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2009 Honorees
Mark Assaad John Bilbow Matt Browning Luis Caballero Misti Callicott Kathryn Cardarelli Kim Catalano Greg Cook Andrew de la Torre Mark Drennan Jamie Fulton J. R. Holland Lyndsay Hoover David Kramer Craig Lloyd Brant Martin Daniel McCarthy Todd Miller Nelson Mitchell Randi Mitchell Drew Myers 4 5 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Teresa Nelson Amanda Neill David Nolan David Parker Elaina Perez Ken Shetter Adam Smith Jason Smith III Brent Sorrells Dana Stayton Frank Taylor Mike Thomas Jr. John Thompson III Michael Tothe Ginger Webber Brook Whitworth Charles Williams Richard Williams Jennifer Yoder 30 31 32 33 34 35 37 38 39 41 42 43 45 46 47 49 50 51 52

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Publisher

Banks Dishmon
Editor

Robert Francis
Associate Editor

Leading the way
When it was suggested to ask the 40 Under 40 recipients the strangest thing they’ve expensed my first thought was that no one would answer. Imagine my surprise when I see how honest this class is. Did you know in the right profession you can expense a 150-pound pig, the “finer Belgian-style blond ales,” the passenger side of a wrecked 1957 Chevy Bel Air and Hans and Frans costumes from Saturday Night Live. Just from some of the expense items you can see that we have a lively Class of 2009. So lively, in fact, there is an exprofessional wrestler, The Blue Hawaiian, on the list. While the fun, creative juices are flowing, this group is dedicated to the community and being workplace leaders. They go above and beyond before they are asked and exceed expectations. Members of this class include professionals in law, real estate, finance, hospitality, sports, health care, marketing and more. Oh yeah, need a gift basket or a Harley-Davidson? We’ve got that covered as well. As we’ve said year after year, the 40 Under 40 classes represnt Tarrant County’s best leaders in work and the community. The Class of 2009 is heavily involved in the community. In addition to the long hours at the office, the honorees spend countless hours on the boards of many nonprofit organizations, neighborhood boards or just volunteering their time. One honoree quit his day job to start a company that focuses on giving to nonprofits, e-Partners in Giving. With young professional groups popping up left and right, this is the class making these groups happened. Several honorees have found the time to be founding member of young professional groups. Ready to know who did what? Flip through the pages of the Fort Worth Business Press’ 40 Under 40 Class of 2009 to see who you know and who you should know. – Crystal Forester Managing editor

Michael H. Price
Managing Editor

Crystal Forester
Contributors

Aleshia Howe, Betty Dillard, Elizabeth Bassett, John-Laurent Tronche, Leslie Wimmer, Laurie Barker James
Production

Brent Latimer, Clayton Gardner
Photography

Glen E. Ellman
Advertising Executives

Ann Alexander, Andrea Benford, Bob Collins, Elizabeth Northern Mary Schlegel, Annie Warren
Business Manager/ Director of Events

Shiela West
Reception

Maggie Franklin

3509 Hulen, No. 201 • Fort Worth, TX 76107 817-336-8300 • Fax: 817-332-3038 www.fwbusinesspress.com Fort Worth Business Press. © 2008
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May 28, 2009

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Mark Assaad
A.N.A. Consultants LLC
it’s a chance to help show them a different path in life.” Donnie Siratt, Assaad’s nominator for the 40 Under 40 distinction, described Assaad as a successful engineer and business owner, but more importantly, as “a person that truly has his priorities in order,” Siratt says. “He is deeply rooted in faith, a family man in every sense of the word, a great friend and one of the nicest people you’ll ever meet.” Assaad and his wife, Kimberly, who also is a civil engineer by degree, have been married for 10 years and have two children: a 7-year-old son named Sam and a 6-year-old daughter named Lina Grace.
– Aleshia Howe

When Mark Assaad was a child, he often used his blocks to build things. These days, he makes his living in a similar fashion, but his blocks are significantly bigger. Assaad is vice president of A.N.A. Consultants LLC, a Fort Worth-based consulting and civil engineering firm – and a company that represents several generations of engineers. Assaad says he knew from the time he was a child playing with blocks he wanted to follow in his father’s and grandfathers’ footsteps and become an engineer. When Assaad graduated from Texas A&M University in 1994, he teamed up with his father and founded A.N.A. Consultants. Since then, Assaad has been honored as Young Engineer of the Year by both the American Society of Civil Engineers as well as the Texas Society of Professional Engineers. And though Assaad lists both as accomplishments he is proud of, he is most proud of a different kind of accomplishment: his family. “My wife and my children; I am so proud of my family,” he says. “They are great and I love them dearly.” In addition to his involvement with several professional organizations, Assaad also is heavily involved with his church because, as he says, it’s a place he can give back. “It’s important to go out and be active in different organizations – professional or not – as a way to give back,” he says. “There is always a younger generation of kids who can learn from what you can offer. And they may not have the same opportunities you had, so

About the prop: They are the two things most important to me. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A night at the Delano hotel in South Beach, Fla. Where did your first paycheck come from? Winn Dixie on Alta Mesa Boulevard in Fort Worth What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? An Alpine radio and six-disc CD changer Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Ambassador to New Zealand or a chef Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Café Aspen

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John Bilbow
Fort Worth Cats Baseball
was coaching. They married in 2000 and now have three children: Jylian, who is 7, Mikey, who is 3, and Ivy, who is just younger than 2. Bilbow’s oldest daughter, Jylian, also has chronic, severe medical issues, and Bilbow said that has taught him to adapt to situations and stay focused on outcomes. Bilbow and his wife are involved with many organizations, and they’ve also raised almost a quarter of a million dollars for children with rare birth anomalies through work with organizations like World Craniofacial Foundation. While Bilbow does love his job, it’s not all just about the love of the game. Just like any manager, there are challenges, but he said most people – including himself – are quick to recognize that he’s got a good thing going. “I think the most common phrase is, ‘That’s a cool job,’ and my response is, ‘On most days it is,’” he says.
– Elizabeth Bassett

After graduating from Oklahoma State University in 1995, John Bilbow spent about a year and a half selling induction motors for oil pumps and deep wells. It was a national and international selling job, based out of Oklahoma. When his grandmother died and left him $3,000, though, he packed his bags and moved to Texas. Today, Bilbow is the executive vice president and general manager of the Fort Worth Cats, a highly successful independent baseball team. He admits that it’s a dream job, but it came after working in the commercial real estate realm, the computer industry, and finally after holding many positions in the Cats organization, which he joined as an account executive in February 2002. “I credit my steady rise to my ability to sell,” Bilbow says of his ascent through the organization. The ability to promote the team while simultaneously pushing himself is what Bilbow also thinks will help his future in baseball. At 38, he’s already spent three years in the general manager role, the first as a sort of apprentice as leadership changed. There are only about 200 GMs in baseball at all of its levels, Bilbow said, and he said he wouldn’t rule out moving up in the organization. While Bilbow has had several sales-based jobs, he says he always knew he wanted to be involved in sports. He played various sports growing up – from soccer to baseball to tennis and college cheerleading – and still enjoys golf and skeet shooting when he gets the chance today. He met his wife, Kendall, when she was a cheerleader at the University of North Texas and taking lessons at a gym where Bilbow About the prop: Part of the reason why I’ve received this recognition is because of the uniqueness of this baseball team. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A 150-pound pig Where did your first paycheck come from? A bridal and tuxedo rental shop in Oklahoma What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? My first car when I was in college, a Mitsubishi Eclipse Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Medical sales Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Joe T. Garcia’s

May 28, 2009

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Congratulations to the 40 Under 40 Class of 2009 From your friends at Coors Distributing

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Matt Browning
American National Bank of Texas
ed to his faith or have a special meaning. “As president of a community bank, I believe it is important to be visible in the community we serve and give back,” he says. Browning and his wife, Jeanette, have been married for eight years and have three girls ages 4, 2 and 1. Browning has a son who is 12 years old. And Browning says one of the best personal decisions he and his wife ever made happened a few years ago when they adopted a little girl from China – an experience Browning calls ‘incredible’ and something he and his wife were simply meant to do.
– Aleshia Howe

Matt Browning believes faith and family are No. 1. He says whenever he’s put those things first in his life, everything has gone right. And a lot has gone right. Browning worked his way through college starting as a part-time bank teller. Eventually, he went full-time and was promoted to a supervisor. Now nearly 20 years later, Browning is president of American National Bank of Texas and he has done it all with a smile. “I like to have fun and laugh and find the humor in everything,” he says. Browning spent most of his career working his way up the ladder at Chase Bank/Bank One. But 18 months ago, he made a big change when he accepted his position at American National Bank. “I always thought I was more suited for a smaller, community style bank,” he says. “I took that leap of faith and came to my current employer [and] I couldn’t be happier.” Throughout his career, Browning has been a devout supporter of dozens of charity organizations including Sounds of Spring for North Richland Hills, the Best Buddies Program, the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth, the American Heart Association, Alliance for Lupus Research, March of Dimes, Kids Wish Network, Paralyzed Veterans of America and The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to name a few. Browning says several of the organizations are relat-

About the prop: I love to hunt. Duck hunting is my favorite. Hunting is important to me because it is the one thing that my dad and I do together. I am hoping to pass that tradition down to my son. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Hans and Frans costume (Saturday Night Live) Where did your first paycheck come from? I was a sacker at Skaggs Alpha Beta. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? I shot a Sika Deer and had it mounted. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail for most basic communication Another profession you would like to try? Professional golfer Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Anywhere that serves good sushi or Thai

May 28, 2009

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A Special Thank You to our 40 Under 40 Gift Providers

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Luis Caballero
Matador Marketing Group
Clients have included Anheuser-Busch, Pepsi Co., Nissan North America, AT&T, the Fort Worth Transit Authority and even Yum! Brands – notable because the Taco Bell-parent company refined its marketing message after an initial stumble in Mexico and now is boasting sales that rival those in the United States. Rene Smith is senior public relations specialist at Concussion LLP, a Fort Worth advertising and marketing company that recently joined forces with Matador to take advantage of the large and still-growing North Texas Hispanic population. “Luis Caballero adds value to everything he touches,” Smith says. “Whether coaching his two young girls’ soccer team, volunteering at local not-for-profit organizations or conducting business, Luis’ actions command both respect and admiration from his peers.” Caballero’s volunteer efforts also are important; he has donated his time to Musicarte de Fort Worth, Artes de la Rosa, the American Cancer Society the Fort Worth Youth Soccer Association and Southern Methodist University’s Young Alumni organization.
– John-Laurent Tronche

Hispanic consumers account for an annual buying power in the billions of dollars in the Dallas-Fort Worth area – Luis Caballero wants to help you attract some of that. Caballero is president of Matador Marketing Group, a local advertising and marketing company that aims to connect businesses across the nation with the growing Hispanic population. “It’s an education to both the businesses and the Hispanic culture,” Caballero says of his approach. “I view myself as an intermediary bridging that culture gap.” Often, businesses fall to stereotypes when approaching the Hispanic market, which no doubt is a costly mistake. Other times those same businesses approach the Hispanic consumers as a large group, instead of a collection of many different individuals, including English-speaking Hispanics, Spanish speakers, first-generation Mexican-Americans, South Americans and more. There was a time when a logo could be presented at an event aimed at Hispanics and the company could get a good response. Those times have changed, Caballero says. “It’s about education,” he says, “that’s my main goal: for businesses to realize they can grow their sales or their profits by not necessarily expanding from a physical standpoint but expanding from a customer-base standpoint.” To expand: “It’s easier to diversify your customer base than to diversify your product line,” he says. About the prop: It’s a reflection of my life with my family. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A tattoo Where did your first paycheck come from? TCU Florist back in 1985 or ’86 What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? I’m still waiting to buy that luxury item. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? I hopefully will retire into being a professor. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? The Fort Worth Club

