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Tutorial 1: Getting Started Welcome to the Getting Started tutorial.

This tutorial shows you how to create a drive alias and set up a project. You must complete both of the lessons in this tutorial before you can continue to the lessons in the following tutorials. Lesson 1: Create a Drive Alias 1. From the Map menu, choose Drawings>Define/Modify Drawing Set. The Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box will appear. 2. In the Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box, click Attach. The Select Drawings To Attach dialog box will appear. 3. In the Select Drawings To Attach dialog box, click the Create/Edit Aliases button. The Drive Alias Administration dialog box will appear. 4. In the Drive Alias Administration dialog box, in the Drive Alias text box, type TUT_DRIVE. Important: It is necessary to enter the exact alias name of TUT_DRIVE in order to use the sample drawing files for the tutorial.

5. Click Browse. In the Choose Directory dialog box, navigate to the MAPTUT folder in your Autodesk Map folder. Click OK. You installed Autodesk Map on your C drive. The Actual Path value should end with \MAPTUT. 6. Click Add to create the new Drive Alias. You should see your new alias displayed in the Drive List box. 7. Close the Drive Alias Administration dialog box. Click OK on the Select Drawings To Attach dialog box. Then click OK on the define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box. You have created your 'TUT_DRIVE' alias. Lesson 2: Setting Up a Project Exercise 1: Set Project Options You begin a new project by setting options that define how Autodesk Map will work for you. In this exercise you'll learn how to set basic Autodesk Map options. 1. From the Map menu, choose New. 2. On the Create Projects tab, select Start From Scratch from the drop-down menu. Then click English. Autodesk Map creates a new drawing file. 1

3. From the Map menu, choose Options. The Autodesk Map Options dialog box appears. 4. In the Map Options dialog box, click the Project tab. 5. Under Activate Attached Source Drawings, be sure that the From Last Session At Startup and After Attaching options are selected. 6. Click the Query tab. 7. Under Preview Queries, make sure both Show Insertion Point Only and Show Images Clipping Boundary Only are selected. 8. Click the Save Back tab. Under Save Set, make sure 'Prompt To Add Objects' is selected. When you select this option, Autodesk Map will always ask you to confirm whether you want to include edited queried objects to the Save Set. 9. At the bottom of the Autodesk Map Options dialog box, click OK. The options you set are saved in the drawing file. Exercise 2: Define Drawing Set With Autodesk Map, you often work with many source drawings simultaneously. You can quickly return to the same set of source drawings by associating the set with the project. This type of set is called a drawing set. In this exercise you will define a drawing set. 1. From the Map menu, choose Drawings > Define/Modify Drawing Set. The Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box, click Attach. The Select Drawings To Attach dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Select Drawings To Attach dialog box, set 'Look In' to TUT_DRIVE, the alias you created for these tutorials. Open the TUTORIAL III folder. If you don't have a TUT_DRIVE alias, you need to create one now. See Creating a Drive Alias in the Getting Started tutorial. 4. Hold down the Ctrl key and select the CITYMAP and HOUSES1 drawing files, then click Add. The map drawings appear in the Selected Drawings list. 5. At the bottom of the Select Drawings To Attach dialog box, click OK. The maps appear in the Attached Drawings list in the Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box. They should both be Active. 6. To deactivate HOUSES1, select it, click Deactivate, then click OK. Deactivating HOUSES1 improves performance while retaining it as part of the drawing set. 7. From the File menu, choose Close to close the file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No.

Tutorial 2: Object Data, Digitizing, and Cleanup 2

Welcome to the Object Data, Digitizing, and Cleanup tutorial. This tutorial consists of three lessons.

Creating Object Data Digitizing Data Cleaning Up Maps

The first lesson shows you how to create a data table, attach table data to the map, and view the table data. The second lesson shows how to digitize data on the map. In the last lesson you will learn how to clean up map data. Lesson 1: Working with Object Data Data about a drawing object can be stored in a drawing file and associated with an object as object data. You can create an object data table with several fields and enter different values for different objects. This is the first of three lessons in the Object Data, Digitizing, and Cleanup tutorial. You will learn how to:

Define an Object Data Table Specify and Attach Object Data View Object Data

1. From the File menu, choose Open. Open the STPIERRE.dwg file in the MapTut\Tutorial II folder, then zoom to the extents of the drawing by choosing Zoom > Extents on the View menu. The STPIERRE map shows three water bodies, cyan in color. 2. From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Define Object Data. The Define Object Data dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Define Object Data dialog box, click New Table. The Define Object Data dialog box is displayed. 4. In the Define Object Data dialog box, click New Table. The Define New Object Data Table dialog box is displayed. 5. In the Define Object Data dialog, specify the following fields for the new table, then click Add to create the table. WATER_BODIES for the Table Name NAME for the Field Name, then select Character from the Type drop-down list NAME OF WATER BODY for the Description 2. Add three more fields to the table by setting the options for each field name and clicking Add.

Field Name

Type

Description 3

Default

TYPE ACCESS

Character Character

Type of water body Public Access Allowed? Average depth No

AVG_DEPTH Real

Click OK to close the Define New Object Table dialog box, then click Close to close the Define Object Data dialog box. To specify and attach data table values: From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Attach/Detach Object Data. The Attach/Detach Object Data dialog box is displayed. 4. In the dialog box, assign values to the object data, by selecting the object data in the Object Data Field list, type the value in the Value text box, and press Enter. Assign the following values to the following data objects.
3.

Object Data Field NAME OF WATER BODY Type of Water Body Public Access Allowed? Average Depth

Value to Attach GRANDE RESERVOIR YES 35

Click Attach to Objects, then click the edge of the largest body of water (the cyan object located in the middle of the left side of the map), and press the Enter key. Now attach values to the data objects for the water body at the top of the map. From the Map Menu, choose Object Data > Attach/Detach Object Data. The Attach/Detach Object Data dialog box is displayed. 6. In the dialog box, assign values to the object data, by selecting the object data in the Object Data Field list, type the value in the Value text box, and press Enter. Assign the following values to the following data objects.
5.

Object Data Field NAME OF WATER BODY Type of Water Body Public Access Allowed? Average Depth

Value to Attach Lac D'Annecy Lake NO 12.000

Click Attach to Objects, select the lake at the top of the map, and press the Enter key.

Now attach values to the data objects for the water body at the bottom of the map. From the Map Menu, choose Object Data > Attach/Detach Object Data. The Attach/Detach Object Data dialog box is displayed. 8. In the dialog box, assign values to the object data, by selecting the object data in the Object Data Field list, type the value in the Value text box, and press Enter. Assign the following values to the following data objects.
7.

Object Data Field NAME OF WATER BODY Type of Water Body Public Access Allowed? Average Depth

Value to Attach Lagoon Lake YES 5.000

Click Attach to Objects, select the lake at the top of the map, and press the Enter key. To view the data attached to objects 9. From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Edit Object Data. Using the selector cursor, select one of the lakes on the map. The Edit Object Data dialog box will display the values you entered for that lake. 10. Close the STPIERRE drawing, but do not save your changes. Lesson 2: Prepare and Digitize Data Welcome to the Prepare and Digitize Data lesson. Digitizing data involves digitizing an existing paper map and create an accurate digital file. This lesson will show you you how to set digitizing options in order to attach object data or links to external databases as you digitize. You will also learn how to digitize the streets on the map. 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Open the STREETS.dwg file in the MapTut\Tutorial II folder. 2. From the Map menu, choose Data Entry > Digitize Setup. The Digitize Setup dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Digitize Setup dialog box, under Object Type, make sure Linear is selected. Also make sure the Attach Data check box is selected. 4. Click Data To Attach. The Data To Attach dialog box is displayed. 5. In the dialog box, under Object Data Tables, make sure STREETS is selected, then click OK. 6. In the Digitize Setup dialog box, under Linear Object Settings, click Layers. The Select dialog box is displayed. 7. In the Select dialog box, make sure the STREETS layer is selected, then click OK. The Digitize Setup dialog box shows the settings that will be associated with the streets you digitize. 5

To digitize map streets 1. From the Map menu, choose Data Entry > Digitize. 2. On the command line, type INT to help you select the intersecting line, then press the Enter key. 3. In the actual drawing, click point A. Point A is the intersection point of the two streets. A highlighted X shows you the point of intersection. On the command line, type END, then press the Enter key. 4. Click point B in the drawing. Point B is endpoint of the line marked by the letter B. When you pass over point B, a highlighted square will show you the endpoint. Press the Enter key. The Attach Object Data dialog box is displayed. 5. In the Attach Object Data dialog box, select an Object Data Field, enter a value for each field, and press Enter. For STNAME, type Camino Del Ray as the value. For Volume, type Low as the value, and for STID, type 315 as the value. 6. Press OK to accept the values and close the dialog box. 7. On the command line, type INT, then press the Enter key. 8. Click point B on the drawing, click the command line, type END, and then press Enter. 9. Click point C, then press Enter. When you pass your pointer over point C, a highlighted square displays showing you the endpoint. The Attach Object Data dialog box is displayed. 10. In the Attach Object Data dialog box, select an Object Data Field, enter a value for each field, and press Enter. For STNAME, type Camino Del Ray as the value. For Volume, type Low as the value, and for STID, type 316 as the value. Press OK to accept the values. 11. Finally, press the Enter key an additional time to deselect the MAPDIGITIZE command. 12. From the File menu, choose Close. When you are prompted to save the file, click No. Lesson 3: Cleaning Up Maps You can use the Autodesk Map drawing cleanup tools to improve the quality and accuracy of your maps and correct errors caused by digitizing, importing, surveying, inaccurate drawing, and so on. You use the drawing cleanup tools in the following ways:

Check maps before linking objects to databases. Prepare maps before working with topologies. Find and remove map errors, such as duplicate objects, undershoots, and overshoots, so that your maps are accurate.

