www.smdailyjournal.

com
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 21
ENERGY BILL
STATE PAGE 7
DONS SWEEP
SANTA TERESA
SPORTS PAGE 11
TART IS EASIER
THAN APPLE PIE
FOOD PAGE 19
REGULATIONS COULD AFFECT ELECTRICAL
RATES FOR MILLIONS
By David Espo and Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama told the nation from the White
House on Wednesday night that diplo-
macy suddenly holds “the potential to
remove the threat of chemical
weapons” in Syria without use of
force, but he declared the U.S. military
will “be ready to respond” against
President Bashar Assad if other meas-
ures fail.
For now, Obama said he had asked
congr es s i onal
leaders to post-
pone a vote on
legislation he
has been seek-
ing to authorize
the use of mili-
tary force
against Syria.
In a 16-minute
speech, the pres-
ident repeatedly
offered reassurances that even the fail-
ure of diplomacy — in promised talks
at the United Nations or elsewhere —
would not plunge America into another
war.
“I will not put American boots on
the ground in Syria,” he promised. “I
will not pursue an open-ended action
like Iraq or Afghanistan. I will not pur-
sue a prolonged air campaign like
Libya or Kosovo.”
“This would be a targeted strike to
achieve a clear objective: deterring the
use of chemical weapons and degrading
Assad’s capabilities,” he said.
Obama: Diplomacy may work
REUTERS
A couple walks in front of the skyline of New York’s Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in a park along the
Hudson River in Weehawken, N.J.Today marks the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade center.
SEE STORY PAGE 7, EDITORIAL PAGE 9
REMEMBERING 9/11
U.S. military will ‘be ready torespond’ against Syria if measures fail
REUTERS
Barack Obama addresses the nation about the situation in
Syria from the East Room at the White House.
See page 28
Inside
Question of
enforcement casts
cloud on Syria plan
County OKs
$14M update
to HR system
Equal benefits waiver
frustrate supervisors
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County supervisors agreed to spend
nearly $14 million to upgrade its anti-
quated human resources system but not
before a contract caveat sparing provider
Workday from offering its employees
equal benefits to same-sex spouses
sparked questions of how to impose local
values in an international arena.
Board President Don Horsley said he could not back that
caveat which nearly led the supervisors to postpone a deci-
sion on the new HR/payroll system until they could get
more clarification or craft a workaround.
Don Horsley
See UPGRADE, Page 18
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Stanford University’s planned expansion
into Redwood City is a “momentous” occa-
sion several years in the making that will
pour hundreds of millions of dollars into the
community and create a valuable partner-
ship, according to city officials.
The City Council Monday night unani-
mously certified the final environmental
impact report for the Stanford in Redwood
City project. With the documents finished
and approved, discussion can now turn to
the merits of the project itself.
Although councilmembers said they’d
received some letters about traffic concerns,
they each expressed enthusiasm for the uni-
Stanford expansion moves forward
University plans first major foray outside main campus
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Michaels Arts and Craft store’s quest to
move to the former Borders bookstore site
on El Camino Real does not fit in with San
Mateo’s transit-oriented-development plan,
the San Mateo Planning Commission deter-
mined last night.
The commission also ruled that the retail
use for the property on 2925 S. El Camino
Real has also been lost since a retail use was
discontinued for six months between
November 2011 and May 2012.
Planning Commission:
Michaels move no good
See STANFORD, Page 18
See OBAMA, Page 20
See MICHAELS, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Singer Harry
Connick Jr. is 46.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
2001
America faced its worst day of terror-
ism. Nearly 3,000 people were killed
as 19 al-Qaida members hijacked four
passenger jetliners. Two planes
smashed into New York’s World Trade
Center, causing the twin towers to
fall; one plowed into the Pentagon;
and the fourth was crashed into a field
in western Pennsylvania.
“I have seen gross intolerance
shown in support of tolerance.”
— Samuel Taylor Coleridge, poet and author (1772-1834)
Musician Moby is
48.
Rapper Ludacris is
36.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Members of Radar 360 1/4 perform their show titled ‘O Baile dos Candeeiros’ in Montijo near Lisbon, Portugal.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy
fog in the morning. Highs in the upper
60s. South winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday ni ght : Mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
mid 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs
in the mid 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after mid-
night. Lows in the mid 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog. Highs in the upper 60s.
Friday night through Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog. Lows in the mid 50s. Highs in the upper 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1777, during the American Revolution, forces under
Gen. George Washington were defeated by the British in the
Battle of Brandywine.
I n 1814, an American fleet scored a decisive victory over
the British in the Battle of Lake Champlain in the War of
1812.
I n 1857, the Mountain Meadows Massacre took place in
present-day southern Utah as a 120-member Arkansas immi-
grant party was slaughtered by Mormon militiamen aided by
Paiute Indians.
I n 1922, the British Mandate for Palestine went into
effect.
I n 1936, Boulder Dam (now Hoover Dam) began operation
as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a key in
Washington to signal the startup of the dam’s first hydro-
electric generator.
I n 1941, groundbreaking took place for the Pentagon. In a
speech that drew accusations of anti-Semitism, Charles A.
Lindbergh told an America First rally in Des Moines, Iowa,
that “the British, the Jewish and the Roosevelt administra-
tion” were pushing the United States toward war.
I n 1954, the Miss America pageant made its network TV
debut on ABC; Miss California, Lee Meriwether, was
crowned the winner.
I n 1962, The Beatles completed their first single for EMI,
“Love Me Do” and “P.S. I Love You,” at EMI studios in
London.
A measurement of body fat content
based on the height and weight of
adults is called BMI (body mass
index). Ahigh BMI may indicate future
health problems. ABMI between 18.5
and 24 is healthy. A BMI over 30 is
considered obese.
***
The 1968 Beatles song “Back in the
USSR” (Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics) begins “Flew in from
Miami Beach BOAC/ Didn’t get to bed
last night/On the way the paper bag
was on my knee/Man I had a dreadful
flight.” BOAC is British Overseas
Airways Corporation, which became
Britain’s state airline in 1939.
***
The first DVD (digital versatile disc)
player came on the market in 1997. A
standard DVD holds seven times more
data than a CD (compact disc).
***
The MPAA (Motion Picture
Association of America) introduced
the current movie ratings system in
1968. Do you know what the movie
ratings G, PG, NC and R stand for? See
answer at end.
***
John Mauchly (1907-1980), a physi-
cist, and J. Presper Eckert (1919-
1995), an engineer, developed the first
computer in 1946. Known as the
ENIAC (Electrical Numerical
Integrator And Calculator), the com-
puter weighed 60,000 pounds and con-
tained 18,000 vacuum tubes. The U.S.
military used the computer for calcula-
tions.
***
The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 cre-
ated the FAA (Federal Aviation
Administration), a government
agency. The purpose of the FAA is to
establish regulations that promote
safety in aviation and to conduct air
traffic control.
***
James Cash Penney (1875-1971),
founder of department store JCPenney,
opened his first store in 1902 at age
26. The Golden Rule in Wyoming was
a dry goods and clothing store. By
1911, Penney and partners operated
22 stores that made more than $1 mil-
lion in sales.
***
The trademark of MGM (Metro
Goldwyn Mayer) is Leo the Lion. The
roaring lion is seen at the beginning
of every MGM feature film. Leo was
first seen in the 1928 silent movie
“White Shadows of the South Seas.”
The lion’s roar was played on a phono-
graph.
***
In 1938, candy manufacturer NECCO
(New England Confectionery
Company) introduced the Skybar. It
was the first candy bar that had four dif-
ferent flavors in the center — caramel,
vanilla, peanut and fudge covered in
chocolate. NECCO first announced the
new candy bar to the public with a sky-
writing campaign.
***
The FDA (Food and Drug
Administration) conducted research on
how consumers use labels on drugs and
determined that labels needed simple
language in an easy to read format. In
May 2002, OTC (over the counter)
medicines were required to carry a new
drug facts label that lists the active
ingredients of the product and the pur-
pose of the medication.
***
Answer: G means the movie is accept-
able for a General Audience, PG means
Parental Guidance, NC, usually listed
as NC-17, means No Children under
17, R stands for Restricted. In 1984,
PG-13 was added to the ratings sys-
tem, which means Parental Guidance
not recommended for children under
13.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
(Answers tomorrow)
FLINT BURST EASILY OPPOSE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Casper bought a cabin in the woods so that
he could live in the — “BOO-NIES”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TAUQO
TENIW
SODWIN
LUFOND
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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a
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ila
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Answer
here:
Actress Betsy Drake is 90. Sen. Daniel Akaka, D-Hawaii, is
89. Actor Earl Holliman is 85. Comedian Tom Dreesen is 74.
Movie director Brian De Palma is 73. Rock singer-musician
Jack Ely (The Kingsmen) is 70. Rock musician Mickey Hart
(The Dead) is 70. Singer-musician Leo Kottke is 68. Actor
Phillip Alford is 65. Actress Amy Madigan is 63. Rock singer-
musician Tommy Shaw (Styx) is 60. Sports reporter Lesley
Visser is 60. Actor Reed Birney is 59. Singer-songwriter
Diane Warren is 57. Musician Jon Moss (Culture Club) is 56.
Actor Scott Patterson is 55. Rock musician Mick Talbot (The
Style Council) is 55. Actress Roxann Dawson is 55.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
6,in first place;Gorgeous George,No.8,in second
palce; and Winning Spirit, No. 9, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:44.12.
4 1 8
2 12 18 54 56 1
Mega number
Sept. 10 Mega Millions
2 19 22 26 45 24
Powerball
Sept. 7 Powerball
10 16 24 28 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 0 6 8
Daily Four
3 3 9
Daily three evening
25 28 35 45 47 20
Mega number
Sept. 7 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associ-
ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
Daily Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it fnds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be
acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the
Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarifcation (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind
whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week Two
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 9/13/13
Cleveland Baltimore
Washington Green Bay
San Diego Philadelphia
Tennessee Houston
St. Louis Atlanta
Miami Indianapolis
Dallas Kansas City
Minnesota Chicago
Carolina Buffalo
Detroit Arizona
New Orleans Tampa Bay
Denver NY Giants
Jacksonville Oakland
San Francisco Seattle
Pittsburgh Cincinnati
TIEBREAKER: Pittsburgh @ Cincinnati__________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play.
Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop off by 9/13/13 to:
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
BELMONT
Drunk in public. Aman that was bleeding
from the head wandered into a lobby and was
arrested for being drunk in public on
Shoreway Road before 3:32 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 8.
Assault with a deadly weapon. Two
men were found fighting and one was arrest-
ed for carrying a deadly weapon on Marine
View Parkway and Chesteron Avenue before
11:58 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8.
Suspi ci ous person. A man was found
inappropriately touching himself in the
pool area on Shoreway Road before 3:28
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7.
Dri vi ng wi thout l i cense. A man was
cited and released for driving without a
license at the intersection of Ralston
Avenue and Hiller Street before 8:44 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 2.
Sexual assault. Someone reported being
assaulted on Twin Pines Lane before 10:35
a.m. Monday, Sept. 2.
Disturbance. A mother and son were in a
verbal argument on Continentals Way
before 1:10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 2.
FOSTER CITY
Suspended license. Awoman was arrested
for driving with a suspended license on
Triton Drive before 10:07 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 3.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. Aman with
gray hair parked at the intersection of
Halsey and Beach Park boulevards for
approximately one hour before 6:33 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 3.
Suspi ci ous person. Two men were seen
wandering around outside the pool area on
Sea Spray Lane before 6:32 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 3.
Burglary. A vehicle was burglarized on
Edgewater Boulevard before 10:21 a.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 3.
Burglary. A business was burglarized on
Chess Drive before 9:36 a.m. Tuesday, Sept.
3.
Police reports
Like a sad country song
Someone’s ex-girlfriend took his
mountain bike, garage door remote,
laptop and dog and refused to return the
items on the 3600 block of Sunset
Drive in Sun Bruno before 5:08 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 5.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A lawsuit has been filed in San Mateo
County Superior Court challenging the ade-
quacy of an environmental impact report for a
Highway 1 widening project planned for
Pacifica.
Pacificans for a Scenic Coast filed the com-
plaint Friday and contend the project is out of
scale with “Pacifica’s scenic nature” and that
the EIR contains contradictory information
on impacts to threatened species or any other
adverse impacts of the project.
“We would like to have more details to
know if it’s a project we like or not,” group
spokeswoman Cynthia Kaufman told the
Daily Journal Tuesday.
The plan is to widen Highway 1 between
2,300 feet north of Reina Del Mar Avenue to
approximately 1,500 feet south of Fassler
Avenue, a stretch of about 1.3 miles, accord-
ing to Caltrans.
The project proposes to widen Highway 1
from four lanes to six lanes to have three
through-lanes in each travel direction,
according to Caltrans.
The highway gets heavy traffic during the
morning and afternoon commute.
The EIR was approved last month and the
cost of the project is expected to be about $52
million.
Kaufman’s group is concerned that the EIR
does not give enough detail on how wide the
road will ultimately be or how big the sound-
walls will be and how pedestrians and bicy-
clists will be impacted by the project.
“There are other ways to deal with traffic
other than widening,” Kaufman said.
The California Environmental Quality Act
requires that the EIR includes an “accurate”
project description.
Pacificans for a Scenic Coast filed the com-
plaint against Caltrans under CEQA.
“At minimum it must include a detailed map
with the ‘precise’ location and boundaries of
the proposed project. Instead the EIR vaguely
described the project as widening ‘primarily
on the west side of the roadway’ varying
somewhere from ‘20 feet to 50 feet wide’ and
referencing pictures which are purely concep-
tual and ‘not to be used as official record.’ In
conjunction, the width of the highway at the
pedestrian and bicyclist crossing points was
not adequately described,” the group wrote in
a statement. The lack of details in the EIR, the
group contends, prevents an adequate analy-
sis of the project’s impacts.
The EIR also contains contradictory infor-
mation regarding the habitat of the California
red-legged frog, the group contends.
In October, Pacifica residents launched an
organization to oppose the city’s plan to
widen Highway 1 called Pacificans for
Highway 1 Alternatives which wants the city
to consider various alternatives to the Calera
Parkway Project, which would widen the
highway from Sharp Park through Rockaway
Beach.
Pacificans for a Scenic Coast is an offshoot
of Pacificans for Highway 1 Alternatives,
which has about 50 members, Kaufman said.
The project will be funded from San Mateo
County Transportation Measure A and State
Transportation Improvement Program funds
and is expected to take about two years to
complete.
The work will be done by the San Mateo
County Transportation Authority as Caltrans
will be the lead agency under CEQA. The
SMCTA, the Pacifica City Council and city
staff have worked with Caltrans for years to
solve the area’s traffic congestion problems.
Caltrans’ officials told the Daily Journal
yesterday they cannot comment on pending
litigation.
Pacifica group challenges
highway widening project
4
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
McDonald’s robbery suspect
held for similar crime in East Bay
A man who robbed a San Mateo
McDonald’s at gunpoint last week and
forced employees into a freezer while forc-
ing another to open the safe is also the same
suspect in a similar robbery at a McDonald’s
in Pleasanton, San Mateo police reported
yesterday.
The suspect, 42-year-old suspect Felix
Gonzalez-Becerra of Oakland is in custody
and now faces charges in San Mateo and
Alameda counties.
Gonzalez-Becerra was spotted by a San
Mateo police officer driving his Chrysler PT
Cruiser across the San Mateo-Hayward
Bridge toward the East Bay. The officer
called for backup as police prepared for a
high-risk pursuit, according to police.
Police pulled him over in San Leandro and
recovered the stolen cash and a replica hand-
gun, according to police.
Gonzalez-Becerra allegedly robbed the
Pleasanton McDonald’s, where he allegedly
once worked, Aug. 28 in the same fashion,
according to police.
He is currently jailed in San Mateo
County, according to police.
Board OKs $11,000 raise
for high-speed rail CEO
SACRAMENTO — The board that over-
sees California’s High Speed Rail Authority
has approved a raise for its chief executive,
who makes $365,000 a year.
Board members unanimously approved a 3
percent raise for CEO Jeff Morales at their
meeting Tuesday in Sacramento. That
amounts to about $11,000 a year.
The 3 percent raise was recommended by
CalHR, the state’s human resources agency,
and matches those given to other senior rail
authority staffers in July.
Morales was named CEO last May.
The board had approved a $25,000 bonus
if Morales met certain benchmarks in his
first year on the job, but he did not get the
payout.
Local briefs
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For the fourth year in a row, the
Hillsborough City Elementary School
District had the number one Academic
Performance Index scores for a transitional
kindergarten to eighth grade district in
California.
The district walked away with scores rang-
ing from 956 to 978, a six-point drop from
last year, but still top in the state. North
Hillsborough had a Growth Score of 978,
while South Hillsborough’s Growth Score
was 956, West Hillsborough’s was 978 and
Crocker Middle School’s was 961.
“It starts with high-quality teachers,” said
Superintendent Anthony Ranii. “The staff
goes the extra mile for the kids. We have a
supportive school board that makes the
right choices. Parents also take the time;
keeping kids ready for school and providing
funds.”
Core partnerships with community
groups like the Hillsborough Schools
Foundation have also helped the schools
stay strong, Ranii said.