May 28, 2009

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Misti Callicott
Reata Restaurant
“For nonprofit organizations, community leaders and corporate functions, the name ‘Misti Callicott’ is practically synonymous with Reata,” says Julie Hatch who works at Creative Communications. Always “positive, upbeat and packed full of energy,” Hatch says, Callicott is “truly an unsung hero to Reata Restaurant and the Fort Worth area. Because the nature of her position keeps her behind the scenes, she rarely gets recognized or takes credit for the relationships – and revenue – that she personally generates.” One of the things she enjoys most about Reata, Callicott says, is being a part of the family-owned business. “It is truly a pleasure to come to work every day. I am surrounded by talented and creative individuals, and sincerely enjoy our large and varied base of clientele,” Callicott says. “Al Micallef, the owner of Reata, has taught me so much about setting goals, being creative and doing what it takes to get the job done,” she says. “I am honored to be given this prestigious award, and am extremely thankful that my colleagues and clients have created such a positive work environment, and for my family for giving me the time and the freedom to commit to my job.” Callicott and her husband, Steven, have a 3-year-old daughter named Kelby – “and both of them mean the world to me,” she says.
– Betty Dillard

Misti Callicott began her career with Downtown’s Reata Restaurant in early 2002 just after the eatery relocated to Sundance Square. The restaurant known far and wide for its cowboy cuisine didn’t even have a catering division until Callicott came galloping to the rescue. Since riding into town, Callicott – who hails from Crandall just east of Dallas – has helped establish Reata’s reputation for top-notch catered affairs while cultivating relationships with hundreds of meeting and event planners across the Lone Star State. Her passion for giving back to the community has endeared her to charities and those less fortunate. Callicott and her team have provided Reata’s legendary Western fare to charity events including the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame Luncheon, Habitat for Humanity’s Tool Box Bash, the YWCA’s Tribute to Women in Business Luncheon as well as largescale community events such as MAIN Street Arts Festival. She also is an avid supporter of Big Brothers & Sisters’ Big Taste, Lena Pope Home’s Sweetheart Dessert Fantasy and the Tarrant Area Food Bank’s Empty Bowls. Callicott, 29, has played a key role in Reata’s expansion at the annual Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo, which includes two full-service restaurants, Reata at the Rodeo and Reata at the Backstage. Under her leadership, Reata’s catering component, Reata on the Road, surpassed $1.4 million in sales in 2008.

About the prop: It's pictures of my daughter Kelby and she's my inspiration. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Raw chicken Where did your first paycheck come from? Snowy Ice, a snow cone stand when I was 15 What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? I love bags and purses. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Business owner of my own café/bakery Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Reata, of course!

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Kathryn Cardarelli
Center for Community Health, Department of Family Medicine at Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health at the UNT Health Science Center
chronic disease and pregnancy outcomes and research on policy and methods related to population health and health disparities. She joined the UNT Health Science Center in 2004, where she’s a researcher, a leader and a teacher, exposing students to epidemiology. While being with students is always exciting and challenging, she says, working in a field that always produces new research and insights is part of what keeps her intrigued. “I feel blessed to have a job that changes every day because that’s the nature of science,” she says. While Cardarelli will be teaching some summer classes at the UNT Health Science Center, she will be taking a brief hiatus this fall when she and her husband welcome their second son in October. Cardarelli and her husband, Dr. Roberto Cardarelli, already have one child, Cristiano, who is 3 years old. Cardarelli herself grew up with two parents in the medical field, and says she always knew she wanted to go into the sciences, but right now her son’s favorite thing is to ask “Why?” to everything. That constant questioning is similar to what keeps the field of epidemiology moving forward. The public may not think much about the field, but that doesn’t mean there’s not plenty to learn. “When everything is good and everything appears normal, no one thinks about it,” she says.
–Elizabeth Bassett

It always seems that public health topics come up in crisis moments – when swine flu is being put forward as the next virus to panic about, for example. “It’s unfortunate you have to have some disaster occur for people to understand what’s going on,” says Kathryn Cardarelli, a professor at the UNT Health Science Center and director for the Center for Community Health. Cardarelli, an epidemiologist, initially focused on infectious disease. When she was an undergraduate at the University of Texas at Austin, she had an internship at the state public health department, which solidified her interest in studying the factors affecting health and illness in populations. Later on, her research focus shifted, but she went on to get a master’s degree in public health and then a doctoral degree in epidemiology. Before earning her doctorate, though, Cardarelli spent two year’s completing a fellowship with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which focused on health policies and programs for vulnerable populations. She spent time in Washington, D.C., and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, but most of her time was in regional Dallas offices, where she could better study the populations along the Mexico/Texas border. Today, Cardarelli’s interests include the influence of social and psychosocial factors on

About the prop: I had planned to use a different prop, but the photographer liked my pregnant belly better. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Working for the state, there is little that I can expense. Where did your first paycheck come from? My father’s office, age 13 What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A handbag – this is my big vice (just ask my husband). Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Definitely e-mail...can respond whenever you have a moment. Another profession you would like to try? Meteorology; I have always been fascinated with weather. Where is the best place to have a business or work lunch? Michael’s on Seventh – it’s a short walk from my office.

May 28, 2009

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Kim Catalano
Fort Worth Municipal Court Judge Pro Tem
Catalano also works at First United Methodist’s pre-school once a week, and works with the Tarrant County Young Lawyer’s Association, the Tanglewood Elementary School PTA board, the Fort Worth Junior Women’s Club and the University Little League. At Tanglewood Elementary, Catalano is involved in the school’s Reading is Fundamental program, where she and others encourage children to read by giving children free books and hosting reading events. Catalano says she finds working with Tanglewood Elementary rewarding because she’s working to help educate children, including her own. “Anything you can do for a child that enhances their education and makes them want to learn more is so rewarding,” she says. “I tell my husband all the time that I’m not getting the self-satisfaction you get from winning a trial or settling a case, but I see my children’s faces smiling all the time, and that’s what I’m getting.”
– Leslie Wimmer

Kim Catalano juggles it all: her family, her jobs and her community service. After about six years of working as a director and a nonequity partner at Bracket & Ellis, Catalano decided it was time to spend more time with her three children who are now 8, 7 and 3 years old. “I just can’t imagine somebody else taking care of my children, and being gone from them,” Catalano says. “It was a very hard decision to [leave the firm]. But, people always ask me ‘Kim, how do you do it all?’ and I say I don’t, you have to give up things for yourself and do what you need to do for your family.” Soon after leaving the firm, Catalano found herself with new career opportunities, and took on a job as a Fort Worth Municipal Court Judge Pro Tem on nights and weekends. As a Pro Tem Judge, Catalano serves in the Fort Worth Municipal Court and in the Fort Worth Jail as needed. She deals mostly in traffic citations, class-c misdemeanor tickets and arraignments. She also works as Tarrant County’s Tax Ad Litem attorney, where she serves two roles: representing children or incompetent adults who are injured, and in locating people who have been sued but can’t be found.

About the prop: I juggled a gavel, which represents my legal career as a lawyer and a judge. And I juggled a microphone, which represents my personal interest and hobby with my vocal performance degree. And then I juggled the baseball, and that represents my husband and three boys who just love baseball. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Fake handcuffs for a “Book ‘Em” themed reading event at my kids’ elementary school. Where did your first paycheck come from? I was a pizza delivery girl. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? My used “Mommy” Volvo. It wasn’t brand new, but it was Volvo and I considered a Volvo a luxury item. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Broadway singer Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Anywhere. I am just happy if I have the time to eat.

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Greg Cook
Integra Realty Resources
dent. But Cook hasn’t stopped with professional organizations. He also has served as chair of the Steve Baggett Memorial Golf Tournament, a volunteer at Westaid, providing assistance for West Fort Worth citizens in need and has served on the Ridglea Hills Neighborhood Association. Cook says his community involvement is important to him because it’s “important to help those that are less fortunate. It’s just that simple.” Cook and his wife, Shannon, have been married for almost 14 years and don’t have any children, but “don’t tell our 14year-old chocolate lab that,” he says.
– Aleshia Howe

Greg Cook’s motto in life is ‘don’t dwell on the past. Learn from it and move forward.’ And that’s just what he has done. Cook has taken lessons he learned outside of the classroom while playing football at Texas A&M University (a center) and coupled those with earning his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics and subsequently his master’s degree in land economics and real estate in back-to-back years to propel him to becoming senior analyst at Integra Realty Resources in Fort Worth. Cook got his start with Integra through an internship with Donald Sherwood during the summer of 1994. Sherwood eventually would merge offices with Ben Loughry in 1996 to form Appraisal Data Services and hire Cook. Appraisal Data Services later merged with Dallas-based LamBis Consulting to form Integra Realty Resources DFW. Loughry, who nominated Cook for the 40 Under 40 award, says Cook is one of his company’s top producers. “Greg is a very valuable asset to our company both in and out of the office,” Loughry says. “He is not only one of our top producers year in and year out, but he also represents us in various industry groups.” These groups include being a member of the International Right of Way Association since 2002 and serving as its secretary, treasurer and vice presi-

About the prop: It’s my helmet that I played in at Texas A&M! What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Shotgun ammunition Where did your first paycheck come from? City of Amarillo as a life guard What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A watch, which to this day I still wear. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Either is fine. They both have their advantages. Another profession you would like to try? Hunting guide or golf pro but my golf game disqualifies me from the latter. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Lucile’s Stateside Bistro on Camp Bowie Boulevard

May 28, 2009

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Andrew de la Torre
Embargo
“Whether serving as a board member, providing a venue for events or providing monetary support,” a colleague notes, “Andrew de la Torre has made an impressive showing of community involvement.” His volunteer-service efforts extend to such organizations as Texas Ballet Theatre’s Board of Patrons, United Way, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the AIDS Outreach Center, Leadership Fort Worth and affiliated programs, Centro Cultural de las Americas, the Latino Peace Officers Association, Professionals Supporting the Arts, Artes de la Rosa and the Rose Marine Theatre, the Fort Worth Library Foundation and the city of Fort Worth Hispanic Leadership Organization.
– Michael H. Price

At 29 Andrew de la Torre has developed a substantial contribution to the economy of Fort Worth’s thriving Central Business District. His entertainment venue, Embargo, has helped to trigger a lively scene within a once-neglected southern end of the Downtown area, in the 900 block of Houston Street. Embargo has emerged as a fitting complement to the entertaining, pedestrian-welcoming atmosphere that has developed since the 1980s within the northern stretches of the Downtown area. de la Torre counts among his mentors some of the most capable leaders the city has seen – including his father, political and economic leader Carlos de la Torre, and former Mayor Bob Bolen. Bolstering an advertising and public relations degree from Texas Christian University with backup studies in art and Spanish, de la Torre found his professional leanings in property development ventures – declining job offers elsewhere in order to indulge a love for his hometown. An early collaborative effort, Gryphon Acquisitions, found him doubling as a project manager and construction worker, restoring deteriorated properties on the city’s historic south side. In times more recent, de la Torre has established Embargo as a preferred location for business gatherings, professional networking events and entertainment for entertainment’s sake.

About the prop: I have three skateboards and use them all to commute to work and run errands around Downtown. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? The passenger side of a wrecked 1957 Chevy Bel Air. It’s hanging above the front door at Embargo. Where did your first paycheck come from? Louis Heinze Construction What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A Romeo y Julieta Anniversary cigar humidor, stocked with Cubans Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Neither, face to face is the way to go. The eyes never lie. Another profession you would like to try? City planner or developer Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Nowhere. How can you talk business while you are stuffing your face? Logistically, it just doesn’t make sense. Cocktails, anyone?

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Mark W. Drennan
Bank of Texas NA
“He’s been a great mentor, really he has been ever since I met him,” Drennan says. Since returning to his hometown, Drennan and his wife, Heather, have stayed busy. Drennan is a member of the Fort Worth Chamber’s Vision Fort Worth group, on the Young Leaders council of the Greater Fort Worth Real Estate Council and a member of the Society of Commercial Realtors. He has also been in the class of Leadership Fort Worth, which he touts as “great program.” He also is attending the Stonier Graduate School of Banking at the University of Pennslyvania. When not working, Drennan and his wife like to travel, but that has been hampered somewhat by the birth of two twin boys, Beckett and Finn, now 2 years old. “They’re my future travel buddies,” he says.
– Robert Francis

Born and raised in Fort Worth, Mark W. Drennan returned six years ago and has been working to provide a positive impact ever since. He earns high praise from those who work with him. “Mark meets the challenges of today’s banking environment with integrity, intelligence and ingenuity,” says Charlie Powell, Tarrant County Market President for Bank of Texas N.A. “Mark is also committed to making his community a better place to work and live.” As senior vice president market manager for commercial real estate for Bank of Texas, Drennan currently is dealing with difficult market conditions. But he has an upbeat attitude about the current environment. “I’ve done this for 11 years and I haven’t seen a market like this before – and neither has anyone else. It’s a unique time, but it’s a good learning experience,” he says. “I truly believe when we come out of this, we’ll have learned a lot.” Drennan left his native city to attend college at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, where he received his bachelor’s degree and an MBA. From there, he spent some time in Denver before joining Bank of Oklahoma. With Bank of Oklahoma, he worked in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Okla., then moved to Dallas with Bank of Texas, before landing back home in Fort Worth. He has known Powell for about nine years, though he has only worked directly with him for the past six years.

