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Draper Elementary

Dual Language Immersion Parent Meeting
   

September 10, 2013

Utah’s Model for High Quality Immersion Instruction
Program Overview

WHAT WE TEACH

MATH

SCIENCE & SOCIAL STUDIES

CHINESE LITERACY

WHEN WE TEACH: GRADES K-3
Math & Content Areas Reinforcement Math in Target in English Language

Math in Target Language (20%) Content Areas in Target Language (15%) Target Language Literacy (15%) English L.A. (35%) Math and Content Areas Reinforcement in English (15%)

English L.A.

(Social Studies, Science, P.E., Art, Health and Music)

Content Areas in Target Language

Target Language Literacy

WHEN WE TEACH: 4-5 Dual Language GRADES Immersion Instructional Time : Grades 4-5
Math & Social Studies in English. Music, Art, P.E., Health in both Math & Science in Target Language. Music, Art, P.E., Health in both Math& Science in Target Language. Music, Art, P.E., Health in both (25%) Target Language Literacy (25%) English L.A. (25%) Math & Social Studies in English. Music, Art, P.E., Health in both (25%)

English L.A.

Target Language Literacy

UTAH DUAL LANGUAGE IMMERSION

Providing a world of opportunities for students.

MATH CURRICULUM: GRADES K-3
PEARSON enVision MATH, Grades K-3, Chinese Editions

EveryDay Counts Calendar Math

Language Literacy

nguage Immersion Instructional Time : Grades 4-5

ath & Studies nglish. Art, P.E., h in both

8th Utah Secondary Course PEARSON enVision MATH, Dual Language Immersion Instructional Time : Grades 4-5 Sequencing Im Math& Science in Target Language. 9th
Math & Science in Target Language. Music, Art, P.E., Health in both & Math
To satisfy the requirements of the Utah Secondary Dual Language Immersion students must enroll in 2 courses Target Language Literacy Math& Science in TargetModel, Language. in grades (25%) Music, Art, P.E., Health in both 7-9, which are taught entrirely Math in the immersion language (Chinese, French, (25%) & Science in Spanish, or Portuguese). Students will Target Language. English L.A. have the option to take the AP exam as Target Language Literacya 9th grader. Upper division university (25%) Music, Art, P.E., (25%) courses will be offered in grades 10-12 Health in both Math & Social Studies in English. to students who pass the AP exam. Music, Art, P.E., Health in both Students will have the option to (25%) start a 3rd or 4th language English L.A. Target in grades 10-12. (25%)

MATH CURRICULUM: Utah Dual Language GRADES 4-5 Immersion Model
Literacy Math and Content Areas Reinforcement in English (15%)
Music, Art, P.E., Health in both (25%)

Math and Content Areas Target Reinforcement in English Language (15%)

(35%)

En

7th

Practice Sheets in Chinese

Sec

10th

sh L.A.

Social Studies in English. Target Music, Art, P.E., Language Health in both Literacy

English L.A.

Language Literacy

Math & Social Studies in English. Music, Art, P.E., Health in both (25%)
7/30/12 8:50 AM

To s 11th Utah Sec Model, s in grade 12th in the imm Spanis have Chinese th 3H a 9th4 g Chinese H courses to stu Stu

4

INTERCONNECTIONS: SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE
GRADES 1-3 •  Interconnections is a curriculum written specifically for our program that combines social studies and science lessons. •  There is no textbook for Interconnections, only lesson plans written by the Utah State Office of Education dual language immersion teams. •  Interconnections isn’t taught every day, and some lessons can take several days to complete. •  Interconnections is the curriculum area where teachers have more opportunity to give students social language, an important part of Chinese language learning and literacy.

UTAH’s CURRICULUM SUPPORT
•  TEXTBOOKS and WORKBOOKS
•  Math, Chinese Literacy

•  SCRIPTED LESSON PLANS
•  Math, Interconnections, Chinese Literacy

•  SOCIAL NETWORKING
•  Utah Chinese Dual Language Immersion Official website and Teacher’s Forum

Utah’s Model for High Quality Immersion Instruction
Program Non-Negotiables

State and School Non-Negotiables
•  The district or state mandated curriculum objectives drive immersion instruction •  Utah DLI materials are used for target language literacy development

State and School Non-Negotiables
•  Chinese language teachers and adults in the room use no English in the Chinese language classroom. •  Students speak only the target language during immersion time.*
•  *Grade 1 by January

How do these program non-negotiables affect our school structure?
•  Volunteers - coordinated through the English teacher
•  Fluent Mandarin speakers may assist in classroom