The 2013 Growth API data reveals that of
San Mateo County’s 166 schools, 109, or
66 percent, achieved a school-wide perform-
ance target API of at least 800, the highest
number yet since the inception of the state’s
accountability system in 2002. API is deter-
mined from statewide Standardized Testing
and Reporting results. Despite this achieve-
ment at the school level, API scores for the
county’s districts and the state showed a
slight dip from last year. The API is a numer-
ic index that ranges from a low of 200 to a
high of 1,000.
School Board President Lynne Esselstein
attributes the high scores to the hard work
of kids, teachers and district staff.
“The hard work is really about what’s
doing what’s best for kids,” Esselstein said.
“We’re focusing on the instructional stuff,
not necessarily the tests themselves. The
whole community supports us. Schools are
what Hillsborough has going for it; it’s
really a focal point. We don’t have a down-
town or a lot of businesses here. Schools
hold a special place in people’s hearts.”
Changes are also coming to the state
though with curriculum and ultimately test-
ing. The new Common Core standards shift
to team collaborative learning, with less
time spent on lectures and more of an
emphasis on students using technology in
classrooms. New Smarter Balance testing,
which aligns with these new standards, will
go into effect during the 2014-15 school
year. Since 1998, California school dis-
tricts spent a significant amount of time
preparing for STAR tests, which were
unpopular among some for a variety of rea-
sons.
In 2012, two Hillsborough elementary
schools even acted as pilot sites for the
Smarter Balance Assessments.
Will the new tests affect the district’s
scores?
“I’m not worried about the scores,” Ranii
said.
The district may find test scores drop in
the few years of administering the new
tests, but that the district will make changes
accordingly based on data it gets from stu-
dents’ performances on the exams, Ranii
said.
State Assembly Bill 484, an overhaul of
the state’s student assessment system to
support California’s switch to the Common
Core State standards, would allow for nearly
all of the STAR tests to be suspended during
trials of new Smarter Balance Assessments.
The state Senate passed the bill yesterday. It
now heads to the Assembly for a vote before
it can be considered by Gov. Jerry Brown for
his signature.
Although not taking a particular stance
on the bill, Ranii noted that there will be a
lot of time and effort put into the new
instruction.
“This is a big transition,” Esselstein said.
“Assessments are one facet of accountabili-
t y. ”
Hillsborough tops the state with test scores
This year marks the fourth year in a row of highest API scores
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A former California Highway Patrol auto
mechanic was sentenced to 120 days in jail
and ordered to repay more than $16,000 for
fraudulently billing the agency for parts and
labor, including equipment for his personal
vehicle.
Lester Frank Gutierrez, 46, of Daly City,
will also spend three years on supervised
probation and is prohibited from being
employed in a fiduciary position for the
crime of embezzling public funds.
Gutierrez worked in conjunction with the
Serramonte Ford body shop manager to
defraud the CHP but only Gutierrez has been
prosecuted so far, accord-
ing to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Gutierrez’s job was
maintaining and servic-
ing the CHP vehicle fleet
for the San Francisco
division. According to
prosecutors, between
August 2011 and
September 2012, he sub-
mitted $2,859 worth of
invoices for parts and labor that was never
actually performed. A subsequent audit
showed the man billed CHP for $16,056 in
fraudulent labor and also $1,700 for
Gutierrez’s personal vehicle parts, accord-
ing to prosecutors.
Gutierrez faced up to six months in jail
after pleading no contest. He surrenders to
the jail Oct. 26 and remains free on $75,000
bail.
Auto tech sentenced for stealing from CHP
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
Lester
Gutierrez
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
6
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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San Mateo • 650-685-1250
STATE
GOVERNMENT
• Abill authored by
A s s e m b l y m a n
Rich Gordon, D-
Menl o Park, to
make a San Mateo
County child-care
pilot program permanent is headed to the
governor for signature. The bill, co-
authored by all San Mateo County state
lawmakers, will cement the program which
began after the Legi sl ature in 2003
passed a bill allowing flexibility for fami-
ly eligibility and setting fees and reim-
bursement rates appropriate to the county.
The bill will also extend the pilot program
for the city and county of San Francisco
which began seven years ago. Without
Gordon’s legislation, the programs will
end next year, according to Gordon’s
office.
• Two bills authored by state Se n.
Leland Yee, D-San Franci sco/ San
Mateo, to assist foster youth were passed
by the state Legislature and move to the
governor’s desk.
Young parents in the foster care system
face the challenges of being in foster care
as well as being a young, usually single,
parent. Studies of both groups have found
that they will experience higher than aver-
age rates of poverty, unemployment and
low educational attainment. Senate Bi l l
5 2 8 seeks to provide assistance to these
parents so they and their child can have a
better chance of success, according to Yee’s
office.
Senat e Bi l l 342 will ensure that
monthly social worker visits of foster
youth happen in the home of the child,
ensuring that social workers have a more
complete picture of the child’s home life
and welfare and are better able to support
the child and the family. Data from the
Department of Soci al Servi ces shows
that nearly 24 percent of all case worker
visits occur outside the child’s home lead-
ing to instances where some placements
were not been visited by a social worker for
an extended period of time, according to
Yee’s office.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Burl i ngame Pl anni ng
Commi ssi on Monday night discussed an
application for expanding the Rector
Motors Car Co . at 1010 Cadillac Way. It
also gave feedback to the company. The
commission will consider the application
for a vote at a later meeting.
EDUCATION
• The Millbrae Elementary School
Di st ri ct discussed the feasibility of a
potential educational parcel tax measure at
its Monday night meeting. In the presenta-
tion, a public outreach effort was recom-
mended since a survey showed a parcel
measure is only supported by 61.2 percent
of voters, while support needs to be 66.7
percent to pass.
Yasuko Sako
Yasuko Sako died peacefully Sept. 6,
2013 in Millbrae at the age of 88.
Raised in Salt Lake City, Utah, Yas moved
to the Bay Area in the 1960s with her
beloved husband Tadao, who died in 1991,
and was the loving mother of two sons,
David and Kerry.
Yas was a longtime resident of San Bruno
before moving to Millbrae.
She is survived by her sons, her sister
Renee Nishikawa, her brothers Jun and Tom
Kawakami and many nieces and nephews.
Services will be 11 a.m. at Chapel of the
Highlands in Millbrae (El Camino at 194
Millwood Drive) Saturday, Sept. 14, with
viewing at 10 a.m. Saturday at Chapel of the
Highlands.
In lieu of flowers, Yas’ family appreciates
donations to the charity of your choice.
Obituary
Bill protects immigrants
from employer retaliation
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown will
consider a bill that would make it illegal for
employers to report workers to immigration
authorities as retaliation for complaining
about their working conditions.
SB666 by Democratic Senate President Pro
Tem Darrell Steinberg of Sacramento would
let the state suspend or revoke an employer’s
business license if they attempt to have
workers deported for complaining about con-
ditions. They could be fined up to $10,000
per violation.
Republican Sen. Joel Anderson of Alpine
objected that other state laws already protect
workers no matter their status. Workers can
complain to state authorities if they are
underpaid or experience unsafe work condi-
tions.
Youthful offenders
may get chance for parole
SACRAMENTO — Lawmakers are sending
Gov. Jerry Brown a bill to require parole hear-
ings for inmates who were sentenced to
lengthy prison terms for crimes they com-
mitted before they turned 18.
SB260, by Democratic Sen. Loni Hancock
of Berkeley, requires youth offender parole
hearings for juveniles who were prosecuted
as adults.
The Senate approved the bill 22-14 on
Tuesday.
It responds to federal and state supreme
court rulings finding that decades-long sen-
tences are improper for youthful offenders
who were not convicted of murder. Hancock’s
bill goes further, requiring hearings even for
those convicted of homicide.
Bill would require
safety features in limos
SACRAMENTO — Limousines that oper-
ate in California would be required to have
emergency exits under legislation approved
by the state Assembly in the wake of several
limousine fire deaths.
Democratic Sen. Ellen Corbett of San
Leandro drafted the bill after two limousine
fires in the San Francisco Bay Area earlier
this year. In one, five passengers became
trapped in a limo and died in a fire on the San
Mateo-Hayward Bridge.
Under SB109, limousines that carry fewer
than 10 passengers would be required to have
two push-out windows and two rear doors.
Bill to ban lead bullets
heads to governor’s desk
SACRAMENTO — Abill that would make
California the first state in the nation to ban
lead bullets for all types of hunting is headed
to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk.
The Assembly approved AB711 by
Democratic Assemblyman Anthony Rendon
of Lakewood on Tuesday.
Proponents of the bill say the ban will pro-
tect condors and other wildlife that feed on
gut piles left behind by hunters.
Around the state
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 7
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — When this year’s
Sept. 11 anniversary ceremony
unfolds at ground zero, the mayor
who has helped orchestrate the
observances from their start will
be watching for his last time in
office. And saying nothing.
Over his years as mayor and
chairman of the National Sept. 11
Memorial & Museum, Michael
Bloomberg has sometimes tangled
with victims’ relatives, religious
leaders and other elected officials
over an event steeped in symbol-
ism and emotion.
But his
administration
has largely suc-
ceeded at its
goal of keeping
the commemo-
ration centered
on the attacks’
victims and
their families
and relatively
free of political
image-making. In that spirit, no
politicians — including the mayor
— were allowed to speak last year
or will be this year.
Memorial organizers expect to
take primary responsibility for
the ceremony next year and say
they plan to continue concentrat-
ing the event on victims’ loved
ones, even as the forthcoming
museum creates a new, broader
framework for remembering 9/11.
“As things evolve in the future,
the focus on the remembrance is
going to stay sacrosanct,” memo-
rial President Joe Daniels says.
At Wednesday’s ceremony on the
2-year-old memorial plaza, rela-
tives will again read the names of
the nearly 3,000 people who died
when hijacked jets crashed into
the World Trade Center and the
Pentagon and near Shanksville,
Pa. Readers also will recite the
1993 trade center bombing vic-
tims’ names.
Sept. 11 ceremony will
be quiet ‘last’ for mayor
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
One of three home burglars who
led police on a high-speed chase
into a Belmont neighborhood that
ended with him inside a recycling
bin was sentenced yesterday to
nine years in prison.
Dalton Tubby, 22, of Oakland,
will also pay restitution to be
determined at an Oct. 18 hearing.
After all three pleaded no contest
to residential burglary in June,
Tubby faced the stiffest sentence
because of two prior convictions.
Co-defendant Jorge Nevarez, 23,
received a two-year term and co-
defendant Marquis Weaver, 20,
both of Oakland, was jailed six
months.
The three men were arrested
March 7 after the high-speed chase
that ended with Tubby allegedly
hiding in a residential recycling
bin. The mid-morning pursuit
began after a San Mateo resident
called police to report three peo-
ple breaking
into a
L a k e w o o d
Circle neigh-
bor’s home and
exit with stolen
property. Based
on the caller’s
partial license
plate and car
description, an
officer spotted a possible match
and followed as the gold Hyundai
Santa Fe sped up and changed lanes
evasively until exiting on Holly
Street. The police chased the SUV
— reportedly driven by Nevarez —
into a cul-de-sac on Rinconada
Circle in the hills of Belmont near
Fox Elementary School where
Tubby and Nevarez fled on foot. A
Belmont officer spotted a gun in
Tubby’s hand and hit him with his
vehicle.
Tubby reportedly fled but was
found hiding inside a recycling
can in another yard.
Residential burglar imprisoned
Dalton Tubby
Michael
Bloomberg
REUTERS
A woman places her hand on names at the north pool at the 9/11 Memorial in New York.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — California is
close to passing a sweeping over-
haul of its energy regulations that
could affect electrical rates for mil-
lions of customers and rewrite rules
on solar power usage.
AB327 was approved by the state
Senate on Monday with a 33-5 vote
after clearing the Assembly by a
vote of 66-4 in May. The measure
faces one largely procedural vote in
the Assembly before it is sent to
Gov. Jerry Brown, who is expected
to sign it, the Los Angeles Times
reported.
The proposal would replace “out-
dated, electric-rate restrictions
adopted during the state’s energy
regulation crisis over a decade
ago,” said its author, Assemblyman
Henry T. Perea, D-Fresno.
The bill would allow the state’s
Public Utilities Commission to
change the rate structure for many
utility customers after conducting a
detailed investigation. Coastal res-
idents might see higher bills while
people in hotter climates such as
San Bernardino and Riverside coun-
ties, the San Joaquin Valley and the
Mojave Desert might see rate relief,
the Times said.
California close to passing energy bill
LOCAL 8
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Keeping the Hillsborough City
Elementary School District one of
the top districts in the state, while
adjusting to Common Core stan-
dards and technology are impor-
tant issues for those seeking a seat
on the district’s Board of Trustees.
There are three open seats on the
board. Trustees Steven Koury and
Mary Ellen Benninger are not
seeking re-election, making cur-
rent president Lynne Esselstein
the only incumbent in the race.
The other candidates are Don
Geddis, Kaarin Hardy and Pearl
Wu.
An in-office forum was held to
help the Daily Journal determine
endorsements. To allow each can-
didate a forum to express their
opinions on the issues discussed,
candidates were given the same
questions and asked to answer each
in 50 words or fewer. Answers are
arranged alphabetically by the
candidate’s last name.
Do you think the district
has suffici entl y prepared for
the Common Core standards?
Lynne Essel stei n: We began
implementation over a year ago.
In 2012, teachers began standards
and instructional professional
development trainings, two ele-
mentary schools participated in
Smarter Balance Assessment trials
and Crocker changed to a new
schedule allowing for embedded
common planning time for each
academic department. We have a
plan; we’re on track.
Don Geddis: Common Core
standards are still a year away, and
the district’s preparation is on
schedule. Last spring,
Hillsborough schools had trials of
the Common Core assessments.
This past summer, extensive pro-
fessional development focused on
the new standards. Finally, the
improved Crocker schedule allows
significantly more time for
teacher collaboration.
Kaarin Hardy: Yes. Our prepa-
rations have included grade level
work to understand the standards,
and evaluate the changes needed
across our curriculum, as well as
ongoing staff development.
Additionally, to ensure adequate
collaborative time for teachers,
and increased teaching time for
students, a new student schedule
was implemented at Crocker
Middle School.
Pearl Wu: The Hillsborough
schools are high performing and
have been preparing for the
Common Core for the past five
years. Concurrent to “no child left
behind” is my reinforcing mis-
sion that “every child goes for-
ward!” Electives on science, tech-
nology and engineering comple-
ment reading, writing and math as
enrichment venues for students.
What do you think of the
di st ri ct ’s use of capi t al
appreci ati on bonds?
Lynne Essel st ei n: The dis-
trict’s CABs represent a small per-
centage of our overall $66.8 mil-
lion bond program (total debt
ratio is 3.29:1), were structured
with CIBs to manage interest and
avoid balloon payments, and are
callable (a recent refinance saved
our taxpayers $2 million). HCSD
CAB use was informed, conserva-
tive and appropriate for our situa-
tion.
Don Geddis: The district has
wisely used well-designed CABs,
as part of its fiscally conservative
financial plan. The concerns
raised by the San Mateo County
Civil Grand Jury generally don’t
apply to the structure of
Hillsborough bonds. Our Citizen’s
Oversight Committee thoroughly
monitored the finances, and gave a
stellar review.
Kaarin Hardy: Our district has
acted responsibly and taken pre-
cautions to help safeguard our tax-
payers. HCSD’s CABs meet the
recommendations proposed by the
Grand Jury including a callable
option, our debt ratio is well
below the recommended 4:1, and
the district maintains a AAABond
rating. All signs of sound finan-
cial management.
Pearl Wu: At the Aug. 21, 2013
school board meeting, capital
appreciation bonds were dis-
cussed. My stand is to firmly safe-
guard taxpayers’ hard earned
money. There is a statewide mora-
torium on CABs, and prudent judg-
ment to avert short-term gain for
long-term pain is key to the dis-
trict’s financial health.
Do you think the current
educati onal off eri ngs pro -
vi de the ri ght emphasi s?
Lynne Essel stei n: Yes, but
the program looks different than it
did in 2008. Budget cuts eliminat-
ed K-5 Spanish and some comput-
er lab support, but protected
music, innovation lab, counsel-
ing and libraries. Now standards
are changing, funding is improv-
ing and we have begun a communi-
ty-wide conversation to talk about
educational priorities — transfor-
mation is coming.
Don Geddis: The district’s cur-
riculum is excellent, in both man-
dated material as well as enrich-
ment such as Essential Outcomes
and Innovation Labs. The district
also recently has begun a compre-
hensive strategic visioning
process. I’m particularly excited
about more extensive differentia-
tion, as well as teaching the skill
of persistence.
Kaarin Hardy: We have a rich
curriculum that incorporates prob-
lem solving, social and emotional
learning with the basics of math,
reading and science. The district is
undertaking a comprehensive
strategic planning initiative to
ensure what we teach keeps pace
with a changing world. I’m excited
to contribute to this planning
process.
Pearl Wu: Aligning Common
Core [standards] with an uncharac-
Hillsborough school candidates respond to district issues
Age: 49
Education: A.B.
Humanities, UC
Berkeley and J.D.,
UC Davis King Hall
School of Law
Experience:
School board
president,
consultant on
nonprofit governance, attorney
admitted to California and New York
bars, court appointed special advocate
Family: Married, two daughters
Residence: 17 years in Hillsborough
Lynne
Esselstein Age: 46
Education: B.S.