When you use drawing cleanup, you can choose whether you want Autodesk Map to correct errors automatically, or if you want to review the list of detected errors so that you can correct, mark, or remove errors interactively. In addition, you can use drawing cleanup to simplify objects, which eliminates unnecessary complexity. This is useful when plotting large, complex maps on a small page, or if you want to reduce the file size of a map. 6

Exercise 1: Clean Up a Map and Review Errors Before Correcting Them In this exercise, you clean up a digitized street map. You check the map for common digitizing errors, including duplicate objects, undershoots (gaps), and dangling objects. Then, you review the list of detected errors and correct and mark errors interactively. 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Navigate to your MapTut\Tutorial II folder and open Streets2.dwg. Streets2.dwg is a digitized street map for a proposed new housing development. 2. From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents to view the whole map. 3. From the Map menu, choose Tools > Drawing Cleanup. The Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box appears, where you specify the objects you want to clean up and the objects you want to anchor. Anchored objects are not altered during the cleanup process and are used as reference points for cleaning up other objects. For example, you can anchor survey points that are known to be accurate. To select and anchor objects for cleanup 4. In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box, under Objects To Include In Drawing Cleanup, make sure that Select All is selected, and for Layers, make sure that there is an asterisk (*) in the box. With these options specified, Autodesk Map considers all geometry in the map for cleanup. Note that Autodesk Map does not consider objects on layers that are frozen, locked, or OFF. 5. In this exercise, you don't need to anchor any objects, so accept all other default values, and then click Next. The Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box appears, where you specify the types of errors you want to clean up and the settings you want to use for detecting errors. To select and set up cleanup actions 6. In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box, in the Cleanup Actions list, click Delete Duplicates. Press CTRL and click Extend Undershoots and Erase Dangling Objects so that the three actions are selected, and then click Add to add them to the Selected Actions list. Cleanup actions listed in the Selected Actions list will be performed on your map in the order they are listed. 7. In the Selected Actions list, verify that the cleanup actions are listed in the following order: Delete Duplicates, Extend Undershoots, and Erase Dangling Objects. If you need to change the order, select the action you want to reposition in the list, and click the up or down button. 8. In the Selected Actions list, select Delete Duplicates, and enter 0.1 for the Tolerance. This tolerance value tells Autodesk Map to consider all objects within 0.1 drawing units of each other as duplicates. Autodesk Map does not use a predefined system of 7

unit measure such as meters or inches. For example, a distance of one unit may represent one centimeter, one foot, or one mile in real-world units. When you create a map, you decide what one drawing unit will represent, and then create your map with that convention. In Streets2.dwg, one drawing unit represents one meter. 9. In the Selected Actions list, click Extend Undershoots, and enter 15.4 for the Tolerance. In this map, a tolerance value of 15.4 means that if two polylines pass within 15.4 meters of each other, they will be snapped at their closest point. If no node exists at that point, one will be created. 10. In the Selected Actions list, click Erase Dangling Objects, and enter 10.5 for the Tolerance. 11. Under Options, select the Interactive check box to indicate that you want to review the list of detected errors so that you can correct, mark, or remove errors interactively. 12. Click Next to go to the Drawing Cleanup - Cleanup Methods dialog box, where you specify how modified objects are handled. To specify how modified objects are handled 13. In the Drawing Cleanup - Cleanup Methods dialog box, under Cleanup Method, make sure Modify Original Objects is selected. Then, clear all the check box options. In this exercise, you modify the original objects, but you could also create new objects, and retain or delete the original objects. 14. Click Finish to check the map for errors and display the list of detected errors in the Drawing Cleanup Errors dialog box. To review and correct errors interactively In the Drawing Cleanup Errors dialog box, the first cleanup action, Delete Duplicates, is highlighted in the list. 15. Click the plus (+) next to Delete Duplicates to see how many duplicate objects were detected: Error 1 of 10. 16. Click Error 1 of 10. In the map, the first error is displayed with a temporary marker on it so that you can find it easily. 17. Click the Fix button to correct this error and proceed to the next error. 18. Continue clicking the Fix button until you've deleted all duplicate objects. Tip: If you want to fix all duplicates at once, click Delete Duplicates in the list and click the Fix All button. 8

When you are done correcting duplicate objects, Extend Undershoots is highlighted in the list. 19. Click the plus (+) next to Extend Undershoots to see how many undershoots were detected: Error 1 of 25. 20. Verify that Extend Undershoots is still selected, and then click the Mark All button to place markers on all detected undershoots. The errors are not corrected, but markers are placed on them so that you can find them later and review them more closely. 21. Click the Next Action button. 22. Click the plus (+) next to Erase Dangling Objects to see how many errors were detected: Error 1 of 3. 23. Click Error 1 of 3 and then click the Fix button three times to correct the three dangling objects detected. 24. Click Close to make the specified corrections. Now you know how to set clean up options to detect map errors, and then review the detected errors, place markers, and make corrections interactively. In the next exercise, you learn how to have Autodesk Map correct errors automatically. Leave the map open, because you use it in the next exercise. Exercise 2: Clean Up a Map and Correct Errors Automatically In this exercise, you continue the cleanup process started in exercise 1. You correct more common digitizing errors, but instead of reviewing errors before correcting them, you have Autodesk Map correct the errors automatically. 1. Make sure that Streets2.dwg is still open from the previous exercise. 2. From the Map menu, choose Tools > Drawing Cleanup. 3. In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box, under Objects To Include In Drawing Cleanup, make sure that Select All is selected. For Layers, make sure that there is an asterisk (*) in the box. 4. Click Next to go to the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box, where you specify the types of errors you want to clean up and the settings you want to use for detecting errors. 5. In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box, right-click in the Selected Actions list and choose Remove All. 6. In the Cleanup Actions list, select Break Crossing Objects. Press CTRL and click Zero Length Objects, and then click Add to add them to the Selected Actions list. Neither of these actions requires a Tolerance value. 7. Under Options, clear the Interactive check box. With the Interactive check box cleared, Autodesk Map corrects errors automatically instead of having you review them first. 9

8. Click Finish to perform the drawing cleanup. Autodesk Map analyzes and examines the map and reports on the command line that it modified 1 object. 9. From the File menu, choose Close. 10. When you are prompted to save the drawing, click No. Now you know how to set clean up options to detect map errors and have Autodesk Map correct them automatically. In the next exercise, you learn how to simplify complex maps. Exercise 3: Simplify a Complex Map In this exercise, you simplify a map of New Zealand, which has a complex coastline. Simplifying a map is also known as generalizing or weeding. When you simplify objects, you reduce the number of vertices on complex lines and eliminate unnecessary complexity. The resulting map has a smaller file size and can be plotted effectively on a smaller page. Note: We recommend that you run Simplify Objects as a separate drawing cleanup process (by itself), as demonstrated in this exercise. If you perform Simplify Objects with other cleanup actions, Autodesk Map automatically performs Simplify Objects first, regardless of the cleanup order specified. 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Navigate to your MapTut\Tutorial II folder and open NZ-LL84.dwg. 2. From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents to view the entire map of New Zealand. 3. From the Map menu, choose Tools > Drawing Cleanup. 4. In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box, under Objects To Include In Drawing Cleanup, make sure that Select All is selected. For Layers, verify that there is an asterisk (*) in the box. With these options specified, Autodesk Map considers all geometry in the map for cleanup. Note that Autodesk Map does not consider objects on layers that are frozen, locked, or OFF. 5. Click Next to go to the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box. 6. In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box, click Simplify Objects in the Cleanup Actions list and then click Add. Simplify Objects appears in the Selected Actions list, indicating that it will be performed on the map. 7. In the Selected Actions list, click Simplify Objects, and type 0.1 for the Tolerance. 8. Select the Create Arcs check box to allow Autodesk Map to introduce arcs into objects when simplifying them. 9. Under Options, make sure the Interactive check box is cleared to indicate that you want Autodesk Map to make changes automatically, and then click Next. 10. In the Drawing Cleanup - Cleanup Methods dialog box, under Cleanup Method, make sure Modify Original Objects is selected, and clear all the check box options. 10

11. Click Finish to simply the map. In the map, you can see that the Simplify Objects process reduced the number of vertices on complex lines and created a smoother profile. On the command line, Autodesk Map reports how many objects were modified. If you want to compare the simplified map to the original, you can undo the cleanup operation by choosing Edit > Undo from the menu bar. 12. From the File menu, choose Close. When you are prompted to save the drawing, click No.

Tutorial 3: Working with Multiple Maps This tutorial shows you how to work with multiple maps or source drawings. Source drawings, attached to a project, contain data you want to use. You use queries to retrieve objects from source drawings and place them in the project drawing. This tutorial has three lessons. Lesson 1: Defining and Using a Querying To adjust the source drawing view 1. From the File menu, choose Open to open the sample drawing file that has two source drawings already attached. 2. Navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL III directory in the folder where you installed Map and open the MAPTUT2 drawing. Objects in the drawing will not be visible yet. 3. Type PDMODE at the command prompt. Press the Enter key. For new value, type 3. Press the Enter key again. This will make objects in the drawing clearer. The objects will appear in the next step. 4. To view the the contents of the source drawing, from the Map menu, choose Drawings > Quick View Drawings. The Quick View Drawings dialog box is displayed. 5. In the Quick View Drawings dialog box, be sure that CITYMAP1 is selected. Make sure that the Zoom to the Extents of Selected Drawings check box is selected, then click OK. Rather than opening the drawing, Quick View will display the contents of the drawing without creating any objects. 6. At the command prompt, type REGEN, then press the Enter key. The REGEN command will clear the screen after using Quick View. Now you know how to zoom a project to the extents of a source drawing, and how to use Quick View to view the source drawing. 11

To create an index 1. From the Map menu choose Drawings > Drawing Maintenance. The Drawing Maintenance dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Index Maintenance dialog box, make sure all the Generate Index options except EED are selected. 3. Under Generate Index, click Object Data. The Generate Object Data Index dialog box is displayed. 4. In the Generate Object Data Index dialog box, click Select All to select all of the object data fields, then click OK. 5. In the Index Maintenance dialog box, click OK. When you are prompted to confirm, click OK. Autodesk Map creates the indexes. 6. Click Close to close the Drawing Maintenance dialog box. It is a good idea to periodically use this procedure to update and recreate the indexes. You have successfully created indexes for the CITYMAP1 drawing file. To define a property query 1. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Type, click Property. The Property Condition dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Property Condition dialog box, under Select Property, select Layer. The equal (=) operator is selected for you. 4. Click Values. The Select dialog box is displayed. 5. In the Select dialog box, select RAILROAD, then click OK. RAILROAD is displayed in the Value box. 6. In the Property Condition dialog box, click OK. 7. In the Define Query dialog box, the RAILROAD layer property is now specified for the current query. 8. In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, make sure Preview is selected. Executing the query in Preview mode will quickly show the objects without actually creating them in the project drawing. 9. Click Execute Query. Polylines representing the railroads appear. Like Quick View, Preview mode displays objects in read-only mode. 10. At the command prompt, type REDRAW and press the Enter key to clear the objects. Like the REGEN command, REDRAW clears the objects. Now you know how to execute a query to retrieve information about a drawing. To combine query types 1. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Define Query dialog box, under Current Query, select the LAYER = RAILROAD query, then click Edit. The Property Condition dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Property Condition dialog box, click Values. The Select dialog box is displayed. 12