About the prop: A family heirloom, a globe purchased by my grandparents in 1955, represents my enjoyment of traveling and a photo of my 2-year-old twin boys, Beckett and Finn, my future travel buddies. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Cheesecakes for customer Christmas gifts Where did your first paycheck come from? A job where I packaged and shipped shoe trees. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? New golf clubs Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Host of the Travel Channel Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Fort Worth Club

May 28, 2009

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Jamie Fulton
The Covey Restaurant & Brewery
tional recognition for his skill.” Fulton also has implemented an organization known as The Covey CREW, whose membership of beer connoisseurs partake of such monthly events as beer-pairing dinners, designed to compare dynamics of flavor in a festive setting. Other Fulton-developed brews have scored in prominent championship events, as well, including the Jack’s Reserve Barleywine and the Cowboy Lager. The Covey itself has landed a number of food-journalist accolades. Fulton and his wife, Kelly, have a son, Jackson. Fulton’s community-service activities involve such agencies as the Lena Pope Home, the Tarrant Area Food Bank, Big Brothers/Big Sisters and the Jewel Charity Ball.
– Michael H. Price

An upbringing in a family of physicians and fine-food aficionados prepared Jamie Fulton for a self-assured career in the scientific precision of brewing. Fulton’s development of a distinctive Vienna Lager earned him a World Beer Cup Gold Medal for 2008, in addition to a 2007 regional championship. Fulton, 27, opened The Covey Restaurant & Brewery in Fort Worth in April 2006 as a culmination of interests that date back to childhood. “I absorbed the interest from my parents, the drive and spirit,” Fulton says, “along with the passion for fine foods – cooking is a family tradition – and all that goes with them. I started brewing while in college, even though my major field of study [at Trinity University] was far removed from business or cooking – in art history. But then, brewing is an art in itself.” The Covey has logged steady growth in three years, with a 50 percent surge in profitability since 2007. Fulton has proven himself as a shirtsleeves manager, taking part in the workday routine in both the restaurant and brewery operations while radiating leadership abilities and long-term vision. His customary presence at the restaurant assures visibility among the customers; a Covey mailing list serves 1,400 patrons with frequently updated information. “Jamie is not only a successful entrepreneur who cares deeply about the community,” writes a colleague, “but he also has perfected the art of micro-brewing and has created a niche for himself in Fort Worth … and has received interna-

About the prop: It’s the World Beer Cup medal. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Some of the finer Belgian-style blond ales – research, for my line of work Where did your first paycheck come from? An architectural firm in Dallas What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Fine coffees, chocolates, cheeses – I value the finer such selections. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Cheese-making, perhaps Where is the best place to have a business lunch? The Covey

May 28, 2009

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J.R. Holland
Colonial Savings
commercial loans, commercial checking and savings accounts, business credit and debit cards and more. Before joining Colonial Savings in March 2008, Holland spent seven years as a golf professional in South Carolina, Washington D.C., and finally Fort Worth. He still retains his membership to the Professional Golf Association. And while he doesn’t get to golf as much as he once did, he continues to enjoy the company-to-client relationships his current employer provides. “As a golf professional, I was able to teach people how to improve their golf game, wardrobe and appreciation for the game,” he says in his nomination form for the 40 Under 40. “I realize now that what excited me in golf was the excitement and joy these simple things gave my members. As a banker, I’m using the same principles to help our clients take the small pieces of their life to create a larger, more complete whole.”
– John-Laurent Tronche

Not many people would leave behind a job playing golf to pursue a career at a financial services company, but that’s exactly what J.R. Holland did last year. Holland currently is product manager at Colonial Savings, a longtime Fort Worth-based financial services company, after having previously worked as a golf professional for seven years, two of which he spent at Fort Worth’s Colonial Country Club. But the Tulsa native insists there are similarities between his previous job and current responsibilities. As product manager, Holland works with clients to ensure they’ve got all the tools necessary to efficiently and effectively manage their business needs – from credit and debit card processing to check scanning and more. Much like a golf professional teaches an individual about swings, and perhaps sells them a better club, Holland educates and sells with his current employer. He educates clients about how a Colonial Savings product can work with a business and what it will cost. “The main goal for our existing clients is providing for their needs. Whatever needs they have we strive to not only provide them excellent service but find the product that fills their needs,” he says. “We’re not going to put them in a shoe that doesn’t fit just for the fact of selling one. “We do a little bit of everything,” Holland adds, “we go from restaurants to lawn care all the way to white-collar businesses.” In addition to what Holland provides, Colonial Savings also offers a range of other banking and finance solutions, including About the prop: First a husband, second a PGA golf professional and third a banker. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Cookie cakes for almost every south Fort Worth business Where did your first paycheck come from? A fishing lure company in Oklahoma What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A flat-panel TV when they first came out Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Director of a nonprofit organization Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Joe T. Garcia’s

May 28, 2009

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Lyndsay Hoover
Presbyterian Night Shelter
Fort Worth Public Relations Society of America, and is community vice president as well as vice president of fund development for the Fort Worth Junior League. Hoover also serves as a board member and secretary of MayFest Inc. and serves on the Amon Carter Gallery Steering Committee. But it is her work with the homeless, she says, that inspires her more than anything. “Working at Presbyterian Night Shelter is so challenging but it’s really rewarding, too. It’s sad to see people broken down and disheartened but seeing them tackle those enormous problems, seeing hope light up in their eyes, is one of the most rewarding things possible,” she says. “For every ounce of suffering there’s that much more in the joy expressed when they overcome their obstacles. Helping them see there’s another life out there and seeing that joy keeps me motivated in the midst of all the suffering.” Lyndsay and her husband, Justin, are expecting their first baby in August.
– Betty Dillard

Lyndsay Hoover started volunteering at the Presbyterian Night Shelter in 2004. By November 2007, she left her eightyear role as public relations and development director at the Fort Worth Zoo to join the team at PNS in the same capacity. She recently took over the reins as interim executive director until a permanent one is hired. Although the Weatherford native enjoyed the challenges of fund-raising and increasing awareness of the zoo’s programs and still loves animals – she grew up riding horses and showing longhorns – she’s found her life’s work helping eliminate homelessness. “When I started working with homeless women and children,” Hoover says, “my heart just grew and it became my passion to help the cause.” Hoover has put her whole heart into stimulating community awareness about homeless issues. She initiated the shelter’s first public relations and proactive media placement campaign and created the organization’s first fund-raising strategy. In her time at PNS, she has tripled the volunteer base and has recruited almost 500 new donors. She helped raise $1.78 million in her first year, exceeding the prior year’s annual giving by 20 percent. She also increased foundation support by 120 percent, raising $525,000. “Lyndsay is a remarkable person with tremendous skills, insight and dedication,” says former PNS Executive Director Carol Klocek. “The homeless community has benefited from her ability to raise awareness, generate compassion and bring positive good will toward those who live on the margins in Fort Worth.” A graduate of Texas A&M University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism, Hoover has won numerous awards for her marketing acumen. She is a board member of Greater About the prop: The faces of homelessness are much more diverse than most people suspect. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? I work in nonprofit; we don’t expense much. Where did your first paycheck come from? Either mucking out horse stalls or at Dairy Queen in Weatherford (I can't remember which was first). Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Thankfully, I picked right the first time (PR and fundraising for nonprofits). Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Park Hill Deli – it’s causal, light and isn’t noisy.

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David Kramer
Republic Title of Texas
parameters are met, and your goals are met. Profit margins, all that.” Kramer says. “And from an outside perspective, I think that your reputation is key. You can’t violate some of the core tenets of business. And I don’t distinguish between business ethics and maybe family ethics. You have to hold true to core principles if you’re going to build a reputation, and people have to know you’re going to do what you say and that you stand up for things.”
– Leslie Wimmer

David Kramer, senior vice president of Republic Title of Texas, was genetically predisposed to being in the title business, he says. “This career path was aligned genetically, because my father is in the title business, and he’s the chairman of this company,” Kramer says. Republic Title offers title and escrow related services for residential and commercial real estate transactions. Kramer joined Republic Title in 2005, when he sold a company he had equity in Republic. He now manages the residential operations for the company on the western half of the Metroplex, and does some limited work in the commercial side of the business. Among the reasons Michael Flynn, with Southland Property Tax Consultants, cited in nominating Kramer was Kramer’s business spirit, which Flynn says exemplifies a Fort Worth business person. “I believe strongly in the management style of servant leadership, the role of management is not to really delegate down, but to support up,” Kramer says. “It’s to provide all the tools and resources for employees so they can be successful and the company becomes successful because of that. “The other thing I think is you can manage a business based on all kinds of metrics and systems, but the reality is if you just base your whole culture around customer service, just do excellent customer service, the other metrics and

About the prop: I enjoy hunting and fishing and bow hunting. I love animals, and I think they’re delicious. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A Santa suit, a bottle of scotch and a pack of camel lights. It was my first Christmas party in business work. Where did your first paycheck come from? Bennigan’s, I was a bus boy. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A 19th century armoire for hanging smoked meats. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? I’d have to be matador or a caboose man or a stand-up comedian. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? The City Club

May 28, 2009

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Craig Lloyd
Glint Advertising & Design
for smaller companies and nonprofits, “The budgets aren’t huge – there’s good money but they’re trying to figure out how to make that top-10 spot.” Lloyd credits several facts to his firm’s success, including hiring the right people for the right job. “Our creative director used to be my boss when I started out,” he says. “He’s very good at what he does and we’re a great complement to each other.” He adds, “It’s about finding the right person, the right fit. Skill set is important when it’s a designer but a lot of that stuff can be taught. It’s about tapping into what we do and providing for that client.” Lloyd says he reminds companies that it’s less about them, and more about the consumers, who ultimately decide whether advertising and marketing efforts are a success or a failure. “You’ve got so many different areas of marketing, the bottom line is looking at their budget – big or small – and applying that message effectively,” he says. “Sometimes it’s a pamphlet, sometimes it’s a television ad.”
– John-Laurent Tronche

While some advertising agencies work to land big clients with even bigger wallets, entrepreneur Craig Lloyd said it was the little guys that led him to open his own firm, Glint Advertising & Design, in Hurst. The North Texas businessman founded Glint in 2000, following a stint working in Dallas for a number of years specializing in the retail industry. But after focusing on large clients, Lloyd set out to cater to the companies that resembled him – companies that wanted to be different, grow and blaze new paths. “They’re hungry, they want to move forward and they believe in the process,” says Lloyd, principal of the sevenemployee company. “That’s what I saw working in the industry.” Currently, the company works with 30 different industries and about 80 different types of clients; nonprofit organizations, senior services firms and retail represent most of Lloyd’s clients, while others have included Mensa International, Ameriprise Financial Inc. and fitness firm Larry North through a partnership with a separate company. “A big part for me is I didn’t want the clients running the agency, I wanted the agency to run the client,” he says, adding sometimes large clients are set in their ways and difficult to maneuver. As About the prop: It reminded me of the choice I made to go into advertising rather than become an illustrator. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A wooden statue of a marlin Where did your first paycheck come from? Armed Forces European Broadcasting Squadron What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A burnt orange Chevrolet Avalanche Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Animator for movies Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Sabor Cigar & Wine Lounge in Keller