1987, M.S. 1992,
Ph.D. 1995, all in
computer science
all from Stanford
University
Experience:
Entrepreneur,
current member of
Hillsborough schools GATE committee,
created parent group web sites for all
four Hillsborough schools
Family: Married, two daughters
Residence: 13 years in Hillsborough
Don Geddis
Age: 44
Education: B.A. in
political science,
DePauw University,
master’s degree in
government
administration
from University of
Pennsylvania Fels
Center of
Government
Experience: Management consultant
focusing on improving the efficiency
and efficacy of public sector
organizations, vice president of
volunteers for Crocker Parent Board
Family: Married, three children
Residence: Hillsborough since 2005
Kaarin Hardy
Age: 50
Education: Mount
Holyoke College,
B.A., biochemistry/
premed,Tufts
University School of
Medicine, doctor of
medicine, Cedars-
Sinai Medical
Center/UCLA,
internship and residency
Experience: Parent/physician leader,
parent volunteer for preschool through
Crocker Middle School
Family: Married, three children
Residence: Hillsborough for 11 years
Pearl G. Wu
See DISTRICT, Page 18
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Naming the Bay Bridge
Editor,
Let us name the Bay Bridge
“Corruption Bridge.” This way we
“honor” all the politicians that were
involved in this money pit.
Franz Kemper
San Carlos
High-speed
rail progress
Editor,
Gov. Jerry Brown has signed anoth-
er bill advancing the progress of the
latest boondoggle in transportation
improvement: High-speed rail
(“Brown signs high-speed rail bill”
in the Sept. 7 edition of the Daily
Journal). I am going to start looking
for the ultimate improvement in
transportation: Alot selling Yokes of
Oxen and Conestoga Wagons.
James G. B. DeMartini Jr.
Foster City
Letters to the editor
I
t was 12 years ago today that
the United States was attacked.
Everyone knows the date and,
aside from the very young, remembers
where they were when they heard the
news.
It was an awful attack and forever
changed our nation. At first, there was
a galvanizing effect in which we all
stood together. Members of Congress
even stood on the steps of the U.S.
Capitol and sang “God Bless
America.” Today, the idea of such
unity is unthinkable. So what hap-
pened to us? Time and distance. And
yet today is a reminder of what tran-
spired that fateful morning and how it
showed the worst of humanity, and
then the best of humanity. Forever
etched in our minds should be the
effort of first responders who bravely
put their lives on the line to save as
many people as possible even with-
out knowing the full range of events
that were unfolding. The stories are
myriad and varied and we should think
of the gallant effort of that day.
But we should also remind ourselves
of the negative aspects as well. We
were attacked and innocent people
were killed. Families were ripped
apart and fathers, mothers, daughters
and sons were taken from their loved
ones. We must be resolute in our own
reminders of the meaning of those
attacks as the repercussions are with
us today. In the name of national
security, our privacy has been violat-
ed. In the name of national security,
we have engaged in two costly wars
— both in terms of finances and the
loss of life. Much has been done to
protect us and, for the most, the
actions have been successful. But not
all. It is still a work in progress and it
is key for us all to be mindful of what
type of society we wish to have as we
move ahead.
Much has changed over the past 12
years since the attack while many
things have remained the same. As we
remember Sept. 11, 2001, we should
be mindful of the sacrifice, of the loss
and the way we saw, in the days that
immediately followed those attacks,
that as Americans we have more in
common than differences.
Remembering Sept. 11, 2001
Food porn?
“W
hy should I be sensible when it prevents
me from being happy?” — Ashleigh
Brilliant.
Lots of food news lately — from people suing various
opportunistic facets of the food industry for false claims
on their food labels — to “Ten fresh way(s) to dress your
hot dog” as appeared in this newspaper on Aug. 30. But
the epitome of chutzpah was “The Day of Bacon” on Labor
Day weekend. When reading about it, one immediately
senses that this had to be a gimmick promoted by an
entrepreneur out to profit from people’s lack of dietary
prudence. I wonder how many bucks he squeezed out of the
pork industry for this blatant promotion of a product that
has long been on the “foods to avoid” list of cardiovascu-
lar physicians.
Obviously, the people
who go for this stuff are
not aware of — or they do
not care about — how the
animals are raised, treated
and slaughtered and how
the bacon is processed. Do
they realize how the
employees (often illegal
immigrants) are exploited,
how the offal from the ani-
mals and the processing
plants contaminates the
surrounding area? Does it
matter to them?
Obviously, they are not concerned about their health and
the health of the environment — only about what tastes
good right now.
If you read the hot dog article, you were informed that:
“It’s an exciting time to eat a hot dog.” Well, I guess
that’s one way to put it, but it seems to me that if you are
still eating hot dogs, in spite of all the advice against
ingesting processed meat, you haven’t been listening —
or you have been cavalierly ignoring any and all advice
about eating for health. Check out any list put out by
responsible researchers of foods to avoid and processed
meats are there.
Consider a report in the Sept. 6 “The Week” that asks
the question, “Does soda make kids violent? Researchers
from Columbia University, after interviewing the parents
of about 3,000 5-year-olds in 20 cities, found that “those
who consumed the most soda were twice as likely to get
into fights and destroy other people’s property as those
who didn’t consume soft drinks at all, once other possible
factors were ruled out.” And they add, “Previous research
has shown a similar link between soda consumption and
violent behavior among adolescents.”
Add this to all of the information lately about the ques-
tionable ingredients in sodas — from high fructose corn
syrup to those flavors and colorings that they have been
keeping secret. And it makes you wonder if we truly value
our children.
This all reminds of a regular feature in Nutrition Action
Healthletter titled “Food Porn.” Their latest contribution
is Denny’s new Macho Nacho Burger. How desperate can
those burger outlets be as they try to appeal to those who
are “manly” enough to ignore common sense advice about
their health. This burger contains 1,020 calories (half a
day’s worth) plus 25 grams of saturated fat and 2,170 mil-
ligrams of sodium (more than a day’s worth of each).
Arecent article in the newspaper informs that a study by
the University of Oklahoma School of Public Health
“shows 80 percent of U.S. teens are eating their way to
heart disease.” So who is responsible for all of this? Does
anyone really care? As long as we get to eat all of those
products that have been formulated to tempt us and the
industry laughs all the way to the bank, is that OK? Are
most of us living only for today and ignoring the implica-
tions for the future? Is it too much trouble to think about
these things? As the article reports: “All the health care
reform in the world won’t bring down American’s health
care costs if America’s teens — not to mention their par-
ents — don’t take better care of themselves.”
So how are teens going to learn about good nutrition?
Not in school and not from parents who are often over-
worked and so involved in their own activities and whose
diets are just as bad as their kids. During these very impor-
tant years of their lives nutritionally — growing fast and
often developing lifelong eating habits — teens are being
essentially let loose in the enticing milieu of junk food.
In our culture, where the overriding value is instant grat-
ification, corporate interests are secure in the knowledge
that there will be no concerted effort by consumers to
eschew their products and that those who will make an
effort to learn about good nutrition and eat accordingly
will hardly make a dent in their exorbitant profits. Is this
how to produce healthy American citizens?
“We cannot leave the trap until we know we are in it.”
— Marilyn Ferguson, “The Aquarian Conspiracy. ”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
W
hen it comes to selecting
who should serve on the
Hillsborough City
Elementary School District, there are
really no wrong answers. All four of
the candidates for three seats on the
board are top-notch with great ideas,
enthusiasm and community connec-
tions.
And there are not sweeping changes
needed at the board level.
Hillsborough schools are some of the
best, with high scores and innovative
course offerings. And even coming
out of a period in which cuts were nec-
essary, the district itself has come out
relatively unscathed and is looking at
seeing its revenue rise once again.
But choose one must. Lynne
Esselstein, Don Geddis and Kaarin
Hardy deserve your vote.
Esselstein is an incumbent and pro-
vides a certain amount of institutional
knowledge on a board that is seeing
two incumbents — Steven Koury and
Mary Ellen Benninger — opt out of
re-election. Esselstein has a quick
command of the district’s issues
including its finances as well as the
ability to place the district within the
state education ecosystem. Wi t h
Common Core curriculum changes and
the future planning initiative on the
horizon, Hillsborough schools would
be well-served by another term by
Esselstein.
Change will soon be a constant in
all California schools with the imple-
mentation of Common Core and
Hillsborough is already setting the
stage for that change by implement-
ing some of the teaching practices
early. With the future planning initia-
tive on deck as well for Hillsborough
schools, Hardy’s experience as a
change management consultant puts
her in a unique position to assist the
board and the district navigate some
of these changes. She is also fully
immersed in the town’s education
community through her work on par-
ent boards and schools foundation and
has been key in understanding how
the district best meet the challenge of
implementing Common Core. She
will be a great representative for col-
laboration.
Geddis has a Ph.D. in computer sci-
ence and is intrigued by the future
possibilities of technology in the
classroom. However, while excited by
it, he recognizes it as a tool and con-
siders exposure to a well-designed les-
son is paramount. In fact, his desire
for an emphasis on the importance of
developing persistence as a character
trait in addition to critical thinking
and presentation skills is a refreshing
thought. In addition, he would like to
emphasize communication so that
clear goals are established between
teachers, parents and students.
Wu also brings good ideas to the
table with her emphasis on wellness
and her desire to expand the district’s
offerings of world languages.
Each candidate would do a great job
on the board but the best candidates in
this particular election at this time of
great change is Esselstein, Geddis and
Hardy.
Esselstein, Geddis, Hardy for Hillsborough schools
Editorial
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,191.06 +127.94 10-Yr Bond 2.959 +0.062
Nasdaq 3,729.02 +22.84 Oil (per barrel) 107.25
S&P 500 1,683.99 +12.28 Gold 1,363.00
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stocks rose and oil prices fell
Tuesday as the risk that the U.S. would
attack Syria appeared to fade.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
had its sixth straight gain, the
longest winning streak since July.
Stocks set new highs in early
August, but worries over Syria have
pushed them lower since then. Even
though Syria isn’t a big oil producer,
the possibility of a wider conflict in
the region drove oil prices to two-year
highs last week.
On Tuesday, investors were relieved
that Syria accepted a proposal to put
its chemical weapons under interna-
tional control for dismantling. The
possibility that the crisis between the
U.S. and Syria might be solved peace-
fully was a factor in the stock market’s
gain on Monday, too.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 127.94 points, or 0.9 percent, to
close 15,191.06. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index rose 12.28 points,
or 0.73 percent, to 1,683.99 and the
Nasdaq composite rose 22.84 points,
or 0.62 percent, to 3,729.02.
Crude oil, which closed above $110
a barrel on Friday, lost $2.13, almost
2 percent, to close at $107.39 a bar-
rel.
All 10 industry groups in the S&P
500 rose. The biggest gains were in
financial and industrial stocks.
Despite the recent gains for stocks,
Ralph Fogel of Fogel Neale Partners
thinks it’s about time for a pullback in
the market. He noted that it’s close to
the five-year anniversary of the finan-
cial crisis, and the Dow has more than
doubled since then.
The years since the crisis brought
“almost a straight-up market without a
15 percent correction. That’s a pretty
neat move,” he said. “That doesn’t
mean you have to have one, but the
probability starts to get higher and
higher. ”
“The next significant move isn’t up
20” percent, he said. “It’s down 20.”
Scott Wren, a senior equity strate-
gist for Wells Fargo Advisors in St.
Louis, said investors are still nervous.
“A lot of our clients are sitting on
too much cash and are kind of paranoid
of the market,” he said. He expects
stock prices to be volatile over the
next few months because of the debate
over the U.S. debt ceiling as well as
elections in Germany.
Stocks rise as Syria conflict looks less likely
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Southwest Airlines Co., up 63 cents to $13.90
Passengers flew fewer miles on Southwest Airlines Co. in August but
they paid more per mile than a year ago.
PVH Corp., down $7.45 to $124.66
A financial outlook from the clothing company spooked investors.
Nike Inc., up $1.42 to $66.82
The athletic gear company is added to the Dow Jones industrial average,
part of a six-company shake-up that sees Bank of America, Hewlett-
Packard and Alcoa leaving the widely known barometer of the U.S.stock
market.
ConAgra Foods Inc., down $2.02 to $31.54
The maker of Chef Boyardee, Healthy Choice and Reddi-wip trimmed
its outlook for 2014 after a slow start to its fiscal year.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., down $11.53 to $494.64
Investors appear unimpressed after the tech giant unveils two distinct
versions of the latest iPhones.
Netflix Inc., up $18.91 to $313.06
The stock hits an all-time high after Virgin Media, a U.K. cable company,
said some of its U.K. customers would be able access the online movie
service.
E-Trade Financial Corp., up 59 cents to $17.10
The online broker gets an upgrade from Macquarie Equities Research,
seeing fatter dividends and debt paydown.
Urban Outfitters Inc., down $4.36 to $38.35
The specialty retailer says a key sales gauge may be weaker in the second
half of the year.
Big movers
REUTERS
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. employers adver-
tised fewer jobs in July but hired more work-
ers, a mixed sign that suggests only modest
improvement in the job market.
Job openings fell 180,000 in July to 3.7
million, the Labor Department said Tuesday.
That’s down from 3.9 million the previous
month, which was revised lower.
Overall hiring increased to 4.4 million, up
from 4.3 million in June and 4.17 million a
year ago. Still, hiring has fluctuated in recent
months and remains below the 5 million
pace before the recession.
Layoffs dropped to 1.5 million, the lowest
level on records dating back to 2001.
The latest data on job openings and
turnover in the workforce reaffirmed the
painfully slow but steady progress taking
place over the past three years. The economy
is adding jobs. But much of the improvement
has come from a drop in layoffs — not rapid
hiring. Employers added 169,000 net jobs
in August, and many fewer than previously
thought in July and June, the government
said Friday.
Employers posted fewer jobs,but hired more
By Paul Wiseman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The gulf between the
richest 1 percent and the rest of America is
the widest it’s been since the Roaring ’20s.
The very wealthiest Americans earned
more than 19 percent of the country’s house-
hold income last year — their biggest share
since 1928, the year before the stock market
crash. And the top 10 percent captured a
record 48.2 percent of total earnings last
year.
U.S. income inequality has been growing
for almost three decades. And it grew again
last year, according to an analysis of Internal
Revenue Service figures dating to 1913 by
economists at the University of California,
Berkeley, the Paris School of Economics and
Oxford University.
One of them, Berkeley’s Emmanuel Saez,
said the incomes of the richest Americans
surged last year in part because they cashed in
stock holdings to avoid higher capital gains
taxes that took effect in January.
In 2012, the incomes of the top 1 percent
rose nearly 20 percent compared with a 1 per-
cent increase for the remaining 99 percent.
Richest 1 percent earn biggest share since ’20s
Apple introduces two new iPhone models
CUPERTINO — Apple’s latest iPhones will come in a
bevy of colors and two distinct designs, a cheaper one
made of plastic and another that aims to be “the gold stan-
dard of smartphones” and reads your fingerprint.
Apple unveiled the latest iPhone models, available on
Sept. 20, during an event at its Cupertino headquarters.
The new iPhones arrive at a time when rival phones from
Samsung and other manufacturers are challenging Apple
in the competitive smartphone market. Research firm
Gartner Inc. estimates that Apple had a 14.4 percent share
of the world’s smartphone market in the second quarter of
this year, No. 2 behind Samsung’s 31.7 percent.
The lower-cost iPhone 5C will be available in five col-
ors — green, blue, yellow, pink and white. CEO Tim Cook
calls it “more fun and colorful” than any other iPhone.
The 5C has a 4-inch Retina display and is powered by
Apple’s A6 chip. It also has an 8 megapixel camera, live
photo filters and a rear cover that lights up.
The iPhone 5C will cost $99 for a 16 gigabyte model
and $199 for a 32 gigabyte model with a two-year wireless
contract.
Google loses appeal in Street View snooping case
SAN JOSE — Afederal appeals court said Google wrong-
ly collected people’s personal correspondence and online
activities through their Wi-Fi systems as it drove down
their streets with car cameras shooting photos for its
Street View mapping project.
The ruling that the practice violates wiretap laws sends
a warning to other companies seeking to suck up vast
amounts of data from unencrypted Wi-Fi signals.
“The payload data transmitted over unencrypted Wi-Fi
networks that was captured by Google included emails,
usernames, passwords, images, and documents,” wrote the
U.S. Court of Appeals in San Francisco in a report released
Tuesday.
Business briefs
<< Aldon Smith off to another great start, page 12
• Stanford prepares for Army bout , page 12
Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013
USA! USA! USA! : THE U.S. TAKES DOWN MEXICO, CLINCHES SPOT IN 2014 WORLD CUP >> PAGE 13
CSM women’s water polo strongest it’s ever been
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The way College of San Mateo
women’s water polo head coach
Randy Wright sees it, it takes a
team to replace a pair of All-
Americans.
That’s the task in front of the
Bulldogs as they prepare for 2013
season. Last year’s squad made
history. CSM finished second in
the tough Coast Conference and
earned its first
ever trip to the
postseason —
finishing tied for
fifth at Norcals.
They also boasted
two All-Americans
in Daria Kekuewa
and Miya Oto — who were the
heart and soul of the team.