4. In the Select dialog box, select the STREAM layer from the list of layers. Make sure that RAILROAD is NOT selected. Click OK. You've specified the STREAM layer for the current query. 5. Click OK to close the Property Condition dialog box. 6. In the Define Query dialog box, the STREAM query will appear in the Current Query box. 7. n the Define Query dialog box, under Query Type, make sure the AND operator is selected. The AND operator will allow you to combine the location condition with the property condition so you can create a compound query. 8. Under Query Type, click Location. The Location Condition dialog box is displayed. 9. In the Location Condition dialog box, under Boundary Type, select Circle. This specifies that Autodesk Map will query the drawing for objects that lie within a specific circle whose radius you will define. 10. Under Selection Type, make sure Crossing is selected. Objects (streams) that lie within and cross the circular boundary will be included in the query. 11. Click Define. On the command line, at the CENTER prompt, enter a coordinate of 3085000,1270000. Press the Enter key. This defines the center of the circle. 12. On the command line, at the RADIUS prompt, enter 5000. Press the Enter key. This defines the radius of the circle. 13. In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, select Draw. Draw mode copies objects from the source drawing into the project drawing. 14. Click Execute Query. Only the objects on the STREAM layer that lie within and cross the circle appear in the project. 15. From the Edit menu, choose Undo to remove the queried objects from the project. You can undo the results of a query at any time. 16. From the View menu, choose Redraw. The query boundary is removed from the screen. In this exercise you learned how to refine a query and create a compound query to retrieve a particular data set. To save a query 1. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. The Define Query dialog box is displayed, displaying the query you defined in the previous exercise. 2. In the Define Query dialog box, under Options, click Save. The Save Current Query dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Save Current Query dialog box, click New Category. The Define New Category dialog box is displayed. 4. In the Define New Category dialog box, type STREAMS for the new category name, then click OK. 5. In the Save Current Query dialog box, type STREAMS in the Name text box and STREAMS WITHIN RADIUS OF SELECTED POINT in the Description text box. 13

6. Select the Save To External File check box. When you select this option, all projects can use your saved queries. 7. Under Save Options, make sure the options listed in the Tutorials Helper window are selected. Clear the other two check boxes. 8. Select Save List of Active Drawings, Keep Reference in Library, and Auto Execute. 9. Click Browse to navigate to the folder in which to save the query. 10. In the Create File dialog box, navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL III directory in the folder where you installed Map. 11. Type MAPTUT2.QRY in the File Name text box. Then click Save. Autodesk Map saves the query as MAPTUT2.QRY. 12. In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query, then click OK. Autodesk Map saves the query as an external query. A reference to the query is stored with the project in the Query Library. 13. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, click the plus sign (+) next to the STREAMS category to see a list that shows the Streams query. Now you know how to save a query for future use. To reuse a query 1. From the Map menu, choose Query > Run Query. The Run Library Query dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Run Library Query dialog box, make sure 'Streams' is selected for Category. 3. Under Queries, make sure the description of the query you saved in the previous exercise is selected. 4. Click Run Query. On the command line, specify a CENTER point of 3085000, 1270000, then press Enter. Type 5000 for RADIUS and press Enter. Autodesk Map will retrieve the streams lying within and crossing the area you specify. 5. On the command line, type UNDO and press the Enter key. 6. Type 1 for the number of operations to undo and press the Enter key. This will clear the screen of queried objects. Now you know how to reuse a query that you've previously saved. To alter queried object properties 1. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Define Query dialog box is displayed, displaying the previous query as current. In the Define Query dialog box, under Options, click Alter Properties. The Set Property Alterations dialog box is displayed. In the Set Property Alterations dialog box, under Select Property, select Color. Under Expression, click Values. The Select Color dialog box is displayed. In the Select Color dialog box, under Standard Colors, click the cyan box, then click OK.

The number 4, the AutoCAD color number for cyan, will be displayed in the Expression box. 6. Under Expression, click Add. The expression will be placed in the Current Property Alterations list. 7. Under Select Property, select Width. 14

8. In the Expression box, enter 100, and then click Add. The Set Property Alterations dialog box shows the property alterations you have defined. 9. Click OK to close the Set Property Alterations dialog box. 10. In the Define Query dialog box, under Options, make sure that the check box to the left of Alter Properties is selected. 11. Under Query Mode, make sure that Draw is selected. Property alterations occur only when you execute a query in Draw mode. 12. Click Execute Query. The streams appear in cyan with a line width of 100. 13. On the command line, type UNDO and press the Enter key. 14. On the command line, enter 1 for the number of operations to undo and press the Enter key. Autodesk Map removes the queried objects from the screen. 15. From the File menu, choose Close to close the project file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No. Lesson 2: Querying with Object Data After you add object data, you can use it in a query condition to retrieve and modify objects. Data retrieved from source drawings and modified can be saved back to the source drawings for later use. In this lesson you will learn how to add object data to a drawing and how to edit the object data associated with a reservoir lake that was retrieved by your previous query. 1. From the File menu, choose Open to open the sample drawing file that has two source drawings already attached. 2. Navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL III directory in the folder where you installed Map and open the MAPTUT3 drawing. 3. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 4. In the Define Query dialog box, make sure there is no current query. If there is, click Clear Query. If the Alter Properties check box is selected, click to deselect it. 5. Under Query Type, click Data. The Data Condition dialog box is displayed. 6. In the Data Condition dialog box, make sure WATER_BODIES is selected in the Tables list. 7. Under Object Data Fields, select ACCESS. 8. For Value, type NO, then click OK. 9. In the Define Query dialog, under Query Mode, select Draw, then click Execute Query. The two lakes with no public access are displayed. In this lesson you defined an object data query. To edit object data 15

10. From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Edit Object Data, then click the larger water body (the reservoir). The Edit Object Data dialog box is displayed. 11. In the Edit Object Data dialog box, under Object Data Field, select 'Public Access Allowed?' 12. For Value, type YES, and then press the Enter key. This updates the object data field. 13. Click OK. When you are prompted to specify whether you want to add the selected objects to the save set, click No. The Save Set is a list of new and edited objects that you intend to save back to the attached drawings. 14. From the File menu, choose Close to close the drawing file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No. Lesson 3: Creating a Thematic Map from Object Data In this lesson, the streets in the maps hold street ID data, street names, and traffic volume information as object data. You can use this data as query criteria and in a thematic presentation, graphically representing ranges of traffic volume. This lesson has four tasks. The first task shows how to activate a drawing attached to a project file. The second task shows how to query the drawing's street polylines, in order to create a thematic map. The third task shows how to set display options to represent ranges of traffic volumes. The fourth task shows how to add a legend that shows which color and line width represents each traffic volume category.

To activate a drawing attached to a project file 1. From the File menu, choose Open to open the sample project file. 2. Navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL III directory in the folder where you installed Map and open the MAPTUT4 drawing file. 3. From the Map menu, choose Drawings > Define/Modify Drawing Set. The Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box is displayed. 4. In the Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box, hold down the Ctrl key and select both HOUSES4 and CITYMAP3. Click Activate, then click OK. The Active status of the drawings is changed from No (not active) to Yes (active). 5. From the Map menu, choose Drawings > Quick View Drawings to review the contents of the drawing. The Quick View Drawings dialog box is displayed. 6. In the Quick View Drawings dialog box, make sure both drawings are selected and click OK. The drawings will be displayed on the screen. 7. On the command line, type REDRAW and then press the Enter key. This will clear the screen. You have successfully activated the drawings attached to the MAPTUT4 drawing. 16

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To Define a Thematic Query From the Map menu, choose Query > Object Thematic Query. You use the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box to specify the objects and the properties you want to show in the thematic map. In the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box, under Objects Of Interest, select the Limit To Layers check box. Click Layers. The Select dialog box is displayed. In the Select dialog box, select the STREETS layer and click OK. This specifies that the object data you will query is located on the STREETS layer of the drawing. In the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box, under Thematic Expression, select Data, then click Define. You use the Data Expression dialog box to identify values to use as the basis for the thematic map. In the Data Expression dialog box, in the Tables list, make sure the STREETS table is selected. You will use traffic volume values in the STREETS object data table to distinguish between the streets. Under Object Data Fields, select Volume, and then click OK. Leave the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box open for the next exercise. In this exercise, you specified traffic volume as the data you want to retrieve from the drawing.

