BusinessJournal More design f lexibility for More design your building.

f lexibility for More design
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The number of homes sold across Ohio surged 25.8 percent in July, as the market posted year-over-year gains in activity for the 25th consecutive month, according to the Ohio Association of REALTORS. “Home sales activity in July remained brisk, helping the marketplace maintain its steady progress in recovering from the economic challenges that tested the foundation of the industry a few years ago,” said Thomas J. Williams, president of the Ohio Association of REALTORS. “Attaining increased sales for the 25th consecutive month – our longest stretch of uninterrupted growth in 16 years of tracking Ohio home sales – is a clear indicator of growing consumer confidence and a renewed appreciation that housing is a solid, long-term investment.” Sales through the first seven months of

July home sales for Ohio increase
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OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO

2013 reached 74,666, a 17.5 percent increase from the 63,551 sales posted during the same period a year ago. The average sales price (January through July) this year is $142,701, a 6.7 percent increase from the $133,710, mark set during the period a year ago. Total dollar volume this year is nearly $10.7 billion, a 25.4 percent increase from the seven-month mark of a year ago of nearly $8.5 billion. “We’re experiencing widespread improvement in Ohio’s housing sector, with 18 of our 20 markets posting year-to-date gains in sales,” Williams said. “In a state as diverse as Ohio – with a blend of large, urban cities and smaller, rural locales – achieving balanced growth is a positive development and bodes well for our ongoing recovery effort.”

More design your building. f lexibility for f lexibility for your building. your building. More design flexibility for your building.
©2012 BlueScope Buildings North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Butler Manufacturing™ is a division of BlueScope Buildings North America, Inc. www.AlexanderBebout.com
©2012 BlueScope Buildings North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Butler Manufacturing™ is a division of BlueScope Buildings North America, Inc.
©2012 BlueScope Buildings North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Butler Manufacturing™ is a division of BlueScope Buildings North America, Inc.

Sales in July reached by Multiple Listing Services includes 13,354; a 25.8 percent residential closings for new and existing increase from the 10,619 single-family homes and condominiums/ sales posted during a co-ops. The Ohio Association of REAL• Economic ago, and reached TORS, with more than 26,000 members, is Development 4-5-6B year You might be mark surprised to discover the virtually unlimited design the month’s best the largest professional trade association in ® since 2005. The average Ohio. building system. As your local Butler Bu possibilities of a Butler • Printing sales price ofbuild $156,738 To view a market by market analysis of we can a flexible and attractive Butler building that incorpora percent increase sales activity throughout Ohio and local & Graphics 7B is a 7.2 wood, brick, stone, glass. You can also choose from wide variet from the $146,228 aver- orcontact information, click on the alink beage price posted inand July of metal roof walllow. systems—all in a building that meets both you • Construction 2012. http://www.ohiorealtors.org/wp-content/ You might be 8B surprised to discover the and virtually unlimited design needs your budget. provided to your OAR uploads/Stats/13HS/July13Vocus.pdf building system. As local Butler Builder, possibilities of a Butler Data

INSIDE

North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Butler Manufacturing™ is a division of BlueScope Buildings North America, Inc.

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You might be surprised to discover the virtually unlimited design You might be surprised to discover the virtually unlimited design possibilities of a Butler building®system. As your local Butler Builder, ® possibilities of aand Butler building system. As your local Butler Builder, we can build a flexible attractive Butler building that incorporates wood, brick, stone, or glass. You can also choose from a wide variety we can build a flexible and attractive Butler building that incorporates of metal roof and wall systems—all in a building that meets both your wood, brick, stone, or glass. You can also choose from a wide variety needs and your budget. of metal roof and wall systems—all in a building that meets both your needs and your budget.
® ®

More design f lexibility for
Contact us at 419-238-9567 or visit us on the web www.AlexanderBebout.com
Contact us at 419-238-9567 or visit us on the web

we can build a flexible and attractive Butler building that incorporates wood, brick, stone, or glass. You can also choose from a wide variety of metal roof and wall systems—all in a building that meets both your needs and your budget.

