opening episode at
the recent press tour, creator
Kurt Sutter said, “There is a
lot of blood and guts in my
show, nothing is done gratu-
itously.”
In this instance, it eventu-
ally becomes clear the kid
got the gun from SAMCRO,
which speaks to the larger
paradox that Jax has long
puzzled over: Can he be a
goodfather tohis kids yet also
a murdering thug? (Amazing
that we knowthe answer, but
he doesn’t.)
How to gauge “SOA” this
or any season is tough. The
acting is first-rate, and so
is the writing, but the vio-
lence is appalling, and not
just appalling, but creatively
appalling.
Tonight’s hour is pretty
much what you’d expect,
but I’d also like to think this
genuinely smart show, which
wraps next season, is offering
a larger moral:
That no one and nothing
exist in a vacuum. Not even
TVshows.
NEW YORK — After
the crossfire, CNN’s
new debating crew plans
a “Ceasefire.”
The network res-
urrected its old
“Crossfire” political
debate show Monday.
CNN Washington
Bureau Chief Sam Feist
said Friday that toward
the end of every show,
combatants will search
for ways they can find
common ground on
an issue in a segment
called “Ceasefire.”
The long-running
“Crossfire” has been
off the air since 2005,
in part driven away
because of ridicule by
Comedy Central’s Jon
Stewart. The new ver-
sion has Newt Gingrich,
S.E. Cupp, Stephanie
Cutter and Van Jones as
rotating hosts, debating
one issue per night on
the 30-minute show.
Feist said the show
will not be taped before
a live audience, as it was
in its final incarnation.
This should add to
the depth of the conver-
sations and offer less
temptation for debat-
ers to go after cheap
applause lines, he said.
“If we degenerate into
shouting and yelling at
each other, then we will
have failed the country,”
said Gingrich, the for-
mer House speaker, who
will argue the conser-
vative view along with
Cupp.
While political argu-
ments aren’t exactly for-
eign to cable news, the
“Crossfire” team sug-
gested their show would
stand out because it’s an
unscripted attempt to
fairly present two sides
of an issue.
With Fox News
Channel appealing pri-
marily to conservatives
and MSNBC to liber-
als, much of the content
on those networks is
designed to satisfy the
base, said Cupp, a for-
mer MSNBC commenta-
tor.
Most of the debates
are not fair fights, she
said.
Viewers “are tired of
cheap debates but they
are hungry for deep
debates,” said Jones, a
former Obama adminis-
tration official who will
take the liberal side with
Cutter, who worked in
Obama’s campaign.
They’ve been practic-
ing, and Gingrich said
learning the nuances
of cutting short dis-
cussions and taking
commercial breaks has
been tougher than he
thought; it wasn’t some-
thing he had to worry
about as an interview
guest.
The show airs at 6:30
p.m. ET Mondays.
PAGE 4D Tuesday, September 10, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 10, 2013
LOCAL 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30
WNEP (16) News 16 World News Newswatch Inside Ed. Shark Tank (TVPG) Bachelor (TVPG) 20/20 (N) (TVPG)
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HBO (5:00) <In Time (TVPG) <Game Change ('11, Dra) Woody Harrelson. (TV14) <Argo ('12, Thril) Ben Affleck. (TVMA)
HBO2 (5:50) Cinema Verite (TV14) (:25) <Beasts of the Southern Wild The Newsroom (TVMA) <Anna Karenina (TV14)
MAX <+++ Cowboys and Aliens ('11, Act) (TV14) (:15) <++ Dragonfly ('02, Dra) Kevin Costner. (TV14) <In Their Skin (TV14)
MMAX (5:20) <The Long Kiss Goodnight (TVM) <A Very Harold and Kumar Christmas Strike Back (:50) <+++ Shaun of the Dead (TVM)
SHOW (5:15) <Venus and Serena <The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 (TV14) <++ Saw ('04, Hor) Leigh Whannell. (TVM)
STARZ (:20) <Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery The White Queen (TVMA) The White Queen (TVMA) (:05) <Zero Dark Thirty
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Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \”®”\ indicate reserved seating. 8
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2 GUNS (DIgItal) (R)
4:20PM 10:20PM
BLUE JASMINE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
1:40PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:45PM
CLOSED CIRCUIT (DIgItal) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
10:15PM
CONJURING, THE (DIgItal) (R)
1:55PM 4:35PM 7:50PM 10:35PM
