OregOn Observer

The
Thursday, September 12, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 10 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
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OHS sopho-
mores Charles
Soule, Max
Chase and
Steven Davis
conduct some
core soil sam-
pling Monday
afternoon out-
side the high
school, near
the new pond.
The students
are some of
the more than
40 who have
signed up for
a new fresh-
water ecology
class, taught
by Angela
Schmidt.
Digging into science
New pond, class let students explore nature closer to the classroom
Scott De LarueLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
There’s nothing like hands-
on learning to help students
immerse themselves in the sub-
ject at hand. And in Oregon
High School science teacher
Angela Schmidt’s freshwater
ecology class, students will quite
literally get a chance to immerse
themselves in their learning.
Her classes of around 40 stu-
dents – as well as other OHS
students – will now be able to
explore the wonders of nature
just outside their classroom door
after a new pond was filled up
last month. It’s about three feet
deep in the middle, and col-
lects runoff from the building
roof, providing an ever-chang-
ing environment and a “great
study,” Schmidt said.
“My students are going to see
after the rainfall that things are
different – why is that? They’re
going to research it and find
out,” she said. “And that’s the
beauty of this class, especially
with the new (federal science)
standards talking about research
design and giving your kids that
experience. This class is going
to do it. Plus it’s fun, and kids
like to get their hands wet.”
As school districts battle con-
tinuing budget cuts and belt-
tightening, teachers like Schmidt
remain focused on “giving your
kids that experience,” and the
new pond is conveniently just a
few frog hops from the science
classrooms to keep costs down.
“You never know if you’re
going to have enough money
for field trips, which are very
expensive,” she said. “So having
this ensures that we’ll always
have a test site. And you’re
always a little worried about
safety concerns out in the field,
and you’re going around curves
and corners, and it’s harder for
me to watch.”
Career path?
Schmidt credited Oregon High
School principal Kelly Meyers
and other school officials for
supporting the program.
“The school has really been
great about trying to get these
new ideas out, because (Meyers)
knows education is changing,”
she said.
Greg Granberg, the district’s
“school to career” coordinator,
also drew praise from Schmidt
for helping her grow the pro-
gram, something he said will
continue.
“We looked for grant oppor-
tunities and different partner-
ships we can build throughout
the area, region and state to
make sure this happens,” he
said. “She did a lot of reaching
out to groups and organizations
to make sure this class is going
to be successful and is going
to be a project based on a real
Oregon School District
Rotary connecting students, community to foster science and technology stuides
Scott De LarueLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
Oregon Rotarians might
not necessarily be up on the
latest iPhone App or viral
YouTube sensation.
But when it comes to
keeping area students up-
to-date on the latest tech-
nology skills they’ll need to
compete for a job – they’re
certainly hip to what’s hot.
The Oregon Rotary host-
ed an informational meet-
ing Aug. 15 on potentially
bringing STEM (science,
technology, engineering
and mathematics) educa-
tion to the Oregon School
District, and club members
are in the midst of a pub-
lic push to get information
out and send ideas back to
educators.
Oregon Rotary member
Dr. Larry Mahr said the
meeting moved the process
“one more step as far as
making a decision” to adopt
the STEM curriculum.
“ We h a d a g o o d
representation of teachers
who were present from the
different buildings in the
district,” he said.
Mahr said bringing sci-
e nc e a nd t e c hnol ogy
Oregon School District
Community
of Life church
moves; pastor
starts anew
Victoria VLiSiDeS
Unifed Newspaper Group
Bi g changes ar e happeni ng
at Community of Life Lutheran
Church.
The church that celebrates its
ninth year in Oregon this month
moved out of its Market Street loca-
tion in July and will soon have a new
pastor.
The church currently meets at
Rome Corners Intermediate School
(1111 S. Perry Parkway) on Sundays
in space they rent from the Oregon
School District instead of having a
permanent building space. Last year,
Hillcrest Bible Church did some-
thing similar when they began hav-
ing services in the
Oregon High School
performing arts cen-
ter.
Patrick Williams,
di rect or of opera-
tions at Community
of Life, said the move
helped the church be
out in the community
more and will free up
finances.
“We’re freeing up a large part of
our budget to put back into the com-
munity and to do mission-minded
events,” Williams said.
Some recent community missions
the church took on included cleaning
up trails in Oregon this summer as
well as a parks cleanup set for Sept.
15 at Jaycee Park, Kiser Firemen’s
Park and the Oregon Skatepark on
Brook Street.
While Hillcrest kept its office
space, Community of Life is work-
ing to set up its office to be virtual
through a phone message program
called Grasshopper, associate pastor
Ryan Haack said. That means hav-
ing a virtual phone message service
instead of a physical office.
On the web
For more information about the
STEM Education Coalition, visit
stemedcoalition.org
Turn to STEM/Page 3
Wenger
Turn to Church/Page 7 Turn to Ecology/Page 7
2
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Photo by Seth Jovaag
Volunteers unload pails of grapes picked last Thursday at Mitchell Vineyards.