May 28, 2009

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Brant Martin
Wick Phillips LLP
he’s learned come together with the thrill of being in front of a judge and jury and finding creative solutions. He started his career as a corporate lawyer, but missed the dispute side of law. He’s worked in various positions, including being in-house counsel for a start-up in New York, but says he wanted to get back to Fort Worth, where he was born and raised, to start a family. He married his wife, Natalie, in November 2003, and today has two sons: Campbell, who is almost four, and Davis, who is two. Law is a noble profession, Martin says, and he’s happy to be a part of it. He was the Democratic nominee for Tarrant County Judge in 2002, and he says that gave him an opportunity to meet people on both sides of the aisle who were passionate about local government and the positive impact it can have on citizens. “It’s important for everyone to get engaged,” he says.
– Elizabeth Bassett

On face value, Brant Martin’s academic degrees have little relevancy to each other. There’s the undergraduate work in Spanish and English at Washington & Lee University, where he graduated in 1992, followed by a master’s of arts in religion at Yale University Divinity School in 1994, where Martin had an emphasis in religion and literature. Top all that off with a J.D. degree from Southern Methodist University’s law school in 1997, where Martin was valedictorian and editor of the SMU Law Review. When Martin explains his degrees, though, it suddenly makes sense. “It’s about interpreting texts and helping people at crisis points in their lives,” says Martin, 38. “I do get asked that question quite a bit.” Martin, who is now a partner at Wick Phillips LLP, says being a lawyer has always been something he’s thought of pursuing. In school, his studies focused around interpreting “ancient texts” – whether it’s the law or religious texts – to make it applicable for the modern world, as well as learning to deal with a system with which most people are broadly familiar (again, such as the law or the dogma of a religion) but most don’t know the nuances. The law and religion are also each focused on helping people in a crisis point. Martin is a commercial trial lawyer, and says all of the skills

About the prop: One prop is a picture of his children, and the other is a small movie poster from To Kill a Mockingbird, the scene in which Atticus Finch is in front of the jail talking down a mob. “To me, I’m not there yet . . . but that would be an ideal I would strive toward, which is not only to be a good lawyer but to be a good father.” What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A coal miner’s pick that I bought on eBay for one of my partners as a “trophy” when he resolved a big case that had to do with a coal mining company. Where did your first paycheck come from? The Back Porch ice cream parlor on Camp Bowie Boulevard. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A nice watch Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Both, it depends on the situation. Another profession you would like to try? Writing or teaching Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Reata or the Fort Worth Club

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Daniel McCarthy
The Blum Firm PC
focuses on family businesses and closely-held business entities, providing them with tax and estate planning services. He works with clients to develop and implement structures to form, manage, protect and transfer business and investment assets in a tax efficient manner. He has received numerous accolades for his work with The Blum Firm as well, being named a “Texas Rising Star” by Texas Monthly magazine. McCarthy also has been past president of the Tarrant County Tax and Estate Planning Section of the Tarrant County Bar Association and a vice chairman of the Estate and Gift Tax Committee of the State Bar of Texas Tax Section. McCarthy also receives accolades from his wife, Erica, for being a devoted father to his son, Jack and daughter, Shea.
– Robert Francis

For Daniel McCarthy, coming to Texas several years back has given the young man a chance to make his mark on his adopted home – and make it he has. McCarthy, 39, a tax and estate planning attorney and CPA with The Blum Firm PC, has found success, not just in his chosen profession, but also though his involvement in the community. The current board president of Imagination Celebration said he was initially impressed when he began to see what the organization, which combines appreciation of the arts with education, was accomplishing in the community. “We provide a wonderful opportunity to the school children of this area,” he says. As a leader in the organization, McCarthy says he stays involved by giving his time and supporting others in the work there. “I think it’s important for me to be a strong voice of support for the organization,” he says. For Ginger Head-Gearheart, executive director and founder of Imagination Celebration, McCarthy’s integrity is a key attribute he brings as a leader to the organization. “He is someone that is a very strong, bright and quiet, but he’s absolutely a leader,” she says. “I’m very impressed and the longer I know him, the more impressed I am.” For instance, though he is busy in his professional life, he never seems pressed for time, she says. “That’s one key component to being a good leader, not letting anyone feel like you don’t have time for them,” she says. In his profession, the Chicago-born McCarthy primarily

About the prop: I picked the program from 2005 World Series. I’m a lifelong Chicago White Sox fan and I was able to get tickets to go see one of the games with my father. Where did your first paycheck come from? As a caddy at Inverness County Club near Chicago What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? I remember in high school and installing cable and we got paid in cash, so I went out and bought – and I know this really dates me – Guess Jeans. They were just “in” then. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Oil and gas exploration Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Fort Worth Club

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Todd Miller
Worth Benefits & Consultants Inc.
“Worth Benefits offers something that is not in this demographic,” Miller says. “It is overlooked by many people out there. It’s really exciting to do something that has not been done before. I just love building long-term relationships.” In addition to his business venture, Miller has an extensive list of community involvement. He is a founding member of the Young at Heart Board, a young professional American Heart Association group, founder and chairman of the Samaritan House young professionals committee, founder of the Samaritan House Youth Initiative, chairman of Bluebonnet Place Neighborhood Association, Berry Street Initiative executive committee and Presidents Council for Texas Wesleyan University. “Todd is passionate about being an influence for good across all platforms in our city,” says Susan Nix, director of marketing and community relations at Casa Mañana. “He is building business relationships and a network of professionals to accomplish these goals.” Miller and his wife, Michele, have two children, Aggie and Pate.
– Crystal Forester

Todd Miller has made a career of out-of-the-box ideas. “If it sounds like a bad idea I’ll give it a shot,” he says. Miller’s business ventures began while still in college at Texas Wesleyan University working on a bachelor’s degree in advertising and public relations. With several friends, Miller owned a movie production company making short films and full-length features. After Miller graduated in 2000, they sold the company. One of the films Miller’s group shot required wrestling knowledge, so Miller stepped up to the plate. This led to a four-year stint as a professional wrestler, The Blue Hawaiian. In addition to wrestling, he also announced. “My mom never understood how I could go from a debutante ball one weekend to wrestling in a hole-in-the-wall bar the next,” Miller says. More recently, however, Miller opened his own insurance company, Worth Benefits & Consultants Inc., in March. An interest in insurance was fueled by Miller’s stint as a test driver for motorcycles. “It was one of the most fun jobs in the whole world. I was young and newly married, having a good time,” he says. “I had a couple of accidents and insurance didn’t cover it.” Curious about other people in similar situations, he investigated the industry. He worked at Johnston and Matthews Benefits and Technology Consultants for more than a year working with companies with more than 100 employees. “My parents were excited to say I had a real job,” Miller says. Now, in his own firm, he works with companies with less than 150 employees in the small- to mid-market business.

About the prop: I love to grill, you can give me a whole weekend and leave me in the kitchen and I’m happy. That’s how I relax. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Never had the opportunity to expense anything – I’ve owned my own business most of the time. Where did your first paycheck come from? University Car Wash, it’s Cityview Car Wash now. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Custom made one-off motorcycle Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Is there anything else I haven’t tried? Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Piranha Sushi, especially if someone else is buying.

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Nelson Mitchell
History Maker Homes
the Young President’s Organization. In addition to building homes for primarily first-time homebuyers, Mitchell says History Maker Homes also is a faithbased organization. “It is sometimes difficult because we get called to a higher standard by our customers and partners. We set very high expectations for ourselves on how we treat our internal and external customers,” he says. “[But] mostly, it is not hard at all because it is consistent with my beliefs, convictions and values.” Mitchell and his wife, Liz, have three sons: Jake, Miles and Luke.
– Aleshia Howe

Nelson Mitchell never intended to go into his family’s business. The fourth generation in a line of men who founded, then ran History Maker Homes, Mitchell earned money in junior high and high school by working on home construction job sites doing the dirty work, like picking up trash, scrubbing tubs and mowing model lawns. It wasn’t until his college years at Texas A&M University, where he framed houses during his summers, that he fell in love with building homes. “I also worked with some of our superintendents the summer before I graduated college and experienced first hand the rewarding feeling of taking a piece of dirt with nothing on it then building a home and experiencing the joy of handing over the keys to an excited family who is owning their first home,” he says. In 2000, Mitchell became the fourth-generation president of History Maker Homes and he described the experience as “humbling.” “After running our company for almost 10 years, I have so much of a better appreciation for the effort it took from the past three generations,” he says. “… [My grandfather and greatgrandfather] had great vision and drive to start a company from scratch.” In his home life, Mitchell is a member of the World Bible Translation Center in Fort Worth as well as board member of Fort Worth Christian School in North Richland Hills. And he is just as active in the home building industry, with distinction as a progressive and innovative member of the National Association of Home Builders, and Builder’s 20. He is also a member of the Greater Fort Worth Builders’ Association and

About the prop: It was the coolest thing in my office. Where did your first paycheck come from? Cleaning dog and cat kennels from my father’s veterinarian clinic What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A Porsche 911 Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Own and manage a ski resort Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Reata

May 28, 2009

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Randi Mitchell
OmniAmerican Bank
“For children it’s important just to make sure, because our children are our future, to make sure they understand the value of saving money and understand what money is and how they need to save for the future,” Mitchell says. “And on the adult side, it’s important, especially in this economy, to make sure people understand how best to save their money and really prepare for the unexpected.” A good portion of Mitchell’s community service work is her involvement with OmniAmerican’s efforts with Junior Achievement, which includes setting up and organizing schools and volunteers for various programs, and participating in a bowl-a-thon every year, she says. Also, Mitchell works with Catholic Charities, United Way, and the American Lung Association.
– Leslie Wimmer

A large part of Randi Mitchell’s work is teaching young people and adults about financial literacy and how to save money. Mitchell, the vice president of marketing at OmniAmerican Bank, works in several capacities to further financial education for students and others in Texas. She serves on the Texas Bankers Association’s Foundation Board, which focuses on financial literacy and programs such as Teach Children to Save, Junior Achievement and works to award scholarships to students. “We go out to schools every year and teach programs on financial literacy,” Mitchell says. “Last year, we had three schools, and it was a big year for us. We had over 1,500 kids that we were able to teach these programs to.” The programs are broken into two parts: A program geared toward kindergarten to second grade focusing on money and the value of money, and a program for third through fifth grades focused on the difference in needs and wants.

About the prop: A photo of my family, my husband Matthew and our two girls: Maitlynn, 5-years-old, and Mayden, 9 weeks. My family is so very important to me. A scrapbook, turned to the page with my mother and grandmother on it. And my camera. I love to take pictures, especially of my girls. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Many years ago my team and I were up working late - until 4 a.m. - preparing for a launch of a new campaign. We were assembling displays for our branches. To keep everyone’s spirits up and keep them motivated I made a Wal-Mart run and bought all kinds of crazy things for them. It made everyone laugh and kept us going. Where did your first paycheck come from? I worked at the concession stand at the Benbrook Ballpark for several summers. After that it was as a carhop at Sonic. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A Tahoe. It was absolutely beautiful. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Probably photography. I love taking pictures and capturing the cutest expressions. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Any of the Pappa’s restaurants. My boss loves Pappa’s burgers so I’ll go with that.