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GETAWAY, THE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM
9:15PM
JOBS (DIgItal) (Pg-13) 1:20PM
7:20PM
KICK-ASS 2 (DIgItal) (R) 9:20PM
LEE DANIELS’ BUTLER, THE
(DIgItal) (Pg-13)12:30PM 3:40PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS
(DIgItal) (Pg-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM 9:45PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (3D)
(Pg) 11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM
7:10PM 8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
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PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
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4:50PM 9:35PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
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6:50PM
THIS IS THE END NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal) (R) 12:00PM 2:35PM
5:10PM 7:40PM 10:15PM
ULTIMATE LIFE, THE NEWMOVIE
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WE’RE THE MILLERS (DIgItal) (R)
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WORLD’S END, THE (DIgItal)
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YOU’RE NEXT (DIgItal)
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2 GUNS (digital) (r)
4:20pm 10:20pm
BLUE JASMINE (digital) (pg-13)
1:40pm 4:45pm 7:15pm 9:45pm
CLOSED CIRCUIT (digital) (r)
12:05pm 2:30pm 4:55pm 8:00pm
10:15pm
CONJURING, THE (digital) (r)
1:55pm 4:35pm 7:50pm 10:35pm
ELYSIUM (digital) (r)
12:45pm 3:20pm 6:20pm 9:55pm
GETAWAY, THE (digital) (pg-13)
12:15pm 2:30pm 4:45pm 7:00pm
9:15pm
JOBS (digital) (pg-13)
1:20pm 7:20pm
KICK-ASS 2 (digital) (r)
9:20pm
LEE DANIELS’ BUTLER, THE
(digital) (pg-13)12:30pm 3:40pm
7:05pm 10:05pm
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS (digital)
(pg-13) 12:25pm 3:45pm 6:45pm
9:45pm
ONE DIRECTION, THIS IS US (3d)
(pg) 11:55am 2:20pm 3:25pm
4:40pm 7:10pm 8:25pm 9:40pm
ONE DIRECTION, THIS IS US
(digital) (pg) 12:55am 5:55pm
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3d) (pg) 1:25pm
6:55pm
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (digital) (pg) 4:05pm
9:50pm
PLANES (3d) (pg) 2:30pm 7:10pm
PLANES (digital) (pg)12:10pm
4:50pm 9:35pm
RIDDICK (digital) (r)12:20pm
3:10pm 6:05pm 8:50pm
RIDDICK (xd) (r)1:30pm 4:25pm
7:25pm 10:10pm
SMURFS 2 (3d) (pg)4:00pm
SMURFS 2 (digital) (pg) 12:50pm
6:50pm
THIS IS THE END (digital) (r)
12:00pm 2:35pm 5:10pm 7:40pm
10:15pm
ULTIMATE LIFE, THE (digital)
(pg) 11:50am 2:25pm 5:00pm
7:35pm 10:10pm
WE’RE THE MILLERS (digital)
(r) 2:05pm 4:50pm 7:35pm
10:25pm
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*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
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The Internship – PG13 – 125 min –
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After Earth – PG13 – 105 min –
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Seating R, 1 hr 59 min - 1:50p 4:25p 7:20p
10:05p
One Direction: This Is Us 3D PG, 1 hr 32 min
2:00p 3:00p 4:00p 5:00p 5:55p 7:00p 8:00p
9:00p 10:00p
Getaway PG13, 1 hr 30 min - 2:40p 5:00p
7:15p 9:25p
The World’s End R, 1 hr 49 min - 1:45p 4:20p
7:15p 9:50p
You’re Next R, 1 hr 34 min - 2:10p 4:30p
7:20p 9:40p
The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones
PG-13, 2 hr 10 min - 1:40p 4:20p 7:00p 9:50p
Lee Daniels’ The Butler PG-13, 2 hr 12 min
1:55p 4:30p 7:10p 9:50p
Planes PG, 1 hr 32 min - 2:15p 4:25p 7:10p
9:30p
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters PG, 1 hr 46
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We’re the Millers R, 1 hr 50 min - 1:40p
4:15p 7:15p 9:45p
This Is The End R, 1 hr 47 min - 2:20p 4:40p
7:25p 9:45p
The Conjuring R, 1 hr 51 min - 7:05p 9:35p
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1 hr 40 min - 7:40p
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Despicable Me 2 PG, 1 hr 38 min - 2:00p
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLE Tuesday, September 10, 2013 PAGE 5D
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I am a
75-year-old man who
lives in a gated com-
munity. I have been
seeing a woman who
lives nearby. We are
starting to fall in
love.
Our problem is her 95-year-old
mother, who lives with her. Her mom
is pretty healthy and has some mon-
ey, but she’s scared to be left alone.
Because of this, my lady and I have
difficulty finding private time.