Contact us at 419-238-9567 or visit us on the web www.AlexanderBebout.com

Alexander & Bebout, Inc.
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Findlay Center Relies On DSC DSCSurgery Provides Pick-up Service Service For Business for Medical, Rowmark Tapes Records
“If something happened “We have been working to our server, it would with the Document take us hours, ifCompany not days, for to get the Service over information back Cheryl up, says five years,” says Scott Austermiller, IT Manager Cunningham, Administrator at the Rowmark Inc., a Findlayof Findlay Surgery based manufacturer plastic Center. “I have to tellof you sheets for the display industry. that their customer service is “As it is, if there is a problem, superior. I call Don and he is back at our plant in 15 minutes with a “The Surgery Center opened backup tape.” seven years ago,” she explains, “and we do 7,000 Don, is Don Thompson, outpatient surgeries per year. manager of Document We need to have access to Service Company, and he each those records, as visits of Scott at Rowmark once well as our business records. a week to pickup five backup tapes. Don then stores the tapes at theis DSC facility in “All it takes a phone call. Findlay. The people at Document Services are very Rowmark was founded in responsive. They pull files Findlay about two decades immediately and get them ago. is a dynamic member to us.ItThey are pleasant, of the Findlay business well organized, and their community. customer service is superior. sitealso storage exceeds any She likesfar working with a calculated ROI.” local company which has a solid reputation for support of Scott thinks it is important to community projects. deal with another communityminded local company, and, “DSC also provides secure frankly, he likes the personal destruction for records after service he gets from Don they have been stored for Thompson. seven years and leaves is a guy with a positive attitude. It is great when you can do business with a person who genuinely cares about your company and the people there.”

Stump receives CMIT certification
Lima, OH – Matt Stump, Project Engineer of Touchstone CPM, recently obtained his Construction Manager in Training (CMIT) Certification from the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA). This designation certifies competence in construction management practices, knowledge of procedures and principles, Matt Stump and serves as a commitment to becoming a professional, practicing construction manager. The  CMIT  program has two phases: The Capstone Assessment (testing) and the Mentor-Protégé Relationship.   The Capstone Assessment component of the program lays the foundation of knowledge and instills an understanding of the history of construction management practices and procedures.   Candidates are tested and when a score of 80% or higher is achieved, candidates then earn the CMIT designation and are enrolled in the CMIT Program.  The Mentor-Protégé Relationship is an on-going and key aspect of the CMIT program.  Mentors provide CMITs guidance and support to ensure  CMITs  are on the right track to obtain the project experience needed to qualify for CCM certification. The CMIT program is a precursory certification to the Certified Construction Manager (CCM) certification, also offered by the CMAA.

Committed Findlay Surgery to exceeding Committed Center your Relies On DSC to exceeding Service Foryour expectations
Medical, Busiexpectations ness Records

“Intangible personal touch”

“If we dealt with an out-of“Custom service is superior” town company, it would take hours, instead of minutes, to a tape when we need a retrieve document trail for our “Making backup tapes it,” he says. “Don and his “As a and medical facility, we are records. Their hammermill daily storing them offpeople are just a few minutes destruction process is better extremely about site is partconscious of our security away, and his service than shredding becauseis top compliance HIPAA procedure,” with Scott explains. it notch.” ensures that documents regulations concerning cannot be reconstructed. patient confidentiality. “Many companies just DSC Then, there is an intangible send the tapes home with knows the regulations, personal touch. “They provide us with very an employee, but therefor is follows the regulations service!” “Rowmark is an upbeat inherent and risk in that. The security, provides ustapes positive can be lost or destroyed. The with signed affidavits to that price benefit with DSC for offeffect.” company,” says Scott, “and Don is an upbeat guy. He
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TheBusinessJournal September 2013