But those two have moved on.
And what’s left, according to
Wright, is a team that has plenty
to look forward to.
“Lots of different faces, lots of
different places,” Wright said.
“It’s great. It’s promi si ng.
Clearly, the six girls that are on
the field, plus three, four subs
are better than any team I’ve
fielded in the past.”
The overall team strength is
CSM’s biggest weapon for the
new season. While there are still
a lot of unknowns, mostly
revolving around how the team
will gel in the pool, the sopho-
more core plus the influx of great
talent (coming from as far away
as Idaho) has Wright excited
about CSM’s prospects of dupli-
cating last season’s success.
“This season we have team
speed,” Wright said. “None of
them are close to Miya Oto. But
the average team speed is better
than it was last year. ”
Wright returns three solid pieces
to the puzzle in Erica Staben
(Menlo-Atherton), Jasmine
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Aragon’s first-year varsity vol-
leyball coach Kelsey Stiles said
her Dons’ squad is still trying to
find its identity as she continues to
mix and match players to find the
best combination.
Stiles, a 2005 Aragon graduate,
must be pushing the right buttons
because the Dons improved to 7-0
on the young season with a 25-22,
25-13, 25-18 sweep of visiting
Santa Teresa Tuesday afternoon.
“It was very sloppy,” Stiles said
of Tuesday’s match. “We’re still
trying to get everything together.
All of our big players (from last
year) are gone. It is a transition
(this season).”
The Dons appear to be transi-
tioning quite well. They opened
their season over the weekend at a
tournament in San Lorenzo, where
they went 6-0. Tuesday’s win
keeps the Dons’ winning streak
alive.
And despite the sweep of the
Saints, Aragon had to work for it.
The Dons had to battle back from
deficits in Games and 1 and 3, but
when they cut down on their
errors, Santa Teresa didn’t really
have an answer for the Dons.
Those errors, however, kept
things close, especially in Game
1. The Dons took a 6-4 lead in
Game 1 following a back-row kill
from Ryan Castillo, but Santa
Teresa responded with a 7-1 run to
take an 11-7 lead.
Trailing 13-8, Aragon won five
straight points to tie the game at
13 with Mel Moore’s two kills
sparking the run. Later, with the
score tied at 22, Santa Teresa com-
mitted three straight errors to hand
the game to the Dons.
Of the Saints 22 points in Game
1, 15 came off Aragon errors.
In Game 2, the Dons cut their
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One needed to only look at the
back of the T-shirts worn by the
Monta Vista girls’ tennis team to
know exactly what host
Burlingame was up against in its
season opener Tuesday.
In the left-hand column were the
years Monta Vista won the Central
Coast Section championship:
2003, 2004, 2005, 2007 and
2011. In the right-hand column
were the years the Matadors won
Northern California titles: 2003,
2004, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2011
and 2012.
Needless to say, the Panthers
had their hands full.
“Coach is crazy,” is how
Burlingame coach Bill Smith
responded to the question why
schedule Monta Vista — and
today’s opponent Menlo School,
which might be even more accom-
plished than Monta Vista.
On a serious note, Smith said
not only does it allow his players
to see what top-notch competition
looks like, but it also helps with
power points at the end of the sea-
son when it comes to the CCS
playoffs.
In the end, Monta Vista came
away with a 8-1 victory in a match
that featured four singles matches
and five doubles matches, since it
was a non-league match.
Despite the seemingly lopsided
result, Smith was actually pleased
with his team’s performance.
“I thought it would be a lot
worse,” Smith said. “We got some
moral victories.”
The Panthers even got an actual
victory as No. 2 singles player
See CSM, Page 16
County
college
updates
See page 13
INSIDE
Dons down Santa Teresa
Monte Vista dominates Panthers
Kiwis
blow
past
Oracle
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Maddie Lee passes the ball during Aragon’s three-set sweep over Santa Teresa.The win was the Dons’ seventh. See DONS, Page 14
By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Defending
America’s Cup champion Oracle
Team USAcould be in deep trouble
against scrappy Emirates Team
New Zealand.
The American powerhouse was
so soundly beaten by the Kiwis in
Race 5 Tuesday that Larry Ellison’s
syndicate had to call timeout.
Ellison, the software billionaire
who runs Oracle Corp., has made
crew changes before, and some
could be coming after a major
blunder by his team let Team New
Zealand speed off to a resounding
victory of 1 minute, 5 seconds on
San Francisco Bay on Tuesday.
Not long before the scheduled
start of Race 6, Oracle Team USA
radioed in to the race committee
that it was playing its one post-
ponement card of the regatta,
meaning the race was scrubbed
until Thursday.
The Kiwis crushed the momen-
tum Oracle gained with its heart-
stopping win in Race 4 on Sunday.
Team New Zealand leads 4 to
minus-1 and needs five more wins
to claim the oldest trophy in inter-
national sports for the Royal New
Zealand Yacht Squadron.
Oracle was docked two points by
an international jury and wing sail
trimmer Dirk de Ridder was booted
from the regatta in the biggest
cheating scandal in the 162-year
history of the America’s Cup. It
needs 10 wins to keep the Auld
Mug.
Skipper Jimmy Spithill said
Oracle Team USA needs to regroup
and make some changes. Whether
they’re to the 72-foot catamaran,
the crew or tactics — or all three —
remains to be seen. Oracle has
made numerous errors this regatta
and Team New Zealand continues
to make strong gains sailing
upwind.
Either way, it was a stunning
move for the well-funded, deep
sailing team that won the
America’s Cup in 2010.
After Oracle announced it was
playing its card, Spithill hopped
onto a chase boat and conferred
See CUP, Page 15 See TENNIS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Stanford coach David Shaw
sat his players down this week to make sure
they understood this year’s annual East
Coast trip carries special meaning.
Not because it’s crucial for the Cardinal to
get coaches out on distant recruiting trips,
which it is. Or because it will be the only
time friends and families
for some players can
attend a game this year,
which it will be.
No, it’s because of the
opponent: Army.
“We’re playing against
young men that are will-
ing to do some of the
things that we’re not
willing to do down the
road,” Shaw said Tuesday.
“Our freedom is in their hands. We love
them, we appreciate them.”
And this week, they will try to beat them.
The matchup between No. 5 Stanford (1-0)
and Army (1-1) at West Point on Saturday
has a historical significance for the Cardinal
and personal significance to Shaw.
In 1928, head coach and New York native
Glenn “Pop” Warner took Stanford east of
the Mississippi for the first time in a 26-0
loss against Army in front of some 86,000
fans at the old Yankee Stadium.
Shaw, whose father served in the Air Force
during the Vietnam War, also said about “10
to 12” of his current players — a roster with
roots in 30 states — have a family connec-
tion to the service academies.
Shaw has a cousin serving overseas in the
Army now, his grandfather was in the Navy
and he has a couple of aunts and uncles who
were in the military.
Willie Shaw, a former NFL and college
assistant coach who is often around the
Stanford team, said he enlisted in the Air
Force out of his San Diego high school
because he wanted to learn about electron-
ics. He served from 1962-66, including
stops all over Asia and the Far East, rising
to the rank of sergeant.
The war in Vietnam escalated shortly after
he enlisted, and the Air Force sent him over-
seas to fix computer systems in cockpits
and other armored electronic instruments.
“You look down and see a 500-pound
bomb strapped to a plane. We knew they
were going to be dropped on people,” Willie
Shaw said. “It’ll make you grow up real
fast.”
The most recent connection between
Stanford and Army football came on the
recruiting trail. Former two-way star Owen
Marecic, who was drafted in the fourth round
by the Cleveland Browns in 2011, chose the
Cardinal over the Black Knights.
Wide receiver Devon Cajuste also is
among several Stanford players with Army
ties. His sister served in the Army and Black
Knights linebacker Tyler McLees played for
a rival New York high school that would
always beat Cajuste’s team.
“I was waiting for this game for two years
because now it’s my turn,” Cajuste said.
The visit to West Point this week will also
include more than a game.
Stanford is taking a flight Thursday after-
noon to New York to allow for an extra day
to adjust to the time change, especially with
a 9 a.m. PDT scheduled kickoff. Shaw has a
bus tour organized around the gothic-style
buildings on campus Friday for his players
to learn about Army’s history before play-
ing near the banks of the Hudson River at
Michie Stadium on Saturday.
“I’m going to be a tourist for a little bit,”
Shaw said.
Stanford, which opened as a 30-point
favorite by Las Vegas bookmakers, should
have a distinct size advantage at the line of
scrimmage.
Army game has very special
meaning for Shaw, Stanford
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Quarterback Colin
Kaepernick and linebacker Patrick Willis
engaged in a friendly game of one-on-one
with a miniature basketball at one end of the
San Francisco 49ers’ locker room
Across the room, Aldon Smith leaned
back on a stool and waved off a suggestion
this week’s game against Seattle is any
more important than the others on the
schedule.
Five days before the 49ers play the
Seahawks in a matchup between division
rivals, the defending NFC champions could-
n’t be more relaxed.
Smith, especially, seems very calm.
After setting the franchise single-season
record for sacks a year ago, San Francisco’s
first-round pick in 2011 is off to another
fast start. He’s also increased his workload
and split time on both the right and left side
of the 49ers defense in Sunday’s win over
Green Bay.
“It was just giving me a chance to move
around a little bit,” Smith said Tuesday. “It
gives (opponents) something to game plan
for. We all know each other’s strengths and
weaknesses. Being able to move around just
helps out.”
Smith stayed almost exclusively at right
outside linebacker in 2012 when he broke
Fred Dean’s 28-year-old team record with 19
1/2 sacks and was voted to the Pro Bowl.
Those numbers, however, are slightly
misleading. After defensive end Justin
Smith went out with triceps and elbow
injuries which forced him to miss the final
two regular season games, Aldon Smith’s
production decreased significantly.
He was held without a sack over the final
three games, then was shut out in San
Francisco’s two playoff games and in the
Super Bowl.
Both Smiths looked fine in last week’s
season-opening 34-28 win over Green Bay.
Justin Smith had three tackles, while Aldon
Smith had six, including 1 1/2 sacks. He
also forced four hurries by Packers quarter-
back Aaron Rodgers.
Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson is a
completely different challenge than
Rodgers.
“We just have to make sure we’re on top of
our stuff, defending the run, defending the
option, then stopping the pass,” Smith
said. “We’ll make sure we focus on those
things so when game time comes we’re
ready. ”
When asked if it was good that the two
NFC West powerhouses, San Francisco and
Seattle, were meeting so early in the sea-
son, Smith seemed not interested.
“Uh, what about it?” he asked. “Just
another game.”
The rest of the 49ers aren’t so certain.
Smith off to another fast start
David Shaw
REUTERS
Aldon Smith, right, sacked Aaron Rodgers
twice in Sunday’s 34-28 win for the 49ers.
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
U.S. takes down Mexico, qualifies for 2014 Cup
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio — The United
States clinched its seventh straight
World Cup appearance, beating
Mexico 2-0 Tuesday night on sec-
ond-half goals by Eddie Johnson and
Landon Donovan before a raucous
red-white-and-blue-clad crowd that
stood and chanted from start to fin-
ish.
After withstanding Mexican pres-
sure for the first 20 minutes, the U.S.
settled in the match and got the
breakthrough in the 49th minute
when Johnson outjumped defender
Diego Reyes to meet Donovan’s cor-
ner kick 8 yards out and head the ball
past frozen goalkeeper Jesus Corona.
With Mexican shifting to an
offense-minded 3-4-3 formation, the
U.S. scored in the 78th following a
throw in when Mix Diskerud threaded
the ball across the middle. Clint
Dempsey got the slightest of touches
as he slid into the goalmouth, and
Donovan poked the ball in from 2
yards.
The U.S. (5-2-1) moved into first
place in the North and Central
American and Caribbean finals with
16 points, one
ahead of Costa
Rica (4-1-3),
which was held
to a 1-1 tie at
l a s t - p l a c e
Jamaica and also
clinched.
The top three
teams qualify,
and the U.S. had
to wait an hour
after the final whistle to learn it was
assured of a spot in the 32-nation
field for Brazil next June. But when
Honduras (3-3-2) held on for a 2-2 tie
against Panama (1-2-5) in
Tegucigalpa, the Americans had
grabbed a berth with two games to
spare.
Mexico (1-2-5) dropped into fifth
on goal difference and seems likely at
best headed to a playoff against
Oceania champion New Zealand.
U.S. players, many carrying
large American flags on sticks, cel-
ebrated their win with a lap around
the field, saluting the crowd the
whole way. Then they went to the
locker room to wait out the
Honduras game. About 1,000 fans
stuck around to watch on the
videoboard, chanting for Honduras.
Following wins over Mexico in
qualifiers by identical 2-0 scores at
Columbus Crew Stadium in 2001,
2005 and 2009, the U.S. Soccer
Federation picked the same venue for
this year’s match.
The capacity crowd of 24,584
taunted the Mexicans with chants of
“Dos a cero!” and “You’re not going
to Brazil!”
Fans were so loud during “The Star-
Spangled Banner” that anthem singer
Kayleigh Schofield was forced to
alter her tempo to match that of the
crowd.
Landon
Donovan
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Notre Dame de Namur’s Adriana
Cortes has kicked off the new soc-
cer season with a bang.
Cortes capped off her amazing
opening week by being named the
first women's soccer Pacific West
Conference Player of the Week for
the 2013 season.
Cortes was darn near unstop-
pable in NDNU's three games last
week (2-1 record), scoring five
goals and adding an assist.
Cortes scored five of the
Argonauts’ six goals for the week
while assisting on the other and
scoring both game-winners.
Through the first week of the
season, Cortes leads the confer-
ence in points and goals.
On the defensive side, NDNU’s
mens soccer goalkeeper, Jay
Tsuruoka started his junior season
out strong, earning the first Pacific
West Conference Defender of the
Week Award. Tsuruoka helped lead
the Argos to a 1-1 record, includ-
ing a five-save shutout against
CSU East Bay on Sunday. Tsuruoka
posted a .846 save percentage.
And finally in NDNU award
news, the Argonauts volleyball
team went 1-3 at the Springhill
Suites Invitational in Alaska last
weekend but that did not stop
freshman Dominique Tarrant from
taking home some hardware.
Tarrant burst onto the scene for
the Argos in the first matches of
her career, racking up double-digit
kills in all four matches.
She opened the tournament with
10 kills in a loss to American
International before turning in a
spectacular 22-kill performance
against Claflin — a match the
Argos won 3-1.
For the weekend, Tarrant totaled
60 kills, averaging 15 per match
and 4 per game. She also tacked on
49 digs, collecting at least 10 in
three of four matches.
Community College updates
The Skyline volleyball team
returns to the court Wednesday for
the BVC Classic. There, the Lady
Trojans will try to post their first
back-to-back win stretch in 2013
— this after beating Marin
College.
Actually, Skyline has yet to win
or lose consecutive games this
year. Before the Marin game, they
lost to Modesto College.
In the Marin win, Jacqueline
Brandt recorded 33 assists and 10
digs while Judy Viduya led the
offensive charge with 15 kills —
her highest output of the season
while hitting .333. In six games,
Viduya has tallied double-digit
kills three times.
The Skyline women’s soccer
team has hit a bit of lull. After
drawing 2-2 to begin the season,
with goals by Ileana Moncada to
lead the way, the Lady Trojans
were shutout twice by a combined
6-0.
It’s lining up to be a season of
growing pains for Skyline — with
only five sophomores on the cur-
rent roster.
Over at Cañada College, the
women’s volleyball posted an
opening day win over Monterey
Peninsula College 3-1 (27-29, 25-
20, 25-21, 25-21). While in men’s
soccer, Foothill blanked the Colts
3-0.
Menlo College volleyball
moves in NAIA rankings
Following a pair of wins over
two NAIApreseason top 20 oppo-
nents last weekend at the Menlo
College Volleyball Tournament,
the Lady Oaks find themselves
receiving votes in the first regular
season Tachikara-NAIAVolleyball
Coaches’ Top 25 Poll released
Tuesday by the NAIA’s national
office.
Menlo narrowly missed crack-
ing the top 25, receiving 63 total
points, good for 31st in the
nation.
The Lady Oaks sit at 4-3 on the
young season with impressive
wins over then No. 9 The Master’s
College and No. 20 CSU San
Marcos. Menlo also boasts an
impressive victory against Lewis-
Clark State who received votes in
the preseason poll.
The Lady Oaks have two more
non-conference matches on tap
before they kick off the 2013 Cal
Pac schedule with a tough test
against conference newcomer La
Sierra University Sept. 20.
Menlo hosts Mills College
Friday night and then welcomes
UC Santa Cruz Sept. 19.
Big first week for NDNU soccer, Menlo college VB moves up
Natalie Somers rallied from a one-set deficit
to pull out a 6-7(5), 6-2, (13-11) win over
Shwetha Bharadwaj.
The No. 1 doubles team of Lisa Patel and
Haley Shaffer also managed to win a set,
dropping a three-set decision to Jenna
McGuirk and Nicole Stomakhin 6-2, 2-6, 6-
3. The Panthers’ No. 5 doubles team of Pryia
Patel and Megan Reilly won their second set
to force Monta Vista’s Katherine Guo and
Anushka Tyagi to play a third set in the
Matadors’ 7-6(3), 3-6, (10-8) victory.