We get out for short periods, but
we’d like to go away for a weekend to-
gether. If we suggest it, Mom makes a
stink and gets nasty with her daugh-
ter. We have tried talking with her
about it, but she refuses, sulks and
won’t talk for days.
She’s suffering from slight demen-
tia, but gets around OK with a walker.
Mom claims she doesn’t want or need
a “grandma sitter.” She wants only
her daughter to take care of her. Any
help would be appreciated.
— Courting Trouble in Arizona
Dear Courting: If your lady friend
wants to have any life of her own, she
will have to stiffen her spine and deal
with Mama. This includes not allow-
ing her mother’s sulking to prevent
the two of you from having an occa-
sional weekend together.
She should contact assisted-living
facilities in the area and find out if
they will accept guests for short stays
of only a few days or a week. If the
answer is yes, Mama should be of-
fered a choice: Either someone comes
to stay with her while you’re gone,
a friend perhaps, or she will have to
stay elsewhere because being alone is
not an option.
Dear Abby: My brother died earlier
this year due to an overdose. His wife
and one of my sisters lived with him.
They also gave him the drugs that
caused his death.
Abby, they are treating Mom, my
husband and me like dirt. Mom had
no say in the funeral at all. You would
think that since she was the mother,
the wife would have included her.
They have been having parties ever
since the funeral and spending the
money left and right, while not pay-
ing the mortgage on the house.
They have turned my other sister
against us, blocked us on social media
and cut us off completely. They also
turned another part of the family
against us. I know it involves drug
abuse on the part of all of them. We
didn’t do anything to them other than
bring forth evidence of what they did
and confront them.
I have no idea how to trust or to
build a relationship with them again
if they ever decide to come back into
our lives. Any advice?
— Brokenhearted in Tampa, Fla.
Dear Brokenhearted: I’m sorry for
your loss, but please recognize that
when relatives are as dysfunctional as
yours, it’s safer for you, your husband
and your mother to MOVE ON. And
if they do decide to come back into
your lives, run the other way.
Dear Abby: Are there any topics you
won’t touch with a 10-foot pole?
— Just Wondering
Dear Wondering: None come to
mind. At one point or another, this
column has addressed darn near
everything and may have offended
almost everyone.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Couple wanting some private time must stand up to sulking mother
To receive a collection of Abby’s most
memorable — and most frequently re-
quested — poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Don’t
let yourself get attached to an
interaction going any certain
way. This isn’t a movie, and your
happy ending does not hinge on
a single interaction playing out
in one particular way.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You’re
being a bit careful about how
you present yourself. Just know
that you will have to reveal a bit
about yourself if you want others
to let down their guard and do
the same.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You’ll
be making a pitch of some kind.
Don’t forget to ask for what you
want. Once you state your inten-
tion, people will either support
you or opt out. Either way, your
time will not be wasted.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Class
is not money, and money is not
class. Ideally, you’ll learn and
grow and have plenty of both.
For now, determine which you
have more of and then work on
the lacking area for a while.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Beware of
the tendency to spend unneces-
sarily now. It’s a good time to cut
something out for the sake of
living within your means.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Are you
being too hard on yourself? How
far should you push yourself
for optimal strength, health and
happiness? Your tendency is to
go too far, and today you’ll
benefit from pulling back.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Marcel
Proust said that the only para-
dise is paradise lost. He under-
estimated your ability to know a
good thing when it’s happening.
You will revel in today’s slice of
heaven.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). In order
to fully accept yourself, you must
first consciously realize what it is
you’re rejecting. Certain notions
you have about yourself are so
ingrained that you won’t notice
them until someone points them
out to you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Use good judgment in deciding
when to try to influence oth-
ers and when to stay out of it.
People indulging their prejudices
don’t want to be confused with
facts.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Your
smile is your best accessory, and
you’ll wear it from day into night.
When your mood dips, the flex-
ing of a few facial muscles will
improve things immensely.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Other
people’s belief systems may not
match yours, but that doesn’t
make them wrong. The only
steadfast rule is that there are
no steadfast rules. Being flexible
will serve you well.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Cats
and terriers can smell the rats
they can’t see, and you have
something in common with
these perceptive beasts today.
State your suspicion, and it will
be confirmed.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Sept. 10).
What’s better than doing work
you enjoy with people you love?
You’ll find out in the span of
four weeks. October brings a
change in the friendship circle.
November sees you entrusted
with a responsibility, as well as
with the key to someone’s heart.
Cancer and Leo people adore
you. Your lucky numbers are: 30,
14, 2, 35 and 47.
F U N N I E S TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
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STONE SOUP
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BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
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PICKLES
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MARMADUKE HERMAN
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HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA

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