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Drew Myers
e-Partners in Giving
running to Back on My Feet, a nonprofit in Philadelphia that attacks homelessness through running. “Drew Myers inspires people to ‘never stop giving back,’ not only through his company but also by being a great example in the community,” says e-Partners in Giving colleague Carrie Bigbie. “I cannot wait to hear (or read through his blog, Facebook or Twitter) what Drew is doing for his community and the support he gives to organizations around Fort Worth and elsewhere.” Myers helped host the kick-off rally for the 2009 Tarrant County Homeless Count, the first Christmas Extravaganza at Presbyterian Night Shelter and the North Richland Hills Trash Bash 2008. He recently began e-Partners in Giving’s first nonprofit partnership with Nuru International, an organization that fights poverty in Africa. “We need to start thinking about others, about giving back to help others,” Myers says. “We’re making it easy for you to do that.”
– Betty Dillard

Two years ago while on a spring break camping trip, Drew Myers, then the director of communications at Texas Christian University’s athletics department, decided to hang up his uniform and create e-Partners in Giving, a Web site designed to make online charitable donations quick and easy. “The idea came out of the blue,” Myers says. “I literally woke up in the middle of the night thinking about it. I thought there should be an easier way to do online giving.” The former Frogs football coach – he served three years as assistant director of football operations at TCU and as the pro scout liaison to high schools and junior colleges – launched ePartners in Giving in December 2008. Previously, Myers was the director of football operations and the defensive passing game coordinator at Blinn College, where he also coached the wide receivers. He earned a master’s degree in education from Prairie View A&M University and has a bachelor’s degree in mass communications from Midwestern State University. In 2000, he was a training camp analyst for the Dallas Cowboy Insider. Myers says he doesn’t regret giving up sports writing and coaching football to facilitate online donations. “I’ve found my true passion with e-Partners in Giving,” he says. “I really believe in giving back and want to help others give back.” Myers is all about giving back. An avid marathon runner, he ran in the Cowtown Half Marathon in February and on April 25, he ran in the Country Music Marathon in Nashville. He made it to mile 24 before succumbing to dehydration and a trip to the emergency room. He donates all the money he collects from

About the prop: I want ‘Never Stop Giving Back’ to become Cowtown’s mantra. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Twenty-four bags of ice (don’t ask) Where did your first paycheck come from? Little Caesar’s Pizza What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Still waiting to afford something luxurious Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you’d like to try? Country music star Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Chimi’s

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Teresa Nelson
Teresa’s Treasures
the board of directors for the Sister Cities program, is on the Carter BloodCare donor council and is a speaker and counselor at the Business Assistance Center. In addition, she donates many of the proceeds from her business to the Humane Society and Safe Haven. “I continue to search for new ways to give back while also teaching young women and business owners how to thrive, not just survive, in the face of adversity,” she says.
– Robert Francis and Betty Dillard

When called upon to testify before Congress about the impact of the current recession on her business, Teresa Nelson knew she could not afford the airfare to Washington, D.C., but she was determined to tell her story, a story familiar to many small businesses around the country. She was able to testify thanks to friends in the community – particularly at TECH Fort Worth and the University of North Texas Health Science Center – who helped Nelson deliver her message via videoconference. “Teresa is a well-respected small business owner in Fort Worth. Her business has been dramatically affected by the economic downturn and she has had to lay off employees as a result,” says Rep. Kay Granger, R-Fort Worth, who had asked Nelson to speak. “Her story is an example of the kind of issues small business owners across the country face.” Nelson sets quite an example. The owner of a Fort Worthbased gourmet gifts business, Teresa’s Treasures, also teaches a high school success skills class to seniors, is a member of

About the prop: My family completes me and the gift design shows I love my city and allows my creativity to flourish. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Chocolate elephants to market “Don’t forget about us.” Where did your first paycheck come from? Wal-Mart Pharmacy What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? An expensive leather briefcase out of college Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail for convenience Another profession you would like to try? Professional Pastry Chef. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Fort Worth Club

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Amanda Neill
Botanical Research Institute of Texas
mands a more immediate attention: “The field research generates immense volumes of online content,” Neill says, “that take BRIT ever further into the digital realm – where all that data can be made available worldwide via the Internet.” Already renowned for its extensive book-form publications, the institute launched a massive campaign to develop Webbased virtual herbariums at www.brit.com. These include an encyclopedic survey of Texas’ native plants, due for completion by summer’s end. In the geographical realm, meanwhile, Neill is preparing for the relocation of more than 1 million plant specimens to a new Cultural District headquarters in development for BRIT. The work dovetails throughout, Neill believes, with BRIT’s formal mission statement: “… to conserve our natural heritage by deepening our knowledge of the plant world and achieving public understanding of the value plants bring to life.”
– Michael H. Price

At 37, Amanda Neill has pursued enough scientific immersion for any number of lifetimes – facing the occasional deathdefying task in the service of botany. The science of plant life became Neill’s calling during a childhood spent at College Station, where parents engaged in the scholarship of fish-and-game biology and zoology in general encouraged her to commune at close range with the outof-doors world. “I was learning about wildflowers – and how to identify them, in our garden – when I was 5 years old,” Neill says. It comes scarcely a surprise, then, that Neill should have applied her college degrees – two from Texas A&M University, where her father teaches, and a doctorate-in-progress – to a career path that led her six years ago to the Fort Worth-based Botanical Research Institute of Texas. As director of the Herbarium at BRIT, Neill has covered the home-front scene thoroughly, leading frequent tours for local organizations and schools and serving as a mentor to students at Texas Christian University. Neill also has ranged far afield on behalf of BRIT, helping to conceive the Andes to Amazon research project in Peru, a year and a half ago, and to land a Moore Foundation grant of about $3 million to support the venture. Her hitch in Southeastern Peru proved unexpectedly perilous when Neill contracted a native parasitic disease that required cathartic intravenous treatment. Fully recovered now, she looks forward to further such fieldwork in New Guinea. Her work in the computer-based realm, however, com-

About the prop: The image of a Herbarium specimen, the memory-cards and the computer-mouse signify our efforts to take BRIT further into the digital realm. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? BRIT, of course, covered my entire treatment for that experience with the tropical disease, cutaneous leishmaniasis, … contracted while I was working in Peru. Where did your first paycheck come from? Brazos Valley Museum – a day-camp job What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Biologists cannot afford luxuries. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Travel writer Where is the best place to have a business lunch? The Flying Saucer
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David T. Nolan
Texas Christian University
“I just explain to them that both religion and literature all deal with values and relationships and that is a lot of what we do in philanthropy,” he says. “So I see them very directly relating in a very meaningful way.” Nolan’s responsibilities at TCU come with ample outside help, he says. “In our profession, you really have to have a strong group of volunteer leaders and we’re very blessed to have Matt Rose from Burlington Northern as our campaign chair,” he says. “He’s been a very strong advocate as have a lot of the other volunteers. It’s very much a group effort.” Nolan has plenty of other experience as well, working in the Peace Corps where he worked helping develop the nonprofit sector in Moldova. Nolan’s wife, Jana, also is a TCU graduate. They have two sons, Connor and John.
– Robert Francis

David T. Nolan is in charge of raising $250 million for Texas Christian University’s Campaign for TCU. The goal of the campaign, which ends in 2012, is nothing less than fulfilling the university’s vision of providing students a world-class, values-centered university experience. “What we’re doing, as the campaign enters its public phase, is to engage people to the university and expose them to the impact we’re having on students, the university and the community,” says Nolan, associate vice chancellor for university development. The public phase got a pretty strong kickoff too, with CBS’ Face The Nation host and 1959 TCU graduate Bob Schieffer performing with his band, Honky Tonk Confidential, in early April. Pretty heady stuff for a 38-year-old, but Nolan’s work has won him plenty of praise both inside and outside the halls of the university. “His ability to lead by example combined with integrity and a sense of fairness has enabled him to earn the respect of all with whom he works and interacts,” says Victor J. Boschini Jr., TCU chancellor. Despite such acclaim, Nolan would rather stay in the background. A 1992 TCU graduate who earned a bachelor’s degree in English literature and religion, as well as a master’s degree in philanthropy from Indiana University, Nolan says some are people often are surprised at his TCU degrees.

About the prop: I was trying to promote both TCU and to achieving [the $250 million] campaign goal [by 2012]. Also, as a hobby I roast coffee beans, so the coffee mug fit that, too. Where did your first paycheck come from? My first money was mowing grass, but first professional paycheck was TCU, with a lot of odd jobs in-between. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? I’m not sure I have one. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Fly-fishing guide. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Colonial Country Club

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David Parker
AT&T
resources, decision making and much more. Parker went on to complete a master’s in applied economics at Southern Methodist University, and he said his current role out in the community lets him address economics in all forms but most importantly in helping people find solutions. Parker, who was married in September 2008 to his wife Mattie, grew up in Crowley and said he was glad his job brought him back to the Tarrant County area. Mattie is chief of staff for State Rep. Phil King of Weatherford. When he has down time, he loves being with family as well as reading, studying and playing music – “loud music especially.” Growing his career is limitless at the moment, Parker says, although he admits it was hard to fill the shoes of his predecessor, who also was successful. Part of the challenge has been coming into the role so young, he says, but he’s had the opportunity to prove himself and hopes to continue doing so. “Fort Worth, North Texas and the Tarrant County group have been so receptive to me, it would have been so hard to have situated and stepped into this role in another environment,” he says.
– Elizabeth Bassett

When David Parker was growing up, he wanted to be a counselor. He saw it as a way to make a definite impact, one person at a time. Parker, now the regional vice president, external affairs, for AT&T, did not become a counselor. Instead, he found a career path that would still let him make connections with people in his community but on a larger scale. “You can help nonprofit organizations, you can help individuals, you can help businesses that are trying to be more efficient, put them in contact with the right people,” says Parker, 31. Parker spends what he estimates to be about half his time outside his office. He has risen quickly through AT&T during his almost nine years with the company – he joined when he graduated from Texas A&M University in 1999 after being recruited to their leadership development program, a threeyear rotational program he joined when the company was still SBC. In college, he majored in economics and business and was also a part of the Corps Cadets on campus, and he said the two – as well as his parents – give him a good foundation to build on as he started his career. “I think economics is the root of everything; it’s what makes the world turn,” Parker says. “It’s not just money.” Instead, economics is about benefit analysis, maximizing About the prop: The pictures of former Fort Worth Mayor Bob Bolen, musician Merle Haggard, former Utah Jazz point guard John Stockton, and former Chairman of the Federal Reserve Alan Greenspan, all represent the overall theme of principle before politics, substance over style and achievement over action. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? I once hired a starving musician to perform at an employee/retiree appreciation event . . . Let's just say he didn't accept American Express and couldn't break large bills. Where did your first paycheck come from? The Bank of Crowley; I was responsible for changing the sign. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A nice Taylor acoustic guitar. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone Another profession you would like to try? Professor at a small college and teach economics or economic development Where is the best place to have a business lunch? No doubt - the Fort Worth Club.

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Elaina Perez
Elite Staffing Services
industrial settings. We’re still growing, and in addition to the staffing services we’re also handling a considerable volume of payrolling services.” Perez’s community-service activities include projects of the Hispanic Women’s Network. She characterizes her husband of 10 years, Martin, as having “contributed greatly to my success.” The family also operates a ranch at Jacksboro as a favorite haven.
– Michael H. Price

Elaina Perez, 39, discovered the rewards of selfemployment during her mid-20s and has developed that interest from a knack into a multimillion-dollar corporate enterprise. “She is super ambitious,” writes a colleague, “and not only a superb businesswoman … but also a wife and a mother of three children under 10 years of age.” Perez launched her signature company, Haltom Citybased Elite Staffing Services, 11 years ago. “I had worked for a local temporary employment service,” says Perez, a native of Corpus Christi and a resident of Fort Worth since her high-school years. While learning the ropes as a staffing-service employee, she adds, “I observed the procedures and developed my abilities to a point where I knew I could establish a business of my own.” Her success involves a combination of natural ability and a formal degree in communications from the University of Texas at Arlington. Perez’s original strategy involved diversification, including a venture known as Elite Resale Boutique. The success of Elite Staffing Services, however, proved to command increasing time and effort on Perez’s part. She recently sold Elite Boutique in order to concentrate more intently upon the office-and-industrial staffing marketplace. Elite Staffing generated some 1,800 W-2 forms during 2008 – a fiscal year that also saw a 30 percent growth rate, well beyond the owner’s expectations. “Staffing represents a tremendous need,” Perez says, “both in the office-work sector and in the About the prop: A Perez family heirloom of recent years’ vintage, the globe signifies an interest in travel. Where did your first paycheck come from? A movie theater What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Travel Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? The culinary arts Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Mi Cocina, Downtown

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Ken Shetter
Burleson Mayor, Safe City Commission of Tarrant County
intervene in those processes.” During his time as mayor, Shetter says he’s learned that patience is key in both working on problems in the city and in communicating with residents about their concerns. Also, he has learned the importance of government at the city level and how that government affects residents’ lives. “The thing that has impacted me the most is coming to the realization that while everybody thinks about and talks about state and federal government, and when there’s a federal election everybody goes and votes, nobody really pays attention to what’s going on at the local level,” Shetter says. “Its local government that provides all the services that impact your life on a day-to-day basis. Government at the local level is really where it’s happening in terms of the things that impact your life day to day. And while everybody kind of knows that, in my five years as mayor, I really have come to understand that in a very personal way.”
– Leslie Wimmer