•  Class parties – combined and held in a shared space so that English isn’t spoken in the Chinese classroom
•  Gym, cafeteria, library, kiva

•  Shared communication to parents from both English and Chinese teachers •  Specials - In an effort to ease possible segregation of DLI and non-DLI students, students within a grade level are heterogeneous (mixed up) for Computer, PE, Music, Art, and Library classes

Utah’s Model for High Quality Immersion Instruction
Features of Instruction

Instruction: Comprehensible Input
Teachers make themselves understood using … •  Visual supports (body language, objects, concrete experience, pictures etc.) •  Context (advance organizers, background knowledge, stories) •  Language (paraphrase, explanation, definition)

Instruction: Interaction and Output
•  Students talk frequently with peers •  Students are asked questions that require more than a one-word or phrase response •  Students interact in tasks that promote extended language use •  Students communicate academic information through print (writing)

Instruction: Student Engagement
•  Instruction is cognitively engaging and demanding. •  Teachers consistently involve as many students as much of the time as possible. •  Students demonstrate on-task behaviors.

Instruction: Daily Schedules
A/B days
•  Example: •  A day: student starts the day in Chinese, switches at lunch, ends the day in English •  B day: student starts the day in English (where she left off the day before), switches at lunch, ends the day in Chinese

Benefits
•  Allows for fewer transitions and less loss of instructional time •  Allows for greater equalization between time in each language – 50/50 model of instruction •  Facilitates continuity of instruction – picking up where we left off

Research
Past, Present & Future

University of Utah
Dr. Johanna Watzinger-Tharp Dr. Kristin Swenson

National Context: State-Level Dual Immersion Education
•  Immersion Education State Leaders in the U.S.
•  Hawai’i: Indigenous Revitalization Immersion •  California, Louisiana, Minnesota, N. Carolina, Oregon, Utah, Virginia: One-way Foreign/World Language Immersion •  California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas: Two-way Bilingual Immersion

• 

Source: Center for Applied Linguistics (2011). Directory of foreign language immersion programs in U.S. schools. Retrieved October 22, 2012, from http://www.cal.org/resources/immersion/.

National Context: Immersion Education Research Areas
•  Program Design o Outcomes of immersion program types (90/10, 50/50; oneway, two-way) o Articulation from elementary, secondary, to postsecondary levels o Interaction between programs and external factors •  Instruc)on   o Teacher  educa*on  &  creden*als   o Effec*veness   o Language  proficiency  

Immersion  Educa*on  Research  Areas  
(con*nued)  
•  Students
o  Demographics (e.g. socioeconomics, native language, ethnicity) o  L1 & L2 use inside/outside the classroom o  Attitudes and motivation

•  Outcomes  
o Academic  content  achievement  (reading,  math)   o Sociolinguis*c,  sociocultural  and  intercultural  competencies   o Bi-­‐/mul*literacy  &  bi-­‐/mul*culturalism  

Initial Set of Questions Answered through this Preliminary Research

•  How do the school demographics (i.e., race, income, language proficiency and mobility) associated with DLI programs change over time?

•  How do DLI schools differ demographically and academically from non-DLI schools?

Initial Set of Questions Answered through this Preliminary Research (continued)

•  How are student level demographics and academics related to participation in DLI programs? •  How does DLI participation impact academic learning? •  To what extent do student demographics affect academic outcomes for immersion students?

Methods - School Samples
•  All schools that had with DLI programs by the 2012-2013 school year were included in the sample used to answer the school demographics research question, provided the school had begun with the “Utah Model.”
o  o  o  o  o  o  2007, N=5 2008, N=9 2009, N=28 2010, N=44 2011, N=51 2012, N=68 (we had incomplete data for four schools so they were not included in analysis)

•  Schools that had third grade students in DLI programs in the 2011-2012 school year were included in the sample used to answer the student demographic and student achievement research questions (N=17).

Results - How do the school-level demographics associated with DLI programs change over time?
Districts with DLI programs are the most urban districts in Utah (chart from 2011-2012 school year) but new districts are being added each year.

Blah 6 or more programs Blah 3, 4, or 5 programs 1 or 2 programs Blah

Approximately 90 percent of all students are in districts that have DLI programs.