Smith’s biggest fear was getting com-
pletely swept away by the Matadors, thus
preventing him from getting a true evalua-
tion of his team. He believes the Panthers
may be a year away from challenging for the
Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division
championship, but expects to be in the mix
for one of the league playoff spots and a
spot in CCS.
Smith said Hillsdale could be the team to
beat this season. Rumors have it that the
Knights have arguably the best player on
the Peninsula back in the fold after she took
a year off. Another newcomer may push
reigning PAL tournament champion and
Daily Journal Tennis Player of the Year
Mariko Iinuma into the No. 3 singles spot.
Smith also expects Menlo-Atherton and
Aragon to also be battling for the league
title, along with Carlmont.
In reality, this could be one of the more
competitive Bay Division seasons the PAL
has seen in quite some time.
One of the best singles players this sea-
son could be Burlingame’s Alex Harrigan.
Although she lost in straight sets to Monta
Vista’s Aiswarya Sankar 6-2, 6-3, Harrigan
showed she has the power and all-around
court game to be in the mix for the individ-
ual PAL title this season.
“Alex is a lot better player, but it’s not
showing on the scorecard (against Sankar),”
Smith said.
Harrigan definitely had the groundstrokes
to play with Sankar, as well as deft net play.
What did her in Tuesday was her inability to
remain as consistent as Sankar. Too many
unforced errors doomed Harrigan.
Despite the very real possibility of start-
ing the season 0-2 — the Panthers have
never beaten Menlo — Smith doesn’t
believe it will have a detrimental affect on
his team.
“In tennis, I don’t think getting beat up, I
don’t think it destroys your will,” Smith
said.
Oscar De La Hoya admits
himself to rehabilitation
Oscar De La Hoya has admitted himself to
a treatment facility as he continues to fight
substance abuse, just days ahead of the big
fight his company is promoting between
Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Canelo Alvarez.
The former boxer issued a statement
Tuesday saying he voluntarily admitted
himself to an unnamed facility. The move
comes on the eve of the biggest fight of the
year for his promotion company in a fight
expected to be one of the richest in boxing
history.
“I will not be at the fight this Saturday to
cheer Canelo to victory since I have volun-
tarily admitted myself into a treatment facil-
i t y,” De La Hoya said in his statement. “I
explained this to Canelo and he understood
that my health and long term recovery from
my disease must come first.”
mistakes in half, which made them much
tougher to beat. Santa Teresa, which made
14 errors of its own in Game 1, couldn’t do
much better in Game 2, finishing with 10
errors.
Aragon, meanwhile, dominated the game.
Once the Saints cut their deficit to 10-8,
they managed to win only five more points
the rest of the way as Aragon’s serving came
to the forefront. The Dons finished with 10
aces for the match, five of which came in
Game 2.
Game 3 was close for a while before the
Dons pulled away. Santa Teresa led 14-9
before the Dons ripped off six unanswered
points to take a 15-14 lead.
An Aragon serve into the net only briefly
detoured the Dons’ efforts as they went on
win four more points in a row for a 20-15
advantage. Santa Teresa managed only three
more points the rest of the way — all com-
ing on Aragon errors.
“We have a really young team,” Stiles
said, pointing out she had two freshmen,
five sophomores and five juniors on the
team.
“But that excuse stops here.”
Tuesday’s match allowed Stiles to get her
entire team involved in the match as she
continues to evaluate the squad. A dozen
Dons finished with at least one kill, led by
Miranda Taylor’s eight. Mel Moore added
five, while Anna Joshni, Sarah Moore and
Miranda Brinkley each added four kills
apiece.
Taylor appears to be the Dons’ go-to
attacker this year and Stiles expects big
things from her. Taylor got off to a good
start with five kills in the first set, but she
struggled in Game 2. So much so Stiles sat
her down and had a little chat with her out-
side hitter.
The pep talk paid off as Taylor had three
thunderous kills in Game 3.
“She’s had a slump since we came into
season,” Stiles said, adding Taylor was her
club team’s top gun that competed in the
Junior Olympics this past summer.
“I just had to tell her to play her game.”
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame’s Natalie Somers lunges for a
return during her three-set win over Monta
Vista’s Shwetha Bharadwaj.
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
Continued from page 11
DONS
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
with syndicate CEO Russell Coutts,
who won the first two of his four
America’s Cups as skipper of Team
New Zealand in 1995 and 2000.
Spithill declined to recap that con-
versation.
“Oh, we were just talking about
rugby, weather,” Spithill cracked. “No,
I can’t, actually. I’d love to tell you, I
really would. But no.”
Asked how safe he feels, the
Australian said: “You can be a rooster
one day and a feather duster the next,
mate.”
It’s unlikely Spithill would get the
boot. Early speculation was that tacti-
cian John Kostecki, a San Francisco
native, could get subbed out.
Spithill was asked if Kostecki would
be on the boat Thursday, when Races 6
and 7 are scheduled.
“I can’t guarantee anything,” he
said. “I probably can’t guarantee I’ll be
on there. It’s too early to make a deci-
sion right now. It’s really part of the
reason why we played the card. We need
time to assess our program and the
boat. We need to get it heading in the
other direction. We’ve got time, fortu-
nately. There are a lot of races left.”
Kostecki usually attends post-race
news conference with Spithill. On
Tuesday, rising star Tom Slingsby, a
gold medalist for Australia at the
London Olympics and a strategist and
grinder for Oracle, accompanied the
skipper.
Spithill said he was just rotating
things around and it was too early to
say whether Kostecki would be
replaced.
Coutts said in a text to the
Associated Press that he didn’t think
replacing Kostecki was an option.
“But we might look at other
options,” Coutts said.
Kiwi skipper Dean Barker seemed a
bit stunned when Team New Zealand
was told Oracle was playing its card.
“Oracle just pulled the pin, boys,” he
told his crew. “Is that 100 percent?”
It was.
Continued from page 11
CUP
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 87 57 .604 —
Washington 75 69 .521 12
Philadelphia 66 78 .458 21
New York 64 79 .448 22 1/2
Miami 53 90 .371 33 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 84 60 .583 —
Pittsburgh 83 61 .576 1
Cincinnati 82 64 .562 3
Milwaukee 62 81 .434 21 1/2
Chicago 62 82 .431 22
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 85 59 .590 —
Arizona 72 72 .500 13
San Diego 66 77 .462 18 1/2
Colorado 67 79 .459 19
San Francisco 65 80 .448 20 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
San Diego 8, Philadelphia 2
Atlanta 4, Miami 3
Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 1
Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Pittsburgh 5,Texas 4
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 2
L.A. Dodgers 5, Arizona 3, 11 innings
Colorado 9, San Francisco 8
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 88 58 .603 —
Tampa Bay 78 65 .545 8 1/2
Baltimore 77 67 .535 10
New York 77 68 .531 10 1/2
Toronto 67 77 .465 20
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 83 62 .572 —
Cleveland 77 67 .535 5 1/2
Kansas City 76 69 .524 7
Minnesota 63 80 .441 19
Chicago 58 86 .403 24 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 83 61 .576 —
Texas 81 63 .563 2
Los Angeles 68 76 .472 15
Seattle 65 80 .448 18 1/2
Houston 49 96 .338 34 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Kansas City 6, Cleveland 3
N.Y.Yankees 7, Baltimore 5
L.A. Angels 12,Toronto 6
Boston 2,Tampa Bay 0
Pittsburgh 5,Texas 4
Detroit 9, Chicago White Sox 1
Minnesota 4, Oakland 3
Houston 13, Seattle 2
NFL
NFL—FinedDetroit DTNdamukongSuh$100,000
for his illegal low block of Minnesota C John Sulli-
van in a Sept.8 game.Suspended free agent S Tom
Zbikowski four games for violating the league’s
policy on performance-enhancing substances and
free agent CB Brandon McDonald two games for
violating the league’s personal conduct policy.
BUFFALOBILLS—Signed CB Johnny Adams from
the practice squad. Released DT Jay Ross. Signed
DB Brandon Smith to the practice squad.
DALLAS COWBOYS—Released LB Alex Alrbight
and S Eric Frampton from the injured reserve list.
KANSASCITYCHIEFS—ReleasedOLTommieDra-
heim from the practice squad. Signed DT Jordan
Miller to the practice squad.Terminated the prac-
tice squad contract of OT Matt Reynolds.
MINNESOTAVIKINGS—Signed RB Joe Banyard
to the practice squad. Released DE Tristan Ok-
palaugo and RB Bradley Randle from the practice
squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Placed RB Shane
Vereen on the injured reserve/return list.Re-signed
TE Matthew Mulligan.Signed DL A.J.Francis to the
practice squad. Released WR Quentin Sims from
the practice squad.
NEWYORKGIANTS—Signed RB Brandon Jacobs.
NEWYORKJETS—Re-signed WR Ben Obomanu.
Released LB Scott Solomon.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX—ActivatedRHPClayBuchholz
from the 60-day DL. Designated RHP Jose De La
Torre for assignment.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Activated INF Howie
Kendrick off the 15-day DL.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
TRANSACTIONS NATIONAL LEAGUE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 1 0 0 1.000 23 21
Miami 1 0 0 1.000 23 10
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 18 17
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 21 23
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 21 17
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 16 9
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 31 28
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 2 28
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 21 24
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 9 16
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 10 23
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 28 2
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
San Diego 0 1 0 .000 28 31
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 17 21
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 27
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 31
Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 33
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 36
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27
NFL GLANCE
Thursday,Sep.12
N.Y. Jets at NewEngland, 8:25p.m.
Sunday,Sep.15
Dallas at Kansas City, 1p.m.
Tennesseeat Houston, 1p.m.
Washingtonat GreenBay, 1p.m.
Minnesotaat Chicago, 1p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1p.m.
SanDiegoat Philadelphia, 1p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1p.m.
Clevelandat Baltimore, 1p.m.
Carolinaat Buffalo, 1p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05p.m.
NewOrleans at TampaBay, 4:05p.m.
Jacksonvilleat Oakland, 4:25p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 4:25p.m.
SanFranciscoat Seattle, 8:30p.m.
NFL SCHEDULE
16
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
650-354-1100
by
Zaldivar and Kelly Dwyer (Terra
Nova). The trio will fuel a new
approach to defense — one that
shifts from a lot of zone to a more
aggressive style in 2013.
“This year is a lot more pressing
defenses,” Wright said. “This year,
I have three or four girls [on the
bench] that are ready to go.
They’re hungry for minutes. So,
let’s increase our aggressive play
and really press down and force
turnovers. Limit the shots. Now,
it’s game on. Let’s force
turnovers. Let’s get steals. And
let’s team counter. We’re com-
pletely different. We’re complete-
ly changed. And the change
absolutely fits the personnel.”
All three sophomores provide
Wright with consistent play —
with Zaldivar being the most reli-
able of the trio. “You get what you
get with Jasmine,” Wright said,
“and that’s a very high level of
play.”
Wright said Dwyer has grown a
lot over the offseason — focusing
a lot more on the mental aspect of
her game and building her confi-
dence.
What’ll be important for this
trio is having one step up and pro-
vide the leadership that Oto and
Kekuewa provided last year.
“I’m the leader right now, ”
Wright said. “Until I can identify a
player and see if they have those
leadership qualities, it’s going to
be my way. We’re going with a
very systematic approach on
offense because we haven’t played
together, and a lot of them haven’t
played at this level. I don’t want
the freedom at this point. I want
things to be a little more step by
step.”
The step by step approach
comes from seven freshman on
this year’s team. The most prom-
ising of the group is Shelby
Chung from Sonora. “She’s the
real deal,” Wright said. “She can
score. She has great goal aware-
ness.” He added that Chung has the
potential to be one of the best
players in the conference.
Chung highlights a new class
that consists of great raw talent in
players like Melissa Chatelain
(Sequoia), Kaila Clark (Half Moon
Bay) and Kacee Johnson.
But the most important is prob-
ably Ashley Mullany (Terra Nova),
who takes over for Kekuewa in
goal.
“When you have two years of
All-NorCal, All-American goalie,
it really makes you jaded on the
type of analysis you give to your
freshman goalie,” Wright said,
adding he’s had to redirect his cen-
tral defense and be more aggres-
sive on the perimeter to try and
limit quality shots on goal.
CSM jumps into the pool next
Tuesday with a huge match right
out of the chute. They’ll take on
Delta before facing Modesto at the
West Valley tournament. The
matches are big as far as postsea-
son implications are concerned. If
there a tie at the end of the year,
head-to-head results is the first
tiebreaker — Modesto and Delta
play in the Big 8 conference.
Continued from page 11
CSM
Twins slow down A’s, 4-3
Giants blow six-run lead
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MINNEAPOLIS — Josh
Willingham hit two home runs,
including a two-run shot in the
eighth that put the Twins in front for
good, to lead Minnesota past the
Oakland Athletics 4-3 Tuesday night.
Oswaldo Arcia also homered for the
Twins, who snapped Oakland’s three-
game winning streak and prevented
the A’s from stretching their two-
game lead over Texas in the ALWest.
They also spoiled a solid outing by
A’s starter Jarrod Parker, who tossed
six strong innings and stretched his
unbeaten streak to 19 starts.
Despite giving up homers to
Willingham and Arcia, Parker
appeared to be on the verge of earn-
ing his 12th win. But Arcia singled
off reliever Sean Doolittle to lead off
the eighth. Doolittle struck out Ryan
Doumit before being pulled for Ryan
Cook (6-4), and Willingham fol-
lowed by launching a 2-0 pitch an
estimated 439 feet into the middle
deck for his second multi-homer
game this season.
Anthony Swarzak (2-2) pitched a
scoreless eighth to pick up the win
on his 28th birthday, and Glen
Perkins pitched the ninth for his
34th save in 38 chances.
Twins starter Liam Hendriks
worked 5 1-3 innings and matched
his career high with six strikeouts.
He had a one-run lead for most of
those innings thanks to
Willingham’s second-inning solo
shot. But Alberto Callaspo sent a 1-1
pitch 384 feet into the right-field
seats after Hendriks hit Yoenis
Cespedes to lead off the fifth and give
the A’s a 2-1 lead.
Hendriks hit another batter,
Brandon Moss, the next inning and
Cespedes followed with a run-scor-
ing single to put Oakland up 3-1.
Parker finally got into trouble in
the sixth after Arcia led off with a
monster homer to right. Three of
Minnesota’s next four batters
reached to load the bases for Pedro
Florimon.
But after a meeting on the mound,
A’s manager Bob Melvin elected to
leave Parker in the game, and the 24-
year-old righty induced Florimon
into a double play to end the threat.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Michael
Cuddyer hit a tiebreaking homer
leading off the ninth inning to go
with his three-run shot, and the
Colorado Rockies rallied from an
early six-run deficit to beat the San
Francisco Giants 9-8 on Tuesday
night.
Cuddyer sent a 3-2 pitch from
Sergio Romo into the left-center
seats for his 20th homer of the sea-
son, 10th career multihomer game
and second this year. He also con-
nected in Colorado’s five-run fifth
to spark the comeback.
Hunter Pence produced some
impressive slugging himself, hit-
ting a three-run homer in the first,
an RBI double in the fourth and a
tying, two-run single in the eighth
against winner Wilton Lopez (3-4).
Pence matched his career high
with six RBIs. He also drove in six
runs on Aug. 12, 2009, at Florida
with Houston.
Sergio Romo (4-7) gave up
Cuddyer’s go-ahead homer, though
much of the sellout crowd of 41,171
was already long gone by the late
innings. The game ended at 11:17
p.m. after 4 hours, 2 minutes.
Rex Brothers finished for his
16th save in 18 chances to end the
longest nine-inning game of the
season for each club.
Twins 4, A’s 3
Rockies 9, Giants 8
FOOD 17
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By W. Wayt Gibbs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
When you head off to the shore, the woods,
or a tailgate party at the stadium, you don’t
have to settle for preservative-filled hot dogs
or overcooked burgers.
Live a little, and take along a few inch-
thick strip steaks, or maybe some fresh
salmon or chicken fillets. Rest easy, because
cooking the meat to perfection will be a
snap. And the best tool for the job is the very
container you’ll use to carry the food: a big,
insulated ice chest. You’ll also want to pack a
digital thermometer — and a blowtorch, if
you have one.
When relaxing outdoors, we’re in no hurry.
But cooking over the intense heat of a fire or
grill is unforgiving; time things wrong by
just a minute or two, and the window of
opportunity for a perfectly medium-rare steak
or a just-done salmon fillet will have closed.
As long as you have plenty of water and a
way to heat it, however, you have a better
alternative: transform that insulated cooler
from an improvised fridge into an improvised
hot water bath for cooking your food. Then
you can cook your meat the way high-end
chefs do, or sous vide, as they say in the
restaurant world.
I realize that this idea strikes some people
as funky, but it’s simple. Here’s how it works.
You fill the cooler with hot water. You place
your meat in a sealed plastic bag. Add the
bagged meat to the cooler, then walk away.
The hot water slowly, evenly, perfectly
cooks the meat to your desired doneness.
First, a few guidelines. The cooler and meat
should be warmed to room temperature before
you start. To maintain the temperature during
cooking, plan on using about 8 quarts of
water per steak or fillet, and dump in water
that is a good 15 F warmer than the final tem-
perature you want the center of the meat to
achieve. The recipe below lists final target
temperatures for several good options.