Burleson Mayor Ken Shetter’s career description includes keeping Tarrant County safe, helping younger residents of Burleson go to college and working on transportation issues in Tarrant County. Along with his work as mayor, Shetter also serves as executive director of the Safe City Commission of Tarrant County, where he runs the organization’s day-to-day operations and works on strategic planning for the future. The commission operates the Crime Stoppers program, which has been successful in getting dangerous criminals off the streets, Shetter said. The commission also offers training programs for law enforcement officials and provides mentoring programs for at-risk middle school students. “Everything we do is different or innovative, or an experimental approach to doing something, we don’t want to do anything somebody else can do,” Shetter says. One program Shetter is excited about is a violence witness intervention project. “It provides intervention services to children and youth who witness violence, it’s our newest program and I think it’s important because what we’re trying to do is approach violence as a public health problem,” Shetter says. “That means we want to have an epidemiological approach, so we try to look at things that can cause violence to happen and spread, and then

About the prop: I brought a banner that was for the Burleson Opportunity Fund, and it’s the one thing I’m most proud of. We started a program that provides scholarships to high school graduates to go to community college in Burleson. And I brought a book, it’s a dictionary my great grandfather gave me when I was 9 years old. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? When you’re an elected official, or working for a semi-public, nonprofit, you’re not very smart if you expense something that’s strange. Where did your first paycheck come from? Burleson Mini Golf was my first official paycheck, before that it was from my grandfather doing work for him. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? I did some traveling. Nothing exotic, but it was the first thing I gave myself. I went on a long hiking trip to Colorado after about a year at work. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? It depends, but I really prefer the phone. I prefer to speak to a live person if it’s something really important. Another profession you would like to try? Teaching, government, politics or law. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Reata. The food is good, and the service is great. They’re not overbearing, so if you’ve got an important conversation going on they don’t interrupt you, and you can hear each other talk in there.
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Adam Smith
Texoma Harley–Davidson
at Arlington, Smith’s previous association with such dealerships as Longhorn Harley–Davidson and Waco Harley–Davidson served early on to establish him as an authoritative figure in the industry. His expertise has been called upon by the likes of Public Broadcasting Service, Harley–Davidson University and assorted alumni and entrepreneurial organizations. Smith recently joined American Bank of Waco as a member of the board of directors. On the community-service front, Smith devotes volunteer-effort involvement to such benevolent organizations as Brighter Tomorrows, a shelter for women and children, and the Grayson County Crisis Center in addition to service on behalf of UT–Arlington.
– Michael H. Price

Motorcycles have figured in Adam Smith’s orbit since childhood. “I learned to ride a motorized cycle before I learned to ride a bicycle,” he says. Smith’s father and an uncle, too, were involved in Honda and Yamaha cycle sales during the late 1960s – a practical background for Smith’s signature venture today with Texoma Harley–Davidson. A colleague characterizes Smith, 35, as “a successful entrepreneur who has mastered the skill of knowing how to rev up businesses and corner a niche,” adding “his unique approach to finance, management and customer service has earned his dealerships industry recognition.” Smith also is a prolific investor in commercial real estate, with various ownerships and part-ownerships in a range of properties including the historic Sinclair Building. “This is an excellent time to be acquiring commercial properties,” says Smith, of Westlake. The fondness for motorcycles extends to some savvy collecting, as well, in addition to the dealership. Smith owns the celebrated movie cycle that serves as a metaphor for solitude and freedom in the 1973 film Electra Glide in Blue. A marketing-degree graduate of the University of Texas

About the prop: It’s a book, such as some people might use for a diary, that I use to write down various thoughts and sayings – some words of my own, some learned and collected from others. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A bet with a friend, that he couldn’t ride a 50CC scooter, in costume, from Los Angeles to Texas. I lost. But it was a legitimate business expense, having to do with my profession. Where did your first paycheck come from? A bicycle shop in Bedford. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Probably a pickup truck – back when a pickup would have seemed like a luxury to me. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Neither. Face-to-face communications work best. E-mail makes it way too easy to say, ‘No.’ Another profession you would like to try? I don’t believe so. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Bodacious Barbecue in Arlington.

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Jason Smith III
Arcos Interactive Marketing
“As a pitcher you learn how to be a leader without being demonstrative about it,” he says. “You find ways to lead by example and to encourage others to do better.” Smith’s friends and colleagues call on him as a motivational speaker and to intelligently discuss topics related to Internet marketing. Says friend Todd Miller: “Jason has determination and will unlike anyone I have ever met. He looks at life and sees a playing field that is his to own.” Smith and his wife, Anne-Marie, have two daughters; 21month-old Glorianne and 6-month-old Gabrielle.
– Robert Francis

Jason Smith III’s business, Arcos Interactive Marketing, is heavily involved in cutting-edge technology, but that doesn’t mean he puts technology before people. “I believe in focusing on the relationships we have with the people we work with,” he says. “What makes us different is that, even though we’re in a very technology-driven business dealing with Internet marketing and social media, we act more as a guide for our customers. When they come to us, they’re getting more than just a business transaction.” Smith’s philosophy has paid off. Arcos this year won the Small Business of the Year Award in the emerging business category from the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce. Smith also is a big believer in giving back to the community. His various community projects include work with the Lena Pope Home and the Ronald McDonald House. He also gives back through his Web site: http://arcosit.com/lifeonehanded, where he shares stories on how he has handled many tasks in his life resulting from being born with just one hand. Smith says he learned early on he was going to have to grow up quickly. When he was 5, he went to sign up to play baseball, but the organizers did not want to let him sign up. Smith did, excelling at his beloved sport to the extent he eventually made the Texas Christian University baseball team roster. About the prop: I chose my baseball glove because of the many life experiences and lessons connected to my time playing. From overcoming challenges and learning to harness determination to team building and leadership, the baseball field was my training ground for much more than pitching. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Drill bits bought from a pawn shop. Where did your first paycheck come from? My first paycheck, at the age of 8, came from a company that solicited kids to sell greeting cards.I sold to family, friends and door-to-door. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? 50-inch Plasma TV Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Baseball coaching Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Fort Worth Club. Great atmosphere and never have to worry about the quality of food or service.

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Brent Sorrells
TECH Fort Worth, UNT Health Science Center
ogy and an MBA in strategic management. Prior to joining TECH Fort Worth three years ago, Sorrells was in the banking industry. When not playing or watching sports – pastimes include soccer, softball, basketball and racquetball – Sorrells gives back to the community. He is active with the Entrepreneurs Foundation of North Texas and was co-chair of last year’s Freedom Day event Sept. 11. He’s a member of BioDFW, The Rotary Club of Fort Worth, the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce and the Fort Worth Life Science Coalition. He also volunteers with the North Texas Regional Center for Innovation and Commercialization, serving on the steering committee for its Tech Success event. Ask anyone who knows him, and they all describe Sorrells the same way – passionate, dedicated, creative, organized, selfless, a born leader, the unsung hero behind the curtain making it happen – whether it’s helping stimulate the formation of new businesses or helping upgrade the community. “Brent cares deeply about this community and he works tirelessly to make improvements in our city. When he does something, he does it with everything he’s got, leading others around him to get involved and making sure the job gets done,” says Darlene Ryan, TECH Fort Worth’s executive director. “His unqualified commitment to the success of Fort Worth is evident in every task Brent undertakes. His enthusiasm, organization and ‘never die’ attitude is contagious and effective. He is sure to be a top player in making Tarrant County a great place to live and work,” says attorney Kathleen Knight. “It’s the societal issues I want to help solve,” Sorrells says. “What can we do to improve our quality of life, both locally and globally?”
– Betty Dillard

When Brent Sorrells starts talking about incubators, people often think he’s a chicken breeder. A thought he laughs about. He does breed and nurture though – people, not poultry. Passionate about entrepreneurialism, Sorrells is committed to helping individuals turn their dreams into viable business enterprises and seek success on their own terms. He is operations manager of TECH Fort Worth and associate director of entrepreneurship at UNT Health Science Center. Personally dedicated to improving the quality life around him, Sorrells is helping others enhance their communities. “I love my job. It’s all about making an impact but not so much an economic impact,” Sorrells says. “The way I view it, that’s a result of what we do, not the reason to do it. For me, the passion comes from the desire to make the world a better place, helping technology startups get their innovations to market where they can improve our environment, our communities and our health.” Sorrells is the first incubator manager in North Texas to be certified by the National Business Incubator Association. He is a double graduate of the University of North Texas, earning a bachelor’s degree in biolAbout the prop: Often when I tell someone I run an incubator they think I’m in the poultry business…thought I’d embrace it. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Right now I’m trying to expense an ostrich egg. Where did your first paycheck come from? A horse stable…earned it shoveling manure. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Does leasing a Lexus count? Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Because they don’t have spam filters for phone I’ll go with e-mail. Another profession you would like to try? One day I’d like to start my own company…still waiting for that ‘aha!’ moment. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Blue Mesa, I love the salsa.

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Dana Stayton
Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP
United Methodist Church. Stayton’s area of practice at Kelly Hart & Hallman also sets her up to work with a number of community organizations, as she primarily represents nonprofit organizations. “I have focused my law practice almost exclusively on representing nonprofit organizations,” Stayton says. “Thus, my legal counsel and guidance to those organizations ultimately benefits a multitude of youth and adults located primarily in the city of Fort Worth but also throughout the State of Texas. I also provide legal counsel and guidance to various wildlife conservation organizations operating in the United States and other countries which ultimately benefits thousands of individuals throughout the world.” – Leslie Wimmer

Dana Stayton has two philosophies on work ethic: Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today, and her work product has to be the best. Those who nominated Stayton, a partner at Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP, for her 40 Under 40 award cited her hard work ethic and dedication to helping others as reasons that she stands out among Fort Worth’s young professionals. “These have been my philosophies from a very early age,” Stayton said via e-mail. “I was the kid in school who finished assignments well before the deadline, and then asked for extra credit projects… My philosophies guided me all through school and are still applicable in my professional career. I aim for my response time and deliverables to be prompt and outstanding. The standards I set for myself are higher than anyone could place on me.” Along with her career, Stayton also is involved in community service work in Fort Worth. She is a member of the 2008 – 2009 class of Leadership Fort Worth; a member of the Junior League of Fort Worth, where she has served on the board of directors; a member of Partners Together for Health with the JPS Health Network, where she is a member on both the Planned Giving Committee and the Comprehensive Campaign Steering Committee. Along with this work, Stayton is a past member of the Junior Woman’s Club of Fort Worth, and she, her husband and 2-year-old son are members of Fort Worth’s First

About the prop: A picture of my 2-year-old son, Riley; an art law treatise and a treatise on tax-exempt organizations indicating my areas of practice; and a pair of Cowboy Boots with “Kelly Hart & Hallman” embroidered on them. I worked with Justin Boots to design these boots. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A pedicure. It wasn’t a common business expense nine years ago when I first sought reimbursement for it. Where did your first paycheck come from? A law office in Cleburne, Texas. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A silver BMW 325ci. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Travel book writing, event planning or interior design. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Reata. They have separate rooms available for groups.

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Frank Taylor
Jones Lang LaSalle
And what a busy world that is. From making the trek to his children’s school to help them bake muffins for Mother’s Day presents to spending much of his free time at the Westside Little League field – where Taylor coaches and all three children play baseball – Taylor says it’s hectic, but he loves it. “I just love to be involved. My wife and I both love it,” he says. Taylor also has served on several committees locally including committees at All Saints Episcopal School, The WARM Place and the YMCA. Taylor and his wife, Moira, have been married since 1995. – Aleshia Howe

Frank Taylor hasn’t been in every office in Tarrant County, but he’s certainly been in a lot. For the past 17 years, Taylor has worked at major brokerage companies handling office project leasing. And he loves it. After all, he says, “it’s the only job I’ve ever had.” A Fort Worth native, Taylor began as an intern at Huff, Browse, McDowell, Montesi – a firm that has since spawned several successful brokerage houses in Fort Worth – in 1992. Today, Taylor is senior vice president at Jones Lang LaSalle and says he has a favorite saying when it comes to real estate: ‘fair is fair.’ “You may not like what I have to say, but I’m going to be honest,” Taylor says. “Ethics are No. 1 and everybody knows that’s where I’m coming from.” Todd Burnette, managing director at Jones Lang LaSalle and Taylor’s nominator, had nothing but accolades for Taylor. “Frank has been a very successful office broker in Tarrant County for many years,” Burnette says. “He has consistently been a top producer and has been recognized as one of the leading office leasing brokers in Fort Worth.” Though he has had a successful career, Taylor says the thing he’s most proud of in his life is his wife and three children. “They’re my world,” he simply says.