To set the thematic map display options 8. In the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box, under Display Parameters, in the Display Property list, select Line Format from the drop-down list. You will use variation in line width and color to represent different traffic volume ranges. 9. For Range Division, make sure Discrete is selected, then click Define. In a discrete thematic map, each value forms a new category, and you can color each category uniquely. 10. In the Thematic Display Options dialog box, click Add. The Add Thematic Range dialog box is displayed. 11. In the Add Thematic Range dialog box, select Linetype, type CONTINUOUS for the Edit Value, and press the Enter key. Optionally, you can click Select and select Continuous from the Select Line Type dialog box. 12. For Width, enter 10 and press the Enter key. 13. For Color, enter 2 and press the Enter key. 14. For Value, enter LOW and press the Enter key. 15. For Desc, enter LOW TRAFFIC and press the Enter key. 16. Click OK. The Thematic Display Options dialog box will display the range you defined. 17. Click Add again. The Add Thematic Range dialog box is displayed. 17

18. In the Add Thematic Range dialog box, specify the following three ranges. After specifying each range, click OK. Then click Add for the next range. For the first range, enter Continuous for the Linetype, 50 for the Width, 3 for the Color, Medium for the Value and Medium Traffic for the Description. For the second range, enter Continuous for the Linetype, 100 for the Width, 5 for the Color, High for the Value, and High Traffic for Description. For the third range, enter Continuous for the Linetype, 200, for the Width, 1 for the Color, Very High for the Value, and Heavy Traffic for the Description. 19. When you have added all the ranges, click OK in the Thematic Display Options dialog box. Leave the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box open for the next exercise. You have finished setting up the thematic map display options. To add a legend to the map 20. In the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box, under Display Parameters, click Define. 21. In the Thematic Display Options dialog box, click Legend. The Thematic Legend Design dialog box is displayed. 22. In the Thematic Legend Design dialog box, select the Create Legend check box. 23. Make sure the Create On Layer value is 0. 24. For Insertion Point, type an X value of 3093000 and a Y value of 1269000. These are the location coordinates for the legend. 25. For Display Order, make sure Ascending is selected. 26. Under Symbols, select the Boxed Symbols check box. For Size X type 750; for Size Y type 750; for Offset type 750. These values set the size and spacing of the boxes that hold the legend symbols. 27. Under Labels, for Size type 500; for Style, make sure STANDARD is selected; for Offset, type 750. These settings describe the text size, text style, and location of the description in the legend. 28. Click OK to complete the legend definition. 29. In the Thematic Display Options dialog box, click OK. 30. n the Object Thematic Mapping dialog box, click Proceed. The drawing is displayed showing graphically represented ranges of traffic volumes. 31. From the File menu, choose Close to close the file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No.

Tutorial 4: Working with External Databases This tutorial teaches you how to attach textual information in an external database to graphic objects in a drawing. You can then query or view this information, or use SQL statements to access data in the external database. This tutorial has four lessons, each with its own set of exercises. Make sure to complete the lessons and exercises in order. 18

Lesson 1: Preparing to Use Data Autodesk Map uses links to connect objects in a drawing with information in a database. In this lesson, you will create links between the drawing and an external database. First you will query all of the objects in a drawing. Then you link the objects you queried to records in a database, and finally you will generate database links. To set up for a database connection 1. From the File menu, choose New to open a new drawing. The Autodesk Map Today window is displayed. 2. On the Create Projects tab, select Start From Scratch from the drop-down list, then click English. 3. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Attach from the shortcut menu. The Select Drawings To Attach dialog box is displayed. 4. Under Look In, select the TUT_DRIVE alias and open the TUTORIAL IV directory. Select the PARCELS drawing and click Add, then click OK. If you don't have a TUT_DRIVE alias, you need to create one now. See Creating a Drive Alias in Tutorial 1: Getting Started. 5. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Zoom Extents from the shortcut menu. The Zoom Drawing Extents dialog box is displayed. 6. Make sure the PARCELS drawing is selected, and then click OK. Autodesk Map zooms to the extents of the PARCELS drawing. 7. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Current Query and choose Define from the shortcut menu. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 8. In the Define Query dialog box, click Location. The Location Condition dialog box is displayed. 9. In the Location Condition dialog box, under Boundary Type, make sure All is selected, and then click OK. 10. In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, select Draw, and then click Execute Query. Autodesk Map queries the objects in the drawing. To create database links 1. Open Windows Explorer. Position Explorer next to Autodesk Map so you can see both windows. In Explorer, navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL IV folder in your Autodesk Map folder. 2. Select the Parcels.mdb database, drag it to the Project tab in the Project Workspace, and release the mouse button. If a UDL file does not already exist, Autodesk Map will automatically create one as a shortcut to the data source.

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3. From the Map menu, choose Database > Define Link Template. A link template contains the path information needed to access the database table and the key field that links the database record to a drawing object. 4. In the Define Link Template dialog box, under Table Name, select PARCELS. 5. In the Link Template text box, type PARCID. 6. Under Key Selection, select the top Key check box to make PARCEL_ID the key column, then click OK. If you've previously completed this tutorial, the link template already exists, so you can't create it. Click Cancel. 7. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, click the plus sign (+) next to Link Templates to list the PARCID link template you created. You have now created a link template and connected the PARCELS table to the PARCELS drawing using PARCEL_ID as the key column. To generate database links 1. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click the PARCID link template and choose Generate Links from the shortcut menu. The Generate Data Links dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Generate Data Links dialog box, under Linkage Type, make sure Blocks is selected. 3. Under Data Links, select Create Database Links. PARCID is selected as the link template, and Key 1 is the PARCEL_ID field, the key column in the database. 4. Under Database Validation, select Link Must Exist. Link Must Exist means that a text item in the drawing (the parcel number ID) must match a value in the key column (PARCEL_ID) of the database. 5. Click OK to generate the links. When prompted on the command line for a selection method, type ALL and press the Enter key. For each object, Autodesk Map links the block attribute in the drawing with a row in the database. The command line reports the number of links created. 6. If Map prompts you whether to add objects to the Save Set, click Yes. Otherwise, from the Map menu, choose Save Back > Add Objects To Save Set. 7. If you are prompted at the command line for which objects to select, type ALL and press the Enter key. Then press the Enter key again. Autodesk Map saves all the objects to the drawing's save set. 8. From the Map menu, choose Save Back > Save To Source Drawings. The Save Objects To Source Drawings dialog box is displayed. 9. In the Save Objects To Source Drawings dialog box, under What To Save, make sure Save Queried Objects is selected. Then click OK. The command line displays 78 as the number of objects saved to the source drawing. 10. From the File menu, choose Close to close the project file. When asked whether you want to save changes to the drawings, click No.

Lesson 2: Viewing and Editing External Databases (Vizualizarea si editarea bazei de date externe) 20

In this lesson, you will use the Data View to view the information in an external database table that is attached to a drawing. You will also learn how to edit this data. To view the database table 1. From the File menu, choose Open to open a sample drawing file. The Select File dialog box is displayed. 2. Navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL IV directory in the folder where you installed Map and open the PARCELDB1 drawing file. 3. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, in the Data Sources folder, under Tables, right-click the PARCELS table and choose Edit Table from the shortcut menu. The Data View will display the PARCELS table. 4. Adjust the column widths by placing the cursor on the line separating column titles, clicking, then dragging the column left or right. Adjusting the column widths will display more of the data in the Data View. 5. Now you will edit a database record. Click PARCEL_ID to highlight the entire column. 6. To sort the column in ascending order, from the View menu in Data View, choose Sort > Ascending. You can also sort the column by double-clicking the column name. 7. Use the vertical scroll bar arrows on the right side of the Data View and scroll down until PARCEL_ID 11232006 is visible. 'REID' should appear for LNAME and 'JOHN' for FNAME. 8. Click on the text of the appropriate fields, and enter the following values. For the first field, enter SALUTATION as the Field, MR. as the Current Value, and MR. and MRS. as the New Value. For the second field, enter LNAME as the Field, REID as the Current Value, and REID_GIRAULT as the New Value. For the third field, enter FNAME as the Field, JOHN as the Current Value, and JOHN_SIMONE as the New Value. 9. Click any field in another row to save the changes. You have now edited and updated the database table. 10. In the Data View, from the File menu, choose Close to close the Data View.

Lesson 3: Highlighting Records and Objects You can highlight records in a database table that are linked to objects in a drawing, or you can highlight objects in the drawing that are linked to records in the table. This is an easy way to view specific data. In this lesson you will learn how to highlight a record linked to an object and how to highlight an object linked to a record. Note: The Data View window does NOT remain on top of the Autodesk Map window. If you cannot see the Data View window, you will need to select it from the Windows task bar to move it on top of the Map window. To highlight a database table record that is linked to a drawing object 21

1. From the File menu, choose Open to open a sample drawing. The Select File dialog box is displayed. 2. Navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL IV directory in the folder where you installed Map and open the PARCELDB2 drawing file. 3. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Current Query, and then choose Define from the shortcut menu. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 4. Make sure that there is a Location:All query in the Current Query box. If not, create one now. For more information about queries, see the Defining and Using a Query lesson in Tutorial 3: Working with Multiple Maps. 5. Under Query Mode, select Draw, and then click Execute Query. 6. From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents to view the entire map. 7. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, in the Data Sources folder, under Tables, double-click the PARCELS table to open Data View. 8. In Data View, from the Highlight menu, choose Highlight Records > Select Objects. Then click the parcel number inside the largest parcel (upper-right corner of drawing) and press the Enter key. The Data View highlights row 11234001, which is associated with that parcel. 9. Leave the Data View open; you will use it to perform the next task. To highlight and zoom to a drawing object that is linked to a database record 1. In Data View, from the Highlight menu, choose Highlight Records > Clear Highlight. This clears the previous highlight. 2. From the Highlight menu, choose Zoom Scale. The Zoom Scale dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Zoom Scale dialog box, type a value of 50 and click OK. This setting will magnify selected objects to a size of 50% of the current window. 4. In the Data View Highlight menu, make sure both AutoHighlight and AutoZoom are selected. 5. In the Data View, double-click the PARCEL_ID column heading to list the records in ascending order. Then use the scroll arrows to scroll to the row containing PARCEL_ID 11232006. 6. Select the whole row containing PARCEL_ID 11232006 by clicking on the box to the left of the first column. Autodesk Map displays a magnified view of the parcel with the PARCEL_ID of 11232006. 7. Click the Data View close box. 8. From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents to return the drawing to its previous display. 9. From the File menu, choose Close to close the project file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No.