2A

How to pay for senior care with limited resources
We don’t often think of living a long life as a problem, especially for those we love. But what happens when Mom, Dad, a spouse or another beloved family member are in need of regular health care yet are apparently short on finances? Actually, paying for care may be well within your loved one’s means, says insurance expert Chris Orestis. “It’s a secret the life insurance industry has managed to hide for decades: Your policy can be used to pay for long-term health care such as home care, assisted-living or nursing home expenses,” says Orestis, a for-

Expert Offers Tips for Troubleshooting Health-Care Woes
mer insurance industry lobbyist. “Many people who need long-term care can’t afford it, so they drop the policies they’ve been paying on for years in order to qualify for Medicaid. The life insurance companies profit from the fact that they get all those years of premiums and never have to pay out a death benefit.” Orestis, who’s been lobbying state Legislatures – including Texas – to make the public aware of their legal right to use this option, says seniors can instead sell their policy for between 30 and 60 percent of its death benefit value. The money can be put into an irrevocable fund designated specifically for their care. He offers more tips for paying for a senior’s health care: • Don’t go straight to Medicaid. If your first thought is skipping right to Medicaid, the government’s health-care safety net for the very poor, then you may be heading for a trap. Once you have Medicaid paying the bills, you and your loved ones have little say in how you’re cared for and by whom. This policy conversion option allows you to live in a place where you’re happy and comfortable and it saves taxpayers millions of dollars every year. Also, with 30 percent of the Medicaid population consuming 87 percent of Medicaid dollars spent on long-term care services, more individuals will be forced to find their own resources to pay for those needs. • Consider what you’ve already paid for; www.lifecarefunding.com. The practice of converting a life insurance policy into a Life Care Benefit has been an accepted method of payment for private duty in-homecare, assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care and hospice care for years. Instead of abandoning a life policy because your loved one can no longer afford the premiums, policy owners have the option to take the presentday value of the policy while they are still alive and convert it into a Life Care Benefit – Long Term Care Benefit Plan. By converting the policy, a senior will remain in private pay longer and be able to choose the form of care that they want but will be Medicaideligible when the benefit is spent down. • Think again before tapping other assets. It costs more than $80,000 a year on average to pay for a loved one’s stay at a nursing

home, according to the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long Term Care. And, $178 billion is spent out-of-pocket by individuals and families, accounting for 22 percent of the money spent on nursing homes, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. This can lead down a costly path of tapping other forms of wealth, or even seeking loans. Before doing this, consider utilizing a life insurance policy first. Conversions include provisions for funerals, and whatever money is not spent on care goes automatically to policy beneficiaries. About Chris Orestis
Chris Orestis, nationally known senior health-care advocate and expert is CEO of Life Care Funding, which created the model for converting life insurance policies into protected Long-Term Care Benefit funds. His company has been providing care benefits to policy holders since 2007. A former life insurance industry lobbyist with a background in long-term care issues, he created the model to provide an option for middle-class people who are not wealthy enough to pay for long-term care, and not poor enough to qualify for Medicaid.

of West Central Ohio
Volume 22, No. 8 Publisher: Donald R. Hemple Contributing Writers Jeffrey Gitomer Advertising: Donald R. Hemple

Business Journal

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The Business Journal is mailed to the top business leaders in the 13-county region of West Central Ohio. Although information is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. Information expressed in The Business Journal does not constitute a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any products. Copyright, The Business Journal of West Central Ohio, 2006, All rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission of editorial, photographic or other graphic content in any manner is prohibited. The Business Journal is published monthly at 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833

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TheBusinessJournal 3A

September 2013

The business benefits of good occupational safety and health
Occupational safety and health (OSH) is good for business as well as being a legal and social obligation. Enterprises appreciate that OSH prevents people from being harmed or made ill through work, but it is also an essential part of a successful busienss. vesting in OSH. Simple improvements can increase competitiveness, profitability and the motivation fo employees. The implementation of an OSH management system provides an effective framework to prevent or minimize accidents and ill health. Key OSH principles * Commitment and leadershi to improve OSH * Effective OSH policies and procedures * Proactive risk assessment programmes *Trained and competent workers * Effective risk control measures * Ongoing monitoring and review processes