During the entire cooking time, the food
stays safely sealed in plastic bags, which
lock in the cooking juices and keep out the
water and anything that might be living on
the walls of the ice chest.
Though the meat will take longer to cook
in the bath than it would on the grill, that
gives you time to hang out with friends and
family. And as long as you don’t use water
that is too hot, it is almost impossible to
overcook the food. Just make sure, for safe-
ty’s sake, that you use whole cuts (no ground
meat, such as hamburger or sausage) and that
the food gets eaten within four hours of put-
ting it into the water.
No matter how hot the water is, it won’t
sear the meat. That’s where the blowtorch
comes in. Torches fueled by MAP or propy-
lene gas burn more cleanly than those that
run on butane or propane. Sweep the tip of
the flame across the surface of the meat in
quick, even strokes until an appetizing
brown crust forms. The interior will still be
done to perfection, virtually edge to edge.
Season with some flaky salt and melted but-
ter, and you’ll completely forget that you’re
roughing it.
COOKING MEAT
SOUS VIDE IN A COOLER
If you have time to brine the salmon in
advance, you can refrigerate it for 3 to 5 hours
in a mixture of 4 1/4 cups water, 4 1/2 table-
spoons salt and 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar.
Start to finish: 1/2 to 1 1/2 hours (varies
depending on thickness and variety of meat)
Servings:
Two 1.1-pound (500 grams) beef strip
steaks
OR
2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) boneless chicken
breast
OR
2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) fillets of salmon,
halibut or black cod
1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil
2 tablespoons butter
Flaked sea salt
Drain and wipe down a large, insulated
cooler, then let it come to room temperature.
Bring the meat to room temperature as well.
Select a target final temperature for the
meat.
For beef strip or rib-eye steak — 144 F for
medium, 133 F for medium-rare, 129 F for rare
For beef filet — 144 F for medium, 127 F
for medium-rare, 122 for rare
For chicken breast — 140 F for medium,
and hold at this temperature for at least 20
minutes to pasteurize
Salmon fillet — 113 F for rare, 126 F for
firm
Once you select your target final tempera-
ture, add 15 F to that. This is the temperature
to which you must heat your water. For exam-
ple, to cook a beef strip steak medium rare
(133 F), the water should be heated to 15 F
above that, or 148 F. Heat 8 quarts of water
per piece of meat to the temperature you cal-
culated, dump it into the cooler, and close the
lid tightly.
Wash your hands well with soap. Place each
steak, breast or fillet in an individual zip-
close plastic bag. Add about 1 tablespoon of
cooking oil to each bag.
It is important to remove as much air as
possible from each bag so that it does not
float and the water can transmit heat to every
part of the food. Before sealing the bags,
open the cooler. One at a time, hold each bag
For precision cooking fire up the ... cooler?
Fill a cooler with hot water, place your meat in a sealed plastic bag, adddd the bagged meat
to the cooler and then walk away.The hot water slowly,evenly,perfectly cooks the meat to your
desired doneness.
See COOLER, Page 18
18
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD/LOCAL
EXPIRES: September 30, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
by its open end and slowly lower it into the
water until the water level is just below the
seal. The water will push the air out of the
bag.
Seal the bag tightly. The sealed bag should
sink. Repeat with the remaining bags of
food. Space the food in the bottom of the
cooler so that water can circulate easily
around each bag.
Close the cooler lid firmly, and cook until
the meat warms to the target temperature.
Expect inch-thick steaks to reach medium-
rare in 50 to 60 minutes; salmon fillets of
that thickness may take only 20 minutes.
Chicken breast may reach 140 F in 30 to 40
minutes, but must be held at that temperature
or higher for at least 20 minutes more in
order to pasteurize them.
Remove the meat from the bags and place
it on a rack or baking sheet. If you want to
sear the surface of the meat, sweep the flame
of a blowtorch over each side in a series of
quick, even passes, or place it on a very hot
grill until browned.
Season generously with salt and serve
immediately.
Continued from page 17
COOLER
teristic drop in HCSD STAR performance in
a math section below the state benchmark,
the current curriculum emphasizes math
with class time at 65 minutes each day. This
enhances problem-solving strategies by
students and collaboration among teachers
for students’ mastery of concepts and appli-
cations.
What changes would you like to see
at the board level?
Lynne Essel st ei n: We have an excel-
lent board right now and have prepared a
solid foundation for integrating new mem-
bers in November. Recently, we took time
to review, update and publically adopt our
governance norms, reaffirming the values of
transparency, communication, integrity,
respect and teamwork that we rely on to
work well together.
Don Geddis: Much board activity, by
necessity, focuses on budgets, regulations
and personnel. I would like additional board
effort on an overall educational vision.
Fortunately the district has recently begun a
strategic planning process, to which I’m
eager to contribute my strengths.
Kaarin Hardy: Over the last four years,
the board focused on a balanced budget in a
difficult economy. The board spent consid-
erable time with budget cuts and personnel
issues. The upcoming strategic planning
initiative will allow the board to more
deeply consider our future and our communi-
ty’s commitment to excellence in educa-
tion.
Pearl Wu: As an avid parent volunteer for
my three children’s classes, and as a sea-
soned physician leader and community
health advocate, I add insight, leadership
skills on innovation, high IQ /EQ and mul-
ticultural elements to the school board. My
focus is on transparency and accountability
for superior performance on the board.
Do you feel there is an appropri ate
amount of high-tech learning?
Lynne Essel st ei n: Technology is a
tool; it cannot replace good teaching. It can
enhance content learning and critical think-
ing, but it’s not an end in itself. We know
more technology is coming to the class-
room. Defining the “appropriate amount” is
something I look forward to exploring with
the community during HCSD Forward.
Don Geddi s: Hillsborough already
incorporates a significant amount of tech-
nology into the existing curriculum.
Improvement is always possible, but the
current offerings are strong. There are smart
boards in every classroom, and extensive
technology in the Innovation Labs. I would
have computers help more in areas such as
rote memorization.
Kaarin Hardy: Yes — but we can always
do more. Our curriculum incorporates robot-
ics and innovation labs at the elementary
level and our middle school students produce
a daily news show in our state-of-the-art stu-
dio. As we adopt the [Common] Core cur-
riculum, we will need to invest further in
how our children use technology.
Pearl Wu: Plenty of high-tech learning
occurs at the Hillsborough schools that
stimulate the students’ love of learning.
From the smart boards to computer labs for
kindergartners to play with geometric
shapes, to the Crocker eighth graders’ sub-
stantial Web/YouTube researches on their
Share projects, high-tech learning comes
alive in a thriving community.
Continued from page 8
DISTRICT
“If [equal benefits] is a value the county
has then that’s a value the county has,”
Horsley said. “I don’t care if it is a problem
in other states.”
Horsley said if the U.S. military must now
offer the benefits regardless of state law, the
same can be true for companies employed
by San Mateo County.
Ultimately, a review of the Workday con-
tract showed the company will offer equal
benefits except where prohibited by local
law.
But while the potentially discriminatory
situation with Pleasanton-based Workday
was remedied, the supervisors said they need
to be prepared for future issues that could
arise out of doing business beyond the
county’s borders. The Workday contract
involves software in the cloud which means
assigned employees could be located in
states or countries that do not favor — or
even outright ban — benefits to same-sex
partners.
Supervisor Adrienne Tissier said the coun-
ty must walk a tough fine line because it
can’t tell a global company what to do with-
out risking removal from the entire cloud
market.
“So does the county stay in the Dark
Ages?” Tissier asked.
Horsley and County Manager John
Maltbie said it would be unusual for a state
to interfere with a private company’s busi-
ness, including benefit policies.
Workday representative Seth Catalli said
the company has no intention of not offer-
ing the benefits where it can but that, for
example, in Virginia where its attorney
lives, the state is asking state universities
and colleges to stop guaranteeing equal
treatment. Catalli also pointed to recent
refusals by the National Guard in some
states to abide by the federal law change.
Workday couldn’t point out specific states
where such a state ban is in place but said
within the five years of the contract the
political climate could lead to changes.
Aside from the concerns over benefits, the
contract received praise from county super-
visors who appreciated it as a pilot program
for the county’s reorganization into a so-
called “agile workforce.”
The existing system is 20-plus years old
and has done an “admirable” job but is due
for replacement with an integrated plan that
uses newer technology to prevent large
peaks and valleys of modernization
between the pieces, said Jon Walton, the
county’s chief information technology offi-
cer.
Nine of the county’s current custom-built
systems are so old they are no longer sup-
ported.
Walton said the cloud system also pro-
tects it from loss in case of a local disaster.
Full implementation is expected to take
two years and cost $13.96 million. The
price tag includes up to $3.8 million for
subscription to Workday, professional serv-
ices up to $4.4 million and $177,680 for
training on the new system. Funding will
come from a combination of payroll
reserves that have been set aside for years
and non-department reserves, according to
Maltbie.
After three years, the annual subscription
cost is estimated at $851,000, said project
manager Mike Murphy.
Continued from page 1
UPGRADE
versity’s first significant foray outside its
main campus. The project will carry numer-
ous community benefits from $260 million
in ancillary spending on top of a $15 mil-
lion development deal to underground power
lines and establish a shuttle to Caltrain, the
officials said.
The development is projected out 30 years
but essentially calls for replacing the for-
mer Excite@Home campus at Mid-
Technology Park with up to 1.518 million
square feet of building spaces and approxi-
mately 4,500 parking spaces. The existing
eight office and research and development
buildings will be demolished to make way
for a medical clinic and offices.
As work goes forward on the 35-acre cam-
pus bisected by Broadway and bound in part
by Highway 101, Councilwoman Rosanne
Foust said the city needs to be defensive in
communicating its needs to the university
and the community especially neighboring
Friendly Acres, Redwood Village and North
Fair Oaks.
Although the council is happy about the
potential financial benefits to Redwood
City, Councilman Jeff Ira said it’s important
to move beyond the money and “create
something priceless with Stanford.”
Without naming a specific entity, Ira said
the city is home to at least one company
that has little ties and makes no effort with-
in the community. Stanford, he said, is dif-
ferent.
“We do have a corporate citizen coming to
Redwood City that is going to be a true part-
ner for many years to come,” Ira said.
Community Development Director Bill
Ekern said Redwood City has become a
premier entertainment destination and
project-related improvements like a street
car on Broadway will add to the existing
draws. Programs through the graduate
business school will also benefit the resi-
dents.
More information on both, along with an
outline for the process of penciling out the
community funding allocations, will come
back to the City Council at a future meeting,
City Manager Bob Bell said.
Continued from page 1
STANFORD
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
As satisfying as it is to eat freshly
picked apples straight up and
unadorned, the chill of fall makes it
equally tempting to head back to the
kitchen and bake them into a pie.
But that’s where most people get
tripped up. They fear a fussy pie crust.
They loath a long baking time or a per-
snickety filling. So we decided to come
up with an easy apple tart that uses a
fuss-free crust and comes together in
under an hour. Even better — because
the filling is only gently cooked on
the stovetop, the apples retain more of
their crisp, fresh, just-picked flavor.
EASY AUTUMN APPLE TART
Start to finish: 1 hour
Servings: 12
14 tablespoons (1 3/4 sticks)
unsalted butter, room temperature
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
4 apples, peeled, cored and sliced
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup apple cider
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon water
Heat the oven to 400 F. Coat an 11-
inch removable bottom tart pan with
baking spray.
In a food processor, combine the
butter, sugar and 1/4 teaspoon of the
salt. Pulse several times. Add the flour
and pulse to combine, scraping down
the sides of the work bowl as needed.
Transfer the dough to the prepared pan.
Press the dough evenly across the bot-
tom and up the sides of the pan. Poke
the bottom all over with a fork. Bake
for 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden
brown.
While the crust bakes, make the fil l-
ing. In a large skillet over medium-
high heat, combine the apples, vine-
gar, brown sugar, cider, cinnamon and
the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt.
Cook, gently stirring to promote even
cooking but without breaking the
apples, until just tender, about 10 to
12 minutes.
In a small glass, mix together the
cornstarch and water. Add to the apples
and cook, stirring gently, for 2 min-
utes, or until thickened.
When the crust and apples are
cooked, spoon the apples into the
crust, arranging them in concentric
circles if desired. Pour any extra juices
over the surface of the apples. Serve
warm or room temperature.
Nutrition information per serving:
270 calories; 120 calories from fat (44
percent of total calories); 14 g fat (9 g
saturated; 0 g trans fats); 35 mg cho-
lesterol; 36 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber;
19 g sugar; 2 g protein; 85 mg sodium.
Apple pie in an hour? As easy as it is delicious
Former Greenbrier chef
stars in ‘Recipe Rehab’
By Vicki Smith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — He’s competed in the culinary
Olympics, led a team at a global cooking competition in
France and produced countless photo-wor-
thy dishes for guests at southern West
Virginia’s world-class resort, The
Greenbrier.
But Richard Rosendale, one of TV’s
newest celebrity chefs, says his greatest
challenges come on the set of “Recipe
Rehab,” a Saturday morning show that
begins airing Sept. 28 on CBS.
On the show, families submit a favorite
high-calorie recipe. Two chefs then com-
pete to crank out healthier, lower-calorie
versions — and make them easy for amateurs to duplicate.
“Some of the recipes taste really good, but they’re laden
with fat and sugar and sodium and calories,” Rosendale said.
“Every recipe that was on the show, it was like, ‘Yikes! This
is going to be interesting.”’
Rosendale, U.S. captain for the international competition
Bocuse d’Or in France earlier this year, faces off against
California chef Vikki Krinsky throughout 11 episodes.
“Though I have a lot of competition experience, she’s an
expert in nutrition. And here I am cooking with butter, ”
Rosendale said. “But it was an even playing field.”
They shot four episodes a day, a pace requiring snap deci-
sions on how to rehabilitate a meal.
The importance of his work was never lost on Rosendale,
a native of Uniontown, Pa., who worked in Pittsburgh before
opening a restaurant in Columbus, Ohio. In 2009, the now-
38-year-old father of two boys moved to Lewisburg in south-
ern West Virginia — a state struggling with an obesity epi-
demic.
In the 2011-12 school year, nearly 28 percent of fifth-
graders screened by West Virginia University were consid-
ered obese. So are nearly one-third of West Virginia adults,
according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
“There are a lot of great cooking shows out there that are
entertaining,” Rosendale said. “But if I can do something
that’s also going to serve a purpose, I want to do that.”
Nationwide, more than 23 million children and teenagers
are considered overweight or obese, and Illinois-based
Action for Healthy Kids says the numbers are “trending in a
scary direction.”
If childhood obesity isn’t curbed, said spokesman
Matthew Smith, 39 states can expect that more than 50 per-
cent of their adult population will be obese by 2030. And
studies show that children are more sedentary than ever,
spending hours a day on TV, computers, tablets and phones.
“But TV can still pay a role and does play a role in educa-
tion,” Smith said. “Any way we can get a message out that
talks about healthy eating, about balanced eating, about
active lifestyles ... is a positive. “
Rosendale pointed out that many cooking shows focus on
dishes beyond either the imagination or skill set of a typical
TV viewer. “So rather than come up with dishes that people
probably aren’t going to eat,” he said, “why not recreate
what people are already eating?”
Richard
Rosendale
When the crust and apples are cooked, spoon the apples into the crust, arranging them in concentric circles if desired.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11
RSVP Deadline for Newcomers
Club. Sakota, 2198 Broadway,
Redwood City. Luncheon at noon,
Tuesday, Sept. 17. Karen Mead and
Nancy McFarland of the Assistance
League of San Mateo County will
speak about their various philan-
thropic programs, including
Turnstyle Thrift Shop. $25, send to
Janet William, 1168 Shoreline Drive,
San Mateo. For more information
call 286-0688.
Russell Bede School tour. 9 a.m.
446 Turner Terrace, San Mateo.
Russell Bede School helps elemen-
tary-age children whose learning
decisions make mainstream schools
a challenge. Prospective parents,
therapists, pediatricians, school
directors and principals are wel-
come. Please call 579-4400 to sched-
ule a spot for the tour.
Free Blood Pressure and $2 Blood
Glucose. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Senior
Focus, 1720 El Camino Real, suite 10,
Burlingame. Eight-hour fast, water
and meds only, delay diabetes
meds. Drop-in. For more information
call 696-3660.
Sons in Retirement (Branch 1)
luncheon. Noon. Elks Lodge, 229 W.
20th Ave., San Mateo. Guest speaker
Bill Reed will discuss the next cold
war in the Arctic. All retired men are
welcomed. For more information
call 341-8298.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Launch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Admission is
free but lunch costs $17. For more
information call 430-6500 or go to
www. sanmateoprofessi onal al -
liance.com.
JVS Peninsula Orientation and
Enrollment Session. 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. Peninsula JCC, 800 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. For more informa-
tion email jcowan@jvs.org.
Free job interview skills work-
shop. 2 p.m. San Mateo Main
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
To register call 522-7818. For more
information contact Eric Groth at
egroth@cityofsanmateo.org.
Teen (Low-budget) Movie:
‘Napoleon Dynamite.’ 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. PG, 82 minutes.