Lesson 4: Creating an SQL Query 22

With a query, you can use values stored in an external database to specify a set of objects you want to retrieve from an attached drawing. You will use Structured Query Language (SQL) statements to perform this type of query. In this lesson you will learn how to define an SQL query and how to define a range for an SQL query. To define an SQL query 1. From the File menu, choose Open to open a sample drawing. The Select File dialog box is displayed. 2. Navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL IV directory in the folder where you installed Map and open the PARCELDB3 drawing file. 3. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Current Query and choose Define from the shortcut menu. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 4. In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query to clear the current query. 5. Under Query Type, click SQL. The SQL Link Condition dialog box is displayed with the PARCID link template attached. 6. In the Condition area, select LNAME for Column. The Column list contains all the columns in the external database. You will use the LNAME column to select a last name. 7. Make sure the operator is the equal (=) sign. For Value, type FORD, then click Add Condition You've specified that the query contains the SQL Condition: LNAME='FORD'. 8. Click OK to close the SQL Link Condition dialog box. 9. In the Define Query dialog box, the Current Query contains the full SQL statement: SQL: SELECT *FROM PARCELS WHERE LNAME = 'FORD'. 10. In the Define Query dialog box, set Query Mode to Draw. 11. Click Execute Query. The object specified by the SQL condition (the PARCEL ID associated with FORD) appears in the project drawing. Using an SQL query, you retrieved an object that is linked to an external database record. To define a range for an SQL query 1. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Current Query and choose Define from the shortcut menu. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query to clear the current query. 3. Under Query Type, click SQL. The SQL Link Condition dialog box is displayed. 4. In the SQL Link Condition dialog box, select LANDVALUE for Column, greater than or equal (>=) for Operator, type 35000 for Value, then click Add Condition. 5. Under Condition, make sure And is selected. Select LANDVALUE for Column, less than or equal (<=) for Operator, and type 50000 for Value. Click Add Condition, then 23

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click OK. You've specified a query range based on parcel land values between $35,000 and $50,000. In the Define Query dialog box, under Options, click Zoom Ext< to zoom to the extents of the drawing. The Zoom Drawing Extents dialog box is displayed. In the Zoom Drawing Extents dialog box, click OK. Autodesk Map zooms to the extents of the drawing. In the Define Query dialog box, make sure Draw is selected for Query Mode, then click Execute Query. All the parcel IDs with a land value between $35,000 and $50,000 are retrieved from the attached drawing and displayed. From the File menu, choose Close to close the project file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No.

Tutorial 5: Using Topology for Spatial Analysis (Utilizarea topologiei pentru analiza spatiala) You can create topology with Autodesk Map to add information to your data and to facilitate analysis. Topology defines the relationship between adjacent objects and groups of objects, and stores the information as object data. Lesson 1: Creating a Network Topology Network topology uses the interconnections of lines (links) to form a linear network. When you create a network topology, information about the links and their relationships is stored as object data on each link. To create a network topology In this lesson, you create a network topology from lines and polylines that represent streets. Autodesk Map places a node (a point object or block) at the intersection and end of each link (line). 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Navigate to your MapTut\Tutorial V folder. Open houses5.dwg. 2. From the Map menu, choose Topology > Create. 3. In the Create Polygon Topology - Select Topology Type dialog box, click Network For The Topology Type. 4. For Topology Name, type STREETS, and for Topology Description, type TOPOLOGY FOR STREETS IN CITY. Then click Next. 5. In the Create Network Topology - Select Links dialog box, make sure Select All is selected and that there is an asterisk (*) in the Layers box to include all links on all layers in the network topology. Then click Next. 6. In the Create Network Topology - Select Nodes dialog box, make sure Select All is selected and that there is an asterisk (*) in the Layers and Block Names boxes to 24

include all nodes on all layers and use all blocks in the network topology. Then click Next. 7. In the Create Network Topology - Create New Nodes dialog box, select the Create New Nodes check box to create nodes at the intersections and ends of links in the network if they don't already exist. 8. For Layer, type NETWORK to indicate the layer on which to place new node objects. Autodesk Map creates the NETWORK layer automatically, and places all new node objects on it. 9. For Point Object For Node Creation, leave the setting as ACAD_POINT to create new nodes as points. 10. Click Finish. Autodesk Map creates the network topology and reports on the command line that it was successful. The map doesn't look any different, but Autodesk Map has added data to each link and node that make up the topology. The data contains information about the relationships between the objects in the topology and information about the object. You now have a "smart" map! You can use this relationship data to perform spatial analysis or perform a topology query. Autodesk Map also placed node objects at the intersections and ends of the links in the network. To better view the nodes, you can change the appearance of the point objects that represent the nodes objects. 11. From the Format menu, choose Point Style. The Point Style dialog box is displayed. 12. In the Point Style dialog box, select the X point style. Then click OK. In the map, each node you created appears as an X. 13. Again, from the Format menu, choose Point Style. The Point Style dialog box is displayed. 14. In the Point Style dialog box, reset the nodes to look like points by clicking the top left tile in the dialog box. Then click OK. To view topology data 15. When you create a topology, object data is added to each link and node that make up the topology. The object data stores topology information about the object, such as start node, end node, direction, and resistance. Each element of the network topology has different object data values. Next, you learn how to display this data. 16. From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Edit Object Data. Then click any link (line) on the map. 17. In the Edit Object Data dialog box, for Table, click the down arrow, scroll down the list, and select TPMLINK_STREETS. If TPMLINK_STREETS isn't listed, you may not have selected a link. Close the dialog box and try again. 18. View the topology data. Although you see the topology object data, you cannot edit it here. To edit a topology, you use the topology editing commands, or the Properties window. You learn about the topology editing commands in Lesson 5: Editing Topologies. Next, you learn about the Properties window. 25

19. Click OK to close the Edit Object Data dialog box. 20. In the map, double-click a link. 21. In the Properties window, the topology data is displayed under Topo: STREETS. 22. You can edit information that is not dimmed (estompat). If it is dimmed, it is viewonly and is not available for editing. 23. Click the X in the upper right corner of the Properties window to close it. To view statistical information 1. Next, you learn to view statistical information about a topology. 2. In the Project Workspace, click the plus sign (+) next to Topologies to expand the list of topologies. 3. Right-click the STREETS topology, and choose Statistics from the shortcut menu. The Topology Statistics dialog box appears. 4. Review the statistics. When you're finished, click OK. 5. From the File menu, choose Close to close the drawing file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No.

Lesson 2: Analyzing a Network Topology With Autodesk Map, you can analyze a network topology to calculate the shortest path between two points, calculate the best route from a start point to one or more visit points and back to the start point, or trace out from a point in all directions, specifying the maximum distance the network can go and a maximum resistance. Exercise 1: Prepare the Map for Network Analysis In this preliminary exercise, you'll prepare a map for shortest path trace analysis. To prepare the map, you define and run a query to bring the topology objects you need from the attached drawing (citymap6.dwg) into the project drawing (houses6.dwg). Prerequisite: You need to know how to define and use queries. To learn about this, complete Tutorial 3: Working with Multiple Maps. If you have not set up the TUT_DRIVE alias, see the Create a Drive Alias lesson of the Getting Started tutorial. To Prepare the Map for Network Analysis 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Navigate to your MapTut\Tutorial V folder and open houses6.dwg. 2. In the Project Workspace, right-click Current Query and choose Define from the shortcut menu. The Define Query dialog box appears. Defining queries is explained in the Defining and Using a Query lesson of the Working with Multiple Maps tutorial. 3. In the Define Query dialog box, clear any existing query. 4. Under Query Type, make sure that the logical operator Or is selected. Then click Property. The Property Condition dialog box is displayed. 26

5. In the Select Property section of the Property Condition dialog box, select Layer. Click Values. The Select dialog box is displayed. 6. In the Select dialog box, use the CTRL key to select the EMERGENCY_SERVICES, RAILROAD, and TRANSPORT layers. Click OK. 7. Click OK in the Property Condition dialog box. 8. In the Define Query dialog box, execute the query in Draw mode. The railroad, fire station, and hospital are displayed in the map. 9. From the View menu, choose Named Views. The View dialog box is displayed. 10. In the View dialog box, choose CENTRE, click Set Current, and then click OK. 11. In the Project Workspace, click the plus sign (+) next to Topologies to expand the list of topologies. Right-click the STREETS topology, and choose Administration > Load Topology from the shortcut menu. 12. The Autodesk Map Topology Audit dialog box appears, informing you that the topology is complete and correct. Click OK to close it. You have now finished preparing the map for analysis. The topology objects you need from the attached drawing, citymap6.dwg, are now in the project drawing. In the next exercise, you learn how to perform a shortest path trace analysis. Exercise 2: Perform Shortest Path Trace Analysis In this exercise, you'll learn how to use shortest path trace analysis to calculate the shortest path between two points, and to determine the optimal route based on values and resistance. You learn to display the results on screen and also save them as a new network topology. To perform shortest path trace analysis 1. From the Map menu, choose Topology > Network Analysis. The Topology Selection dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Topology Selection dialog box, make sure that the STREETS topology is selected and then click OK. The Network Topology Analysis - Select Method dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Network Topology Analysis - Select Method dialog box, select Shortest Path, and then click Next. 4. In the Network Topology Analysis - Choose Locations dialog box, make sure that Start Point is selected and then click the Select Point button. 5. In the map, use the highlighted square to select the road intersection at the fire station (marked by an F in the map). Click once to pick it and then press Enter. The coordinates of the start point are displayed in the list. 6. Continuing in the Network Topology Analysis - Choose Locations dialog box, click End Point and then click the Select Point button. 7. In the map, pick the end of the road at the St. Pierre railroad station. Press ENTER. The coordinates of the end point are displayed in the list. 8. Click Next twice. 9. In the Network Topology Analysis - Output dialog box, select the Highlight check box and for Color, choose Magenta to indicate that you want to display the results on screen in Magenta. 27

10. Select the Create Topology check box to indicate that you want to save the results in a new topology. 11. For Name, enter ROUTE. Enter your choice for Description. 12. Click Finish. The results are displayed on screen A magenta line shows the shortest path or route between the two points. Autodesk Map calculates this path. The path is also written to a new topology, ROUTE, which appears in the list of topologies in the Project Workspace. 13. On the command line, enter REDRAW, and press ENTER to refresh the display and clear the shortest path trace from your map. In the next exercise, you learn about network flood trace analysis. Exercise 3: Perform Flood Trace Analysis In this exercise, you learn how to use network flood trace analysis to show all possible routes from a chosen node. You specify the maximum distance and resistance from a starting point. In this exercise, you find which railroad station is nearest to a hospital. 1. From the Map menu, choose Topology > Network Analysis. The Topology Selection dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Topology Selection dialog box, make sure that the STREETS topology is selected. Then click OK. The Network Topology Analysis - Select Method dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Network Topology Analysis - Select Method dialog box, click Flood Trace. Then click Next. 4. In the Network Topology Analysis - Choose Locations dialog box, make sure that Start Point is selected and then click the Select Point button. 5. In the map, select the end of the road at the hospital (marked by an H in the map). If you need to, pan to the right to find it. Then press ENTER. The coordinates of the start point appear in the list. 6. Click Next. 7. In the Network Topology Analysis - Resistance and Direction dialog box, enter 8000 for the Maximum Resistance. Click Next. The flood trace will color streets in the network for a distance of 8000 drawing units in all directions from the hospital. 8. In the Network Topology Analysis - Output dialog box, make sure that the Highlight check box is selected and that Magenta is selected for the highlight Color. 9. Clear the Create Topology check box and click Finish. The trace shows that the Central station on the right is nearest to the hospital. 10. From the File menu, choose Close to close the drawing file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No.