Although the principles of good OSH apply to every organization, the commercial drivers can be very different for large and small organizations. Large organizations Good  companies  have  long  recognised  the  importance  of  their  image  and  reputation. ‘Companies with their eye on their “triplebottom-line” (1) outperform their less fastidious peers on the stock market.’ The  Economist Large  organisations  are  expected  to  demonstrate  ever-higher  standards  of  corporate  governance  and  greater  transparency  in  reporting  practices.  The  combination  of  operating  in  a  market-driven  economy  alongside  a  society  that  is  more  aware  of  risks  means  that  many  enterprise s   n o w   r e a l i s e   t h e   s i g n i f i c a n t   g a i n s  that  can  be  made  from  integrating  OSH  performance  into  their  wider  business  model.  These  include:

•  improvements in the image, brand value and reputation of the enterprise, •  delivering on corporate social responsibility (CSR) commitments, •  maintaining  and  promoting  investor  confidence,  and •  developing  positive  stakeholder  engagement. ‘The board recognises that both the group’s corporate performance and its value to stakeholders are affected by its occupational health and safety performance. It therefore requires the managing directors and all employees to demonstrate a positive approach to health and safety issues.’ Chief  Executive,  Uniq  plc  (food  sector) Corporate social responsibility (CSR) considers how business can take account of its economic, social and environmental impacts in the way it operates. OSH can play a major role in how these principles are put into effect. Of particular relevance is: • including  OSH  in  wider  corporate  governance  initiatives, •  ensuring  OSH  risks  are  adequately  addressed  by  contractors  and  suppliers,  and •  motivating  other  enterprises  to  make  OSH  improvements  through  peer  pressure. Productivity and efficiency A central EU commitment from the Lisbon strategy (2) is to give equal importance to increased employment and productivity through greater competitiveness. The cost of accidents at work and occupational diseases in the EU-15 ranges from 2.6% to 3.8% of gross national product. As well as reducing accidents and ill health, production and efficiency benefits can follow as a result of: • enhancing  the  levels  of  motivation,  cooperation  and  morale  in  the  workforce, •  more  productive  workers  and  more  efficient  working  methods, •  minimising unplanned costs through effective business continuity planning, • improving the quality of employee recruitment and retention, • cutting insurance premiums, and • reducing the potential exposure to criminal or civil litigation, Returns on investment as high as 12:1 (EUR 12 profit for every EUR 1 invested) can be acheived through investing in good OSH. ‘There is a clear and direct relationship between the social behaviors of a corporation and its reputation, sales, brand and indeed overall value. This correlation (and these consequences) get stronger as both the size of the business and the value of the brand increase.’ Leipsizer (1) Small enterprises Many small and medium-sized enterprises are also beginning to recognize the costs of poor OSH, and the benefits of good OSH performance. These are most noticeable in terms of: • meeting the OSH requirements of business clients in order to win and retain contracts, • avoiding business disruption and loss ofkey staff, • motivating staff and retaining their commitment, and • the availability and affordability of insurance. New and growing enterprises seeking to achieve sustained business growth and stability are realizing how their OSH performance can contribute. This is most noticeable in terms of satisfying the OSH requirements of clients. ‘Not only do we now have higher staff morale and lower sickness, it also significantly benefits the retention of existing customers, and it is a real differentiator when winning new business and helping the company to expand.’ John Purnell, Regional Director, Cougar Automation Ltd. The need for corporate businesses to act responsibly also leads to demands being placed on their suppliers. Investing in good OSH standards boosts the competitiveness of the enterprise, which also increases the potential to retain clients and win new business. (See OCCUPATIONAL Page 7A)