About the prop: I seem to have a baseball bat in my hands more than anything else lately. Where did your first paycheck come from? Pat McDowell Another profession you would like to try? Professional golfer Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Carshon’s Deli

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Mike Thomas Jr.
Southwest Bank
to pay out-of-pocket because the helmets were not covered by their insurance. Seeing the families struggle financially while simultaneously dealing with the medical needs of their children frustrated Thomas. “The way I was raised, if you don’t like something, you get involved,” he says. So he and Kerri started a fund to help families struggling to meet the costs associated with treating neurological conditions at Cook Children’s. Lesley Atkinson, director of development for Cook Children’s Health Foundation, commends Thomas for his involvement. “Even though his family was facing adversity, Mike saw other families in need and decided he could make a difference,” Atkinson says. With the backing of the Jewel Charity Ball, the Neuroscience Emergency Assistance Fund has grown to $100,000 in a little more than a year. “People come to Cook Children’s hospital from all over the country for treatment,” Thomas says. “We’re so fortunate to have this resource in our community. I’m glad we could be a part of helping the hospital do the work they do.” – Laurie Barker James

It’s no surprise that Mike Thomas says his favorite place for a business lunch is the Colonial Country Club. For more than 20 years, since he was in middle school, he’s had a variety of volunteer jobs, including work with what’s now called the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial. “I practically grew up at Colonial,” he says. Currently, he serves on the Title Sponsor Liaison committee, helping Crowne Plaza guests with local logistics and hospitality. Margaret Ritsch of the Balcom Agency, who nominated Thomas, says, “his commitment to community service is one reason he’s thriving at Southwest Bank.” As a community banker, he says he does a little of everything. “The majority of what I do is real estate-related, but I also handle everything from individual checking to big business accounts,” Thomas says. Thomas and his wife Kerri also have made a dramatic impact in the health and well-being of children being treated for neurological disorders at Cook Children’s Medical Center. Their daughter Katie Beth was born in 2006 with a condition called craniosynostosis, a premature fusing of the infant’s delicate skull. She required surgery when she was eight weeks old, and had to wear a protective helmet for about a year while her skull healed. The Thomas’ insurance covered the cost of both the surgery and the medical equipment, but they met many families who had

About the prop: My golf clubs – third choice. I couldn’t bring my daughter or wife and didn’t want to haul around a gun all day. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Lunch? I’ve never expensed anything I would consider strange. Where did your first pay check come from? The Deleon Peach and Melon Festival. I was 12 and worked for two weeks on the clean-up crew. I was paid $199.50 and I thought I was rich. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A very nice bicycle – in middle school. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail Another profession you would like to try? Professional hunter or hunting guide Where is the best place to have a business lunch? The Colonial Country Club

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John R. Thompson III
Cantey Hanger LLP
thought they got a good deal at $5,000 obviously isn’t happy when a nearby lessor waited and received a $20,000 bonus. “I think we’re going to continue having those disputes with royalty owners,” Thompson says. “The leases are still out there, there are still going to be issues of post-production costs, or other royalty disputes they can come with.” Cantey Hanger Managing Partner Pollard Rogers nominated Thompson for the 40 Under 40 designation, and speaks highly of his career so far; Thompson made partner in January 2008. “John is a young partner who has earned the respect of the Cantey Hanger partners and Tarrant County judges,” Rogers says. “He is bright and engaging, and his involvement in the community is quite laudable.” In his spare time, Thompson keeps busy with his 16-month-old boy and traveling with his wife to San Francisco, Hawaii and elsewhere. – John-Laurent Tronche

Cantey Hanger LLP’s John R. Thompson III has done Barnett Shale-related litigation since the early days of the natural gas play, and yet the Fort Worth-native still is one of the respected firm’s youngest partners. Thompson specializes in commercial litigation and oil and gas law. His clients include Oncor Electric Delivery Co., Worth National Bank, Finley Resources Inc. and Devon Energy Corp., itself a Barnett Shale pioneer and the largest gas producer in the shale play. Since those early days about six or seven years ago, before the boom, Thompson says the environment has changed much, but his work remains the same. “Overnight there have been a lot more lawyers getting into this area and there is a lot more legal work being done in Fort Worth,” says Thompson, who graduated from Fort Worth Country Day School before earning a bachelor’s degree and juris doctor at Vanderbilt University and the University of Texas School of Law, respectively. “The reality is it became difficult for oil gas companies as the lease terms kept skyrocketing – royalty and bonuses going up over the years – there were lots of people trying to get better deals,” he says. “That in and of itself created more legal work, but obviously that’s fallen off since the energy prices have decreased over the last six to eight months.” Despite the drop, Thompson says the amount of legal work will continue as lessors continue to take issue with deals signed over the years. For example, one lessor who About the prop: I’m just a huge golfer. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? I can’t think of anything. Where did your first pay check come from? The Cloister hotel at Sea Island What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A car Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Probably phone, but depends on what you’re doing. Another profession you would like to try? Being a doctor, that’d be fun. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? The Mercury Chophouse

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Michael Tothe
Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial
as a platform to growing their business.” Tothe, also an avid skier and mountain biker, is a member of the Downtown Rotary Club, a board member of Recovery Resources and sits on the steering committee of Vision Fort Worth. “In just one year being a Fort Worth resident he has fully immersed himself into the business community,” says Peter Ripa, tournament director of the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial. “His vast global experience and personality is endearing to anyone. Michael has a gift in that in minutes you feel you have known him since you were kids.” Tothe says his involvement in area organizations has allowed him to meet people in the community he might not have met. “Fort Worth has been great to me,” he says. “Having grown up in Canada, the people of Fort Worth remind me a lot of Canadians. They are proud of what they have. In the short time in Fort Worth I have been treated as if I have lived here for years. “There are not many cities in North America (if any) where you can walk Downtown, from one end to the other, without having to look over your shoulder,” Tothe says. “ Not to mention I have met Mayor Mike and Rosie many times to the point where I always get a hug…that tells you what Fort Worth is all about.” – Betty Dillard

Hockey is Michael Tothe’s true passion. The sport is a given for the Ontario, Canada, native. An unfulfilled dream of playing in the NHL, however, didn’t deter him from seeking a career in sports. Tothe graduated from Shorter College in Rome, Ga., with a Bachelor of Science degree and competed on the varsity golf team from 1991-1995. His first job after graduation was with the American Junior Golf Association conducting national championships for the elite junior golfer. “Golf is a game of sportsmanship unlike any other,” Tothe says. “Playing junior golf in Canada is a very short season so it was always five or six guys packed in a car going to an event to beat each other…a character builder for sure.” From 1999 to 2002, Tothe was the director of amateur competitions for the Royal Canadian Golf Association. In 2002, Tothe and his wife, Holly, moved to Singapore, where he worked with the golf division of IMG. He became part of the team at the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial as director of sales and sponsor relations in early 2008. “My current position is actually a 365-day, 52-weekyear position,” Tothe says. “I get people always asking me, ‘so what do you do the rest of the year?’ The fun part for me is to educate folks about the efforts that go into a PGA Tour event and selling an experience and opportunity for businesses to use our event About the prop: Just letting the Stars know that if they need a quick backup, I am ready. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Ten packages of Pringle chips on my first trip to China. Pringles were a life saver with turtle soup that included the head and shell. Where did your first pay check come from? Bellamy’s Restaurant, where I worked my way up form dishwasher to line cook. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Armani Jeans. Don’t ask me why, but I still have them. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? I used to be phone, now I’m e-mail but I’m reconditioning myself to use the phone more. E-mail is just so easy. Another profession you would like to try? Chiropractor Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Buffalo Bro’s is tough to beat. The best wings in Fort Worth with lots of TVs. Being in the sports industry, that is important.

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Ginger M. Webber
Jackson Walker LLP
top local attorney, being named a “Rising Star” by Texas Monthly magazine. Webber says she’d been working for Jackson Walker for about six years when she had an epiphany, shortly after the birth of her first daughter. “Rachel’s first year just flew by, and I realized I was missing part of her childhood,” Webber says. “I didn’t want her to grow up thinking that work is more important to me than she is.” Fortunately, Jackson Walker fosters retention among employees like Webber by allowing a selective reduction in hours. In Webber’s case, she no longer works the fabled lawyer “60-hour week,” but a more sustainable 30 hours. She calls the arrangement a win-win situation. “I get all of my work done, my clients are happy, and I have the opportunity to be a better mom as well,” Webber says. – Laurie Barker James

Ginger Webber manages quite an intricate balancing act. The working mother of first-grader Rachel and toddler Claire is also senior counsel at Jackson Walker LLP, where she’s a commercial real estate attorney. Webber has also found time to provide pro bono legal services for real estate projects for the North Texas Women’s Business Council, and has served on the Make Hope Happen Lunch committee for Cancer Care Services, as well as that organization’s marketing committee. Jaymie Bell of Jackson Walker nominated Webber, saying Webber serves as “an exemplary role model for other attorneys, working mothers and for volunteers.” Her 11-year career at Jackson Walker has helped build the company’s real estate practice in Fort Worth. Jackson Walker Fort Worth partner Susan Halsey speaks to Webber’s professionalism. “Ginger handles every transaction with intelligence, grace and humor, and has earned the reputation as an excellent negotiator and dealmaker,” Halsey wrote. Other nominators described her as “brilliant,” “poised” and “adroit.” Webber says she knew for a long time that she wanted to be a lawyer. “In high school I joined the debate team, and enjoyed making arguments for both sides,” she says. The Austin native did both her undergraduate work at and obtained her J.D. from Texas Tech University. As a lawyer, Webber has been repeatedly recognized by her peers as a About the prop: A picture of my daughters; a passport because I love to travel; chocolate because it makes me happy. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Whirlyball. We entertained clients there a few years ago and everyone’s stilling talking about how much fun it was. Where did your first pay check come from? Scarborough’s Department Store in Austin. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A watch. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone. E-mail is efficient, but it’s hard to read the tone of an e-mail, you never know if the e-mail is received or in a spam filter and it can be forwarded to unintended recipients. Another profession you would like to try? Interior designer or children’s clothing designer. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Vidalias - the food’s great, it’s quiet and not pretentious. But for out-of-town clients, Reata - it exemplifies Fort Worth culture.

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Congratulations!
Frost Financial Management Group proudly recognizes Brook Whitworth for the distinguished honor of 40 Under 40.