Lesson 3: Creating a Polygon Topology 28

Polygon topology uses links to define enclosed areas. Each polygon consists of a series of links forming its edges. Polygon topology is used in tax assessment and land planning, in which polygons represent parcels of land. In this lesson, you create a polygon topology and specify the parcel ID numbers as the centroids of the polygon. 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Navigate to your MapTut\Tutorial V folder. Open parcels4.dwg. 2. From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents. This step prepares your drawing for the best visibility as you proceed. 3. From the Map menu, choose Topology > Create. 4. In the Create Topology - Select Topology Type dialog box, click Polygon for the Topology Type, enter PARCELS for the Topology Name, and enter PARCELS IN NEW HOUSING AREA for the Topology Description. Then click Next. 5. In the Create Polygon Topology - Select Links dialog box, make sure Select All is selected. 6. To specify the layers you want to use when selecting objects, click the Select Layers button. The Select Layers dialog box is displayed. 7. In the Select Layers dialog box, choose PARCELS. Then click Select. 8. Verify that PARCELS appears in the Layers box to indicate that you want to include links on the PARCELS layer in the polygon topology. 9. Click Select Centroids on the left side of the dialog box. 10. In the Create Polygon Topology - Select Centroids dialog box, make sure Select All is selected. 11. Click the Select Layers button. The Select Layers dialog box is displayed. 12. In the Select Layers dialog box, select PARCELID. Then click Select. 13. Click Next. 14. In the Create Polygon Topology - Create New Centroids dialog box, select the Create Missing Centroids check box. This option ensures that if no parcel ID exists in a parcel, Autodesk Map will create a new centroid. 15. Under Layer, enter TOPOLOGY to specify the name of the new layer on which to place the new centroids. 16. In the Create Polygon Topology - Create New Centroids dialog box, click Finish. Autodesk Map creates a polygon topology and attaches object data to the links and centroids of the topology. Next, you view the object data containing the topology information. 17. From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Edit Object Data. 18. Select any Parcel ID in the map. Object data showing the topology information for the polygon is displayed in the Edit Object Data dialog box.

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Although you can see the topology object data, you cannot edit it here. To do so, you must use topology editing commands, which you access by right-clicking a topology in the Project Workspace. 19. Click OK to close the Edit Object Data dialog box. 20. From the File menu, choose Close to close the drawing file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No. Lesson 4: Analyzing a Polygon Topology You can use a topology you've saved to analyze areas and interactions between areas. In this lesson, you use one polygon topology showing the area affected by a pollutant spill, and another polygon topology of housing parcels to display parcels affected by the spill. Exercise 1: Prepare the Project Drawing for Analysis In this exercise, you create a new drawing, attach files, and define a query. You also load an existing polygon topology from an attached drawing and set up drawing layers to display it. 1. From the File menu, choose New. Note: If you have disabled Autodesk Map Today, you can skip Step 2. 2. In the Autodesk Map Today window, select Start From Scratch, and then click English (Feet and Inches). 3. In the Project Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Attach from the shortcut menu. Using the TUT_DRIVE alias, select parcels6 from the TUTORIAL V folder. Click Add, then click OK. If your TUT_DRIVE alias is not set up properly, see the Create a Drive Alias lesson of the Getting Started tutorial. 4. In the Project Workspace, right-click the parcels6 drawing and choose Zoom Extents from the shortcut menu. Although you may see no change yet, this step prepare your drawing for the best visibility as you proceed. Next, you define and run a query to bring objects from the attached drawing, parcels6.dwg, into the project drawing so that you can work with them. 5. In the Project Workspace, right-click Current Query, and choose Define from the shortcut menu. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 6. In the Define Query dialog box, define a Location All query. Then execute the query in Draw mode. The results of the query appear in the drawing. 7. In the Project Workspace, click the plus sign (+) next to Topologies to expand the list of topologies. 8. Right-click the PARCELS topology and choose Administration > Load Topology from the shortcut menu. The Load Topology Conflict dialog box is displayed. 9. The Load Topology Conflict dialog box, verify that Load From Current Drawing Only is selected and then click OK. 10. The Autodesk Map Topology Audit message box is displayed. Click OK. 11. Click the Layers button on the Object Properties toolbar. 12. In the Layer Properties Manager dialog box, freeze the PARCELID and PARCELS layers and turn on the SPILL layer. Click OK. 30

The SPILL layer shows a circle, representing the area affected by the pollutant spill. In the next exercise, you create a polygon topology from the circle. Exercise 2: Create a Polygon Topology Now you're ready to create a polygon topology from the circular area that represents the pollutant spill. 1. In the Project Workspace, right-click Topologies and choose Create from the shortcut menu. The Create Topology - Select Topology Type dialog box is displayed. 2. For Topology Type, select POLYGON. For Topology Name, enter SPILL. For Topology Description, type AREA OF SPILL. Then click Next. The Create Polygon Topology - Select Links dialog box is displayed. 3. In the Create Polygon Topology - Select Links dialog box, make sure Select All is selected. 4. Click the Select Layers button. 5. In the Select Layers dialog box, select SPILL, and then click Select. 6. On the left side of the dialog box, click Select Centroids. The Create Polygon Topology - Select Centroids dialog box is displayed. 7. In the Create Polygon Topology - Select Centroids dialog box, make sure Select Manually is selected. Then click Next. 8. In the Create Polygon Topology - Create New Centroids dialog box, select the Create Missing Centroids check box. This option ensures that if no centroid exists, Autodesk Map will create a new centroid. 9. Under Layer, specify 0 as the layer on which to place the new centroids. 0 indicates that you want to place them on the current layer. Make sure that Point Object For Centroid Creation is set to ACAD_POINT. 10. In the Create Polygon Topology - Create New Centroids dialog box, click Finish. The Confirm Save Back message box will appear. 11. When prompted to add objects to the save set, click No. The SPILL topology is created and available for analysis. 12. Click the Layers button on the Object Properties toolbar. 13. In the Layer Properties Manager dialog box: Thaw the PARCELID and PARCELS layers. Freeze the SPILL layer. Click OK. In the final exercise, you overlay polygons using the Intersect operation. Exercise 3: Intersect Polygon Topologies Using Intersect, you can combine nodes, networks, or polygons with a polygon topology and keep only the common geometry. In this exercise, the Intersect operation produces the parcels (or parts of parcels) that lie inside the pollutant spill area.

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To create intersecting polygon topologies 1. In the Project Workspace, right-click PARCELS and choose Analysis > Overlay from the shortcut menu. The Topology Overlay Analysis - Analysis Type dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Topology Overlay Analysis - Analysis Type dialog box, click Intersect and then click Next. 3. In the Topology Overlay Analysis - Select Overlay Topology dialog box, select SPILL as the Polygon Topology To Overlay. Then click Next. 4. In the Output Topology dialog box, select the Highlight check box, and then choose Red for the highlight Color. 5. Enter AFFECTED for Name, and enter PARCELS AFFECTED BY THE SPILL for Description. Make sure that Layer is set to 0. 6. Click Finish. The drawing displays the boundary of the spill area and affected parcels. 7. From the File menu, choose Close to close the drawing file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No. Lesson 5: Editing a Topology To edit a topology, you should use the topology editing commands rather than standard commands such as MOVE or ERASE. With standard commands, you might lose data. Even if you don't lose data, you would still have to create the topology again. To edit a polygon topology In this lesson, you edit the PARCELS topology and merge (a imbina) two parcels by removing the link that separates them. 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Navigate to your MapTut\Tutorial V folder. Open parcels5.dwg. 2. In the Project Workspace, click the plus sign (+) next to Topologies. Right-click PARCELS and choose Administration > Load Topology from the shortcut menu. 3. In the Autodesk Map Topology Audit dialog box, Autodesk Map reports that the topology is correct and complete. Click OK. Next you view the data and then edit it. 4. From the View menu, choose Named Views. 5. In the View dialog box, select PARCEL_2015 in the list, click the Set Current button, and then click OK. In the map, parcels with IDs 11232013 to 11232017 are clearly visible. 6. In the Project Workspace, right-click PARCELS and choose Merge Polygon from the shortcut menu. 7. In the map, select the boundary between parcels 11232015 and 11232016. 8. Select the text for parcel 11232016. 9. On the command line, type Y, and then press ENTER. The boundary between the two parcels, and the centroid for parcel 11232016 are deleted. 32

Next, you will view the object data to confirm that the topology is complete. To view the centroid object data 10. From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Edit Object Data. 11. Select the parcel ID 11232015. The dialog box shows that the topology for this centroid consists of six links forming the boundary of the polygon. The topology is complete. 12. Click OK. 13. From the File menu, choose Close to close the drawing file. When you are prompted to save the changes you made, click No. Normally, you would save this drawing to save topology information. You don't save here, but if you wish to, use a new name.