Grape harvesting season in full force
Continuing a four-year
tradition, staff and volun-
teers from Old Sugar Dis-
tillery in Madison picked
more than six tons of grapes
last week at Mitchell Vine-
yards in the Town of Rut-
land.
Overall, the distillery
hopes to pick about 20,000
pounds of grapes it uses to
make brandy and grappa.
The vineyard, run by Dave
Mitchell for the past 37
years, opened its “pick-
your - own” season l ast
weekend that runs through
early October.
Vi s i t or s can choos e
between 16 varieties grown
at the 6-acre vineyard off
Sunny Ridge Road in Rut-
land.
It’s open from 1-5:30
p.m. Tuesdays, 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Saturdays and noon
to 4 p.m. Sundays. Mitch-
ell said that despite a rainy,
cold spring, the warm, dry
weather in July and August
spurred hearty crops.
For more information on
the vineyards, go to mitch-
ell-vineyard.com.
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Photos by Scott De Laruelle
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Dominic Meyers, Brooke White, Grant Wilson and Grant Wollangk of Karate America Oregon enjoyed
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September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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education to area youth is
traditional focus for Ore-
gon Rotarians, dating to
the Lerner Park Field Day
that started 11 years ago,
and long before that. The
group has also contributed
to the development of the
arboretum at Netherwood
Knoll and an aquaponics
project at Oregon High
School.
In 2010, Oregon Rotary
started the concept of an
“Eco Center,” to be devel-
oped at the middle school
to aid in growing native
prairie plants to be used
at Lerner Park. The plan
included greenhouses, out-
door gardens and an alter-
native energy generation
laboratory.
Science focus
Given the program’s
already in place, Mahr
said the STEM curriculum
would flow very smoothly.
“We had the teachers
involved in math, science,
engineering and technol-
ogy from both the mid-
dle school and the high
school, and they presented
what they were doing,” he
said. “They are on the cut-
ting edge of how they are
teaching technology now.”
Many mi ddl e school
t eachers were al ready
using STEM concepts in
their classrooms, Mahr
said.
“The teachers in those
areas of science and tech-
nology were coordinating
with each other and col-
laborating with one anoth-
er to present a whole pack-
age to the students that out
of that, they could teach all
things, including,health,
science and math – even
to the point where the arts
and humanities can be
woven in,” he said.
Mahr said surveys con-
ducted last year by the dis-
trict show a public interest
in promoting and funding
science education.
Work in progress
Oregon School District
school-to-career coordi-
nator Greg Granberg said
many teachers are already
wor ki ng on concept s
that would be utilized in
STEM programming.
“It ’s not t hat we’re
starting at ground zero,”
he said. “There’s a con-
nected effort to make sure
we’ve got as much com-
munity partnership as we
can – that bridging of the
education world and the
community, to make sure
our students take what
they’re learning here at
high school, and two or
four or eight years later,
come back to our com-
munity and help us be a
strong community.”
Granberg said though
STEM education centers
on the four main disci-
plines of science, tech-
nology, engineering and
math, it is much more
encompassing.
“The sum is larger than
its parts,” he said. “It’s so
much more than those four
areas – it’s giving those
critical thinking skills,
problem solving, where
they can go through and
mimic to the best of our
ability what is truly seen
by a modern-day engi-
neer and those types of
career fields. Gone are
the days of my grandfa-
ther the engineer working
at the drawing board and
handing it off to someone
else to explain. The pros
need to be able to do all of
that.”
Fi ndi ng communi t y
partners will be crucial in
the effort, Granberg said.
“As we go t hr ough
and fi nd exampl es for
students to demonstrate
what they’ve learned, it’s
so much stronger hav-
ing examples in our com-
muni t y t o use; havi ng
t hose i ndust ry expert s
and resources that already
exist in the community,”
he said “Partnering takes
the students out of schools
and into the community,
and they learn from each
other. We want our com-
munity members to be a
part of this movement for-
ward.”
Mahr said Oregon is
wel l - s i t uat ed t o t ake
advantage of the business
climate around the village.
“Being so close to Mad-
ison and a lot of good bio-
tech options, it’s important
to get in the community
just to help take ownership
of the process and get the
kids prepared for college
and getting them back into
the community,” he said.
Next move
Granberg said he’s been
very pleased with the com-
munity response to the
STEM program.
“We had a great kickoff
event, and now we want to
make sure we move for-
ward with some deliberate
planning rather than just
saying, ‘let’s start running
now,’” he said.
The next step, Granberg
said, is to collect more
feedback from community
members.
“I want to make sure
what we’ r e doi ng i n
moving STEM forward
includes that community
voice – what they need
and what they can bring to
the table, because I know
it’s a ton, whether it’s
advocacy, volunteering
time or knowledge of what
could be done,” he said. “I
want to make sure it’s not
education moving one way
and business another.”