Results - How do the DLI and non-DLI school demographics differ over time?
DLI schools have consistently been larger than average schools with lower than average student mobility rates.
2008 (8 Dual Immersion Schools)   2010 *2012 (44 Dual Immersion Schools)   (68 Dual Immersion Schools)  

Was the DLI Non-DI DLI Non-DI Was the DLI Non-DI Was the difference Demographi School School School School difference School School difference c   significant Average   Average   Average   Average   significant?   Average   Average   significant?   ?   Percentage ELL   Percentage FRL   Percentage Mobility   Percentage White   Number of Students  
•  • 

   

15% 32% 19% 70% 658

9% 37% 26% 72% 547

NO   NO   Marginal   NO   YES  

12% 37% 18% 78% 741

9% 41% 21% 75% 553

NO   NO   YES   NO   YES  

12% 38% 18% 76% 753

9% 41% 22% 78% 544

NO   NO   YES   NO   YES  

*2012 percentages taken from 2011 data Note: only schools that began the dual immersion program by implementing the “Utah Model” included in analysis

Methods - Student Sample
•  Students in the third grade in the 2011-2012 school year were included to answer the student demographics research question (N=1,863). •  Students from that cohort who were enrolled in the same school from the first through the third grades were included to answer the student achievement research questions (N=1347). o 78 of the 668 DLI students were excluded because of mobility (12 percent) o 438 of the 1195 non-DLI students were excluded because of mobility (37 percent)

Methods - Academic Achievement Measure
•  Student achievement was measured using CriterionReferenced Tests (CRTs) in English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics. •  The Utah State Office of Education administers these CRTs to all Utah students (grades 3-11) in the spring of each year. •  Scaled scores range from 130 through 190 with a mean of 160 and a standard deviation of 10.
o  Students from schools included in our analysis outperformed their statewide peers:
•  ELA mean =167, std. deviation= 11 •  Math mean = 167, std. deviation = 12

Results - How are student level demographics and academics related to participation in DLI programs?
Students in DLI programs were more likely to read on grade level, be proficient in ELA, and be proficient in math than non-DLI students. Students in DLI programs were less likely to be chronically absent than non-DLI students. BUT…can we compare these two groups in this way?
Academic Indicator Percent of DLI students in demographic group (n)
81.1% (535) 85.9% (566) 83.2% (548)
3.2% (21)

Percent of non-DLI students in demographic group (n)
68.4% (784) 70.1% (815) 67.9% (790)
9.7% (115)

ChiSquare
34.023 57.314 50.007
27.066

P-value

Significant?

On reading level Proficient in ELA Proficient in math Chronically absent

<.001 <.001 <.001
<.001

YES YES YES
YES

English Language Arts CRT Scores
169.01 164.13 Dual Immersion Non-Dual Immersion

Math CRT Scores
168.58 164.35 Dual Immersion Non-DI

Results - How does dual language immersion affect academic learning?
•  Even after removing students who did not remain in the same school between first and third grades, mean differences in scores could not be directly compared. One reason was that demographic differences still existed between the two groups. •  We must also assume non-demographic differences between parents who opt for DLI education and those who do not, and nondemographic differences between DLI and non-DLI students.
Percentage of Students in Special

Special Education
Percentage of Students receiving 14.5 5.8

Low Income Homes
34.9 43.3

Dual Immersion

Non-Dual Immersion

Dual Immersion

Non-Dual Immersion

Results - How is DLI participation related to academic learning?
•  To compare the two groups better, we used scores in English Language Arts (taught in English) as a predictor of scores in Mathematics (taught in the target language). •  We also used the following student level covariates: gender, mobility, race, English proficiency, family income, and special education status. •  With the covariates statistically controlled, we found NO DIFFERENCE in math scores between students taught in DLI Programs and students not taught in DLI Programs.

Results –What does it mean to say there is NO DIFFERENCE in academic learning?
•  Based on demographics and English scores, we predicted DLI students to score an average of 169 and the non-DLI students to score an average of 165.5 on the math test.
Predicted and Actual Values on Mathematics CRTs
170 169 168 167 166 165 164 163 Math CRT Scores

169.02

168.94

Predicted
165.46 165.53

Actual

Dual Immersion

Non-Dual Immersion

Language Proficiency Assessment and Research

Results of May’s AAPPL Testing •  Meeting for 4th & 5th grade parents, •  Sept. 26 6:00 – 6:30 at Draper ES

Utah DLI Programs
State Supports

For teachers, administrators, and specialists •  AUDII – August 5-9, 2013 •  Curriculum & Instruction PD (three times per year) – October, February and March •  Proficiency PD (once per year)
December

Utah DLI Advisory Council
•  Administrators, Principals, Instructional Specialists •  Meetings - October, February, April and August

Parent Resources
For Chinese DLI Parents & Students

http://utahchineseimmersion.org/

http://utahimmersioncouncil.org/

Parent Resources for Chinese Supplemental Materials
•  China Sprout chinasprout.com
•  Choose “Simplified Chinese” when given a choice

•  Better Chinese betterchinese.com
•  Student accounts, iPad apps and practice materials