Tutorial 6: Using Feature Classification This tutorial teaches you to use feature classification (caracteristica de clasificare) to organize objects in your drawing based on the real-world features that they represent. You'll create a library of standard objects, called feature classes. You can then easily create features in your drawing, such as roads or manholes, that automatically have all the properties and attached data that you've set up. You can also easily select, modify, and export objects based on their feature class. Lesson 1: Setting Up the Feature Definition File In this lesson, you will create a feature definition file (fisier de definire de caracteristica). For each feature class that you want to define, you'll create a sample (esantion) object. Finally, you'll define each of the features, using the sample object as an example. Important: To define features, you must have Alter Feature Class privileges. If you do not have these privileges, skip this lesson and go on to Lesson 2. If you are unsure of your privileges, talk to your CAD manager. In a small organization, you may be able to use the MAPLOGIN command to log in as SUPERUSER, using the default superuser password of SUPERUSER. To Create a Feature Definition File (fisier de definire de caracteristica) 1. Open the Roads drawing in the Tutorial VI directory. Note: This drawing has a layer called Roads, an object data table called Roads that has fields (campuri) for Lanes ( benzi) (default 2), Surface (suprafata) (default paved), SpeedLimit (default 35). 2. At the command prompt, enter newdef.

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Note: If you receive a warning that you have insufficient privileges, it means you do not have rights to create feature definitions. In a small organization, you may be able to log in as a superuser using the default superuser password of SUPERUSER. If you work in a large organization, talk to your CAD manager about getting Alter Feature Class privileges. 3. In the New Feature Definition File dialog box, browse to the Autodesk Map 6\MapTut\Tutorial VI directory. Enter the file name RoadSample and click Save. The new feature definition file is created. To Create a Sample Feature Object (caracteristica obiect esantion) 4. If it is not already opened, open the Roads drawing in the Tutorial VI directory. The RoadSample feature definition you created in Exercise 1 is still attached. You want all roads to be on the Roads layer. 5. In the Layers list, select the Roads layer to make it the current layer. Now you'll create a sample road. 6. At the command prompt, enter pline. Select two points for the line and then press Enter to end the command. Now you'll specify that the road use a thicker line. 7. Click the road to select it. Then, right-click the road and select Properties. In the Properties window, click in the Lineweight box and select .40. You want all roads to have object data attached to them that lists the surface type, speed limit, and number of lanes. This drawing already has an object data table with these fields, and you'll attach a record to the line. 8. From the Map menu, select Object Data > Attach/Detach Object Data. In the Attach/Detach Object Data dialog box, note that the Roads table is selected. 9. Click Attach To Objects and select the line. Press Enter to end the command. A record from the Roads table is attached to the line. You have created a sample object. You are ready to define the Road feature using this sample road as an example. To Define a Feature Class 10. In the Project Workspace, right-click Feature Classes and select Define Feature Class. 11. When prompted to select a sample object, select the line you created in Exercise 2. Press Enter to finish selecting objects. The Define Feature Classification dialog box appears. 12. In the Define Feature Classification dialog box, under Feature Name, enter Road. Under Description, enter Local road. The Applies To tab specifies the types of objects that can be valid roads. For our feature definition, only polylines can be roads. 13. Under Object Types, select AcDbPolyLine. On the Properties List tab, select the properties that should be assigned (alocate) to each object that will be classified as a Road. 14. Under Available Properties, select the following properties: General: Color, Layer, Linetype, Lineweight

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OD: Roads: Lanes, SpeedLimit, Surface For each property, you set to specify a range of allowable values. When someone creates a new object using this feature definition, Autodesk Map will check that its properties fall within the defined range (proprietatile sale se incadreaza in intervalul definit). If the value of the property is not within the range, the property will be set to the default value. 15. Select Color, and set both the default and the range to 1. This will make all roads red. Select Layer, and set both the default and the range to Road. This will put all roads on the Road layer. For Linetype, you'll accept any value as valid, so you'll leave the range and default blank (necompletat). For Lineweight, you want to accept a limited set of lineweights. Note that lineweights must be entered as whole numbers.

For example, to specify a lineweight of .30, enter 30. 16. Select Lineweight. For the range, enter 30,40,50. For the default, enter 40.

For Lanes, you want to accept only 2 and 4. 17. Select Lanes. For the range, enter 2,4. For the default, enter 2.

For SpeedLimit, you want to accept any value between 15 and 55. You specify a continuous range by using square brackets (Trebuie sa specificati un interval continuu prin utilizarea parantezelor drepte). 18. Select SpeedLimit. In the Range field, enter [15,55]. For the default, enter 35.

When people in your group create a road, they will only be able to enter a speed limit within this range. If they classify an object that has an existing value that is outside this 35

range, the value will be set to the default value of 35. For Surface, you want to accept Paved, Gravel, and Dirt. 19. Select Surface. In the Range field, enter Paved,Gravel,Dirt. For the default, enter Paved.

On the Class Settings tab, select how the feature appears in the Project Workspace, and how to create a new feature. 20. Make sure Show Feature Class In Workspace is selected. Under Class Icon, select [ISSUE: Will there be a road-type icon.] Next you'll set the Create Method to Polyline. This means that when users create a Road feature, Autodesk Map will automatically create the road using the PLINE command. 21. Under Create Method, select Polyline. 22. Click Save Definition to close the dialog box. Finally, you'll classify your sample line as a Road feature. 23. In the Project Workspace under Feature Classes, right-click Road and choose Classify Objects. 24. Click OK in the Classify Objects dialog box. Select the line and press Enter. You have successfully created a feature definition for a road. Now all the people in your organization can create roads that automatically are on the correct layer, have the correct lineweight, and have the correct object data attached. Lesson 2: Creating New Features In this lesson, you will create a new road. By using feature classification to create the road, it will automatically be on the correct layer, be the correct color, and have the appropriate object data attached. You will then edit the lane information associated with the new road. To Create a Feature 1. In the Project Workspace, right-click Feature Classes and select Attach Definition file. In the Autodesk Map 6\MapTut\Tutorial VI directory, select Tut_Sample.xml and click Open. Notice that the feature class Road appears in the Project Workspace under Feature Classes. Now you'll create the road. 2. In the Project Workspace, under Feature Classes, right-click Road and select Create Feature. Specify the points to draw a line, and click Enter to end the command. Note that the new line is on the Roads layer, and has the appropriate lineweight and object data for a Road feature. To Edit Feature Properties 36

3. Click on the line you created to select it. Right-click on the line and select Properties. 4. In the Properties window, select the Feature Data tab. The Feature Data tab shows only the information associated with the feature class. When you edit data on this tab, you can enter only values that fall within the range specified for the feature class. 5. Click in the Lanes box, and enter 4. The object data is updated. In this lesson, you created a classified object and edited the object data associated with the object. For more information on using feature classification, refer to the online help. Lesson 3: Classifying Existing Objects (Clasificarea obiectelor existente) In this lesson, you will open an existing document and classify the lines on the Road layer as "Roads." To Classify Existing Objects 1. Open the drawing Tut_Sample3 in the Tutorial VI directory. Attach the Tutorial feature definition file. 2. In the Project Workspace, right-click Feature Classes and choose Attach Definition File. Select the Tut_Sample file. 3. In the Project Workspace, under Feature Classes, right-click Road and select Classify Objects. 4. In the Classify Objects dialog box, make sure both check boxes are selected and click OK. 5. In the drawing, select some of the lines. When you finish selecting lines, press Enter. Note that the lines now have the color, lineweight, and object data fields specified for the Road feature. 6. Close the Tut_Sample3 drawing. In this lesson, you learned how to classify objects in your drawing. For more information on using classification, refer to the online help. Lesson 4: Selecting Features In this lesson, you will quickly select all the roads in your drawing. To Select Features Open the Tut_Sample4 drawing. 1. In the Project Workspace, under Feature Classes, right-click Roads and select Select Features. All the Road features in the drawing are selected. 2. Press Esc to deselect the Roads. You can also select objects based on data associated with the feature. Now you will select all roads with 4 lanes.

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3. Right-click a blank space in the drawing and choose Quick Select. The Quick Select dialog box appears. For Object Type, select Road. For Property, select Lanes.For Value, enter 4. Click OK. All the Roads with 4 lanes are selected. Note that the Quick Select command selects objects in your current drawing. If you want to select objects from your source drawings, use the Query command. For example, you can define a query data condition to find all the roads in your source drawings with 4 lanes, then execute the query to bring these roads into the project drawing. 4. Close the Tut_Sample4 drawing. In this lesson, you selected objects based on their feature classification. For more information on using feature classification to select objects, refer to Getting Started with Autodesk Map and the online help. This is the end of the Feature Classification tutorial. In this tutorial, you learned to use feature classification to create standard objects in your drawing. By using feature classification to create the objects, you ensure that all the features you create have the same properties and data. You used the Road feature classification to create lines that automatically have the color, layer, lineweight, and object data that you want for all roads in your drawings. For more general information on feature classification, read the Feature Classification chapter in Getting Started with Autodesk Map. For information on using feature classification, read the Feature Classification section of the online help.

Tutorial 7: Reporting and Plotting Map Data Welcome to the Reporting and Plotting Map Data tutorial. This tutorial consists of two lessons. Lesson 1 includes three exercises that show how to retrieve data with an SQL condition, how to create a report and how to view the report. Lesson 2 has five exercises that include preparing the drawing for plotting, defining and saving a query, inserting a plot template block, defining a new map plot set and previewing a map plot set. Lesson 1: Exporting Data to a Report This is the first lesson of the Reporting and Plotting Map Data tutorial. In this lesson you'll use an SQL condition to retrieve all owners of property with land values greater than $50,000, design a report and you will use Windows Notepad to view the report you create. Exercise 1: Retrieve Data with an SQL Condition

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In this exercise you'll use an SQL condition to retrieve all owners of property with land values greater than $50,000. In the next exercise you'll design a report for them. To retrieve data with an SQL condition 1. From the File menu, choose New. The Autodesk Map Today window is displayed. 2. On the Create Projects tab, select Start From Scratch from the drop-down list, then click English. Autodesk Map creates a new drawing file. 3. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Attach from the shortcut menu. 4. From the Look in drop-down list, select the TUT_DRIVE alias, select PARCELS7 from the TUTORIAL VI folder. Click Add, then click OK. Autodesk Map attaches the PARCELS7 drawing file to your project. 5. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 6. In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query to clear any existing queries. 7. Under Query Type, click Location. The Location Condition dialog box is displayed. 8. In the Location Condition dialog box, make sure All is selected, then click OK. 9. In the Define Query dialog box, under Options, click Zoom Ext. The Zoom Drawing Extents dialog box is displayed. 10. In the Zoom Drawing Extents dialog box, click OK. Autodesk Map zooms to the extents of the drawing. 11. In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, select Draw, then click Execute Query. 12. Open the Windows Explorer. Position it next to Autodesk Map so you can see both windows. 13. In Explorer, navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL VI directory in the folder where you installed Map. Select the OWNERS database, drag it to the Project tab in the Project Workspace, and release the mouse button. Autodesk Map automatically creates a UDL file as a shortcut to the data source and adds the database to the project. 14. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 15. If a previous query is shown, click Clear Query to clear it. 16. Under Query Type, click SQL. The SQL Link Condition dialog box is displayed. 17. In the Condition section of the dialog box, select LANDVALUE in the Column list; select the Greater Than operator (>) in the Operator list, and type 50000 for the Value. 18. Click Add Condition, then click OK. The SQL condition SELECT * FROM PARCELS WHERE LANDVALUE > 50000 is displayed under Current Query in the Define Query dialog box. 19. Leave the Define Query dialog box open. You will use it in the next exercise. Exercise 2: Create a Report