For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
‘Water Water’ show. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Main Gallery, 1018 Main St.,
Redwood City. This exhibit will run
through Oct.13. There will be a free
reception on Saturday, Sept. 14 from
4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
‘Productive Learning and Leisure
with Ann McGinnis.’ 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Dave Checutti Room locat-
ed at 450 Poplar Ave., Millbrae. Free.
For more information call 588-0180.
Choir Sings Spirituals and
American Folk Hymns. 7 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Messiah Lutheran Church,
1835 Valota Road, Redwood City.
Experience the joy and satisfaction
of singing with a vibrant communi-
ty of faith. For more information
email jon.siapno@gmail.com.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Veterans Memorial Senior
Center, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. The process of chip
budding, amongst other things, will
be discussed. Free. For more infor-
mation go to www.peninsularos-
esociety.org or call 465-3967.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 12
Workshop: The Basics of San
Mateo County Housing Elements.
10 a.m. to noon. Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, 1300 El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Josh
Abrams, consultant at Community
Planning Collaborative, will provide
an overview of housing elements
and answer questions. To register or
receive more information call 872-
4444 ext. 2.
Neighbor Law. Noon. San Mateo
County Law Library, 710 Hamilton
St., Redwood City. Learn how to be a
good neighbor. Free. For more infor-
mation call 363-4913.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Despicable Me.’ 3:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
Middle School Ice Cream Social.
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Must show student identification,
homework or something that shows
what school you attend. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Samaritan House’s Annual
Volunteer Recognition. 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 1221 Chess
Drive, Foster City. Volunteers who
participate in all aspects of service
at Samaritan House will be honored
at this event.
Empowering Youth Initiative
Community Briefing and Panel
Discussion. 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Franklin Templeton Investments, 1
Franklin Parkway. $25. For more
information email
srandazzo@pcrc.org.
Managing Talent for
Organizational Success — HR
Business Partner Series. 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. Sequoia, 1850 Gateway
Drive, Suite 600, San Mateo. Learn to
use metrics to measure financial
payback from three aspects of your
talent management plan: onboard-
ing, employee engagement and tal-
ent retention. General: $35, free for
NCHRA members. For more informa-
tion visit www.nchra.org.
Heart Partners. 5:45 p.m. to 7:15
p.m. Burlingame Center, Conference
Room G, 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. For cardiac patients
and their families. For more informa-
tion call 654-9966.
Sense of Place — Art Reception. 6
p.m. The Studio Shop, 244 Primrose
Ave., Burlingame. The Studio Shop is
presenting artist Melinda Cootsona.
For more information email
julie@thestudioshop.com.
Planning and Preparing College
Visits. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Enerspace
Coworking, Suite 100, 2225 E.
Bayshore Road, Palo Alto. Janice
Caine will provide guidance on put-
ting together college visits. Free. For
more information email janice@cus-
tomcollegevisits.com.
Repetitive strain support group. 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Mills Health Center,
100 S. San Mateo Drive, San Mateo.
Free. Drop-in. For more information
call 654-9966.
‘Running for Jim.’ 7:15 p.m. Menlo
Atherton High School, 555
Middlefield Road, Atherton.
Screening of ‘Running for Jim,’ an
award-winning documentary, pre-
sented by the ALS Association
Golden West Chapter. Tickets are $8
for students and $12 for general
admission. Proceeds from the event
will be donated to the ALS
Association GoldenWest Chapter to
support ALS research and families in
the Bay Area who are affected by
ALS and to the Jim Tracy Special
Needs Trust. For more information
or to purchase tickets go to
www.alsagoldenwest.wordpress.co
m.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights. Through
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
Movies on the Square: ‘42.’ 8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or
go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movi
es.html.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 13
Preserving Your History. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. The National Archives at San
Francisco, 1000 Commodore Drive,
San Bruno. Genealogical workshop
on how to care for your personal
family papers and photographs. $15
payable in advance. For more infor-
mation or to reserve a space call
238-3488.
Free preview: American Line
Dancing — Levels Zero and One
Series. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Foster
City Recreation Center, 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. For more informa-
tion call Allen at 515-2320 or go to
www.LDVALI.com.
‘Life Begins at 70.’ Noon. Twin
Pines Senior and Community
Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
Join us for a pizza luncheon fol-
lowed by a performance by Norm
Coleman. Admission is $2 payable at
the door. Reserve a seat by calling
595-7444.
Women’s Recovery Association
Open House. Noon to 2 p.m. The
Open House will include unveiling
of the new logo, inspiring stories of
recovery and a tour of the new facil-
ities. Refreshments will be available.
To RSVP call Amy at 348-6603 or
email her at aphan@womensrecov-
ery.org. For more information con-
t r a c t
bbrown@womensrecovery.org.
Happy Hour: Dinner, Drinks and
Dancing. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. ‘Full House Band’
will be there. $6. For more informa-
tion call 616-7150.
Music on the Square: Foreverland.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
For more information go to red-
woodcity.org/events.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
The speech capped a frenzied 10-day
stretch of events that began when he
unexpectedly announced he was step-
ping back from a threatened military
strike and instead asking Congress first
to pass legislation authorizing the use
of such force against Assad.
With public opinion polls consis-
tently showing widespread opposition
to American military intervention, the
White House has struggled mightily to
generate support among lawmakers —
liberal Democrats and conservative
Republicans alike — who have
expressed fears of involvement in yet
another war in the Middle East and have
questioned whether U.S. national secu-
rity interests were at stake in Syria.
Obama had trouble, as well, building
international support for a military
attack designed to degrade Assad’s mil-
itary.
Suddenly, though, events took
another unexpected turn this week.
First Russia and then Syria reacted pos-
itively to a remark from Secretary of
State John Kerry indicating that the
crisis could be defused if Damascus
agreed to put its chemical weapons
under international control.
The president said he was sending
Kerry to meet with Russian Foreign
Minister Sergey Lavrov on Thursday,
and he added, “I will continue my own
discussion” with Russian President
Vladimir Putin, with whom he has said
he had been discussing ways out of the
Syrian predicament for some time.
At the same time, he said the United
States and its allies would work with
Russia and China to present a resolu-
tion to the United Nations Security
Council “requiring Assad to give up his
chemical weapons and to ultimately
destroy them under international con-
trol.”
Acknowledging the weariness the
nation feels after a decade of war in Iraq
and Afghanistan, Obama said,
“America is not the world’s police-
man.”
And yet, he added, “When with mod-
est effort and risk we can stop children
from being gassed to death and thereby
make our own children safer over the
long run, I believe we should act.
That’s what makes America different.
That’s what makes us exceptional.”
“Our ideals and principles, as well as
our national security, are at stake in
Syria, along with our leadership of a
world where we seek to ensure that the
worst weapons will never be used,” he
declared.
Obama recounted the events of the
deadly chemical weapons attack on
Aug. 21 that the United States blames
on Assad.
“When dictators commit atrocities,
they depend upon the world to look the
other way until these horrifying pic-
tures fade from memory. But these
things happened. The facts cannot be
denied,” he said.
The president said firmly that Assad’s
alleged attack was “not only a viola-
tion of international law, it’s also a
danger to our security. ”
If diplomacy now fails and the United
States fails to act, he said, “the Assad
regime will see no reason to stop using
chemical weapons” and “other tyrants
will have no reason to think twice
about acquiring poison gas and using”
it. Over time, he added, U.S. troops
could face the threat of chemical war-
fare, and if fighting escapes Syria’s
border, “these weapons could threaten
allies like Turkey, Jordan and Israel.”
In the run-up to the president’s
speech, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel
pointedly told a congressional hearing
it was not time to let the threat of mili-
tary retaliation lapse. “For this diplo-
matic option to have a chance at suc-
ceeding, the threat of a U.S. military
action, the credible, real threat of U.S.
military action, must continue,” he
declared.
At the same hearing, Kerry said any
diplomacy “cannot be a process of
delay. This cannot be a process of
avoidance.”
He later added that any agreement
must include binding consequences if
Syria fails to comply, and lawmakers
moved to rewrite pending legislation
along the same lines.
The president readied his speech as a
small crowd of anti-war protesters,
some waving signs, gathered outside
the gates of the White House.
U.S. officials say more than 1,400
died in the Aug. 21 episode, including
at least 400 children, and other victims
suffered uncontrollable twitching,
foaming at the mouth and other symp-
toms typical of exposure to chemical
weapons banned by international
treaty.
Continued from page 1
OBAMA
The site currently is home to the
Spirit Halloween store, which was
granted a business tax certificate to
operate there now while the city con-
sidered an appeal from property owner
1998 Books Holdings LLC.
The company may now appeal the
decision, however, to the City
Council.
Commissioners made it clear though
that they do not want Michaels to
leave the city.
Its lease at 1750 Delaware St. will be
terminated at the end of 2014 as the
property, that also is home to Kmart,
will be transformed in the next decade
into a mixed-used transit-oriented-
development called Station Park
Green.
“We don’t want Michaels to leave
San Mateo and I don’t want to see a
vacant store for 15 years. I hope the
property owner can bring back a new
application that fits with the corridor
plan,” said Dianne Whitaker, the com-
mission’s chair.
The Borders, across from the
Hillsdale Shopping Center, closed in
2011.
Michaels plan to occupy the site
with 25,000 square feet of retail does
not fit in with the city’s future vision
for the area near the Caltrain station as
it is not neighborhood serving, city
staff determined.
Lawyers for the property owner,
however, said they had differing views
than city staff over the term “occupan-
cy.” Staff determined since the site was
not open to retail sales for the six
months that its legal non-conforming
use had been lost despite the property
owner’s contention that the site was
occupied and being prepared for retail
sales during that span.
“Staff equates ‘use’ and ‘occupancy’
as meaning ‘open for business’ but it
doesn’t say that anywhere in the
code,” said attorney Linda Bernhardt,
who represents the property owner.
1998 Books Holdings LLC actually
filed a lawsuit against the city chal-
lenging its zoning rules but dropped it
leading up to last night’s decision.
The city had objected to the compa-
ny’s lawsuit because it had not
appealed administratively a decision
by city staff to deny issuance of a busi-
ness tax certificate.
The company may now appeal to the
City Council to try and get the deci-
sion overturned.
The city changed its zoning rules
regarding the area around the Hillsdale
Caltrain station in May 2011, when an
ordinance passed that put the property
into the city’s Rail Corridor Transit-
Oriented Development Plan.
The current Michaels store is
approximately 30,000 square feet as is
the Borders site, which has been sub-
leased in recent years by the Spirit
Halloween Store for a few months a
year.
Michaels needs at least 21,000
square feet of space to be profitable and
wants to stay in the neighborhood,
said attorneys with DLA Piper, LLP,
which represented 1998 Books
Holdings LLC during its appeal of the
city’s zoning rules last night.
Afew of the store’s loyal customers
made a case for Michaels’ move last
night by saying it was neighborhood
serving. Company officials said the
average customer spends just $20 a
visit and carries out only small bags of
goods.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
MICHAELS
COMICS/GAMES
9-11-13
TUESday’S PUZZLE SOLVEd
PrEViOUS
SUdOkU
anSwErS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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6 Carrot or spud
12 Epic by Virgil
14 Mooring sites
15 Mile High City
16 New York NFL team
17 Memorable time
18 Strange
19 Nasser’s org.
21 Watchdog’s warning
23 Benedictine title
26 FDR had three
27 Shed tool
28 Marsh wader
30 Washboard —
31 Letterhead abbr.
32 Exaggerated
33 Yertle’s creator
35 1040 agcy.
37 PC key
38 Merits
39 Cry of disgust
40 Inquire
41 Golf peg
42 Deep black
43 Stein fller
44 Broad st.
46 Hypotheticals
48 Undermine
51 Alcoves
55 Sea off Greece
56 Crows over
57 Ample
58 Actor Hawke
dOwn
1 Wander
2 Director Spike
3 Place to sleep
4 On no occasion
5 Stadium seating level
6 Strength
7 Novelist Bagnold
8 Make happy
9 Pentagon VIP
10 Morticia’s cousin
11 Hairpin curve
13 Chinese festival sight
19 Cheerful
20 Guarantee
22 Cookbook item
24 Nightmare
25 Fluffy dessert
26 Place for posies
27 Teakettle sound
28 Sudden silence
29 Bottle part
34 Smuggled
36 PG or R
42 Lind or Craig
43 Wide tie
45 Scaloppine base
47 Dossier
48 Tongues do it
49 Fair hiring letters
50 Way back when
52 Derisive laugh
53 Depot info
54 9-digit ID
diLBErT® CrOSSwOrd PUZZLE
fUTUrE SHOCk®
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GET fUZZy®
wEdnESday, SEPTEMBEr 11, 2013
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — A break will do you good
and help you rethink your approach to life. Altering
your living arrangements will be emotional but
ultimately benefcial.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Avoid high-pressure
situations today. Appeal to the emotional side of
anyone making unreasonable demands. Review your
relationships and make adjustments to the connections
that are standing in the way of your progress.
SCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Make your home more
effcient and compatible with your lifestyle. A change
of plans can be used to your advantage, but you must
be prepared to roll with the punches.
SaGiTTariUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Use your energy
wisely. Take advantage of any chance you get to
increase your worth. You can cut corners at home by
setting a strict budget.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Love, romance
and adventure should be included on your to-do list.
Broaden your outlook, explore new places and indulge
in events or activities that you fnd motivational.
aQUariUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Let your emotions
take over when it comes to dealing with a domestic
situation. Don’t be stingy with your take on matters. A
new source of income encourage you.
PiSCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Get out and get
involved today. Meeting with people interested in
unusual activities or hobbies will enrich your life.
Romance should highlight your day.
ariES (March 21-April 19) — There’s no need to act
with undue haste. You have more options than you
realize, so take a moment to examine the pros and
cons before taking action. Moderation should be a
factor in your decision.
TaUrUS (April 20-May 20) — Aggressive action will
get the job done but also create opposition. It might
be a good idea to work secretively until you have
everything in place. It may take longer, but you will
avoid discord.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) — Call in favors and
you will get a job done quickly, enabling you to do
something enjoyable later on. If you let those who
helped you in on the fun, you’ll develop a powerful
support network.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) — Strive for excellence in
whatever you pursue. If you get outside your comfort
zone, you could learn some valuable information.
Question what isn’t working in your life and prepare to
make changes.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Don’t leave anything to
chance. Make moves that are unusual and unexpected,
yet shrewd. Using the element of surprise in a
competitive situation will give you the advantage.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
JOB TITLE: HR COORDINATOR
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MA in HR Mgmt or MBA
or equiv. + 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5).
Exp. w/ HRIS, ATS, Jira, OBS, Oracle
and Concur VMS, MAC OS, MS OS,
CMS, MS Office and HTML reqd. Mail
Resume: RingCentral, Inc. Attn:HR Dept.
1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
124 Caregivers
TOM’S
COMPASSIONATE CARE
Are you in need of home
patient care?
We've got you covered.
Please call us.
You won't regret it.
650-515-0669
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522714
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Gina Freschi Nellesen
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Gina Freschi Nellesen filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Gina Christine Freschi,
Gina Freschi Nellesen, Gina Christine
Nellesen
Proposed name: Gina Freschi Nellesen
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/31/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/23/2013
(Published, 09/11/13, 09/18/2013,
09/25/2013, 10/02/2013)
CASE# CIV 522906
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jon Snitow and Melissa Eitzel
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jon Snitow and Melissa Eitzel
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Jonathan Craig Snitow,
aka Jonathan Snitow, Jonathan C. Sni-
tow, Jon Snitow
a.Proposed name: Jonathan Craig Sni-
tow Solera
b.Present name: Melissa Viola Eitzel
aka Melissa V. Eitzel, Melissa Eitzel
b.Proposed name: Melissa Viola Eitzel
Solera
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/21/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/06/2013
(Published, 08/28/13, 09/04/2013,
09/11/2013, 09/18/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523196
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Huei I. Lin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Huei I. Linl filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Huei I. Lin, aka Stella
Huei I. Lin
Proposed name: Stella Huei I. Lin
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 10,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 08/28/13, 09/04/2013,
09/11/2013, 09/18/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257134
The following person is doing business
as: MJP-ENZ, 117 24th Ave., Apt. 1,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Marian J.
Peris, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Marian J. Peris /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257154
The following person is doing business
as: Resell It with Anna, 3221 La Mesa
Dr., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Anna
E. LeCuyer, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Anna E. LeCuyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257101
The following person is doing business
as: All Bay Hauling and Demolition, 708
2nd Avenue, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hassan Mortazavi, 21 San-
born Road, Orinda, CA 94563. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Hassan Mortazavi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257239
The following person is doing business
as: Glassvendor.com, 830 Bransten
Road, Suite L, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Tony Campanile, 427 Bark Dr.,
Redwood City, CA 94065. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Tony Campanile /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
23 Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257214
The following person is doing business
as: Atlas Heating & Ventilating Co., 340
Roebling Road, SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Tuck Aire Heating &
Air Conditioning Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/21/2007.
/s/ Geoffrey Tuck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257100
The following person is doing business
as: Lockheart Press, 407 Briarfield Way,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Andrea
Simmons, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Andrea Simmons /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257195
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Cosmopolitan Cafe, 2)Patio Cafe,
3)Cosmo Cafe @ MWE, 275 Middlefield
Road, #100, Menlo Park, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Cosmopolitan Catering LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/01/2010.