Why is OSH an essential part of good business? Occupational  safety  and  health: •  helps demonstrate that a business is socially responsible, •  protects and enhances brand image and brand value,  •  helps  maximise  the  productivity  of  workers, •  enhances employees’ commitment to the business, •  builds  a  more  competent,  healthier  workforce, •  reduces  business  costs  and  disruption, •  enables  enterprises  to  meet  customers’  OSH  expectations,  and •  encourages  the  workforce  to  stay  longer  in  active  life. Every enterprise can enjoy significant benefits by in-

4A

TheBusinessJournal

September 2013

Employment Growth Slows in Ohio
Employment in Ohio has grown 2.7 percent since the start of the recovery (June 2009 to March 2013). Over the same period, national employment grew almost a percentage point more (3.5 percent). Elsewhere in the District, employment in West Virginia and Pennsylvania grew at rates similar to that seen in Ohio, 2.6 percent and 2.5 percent, respectively. By contrast, Kentucky saw growth above the national average at 4.1 percent. Among the other 50 states, North Dakota saw the largest employment gain—driven by a boom in energy production—followed by Utah and Texas, while New Mexico and Missouri experienced employment declines.

Ohio’s relative growth ranking since June 2009

Ohio’s employment growth to this point in the recovery puts it close to the middle of the distribution (30th). However, its relative ranking has changed over the course of the recovery. In August 2010, Ohio ranked 25th among the 50 states. Over the ensuing year and a half, its ranking improved, drifting up into the top 15 by the beginning of 2012. But since June 2012, Ohio’s ranking has moved back toward the middle of the distribution.

Employment change by state since June 2009

See EMPLOYMENT GROWTH, page 6A

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5A

Employment growth
(Continued from Page 5A) In part, this movement reflects the weak employment growth Ohio has experienced in the past year. In the twelve-month period ending in March 2013, Ohio’s employment was essentially unchanged, growing a meager 0.1 percent. This represented the thirdworst growth rate among the 50 states. (The worst growth rate occurred in another Fourth District state, Pennsylvania.) At the same time, national employment grew 1.4 percent, with the 10th and 90th percentiles of the state-employment change distribution continuing to experience employment gains. This pushed Ohio away from the higher-growth states and toward the lower-growth states.

Employment change by state since June 2009

Percent employment change by industry in Ohio and US since March 2012

One key difference between Ohio and the U.S. during this period relates to changes in construction employment. Nationally, construction employment grew about 2.9 percent in the twelve months ending in March 2013. By contrast, construction employment fell about 5.2 percent in Ohio over the same period. It’s important to point out, however, that until the third quarter of last year, year-over-year changes in construction employment had been far stronger in Ohio than in the U.S. throughout the recovery. Additionally, since December 2007, when the recession began, the cumulative change in construction employment in the two geographies has been about the same. Nevertheless, construction has clearly contributed negatively to Ohio’s overall employment change in the last year.

While construction is an obvious source of underperformance for Ohio—having grown nationally but not statewide—several other sectors show the same pattern, albeit less dramatically. These sectors include retail trade, transportation and utilities, leisure and hospitality, and information. Collectively, these industries account for about one-third of Ohio’s employment. In the cases of government and businesses services, where direction of growth was the same—negative for the former and positive for the latter—Ohio saw either larger declines or less growth than the associated national industry. Manufacturing and mining were two sectors that grew noticeably more in Ohio over this period. These industries collectively account for about 13 percent of Ohio’s employment, though mining represents a small fraction of this total—about 2 percent, or 0.25 percent of Ohio’s overall employment.