Frost Bank
4200 S. Hulen, Suite 230 • Fort Worth, TX 76109

(817) 420-5222

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Brook Whitworth
Frost Financial Management Group
Susan Medina of SKM Communication Strategies, who nominated Whitworth, singled out Whitworth’s commitment to many Fort Worth organizations. Whitworth is a board member for Safe Haven, on the board of the Fort Worth Junior League and works with numerous other nonprofit organizations ranging from the arts to the Tarrant County Food Bank. “Volunteering is easy because I enjoy it, and my job supports community service,” Whitworth says. “The Frost Bank culture expects employees to be involved on community boards.” Whitworth counts herself lucky that her family helps her balance all her personal, professional and community commitments. At the end of the day, she says, it’s spending time with her family that is most rewarding. “My parents have a house in Port Aransas, and we go as often as we can,” she says. “In fact, I wanted to use something from the beach as a prop, but I just couldn’t make it work.” – Laurie Barker James

Brook Whitworth’s roots in Fort Worth go deep. “My daughter goes to Tanglewood, the same elementary school I went to, and we live in the same neighborhood in which I grew up,” she says. Whitworth also attended McLean Middle School and Paschal High School, and met husband, Whistle, when they were high school students. The two attended separate colleges – he went to Southwest Texas State, while she went “up the road” to the University of Texas. Whitworth studied finance at UT, and loved it, but she says she didn’t only want work with numbers and charts. “I knew I wanted to work with people,” she says. An internship at Frost Bank here in Fort Worth the summer before her senior year of college put all the pieces of the puzzle together. She went to work for Frost Bank right out of college, and has been there for 14 years. At Frost’s Financial Management Group, Whitworth manages trust accounts and estate administration. The job provides variety and challenge for Whitworth. “Some of the clients need investment advice, and sometimes the client is a child who has inherited a trust, which Frost Bank manages,” Whitworth says. Her job at Frost Bank also encourages her ability to do the two other things about which she’s passionate – raise her family and volunteer in the community. About the prop: Family photos - I value the time I get to spend with my family. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? A gingerbread football stadium, sent to a client who builds stadium bleachers. Where did your first pay check come from? Harold's Clothing Store. I started working there when I was 16. What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? When I first started working at the bank I saved up to buy a used Lexus. And two suits that I thought were very expensive. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? It depends. I think the tone of an e-mail can be misinterpreted. Another profession you would like to try? Film or restaurant critic. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Ruffino’s Italian Restaurant or Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine

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Charles Williams
JPS Health Network
to show other administrators how their decisions would impact patient care on the floors and also share his business knowledge with clinicians. “One thing I think is missing in medical education is the financial,” Williams says. “If there is no money, there is no mission. . . So often I hear clinicians say, ‘Well, we’d do it, but administration won’t allow us.’” Williams’ wife, Demetra, is a registered nurse, and he has a 6year-old son named Chase and a 3-year-old daughter named Lauryn. He said his son often asks questions about the medical textbooks in the Williams household. Although he is focused on spending down time with his family, Williams is involved with several organizations. He says he would like to complete a doctoral degree by the time he’s 45 and also become a CEO. He hasn’t forgotten his first love, though; he said he’d really like to see patients on a home health basis again someday. “I’m trying very hard to do the best I can for the patients,” he said. – Elizabeth Bassett

Despite the fact he’s in an administrative role, Charles Williams still keeps his occupational therapist license updated. He also keeps up with his certification as a personal trainer. And although he’s not working with patients directly much at the moment, Williams says his experience as a health care professional – and not just as a manager – are indispensible to his work as a leader for the JPS Health Network, where he is the vice president of support services. “I really do miss that touch,” Williams says of his work as a therapist. Williams, 33, didn’t always know he wanted to go into health care. When he was a junior in high school, though, he attended a health professions outreach program at Texas Woman’s University, where he stayed on campus and was immersed in the world of various health care professionals. He decided being a therapist would be the right fit for him, and he went on to earn his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at TWU. Williams joined LifeCare Hospitals in 1999, a system of longterm acute care hospitals. He was asked to help open a new hospital, and when his fellow therapist, a physical therapist, left the organization, he was asked by the administration to become a manager. In his managerial role, Williams got experience creating standards and procedures, hiring staff and also was prompted to get an MBA. He was recruited to JPS and joined in March 2007, where he used his background About the prop: The picture of my children because they are and always have been the driving force for all I do; the calculator because I plan everything and with planning things must be calculated; the ruler because things I pursue must have a goal attached to it and must be measureable. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? I haven’t had a strange one. Where did your first pay check come from? Winn-Dixie grocery store at Town Center Mall What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? Custom-made golf clubs in 2007. Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? Phone – I believe it is more personal. Another profession you would like to try? Football coach Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Old Neighborhood Grill

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Fort Worth Business Press

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Richard Williams
GSBS Architects
leave the world a little better for generations to come,” he says. “I’ve been lucky to be a part of a company that’s been at the forefront of energy efficient, sustainable design,” Williams says. “Architects will play a huge part in energy conservation and reducing the effects of global warming. Good buildings allow people to work more productively and live better, healthier lives. We’ve got a tremendous challenge before us, but we’ve got some good ideas too, and that has me excited.” Interestingly, if given the opportunity Williams might like to try on another creative hat – specifically a chef’s cap. “I think there are some similarities between designing buildings and cooking creatively,” he says. – Laurie Barker James

Architect Richard Williams remembers very clearly when he discovered the vocation about which he’s so passionate. When Williams was 6, his father showed him how to use some old drafting tools they’d found in the attic. “I looked out the window and drew the house across the street,” Williams says. “I remember my dad saying, ‘I think you might be an architect.’ That was it for me.” Williams was singled out for his “creativity and dedication,” according to his coworker Marty Wieder, who nominated Williams for 40 Under 40. Williams managed the development of the Great Wolf Lodge, the largest indoor water park resort in Texas and one of the area’s most popular new attractions. He is also one of the youngest partners at GSBS Architects. “At age 39, I may be one of the oldest in the group of winners,” Williams says. “But I’m still a relatively young man in what has been referred to as an older man’s profession.” Williams attributes his success to the group of talented people with whom he works. “I had a college professor who told us every day, ‘Surround yourselves with excellence,’” he says. “Each of us has a particular skill, and I truly enjoy coming to work every day to see how those talents will come together through collaboration.” Williams says his wife Ashley inspires him “every day to be a better person.” In addition, his three daughters Sydney, Madison and Elizabeth provide inspiration of a different sort. “They motivate me to create places that will somehow

About the prop: A roll of drawings because it represents a vision that will become something special. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Does a pair of pants torn on the job site count? Where did your first pay check come from? Six Flags Over Texas What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? A LaserDisc player. Remember those things with the giant discs? Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? I suppose it depends on who I’m talking to. Another profession you would like to try? A chef. Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Chef Pointe Café in Watauga. It’s great to see the look on a client’s face when we pull up to the gas station for lunch.

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Jennifer C. Yoder
Baird, Hampton & Brown Inc.
school,” she says. “I went back to school full time, two kids, husband out to sea, and at the same time my father was dying and I was taking care of him. But the company at the time was very supportive of me.” Years later she’s still as busy as ever. In addition to her job and philanthropic endeavors with the Fort Worth Union Gospel Mission, Main Street Arts Festival, Fort Worth Ryan Family YMCA, Yoder also is an integral part of the Society of Marketing Professional Services, which launched May 7 in Fort Worth. She also is interim director of programs for the Dallas chapter. “Every program we have, a portion of the ticket sales along with a portion of the sponsorship will go to one of four charities,” she says, including the YMCA, The WARM Place, Big Brothers Big Sisters and Meals on Wheels. – John-Laurent Tronche

Jennifer C. Yoder spoke to the Business Press just hours before she was to board a plane en route to Madrid, where she and a friend had booked no hotel, had only a vague itinerary but had secured a rented a car in advance – all in the name of good air fare and a penchant for living life to the fullest. Carpe diem is a phrase she knows all too well, and one which she aspires to follow daily. “It’s a phrase I try to live my life by daily and one which I hope will inspire other people, too,” says Yoder, an Orlando, Fla.native who moved to the Metroplex several years ago after living and working on the East Coast. She describes Fort Worth as one of the first places she truly felt at home. Yoder is marketing director of Baird, Hampton & Brown Inc., a Fort Worth-based engineering and surveying company with other offices in Grapevine and Granbury. Her responsibilities include recruitment, branding and name recognition and cultivating business-to-business and business-to-client relationships. “I found my niche, something I think I’m good at and I don’t just love what I do, I’m in love what I do,” Yoder says. “I get a great satisfaction out of it and meet interesting people all the time.” She admits, however, that this job wasn’t her first consideration. “I completely fell into it. I actually went to school in television production,” she says. “I ended up working for an industrial contractor … and just found out that I liked the whole architecture-engineering-construction business. It kind of started from there. “That [first company] encouraged me to go back to About the prop: It’s a phrase I try to live my life by daily and one which I hope will inspire other people, too. What is the strangest thing you’ve expensed? Rabbit Where did your first pay check come from? Sbarro Pizza What was the first luxury item you bought yourself? My obnoxiously bright yellow Street Series PT Cruiser Do you prefer phone or e-mail for work? E-mail – I am an addict! Another profession you would like to try? Talk show host Where is the best place to have a business lunch? Hot dog at a Texas Rangers game

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Fort Worth Business Press

Our emcee: Nerissa Knight
Nerissa Knight began her career in television news 15 years ago, as an associate producer at KATV-TV and later as a reporter at KTHV-TV, both in Little Rock, Ark., while still in college at the University of Memphis. Knight previously worked as an anchor and reporter for four years in Los Angeles at KNBC-TV, in Milwaukee at WDJT-TV, in Mobile at WALA-TV and in Beaumont at KBTVTV. She is currently a weekend anchor at CBS 11 and TXA 21. While in Los Angeles, Knight hosted the top-rated Today In L.A. Weekend for four years, and covered events of national interest, including the Phil Spector, Robert Blake and Scott Peterson murder trials, as well as the Michael Jackson child molestation trial. She also covered catastrophic natural disasters such as mudslides, wildfires and hurricanes. Knight has interviewed many newsmakers in her career, from Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, to Oscar De La Hoya and Kobe Bryant. In addition, she has covered numerous Hollywood red carpet events, such as The Oscars, The Emmys, The Golden Globe Awards and The Grammys, among others. She also has interviewed celebrities including Tom Cruise, Kelsey Grammer, Nicole Kidman, Jennifer Lopez, Will Smith, Halle Berry and Robin Williams. When Knight was only 6 years old, she lost her mother to cancer. Her motto for living is, “It’s not what you’ve been dealt, but how you deal with it.” Knight is dedicated to community service and has often been recognized for her work, with honors including the California Governor's Mentoring Award, the AIDS Project Los Angeles Award and the Brookings Center Community Involvement Award. Knight is married to her junior high school sweetheart and they have three children.

S AV E T H E DAT E

Join us at the First 40 Under 40 Reunion Recognizing brilliance past and present

PLATINUM SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSORS

R E U N I O N
Friday, June 19th • 6-9 p.m.
Casa Mañana
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Pre-Party
The Fort Worth Business Press hosted a pre-party celebrating the 40 Under 40 recipients at Neiman Marcus.

David Kramer, Ginger Webber and Scott Mitchell

Lyndsay Hoover, Dana Stayton and Marjon Zabihi

Brant Martin and Natalie Martin

Mark Assaad and Kim Assaad
Photos by Glenn Killman

Amy Kramer and Kelly Imig

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Fort Worth Business Press

Chef Tim Love tackles American eating habits
Kids are notoriously picky eaters. But what if it was their parents who made them that way? Chef Tim Love is not a picky eater. He’ll admit he thinks a McDonald’s hamburger is pretty good, but at the same time he’s known for using unusual ingredients, like kangaroo, in his dishes. He embraces food of all sorts, and one of his goals is to make sure children do the same. Love, who founded Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, owns the White Elephant Saloon and will be opening a second Love Shack burger joint in the So7 development this June, is planting a garden at All Saints’ Episcopal School for kids to learn about vegetables and incorporate fresh foods into their lunches. He’s teaching students about math and nutrition with the organization Spoons Across America, a national nonprofit dedicated to promoting healthy eating for children during family meals. He’s also buying oysters and beef tongue for his own kids to enjoy. “Perception’s everything,” Love said of children and their food habits. Children take cues about what they should like or shouldn’t like from their parents. The problem, Love said, is often parents give a negative connotation to foods accidentally – by saying a child “has” to eat half of his vegetables, for example, he will think something’s wrong with the food. If it were good, his parents wouldn’t have said that, right? Families often don’t share meals with each other anymore, and food may come from a fast-food joint or from a frozen box that’s been highly processed. When Love’s son started school at All Saints’, Love sat in on meetings about changing the school’s food offerings. He found himself helping completely revamp the menu, leaning to a variety of foods that were healthier and not processed. “Most of the changes are the stuff kids don’t even notice,” Love said, like nixing high-fructose corn syrup or using whole wheat bread products. The garden, which Love is working on now, will soon offer a variety of fresh vegetables and fruits the students can tend to and learn about in

science classes before eating them. With Spoons Across America, Love has been facilitating an annual dinner party project. For the past few years, Love has been leading a six-week course with a group of students who plan and execute a four-course meal for their parents, making everything from scratch. The children learn nutrition, menu planning, etiquette, measuring and cooking, among other things, and it encourages sitting down for family meals, Love said. By introducing children to foods like parsnips or broccoli as something cool and unusual, they learn healthy eating without knowing it. “It’s the Jedi mind trick,” he said.
– Elizabeth Bassett

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