/s/ Joseph Schumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257197
The following person is doing business
as: Cosmopolitan Cafe @ Gopro, 300
Clearview Way, San Mateo, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cosmopolitan Catering LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 11/19/2012.
/s/ Joseph Schumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/13, 08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257353
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Nexus Loans, 2)Galaxy Loans,
3)GMCC, 1350 Bayshore Highway, Suite
740, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Gener-
al Mortgage Capital Corporation, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/28/2013.
/s/ Raymond Chou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256775
The following person is doing business
as: Aqua-Care USA, 1838 El Camino
Real, #207, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Modern Technology Resources, Inc., CA
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Igor Kleyner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257369
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1)Pure Mist, 2)Pure Mist E-Cig-
arettes, 3)Pure Mist E-Juice, 230 South
Spruce Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Dave Gaufo, 485 Cy-
press Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066 and
Maria Cristine Madjus, 402 Campbell
Ave., San Francisco, CA 94134. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Dave Gaufo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257371
The following person is doing business
as: Nutricion Activa, 346 N. Ellsworth
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ru-
malda Rios, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Rumalda Rios /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257119
The following person is doing business
as: Polka Dot Gorilla, 1419 Oak Grove
Ave., #203, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lauren B. Haule, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on August 6,
2013.
/s/ Lauren B. Haule /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257319
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Matchcmo, 930 Edgecliff Way,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Louis
& Jane Lalonde, same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Louis Lalonde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/13, 09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257435
The following person is doing business
as: Miki-Ya, 1180 Vermont Way, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Miyuki Tandy,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/13/2013.
/s / Miyuki Tandy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257452
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pacific Heights Financial, 2) Finan-
cisco 1838 El Camino Real, #180H,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Softeri-
nox, Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s / Valeriy Krysov /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/13, 09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257554
The following person is doing business
as: Action Broadcasting Services, 10
Rollins Rd., Ste. 209, MILLBRAE, CA
94030 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Geoffrey William Kuchlenz,
1000 Davit Ln, #118, Redwood City, CA
94065. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
11/08/1991.
/s/ Geoffrey Kuchlenz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257479
The following person is doing business
as: A & E Limousine Service, 833 Fallon
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Arnold
Balotro, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Arnold Balotro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257473
The following person is doing business
as: Goodwin Properties, 4370 Alpine
Rd., PORTOLA VALLEY, CA 94028 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gary Ahern. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Arnold Balotro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/13, 09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Nida Corpus Patalot
Case Number: 123661
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: NIDA CORPUS PATA-
LOT. A Petition for Probate has been
filed by DANILO C. PATALOT, SR. in the
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo. The Petition for Probate re-
quests that DANILO C. PATALOT, SR.
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: September 30,
2013 at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
203 Public Notices
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Timothy J. Gavin, No.2143147
39300 Civic Center Dr., Ste. 310
Fremont, CA 94545
(510)248-4769
Dated: August 26, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on August 28, September 4, 11, 2013.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Arlis E. Coleman
Case Number: 123713
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Arlis E, Coleman. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Anne
E. Takemura in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Anne
E. Takemura be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble for examination in the file kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 08, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
John P. Breckenridge, SBN: 104244
2901 Moorpark Ave., #175
SAN JOSE, CA 95128
(408)243-3242
Dated: September 9, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 11, 18, 25, 2013.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Dora Maritza Aberouette, aka Maritza
Aberouette
Case Number: 123714
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Dora Maritza Aberou-
ette, aka Maritza Aberouette. A Petition
for Probate has been filed by Gene Felix
Aberouette in the Superior Court of Cali-
fornia, County of San Mateo. The Peti-
tion for Probate requests that Gene Felix
Aberouette be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble for examination in the file kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 02, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
203 Public Notices
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Karl R. Vorsatz, Esq., SBN: 85702
1601 Bayshore Highway, Ste. 350
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
(650)697-9591
Dated: September 9, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 11, 18, 25, 2013.
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA
IN AND FOR
THE COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
CASE NO. 122929
Conservatorship of
TOD EIDSON
Conservatee
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SELL
REAL PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
subject to confirmation by this court,
September 21, 2013 at: 10:00 a.m., or
thereafter within the time allowed by law,
the undersigned, as Conservator of the
Person and Estate of Tod Eidson, will
sell at private sale to the highest and
best net bidder on terms and conditions
hereinafter mentioned all right, title and
interest of Tod Eidson, in the real proper-
ty located in San Mateo County, Califor-
nia, as follows:
PARCEL I:
LOT 42, AS SHOWN ON THE MAP OF
TERRABAY, FILED JULY 2, 1990 IN
MAP BOOK 121, PAGES 65 THROUGH
79, INCLUSIVE, SAN MATEO COUNTY
RECORDS.
PARCEL II:
EASEMENTS APPURTENANT TO PAR-
CEL 1 ABOVE AS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TIONS 3.5.2, 3.5.5, 3.5.7, 3.5.8,
3.5.913.5.10, 3.5.11, AND 3.5.15 OF
THE DECLARATION OF COVENANTS,
CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS OF
TERRABAY VILLAGE ASSOCIATION
RECORDED OCTOBER 24, 1996, SER-
IES NO. 96131901, SAN MATEO
COUNTY RECORDS: 007-590-420
This property is commonly known as 55
Windcrest Lane, South San Francisco,
California.
The sale is subject to current taxes,
covenants, conditions, restrictions, reser-
vations, rights, rights of way, and ease-
ments of record, with any encumbrances
of record to be satisfied from the
purchase price.
The property is to be sold on an as is
basis, except for title. Buyer must exe-
cute an Addendum.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and can be mailed
or delivered to Patrick C. Kerwin, broker
for Conservator, at 968 Woodside Road,
Redwood City, CA 94061 personally, at
any time after first publication of this
notice and before any sale is made.
The property will be sold on the following
terms: cash, or part cash and part credit,
the terms of such credit to be acceptable
to the fiduciary and the court, 3% (three
percent) of the amount of the bid to
accompany the offer by certified check,
the balance t be paid after confirmation
of the sale by the court at the date set for
close of escrow. If purchaser fails to
complete the purchase because of pur-
chaser’s default, seller shall retain as liq-
uidated damages 3% of the purchase.
Taxes shall be prorated, as of the date of
recording of conveyance. Examination of
title, property inspection reports, record-
ing of conveyance, transfer taxes, and
any title insurance policy shall be at the
expense of the purchaser or purchasers.
The undersigned reserves the right to
refuse to accept any bids.
For further information and bid forms,
contact Patrick C. Kerwin at
(650) 366-8060 or 968 Woodside Road,
Redwood City, California
Dated:
September 6, 2013
/s/CAROLYN J.SADLER /
Conservator of the Person and Estate of
Tod Eidson
/s/ HAROLD O. HUGHES /
Attorney for Conservator
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/11/13,
09/13/13, 09/19/13, 10/01/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
296 Appliances
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. (650)654-9252
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SIGNED MARK MCGWIER BASEBALL
- 70th Home Run, $30., (650)595-3933
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash.(650)654-9252
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA TRUCK -great
condition, $25., 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LEGO, UNOPENED, 299 pieces Mon-
ster Truck Transporter, 3 projects to build
, 3 action figures, tools, 5-12, $27.00
(650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
24
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
300 Toys
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PHOTOSMART Printer, mint condi-
tion, 2 sided, view & print color & black,
multi-functions, includes 2 unopened car-
tridges $45.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
304 Furniture
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manuel included. $575 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., (650)591-2720
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, SOLD!
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
KITCHEN POTS - (3) stainless steel
with black handles - 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5
gal. Asking $10 all. Will sell separately,
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
306 Housewares
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET - lid
cover and mat, beige. Asking $10. Call
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINYL SHOWER CURTAINS (3) one is
beige/coral floral; one is aqua/black/
gold floral, and one is royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10 each. Call (650)574-3229 (Foster
City) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" HEDGE TRIMMER - pro mod-
el, sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BLACK AND Decker electric 18" blade
lawn mower, rated at 4 HP,
$45.(650)367-8146
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ELECTRIC BLOWER. Plenty of power.
Clean your leaves. Adjustable tube
length/direction. $20 Cash SOLD!
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
GARDEN CLAW. Excellent for tilling
you soil for planting flowers/vegetables.
$20. SOLD!
LAWN AERATOR. Irrigate your lawn at
the roots. Hose attachment. $15 Cash.
SOLD!
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, 650)315-5902
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
ROSS ROOT feeder. Excellent for
feeding trees/shrubs. $15 Cash.
SOLD!
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
SOLD!
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, SOLD!
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRAND NEW TARP - 7' X 5' sealed fac-
tory package, Only $9., 650-595-3933
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
model #38640, lead drisel dome, 44 car-
ot plated, $45., (650)315-5902
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60
(650)697-5405
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI MAKER - elec-
tric, heat top & bottom only, $9., 650-
595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
310 Misc. For Sale
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW NEWTONE DOOR BELL -factory
pack, complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), clay colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), gold colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 SOLD!
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10.00 all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
SUMMER READING, 100 paperbacks
and hard cover, popular authors, Cuss-
ler, Patterson, Brown, Steele, more.
$30.00 all obo (650)578-9208
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10., Call (650)574-3229
(Foster City) between 10 am - 7 pm.
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited edi-
tion with Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-
5902
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
DENIM JACKET - faded but in good
condition, man's XL, $19., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
25 Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Chiang Mai
native
5 Dance moves
10 Cheerful
14 Mint, e.g.
15 Ira Gershwin
contribution
16 Indiana neighbor
17 Palindromic
fashion mag
18 More aloof
19 “Walking in
Memphis” singer
Cohn
20 Accommodating
work hours
23 Large amount
24 “O Sole __”
25 Harper’s __
28 Chewie’s
shipmate
29 Béchamel base
31 Monopoly deed
abbr.
32 Market research
panel
36 Laundry cycle
37 Fairway boundary
38 Part of i.e.
39 Biblical prophet
40 “Yikes!”
41 Frito-Lay is its title
sponsor
43 Mark of Zorro
44 Action on eBay
45 USN rank
46 Acquirer of more
than 1,000 patents
48 It includes mayo
49 SUV part: Abbr.
52 Culinary
combination
56 Roger Rabbit or
Bugs Bunny
58 Heart of Paris?
59 Old Norse poetry
collection
60 Bring in
61 Rockne of Notre
Dame fame
62 Look slyly
63 Multitude
64 “Bullitt” director
Peter
65 Company that
manufactures the
starts of 20-, 32-,
41- and 52-
Across
DOWN
1 Taking the wrong
way?
2 Nametag greeting
3 “Over the
Rainbow”
composer
4 Wild mountain
goat
5 Deli worker’s
chore
6 Danish
astronomer
Brahe
7 Toledo’s lake
8 Mottled
9 Prepare for
surgery
10 Lefty in
Cooperstown
11 Small Asian
pooch bred as a
watchdog
12 Balloon filler
13 Medical nickname
21 Big success
22 Lenient
26 Miller’s “__ From
the Bridge”
27 Kidney-related
28 “Les Misérables”
author
29 Derby prize
30 Ways of escape
32 Succumbed to
stage fright
33 Wondered aloud?
34 Babylonian
writing system
35 Senate majority
leader since 2007
36 Weeps
convulsively
39 Capital west of
Haiphong
41 Hard to please
42 Grants
permanent status
to, as a professor
44 A.L. East team
47 Golf-friendly
forecast
48 Like the accent in
“entrée”
49 Wedding
memento
50 Rear-__
51 Found out
53 Chaplin’s last
wife
54 Neither masc. nor
fem.
55 Narcissist’s love
56 Darjeeling, e.g.
57 Scull propeller
By David Poole
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/11/13
09/11/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
317 Building Materials
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - $.25 each, or all for
$100., (650)921-6741
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
318 Sports Equipment
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SPECIALIZED CROSSROADS bike. 20"
frame/18 speed. Needs tires.Great com-
mute bike. $99. Cash SOLD!
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TRAINING BASEBALLS - Soft center
(3) $2. each and Regular Softballs (2)
$3. each, (650)595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 NISSAN Xterra XE-V6, 4x4 228k
miles. Runs good, needs minor exhaust
work, $2300, (650) 255-9866
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD ‘95 LX Coupe -
$1900., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Cleaning
Neat Nit’s
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsula’s genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-ڀInterior Residential
- Oďce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Eďcient StaČ
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Gutters
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650)453-3002
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
27 Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Carpet, Tile
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. NANJAPA DDS
DR. SABOOWALA DDS
DR. VIRAPARIA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
We Moved:
1528 S. El Camino Real, #408,
San Mateo 94402
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NATION/WORLD 28
Wednesday • Sept. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FDA: Roche drug works
in early-stage breast cancer
WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug
Administration has issued a positive review
of a breast cancer drug from Roche that could
soon become the first pharmaceutical
option approved for treating early-stage
disease before surgery.
In documents posted online, FDA scien-
tists said women who received the drug
Perjeta as initial treatment for breast cancer
were more likely to be cancer-free at the
time of surgery than women who received
older drug combinations. Although the
results come from mid-stage trials of the
drug, FDA scientists recommended acceler-
ating approval of the drug.
That step is reserved for groundbreaking
drugs to treat life-threatening diseases.
Perjeta was first approved last summer to
treat women with a subtype of breast cancer
that has already spread to other parts of the
body. But Roche’s Genentech unit is now
seeking approval to use the drug at a much
earlier stage of the disease: after diagnosis
and before surgery to remove the tumor.
Around the nation
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — U.S. officials for
nearly three years accessed data on thou-
sands of domestic phone numbers they
shouldn’t have and then misrepresented
their actions to a secret spy court to reau-
thorize the government’s surveillance pro-
gram, documents released Tuesday show.
The government’s explanation points to
an enormous surveillance infrastructure
with such incredible power that even the
National Security Agency doesn’t fully
know how to properly use it: Officials told a
judge in 2009 that the system is so large
and complicated that “there was no single
person who had a complete technical under-
standing” of it.
The documents, which the Obama admin-
istration was compelled to release as part of
a lawsuit by a civil liberties group, show
that National Security Agency analysts rou-
tinely exceeded their mission to track only
phone numbers with reasonable connec-
tions to terrorism.
Officials said that the complexity of the
computer system — and a misunderstanding
of the laws, court orders and internal poli-
cies controlling analysts’ actions — con-
tributed to the abuses. There’s no evidence
that the NSA intentionally used its surveil-
lance powers to spy on Americans for polit-
ical purposes, a fear of many critics who
recall the FBI’s intrusive surveillance of
civil rights leaders and protesters in the
1960s.
“The documents released today are a testa-
ment to the government’s strong commit-
ment to detecting, correcting and reporting
mistakes that occur in implementing tech-
nologically complex intelligence collec-
tion activities, and to continually improv-
ing its oversight and compliance process-
es,” said Director of National Intelligence
James Clapper. “As demonstrated in these
documents, once compliance incidents were
discovered in the telephony metadata col-
lection program, additional checks, bal-
ances and safeguards were developed to help
prevent future instances of noncompli-
ance.”
The Obama administration had conceded
earlier that, when it secretly began gather-
ing Americans’ phone and Internet records
in 2006, it scooped up more domestic
phone calls and emails than Congress or a
court authorized. But many details of the
program’s abuse were not known until
Tuesday.
Docs: Officials misused U.S. surveillance program
By Ryan Lucas and Lori Hinnant
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — A Russian plan for Syria to
turn over its chemical weapons to avert
Western missile strikes bogged down
Tuesday when Moscow rejected U.S. and
French demands for a binding U.N. resolu-
tion with “very severe consequences” for
non-compliance.
The surprise Russian proposal, which
Syria and the United States both accepted,
would put President Bashar Assad’s regime’s
chemical stockpile under international con-
trol before its eventual dismantling. The
initiative — also cautiously endorsed by
Britain and France — appeared to offer a
way out of a crisis that raised the prospect
of U.S.-led military action against Syria in
retaliation for an alleged chemical weapons
attack last month.
But the plan ran aground as the world
powers haggled over the crucial element of
how to enforce it. Wary of falling into what
the French foreign minister called “a trap,”
Paris and Washington are pushing for a
U.N. Security Council resolution to verify
Syria’s disarmament. Russia, a close Assad
ally and the regime’s chief patron on the
international stage, dismissed France’s pro-
posal as unacceptable.
The dizzying diplomatic maneuvering
threatened what had been growing momen-
tum toward a plan that would allow President
Barack Obama to back away from military
action. Domestic support for a strike is
uncertain in the United States, even as
Obama seeks Congress’ backing for action
— and there has been little international
appetite to join forces against Assad.
Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-
Moallem said early Tuesday during a trip to
Moscow that Damascus “agreed to the
Russian initiative as it should thwart the
U.S. aggression against our country. ”
Before departing Moscow in the evening,
al-Moallem told Lebanon’s Al-Mayadeen
TV that Syria would place its chemical
weapons locations in the hands of represen-
tatives of Russia, other unspecified coun-
tries and the United Nations. Syria will also
declare the chemical arsenal it long denied
having, stop producing such weapons and
sign conventions against them.
Question of enforcement casts cloud on Syria plan
REUTERS
A girl stands in front of a building damaged by what activists said was shelling by forces loyal
to Syria’s President Bashar Assad.

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