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6A

TheBusinessJournal

September 2013

Occupational

Productivity and workers Poor OSH performance has a disproporationable impact on small enterprises. The human and business costs of a workplace fatality, a major fire or high-profile prosecution are obvious. Some 60% of companies that are disrupted for longer than nine days go out of business. But well-performing enterprises can realize productivity benefits such as: • safer working methods that also allow work to be done quicker and with fewer people, • reduced rates of accidents, incidents and ill health — with examples of sickness absence being halved, and • maximizing levels of recruitment, motivation and retention of skilled staff. Insurance It is illegal for enterprises to operate without adequate insurance cover, but premiums are rising and becoming more difficult to obtain. The cost of workers’ insurance varies according to te type of business. Clericalbased work enjoys rates of ess than 0.5% of payroll; manufacturing rates are higher at around 5%. Construction activities such as roofing have rates as high as 15%. Significant increases or discounts from these ‘books’ rates are offered in most countries, depending on the insurance system thus meaning significant financial savings for good performers and penalties for poor performers. Making it happen The message is clear: good OSH is good business. Enterprises should integrate OSH into business management and raise the awareness of key decision-makers within the organization. Do your customers, investors or banks expect a responsible and properly risk-managed approach to OSH? Would your business be disrupted if an incident occurred? Would the loss of one or more key staff harm your business? Could you benefit from cheaper insurance or improved productivity? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then OSH is likely to be a key business success factor for your enterprise.
More information  on  OSH  and  economic  performance  is  available  at:  http://osha. europa.eu/topics/business/performance. More information  on  OSH and economic performance in Ireland,   Malta and the UK is available at: www.hsa.ie, www.ohsa.org.mt and http://www.hse.gov.uk/economics/index.htm
(1) The ‘triple bottom line’ captures an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success; economic, environmental and social success (2) See the website (http://en.wildpedia.org/wiki/Triple_bottom_line) (3)    D.  Leipziger  (2001),  SA8000: The definitive guide to the new social standard,  Financial  Times  Prentice  Hall.

(Continued from Page 4A)

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Minster, OH — Minster Bank has once again been described as a top ranking community bank and a proven performer by three independent baning industry organizations. Independent Banker Magazine, published by Independent Community Bankers of America, included Minster Bank in its list of 400 top industry performers. “Community banks at the top of the rankings show a dedication to the basics. They undersand their markets as well as their own strengths, focusing on a few niches for which they are well suited,” Kelly Pike of the magazine wrote. As part of the annual year-end performance ranking, the ICBA pulls call report data from the FDIC to identify the top 20 community banks as measured by return on average assets (ROA) and return on average equity (ROE) ratios for all of 2012. Within the category of banks with assets of $300$500 million, Minster Bank was ranked seventh. This is the third year in a row that the bank has appeared on this elite performance list. Another respected industry publication, American Banker Magazine, published its listing of the top 200 community banks in the country in its May, 2013 issue. With a ranking of sixth out of the two-hundred community banks recognized, this is the third year Minster Bank has been included in this distinguished group. Banks are ranked by a 3-year average of ROE. Minster Bank’s average return on equity for the period was 15.00%. Fiserv, a global provider of information management and electric commerce systems for the financial services industry also annually ranks national financial institutions to identify its ranked Proven Performers. This year, 6268 traditional deposit and lending institutions were analyzed based on growth, profitability and risk management. Based on the Fiserv analysis criteria, 234 institutions cleared all of the high performance hurdles. Within this Proven Performer group, Minster Bank was ranked for the third straight year. “Proven Performers understand and balance the drivers of franchise value. Even in adverse economies, Proven Performers emerge,” noted Andy Grinstead, Fiserv Senior Vice President. “Proven Performers are not working harder; they are working on the right things.” “Minster Bank is honored to be recognized for our performance,” comments Minster Bank CEO, Mark Henschen. “While it has never been our goal to seek banking industry acknowledgements, it is humbling when, through independent analysis, the bank’s performance is recognized with an elite group of its peers. We are committed to delivering the best customer service possible throughout all of our service lines while making available to our customers the latest in banking technology. In addition, we are ever mindful of providing to our shareholders a solid return on their investment. We remain strategically focused and look to continue our measured growth within all of the markets we serve.”

Minster Bank’s performance achievements acknowleded by banking industry

8A

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September 2013

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