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In this exercise you will create a report template. A report template specifies which information Autodesk Map will include in a report. To create a report 1. In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, select Report, then click Options. The Output Report Options dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Output Report Options dialog box, under Expression, click SQL. The Select SQL Column dialog box is displayed. 3. For the Link Template, make sure PARCID is selected. Under Columns, select SALUTATION, then click OK. 4. In the Output Report Options dialog box, under Expression, click Add. SALUTATION is added to the report template. 5. In the Output Report Options dialog box, under Expression, click SQL. The Select SQL Column dialog box is displayed. 6. Under Columns, select FNAME, then click OK. 7. In the Output Report Options dialog box, click Add. FNAME is added to the report template. 8. Repeat the steps 5 through 7 to add LNAME, STNUM, STNAME, STEXTEN, and LANDVALUE to the report template. 9. In the Output Report Options dialog box, under Output File Name, use the Browse button to navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL VI directory in the folder where you installed Map. 10. Enter ZONEOUT.TXT for the file name, then click Save. The completed Output Report Options dialog box shows the settings that will be included in the report template. 11. Click OK. Then, in the Define Query dialog box, click Execute Query. Autodesk Map executes the query and creates the report ZONEOUT.TXT, based on the results of the query. Exercise 3: View the Report In this exercise you will use Windows Notepad to view the report you just created. 1. Open Windows Explorer. 2. In Windows Explorer, navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL VI directory in the folder where you installed Map. 3. Double-click ZONEOUT.TXT to open the report file in Windows Notepad text editor. The report lists all residences with land values greater than $50,000. Each entry is separated by a comma. 4. Close the Windows Notepad text editor, and close Windows Explorer. Lesson 2: Creating a Map Book Autodesk Map uses plot sets to automate the process of plotting a map and generating a book. In this lesson, you will create a map plot set to combine and plot the maps of the city and streets. 40

This lesson has five tasks:


Prepare the Drawing for Plotting Define and Save a Query Insert a Plot Template Block Define a New Map Plot Set Preview a Map Plot Set

Exercise 1: Prepare the Drawing for Plotting In this exercise, you will select a printer and activate attached drawing files. You must complete this exercise before you can continue to the next exercises in this lesson. To prepare a drawing for plotting 1. From the File menu, choose Open. Navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL VI directory in the folder where you installed Map and open the MAPTUT5 drawing file. Maptut5 contains a layout called Map Book, which you will use as part of the plot set. 2. Click the Map Book tab at the bottom of the drawing window, between the Model and Layout2 tabs. The Map Book plot layout is displayed. 3. Right click the Map Book tab, then choose Page Setup from the shortcut menu. The Page Setup dialog box is displayed. 4. On the Plot Device tab, under Plotter Configuration, select a printer or plotter from your list of available printers. Click OK to close the Page Setup dialog box. 5. Click the Model tab at the bottom of the drawing window to return to model space. 6. From the Map menu, choose Drawings > Define/Modify Drawing Set. The Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box is displayed. 7. In the Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box, hold down the Ctrl key and select the HOUSES7 and CITYMAP7 drawing files. Click Activate, then click OK. 8. From the Map menu, choose Drawings > Zoom Drawing Extents. The Zoom Drawing Extents dialog box is displayed. 9. Make sure both drawings are selected and click OK. Exercise 2: Define and Save a Query In this exercise you will define and save a query that will add specific objects to the map book. 1. From the Map menu, choose Query > Define Query. The Define Query dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query to clear any existing queries. 3. Under Query Type, click Location. The Location Condition dialog box is displayed. 4. In the Location Condition dialog box, make sure All is selected, then click OK.

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5. In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, make sure Draw is selected, then, under Options, click Save. The Save Current Query dialog box is displayed. 6. In the Save Current Query dialog box, click New Category. The Define New Category dialog box is displayed. 7. In the Define New Category dialog box, type CITY_MAP for the New Category Name, then click OK. 8. In the Save Current Query dialog box, type STREETS_AND_CITY for Name, and ALL STREET AND CITY FEATURES for Description, then click OK. 9. In the Define Query dialog box, click OK. 10. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, a new query category, CITY_MAP, contains the saved query, STREETS_AND_CITY. Autodesk Map will use the query you defined and saved to retrieve data to include in the map book. Exercise 3: Insert a Plot Template Block A 'plot template block' defines how each plot in a map book is laid out. This includes the map's title block (or title page). In this exercise you will insert a predefined plot template block into the project. To insert a predefined plot template block into the project 1. From the Insert menu choose Block. The Insert dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Insert dialog box, click Browse. 3. In the Select Drawing File dialog box, navigate to the MapTut \ TUTORIAL VI folder and select the TBLOCK drawing file, then click Open. 4. In the Insert dialog box, under Insertion Point, make sure Specify On-Screen is selected then click OK. 5. At the command line, you are prompted to enter an insertion point. Press the Esc key. The title block definition is now part of the project drawing, but the geometry is not visible. The plot template block is now part of the project drawing. Exercise 4: Define a New Map Plot Set To create a map book, you must define a 'plot set'. A plot set specifies which plot layout block, source drawings, query, boundaries, and plot options Autodesk Map will use for the map book. In this exercise you will specify plot set settings for the map book. To plot a large mapped area, you divide a map into a tiled set of map sheets or plots. The boundaries of each map are defined in a separate drawing file. In this exercise, the boundaries are defined in the MSBOUND drawing file. 1. On the Project tab in the Project Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Attach from the shortcut menu. 42

2. In the Look in drop-down list, select the TUT_DRIVE alias, then select MSBOUND from the MapTut \ TUTORIAL VI directory in the directory where you installed Map. 3. Click Add, then click OK. Autodesk Map attaches the MSBOUND drawing file to your project. 4. From the Map menu, choose Plot Map Set. The Plot Map Set dialog box is displayed. 5. In the Plot Map Set dialog box, click New. The Plot Set Definition dialog box is displayed. 6. In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, type CITY_ATLAS for Name and ATLAS OF CITY FEATURES BY QUADRANT for Description. 7. Click Plot Template Block. The Plot Template Block dialog box is displayed. 8. In the Plot Template Block dialog box, make sure the settings shown in the Tutorials Helper window are selected, then click OK. 9. In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Source Drawings. The Source Drawing Selection dialog box is displayed. 10. Under Attached Drawings, hold down the Ctrl key and select the HOUSES7 and CITYMAP7 drawing files. Click >>, then click OK. The drawings are added to the map plot set. 11. In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Plot Queries. The Plot Query Selection dialog box is displayed. 12. In the Plot Query Selection dialog box, make sure that 'CITY_MAP' is selected for Category. 13. Under Queries, select All Street And City Features and click >>, then click OK. The query is added to the map plot set. 14. In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Boundaries. The Plot Boundary Definition dialog box is displayed. 15. Under Boundary Drawing, for File name, select MSBOUND. For Layer Name, select ATLAS1. Then, under Boundaries Selected, click Boundaries. A query is executed and the boundaries in the MSBOUND drawing are retrieved. 16. In the Plot Boundary Selection dialog box, under Available Boundaries, click Select All to select all of the boundaries. Click >>, then click OK. 17. In the Plot Boundary Definition dialog box, select the Map Object Data To Block Attributes check box and click Data. The Map Object Data To Block Attributes dialog box is displayed. 18. Under Object Data: BOUNDARIES, select AREA, and under Block Attributes: tblock, select TITLE. 19. Click >> to move AREA to the Block Attributes column, then click OK. 20. In the Plot Boundary Definition dialog box, click OK. The plot set boundaries are defined. Now you will specify the plot options. 21. In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Plot Options. The Plot Set Options dialog box is displayed. 22. In the Plot Set Options dialog box, make sure Map Book is selected for Layout. 23. Under Template Block Settings, click Select Layer. The Viewport Layer Settings dialog box is displayed. 24. Under Reference View Layers To Display, click Clear All, then select ATLAS1 from the list. The ATLAS1 layer contains the boundaries and annotation that will appear in the reference viewport. 43

25. Under Main View Layers To Freeze, click Clear All. Then click OK. 26. In the Plot Set Options dialog box, under Main View Scale, select Plot To Scale. For Main Scale, type 1:2500. 27. Under Boundary Edge Options, select Trim Objects At Boundaries. This controls the way objects are drawn where they cross a plotted boundary. 28. Click OK. Then, in the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click OK. 29. In the Plot Map Set dialog box, click Plot Set. Watch as the map set is plotted and displayed according to your specifications. You've defined all of the information for the map book's plot set. Exercise 5: Preview a Map Plot Set You have completed all the information necessary to create a map book. In this exercise you will preview the map book's map plot set. 1. From the Map menu, choose Plot Map Set. The Plot Map set dialog box is displayed. 2. In the Plot Map Set dialog box, make sure Atlas Of City Features By Quadrant is selected, then click View Map Sheet. 3. In the View Map Sheet dialog box, select one of the boundaries, then click OK. Autodesk Map will create a preview of the boundary area you chose, displaying the queried objects in that map quadrant. 4. When the View Layout dialog box appears, click Done. 5. In the Plot Map Set dialog box, click Close. Autodesk Map closes the plot set. 6. From the File menu, choose Close to close the file. When you are prompted to save your changes, click No.

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