Meanwhile, Mahr said
organizers will form a
steering committee in the
next week with a “broad
representation” of teach-
ers, school district and
community members, and
“get a plan together.”
“Teachers at the school
are ready to roll,” he said.
“We need to be supportive
and ask them what they
need and try to provide it.”
STEM: Moving forward
Continued from page 1
Drug-related charges lead to jail time
Seth JoVaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
An Oregon man once
lauded for kicking a heroin
addiction was sentenced
to probation and jail time
last week after he pleaded
guilty to stealing from his
family to feed his habit.
Brandon M. Lang, 26,
was sentenced last Friday
to three years of probation
for one count each of bur-
glary and forgery and nine
months in jail for bail jump-
ing by Dane County Circuit
Judge Ellen Berz.
Lang pleaded guilty in
June to all three charges.
He was initially charged in
February with nine felonies
after he admitted to break-
ing into his father’s home
on Waterman Street to steal
jewelry and forge checks to
buy heroin, according to a
criminal complaint.
Lang had been j ai l ed
since his June 22 arrest after
he crashed his vehicle on
Madison’s north side and
admitted to police to using
heroi n t wo
hours earlier,
according to
a cr i mi nal
complaint.
B e f o r e
his sentenc-
ing, Lang’s
father, Mark
Lang, gave
an emotional
appeal to his son to break
his addiction.
“I know he has a prob-
l em, ” Mark Lang sai d.
“You lost my trust again,
and it’s going to take a
while to get it back.”
Appearing in handcuffs,
Brandon Lang wiped away
tears as he apologized to his
family for betraying their
trust.
“I hurt the ones I love,”
he said. “Words cannot
describe how truly sorry I
am.”
Lang was the subject of
an Oregon Observer fea-
ture in December 2011 that
told of his struggles with
heroin addiction. At the
time, he had been sober for
nine months – the longest
he’d been off drugs in eight
years – and was living with
his father in Oregon.
Prosecuting attorney Paul
Humphrey told the judge
that Brandon was sober for
19 months before a doctor
gave him a prescription for
painkillers to treat a medi-
cal condition. That trig-
gered a relapse in late 2012.
Lang’s attorney, Tracey
Lencioni, said that when
Lang was sober, he was “a
star” in drug court and a
model for others battling
addiction.
“He can succeed,” she
said, though she noted that
he faces a “lifelong strug-
gle” to stay off drugs.
Prior to his sentencing,
Judge Berz told Lang that
taking heroin amounted to
shutting off his ability to
care about the family and
friends who supported him.
“You seem like a nice
guy,” she said. “There are
lots of nice guys. They
ar en’ t ni ce guys when
they’re on heroin.”
Along with the sentenc-
ing, she ordered him to
take regular drug tests, to
maintain a full-time sched-
ule combining work, school
and drug treatment and to
meet with her once a month
with his parole agent.
“We’ r e goi ng t o be
together a lot over these
next three years, ” Berz
said. “Or you’re going to be
together a lot with murder-
ers, rapists and robbers in a
cage. It’s your choice.”
Lang
Girard joins UNG
reporting staff
Scott Girard has joined
the staff of Unified Newspa-
per Group.
Graduating in May 2013,
the Madison native recently
served as editor-in-chief of
the University of Wiscon-
s i n - Ma d i -
son’s Daily
Cardinal. He
also interned
for the Isth-
mus, a Mad-
ison weekly
publication,
i n summer
of 2012.
At UNG,
he will fill a variety of roles,
most notably covering edu-
cation in Verona and busi-
ness in all four of UNG’s
communities – Verona,
Oregon, Stoughton and
Fitchburg.
Gi rard succeeds Set h
Jovaag, who is leaving the
company this week after
more than seven years cov-
ering education to pursue
freelance opportunities.
Girard
PolicE rEPorTS
Information taken from the
Oregon Police Department log
book. Oregon residents unless
otherwise noted.
Aug. 8
5:43 p.m. A 42-year-old
woman was cited for disor-
derly conduct after she alleg-
edly confronted and used pro-
fanity toward an Oregon Youth
Football coach about a conflict
over practice times.
Aug. 11
12:46 a.m. A 17-year-old
Madison man pulled over
near the corner of Jefferson
and North Main streets for
failing to stop at a flashing red
light was cited for possession
of marijuana with intent to sell
after a drug-dog search alleg-
edly turned up more than an
ounce of pot.
–Seth Jovaag
4
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Thursday, September 12, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 10
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TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
TASTE OF F TCHBURG
September 14, 2013
11:00 am to 2:00 pm
McKee Farms Park
Great local restaurants
Beer by the Great Dane
Food selection $1 - $4
Live Music and kids events
Proceeds from
this event
benet www.4-C.org
Sponsored by: CUNA Mutual Group, SVA, First Business, Gordon
Flesch Company, Inc., Oak Bank, The Little Gym and Wegner CPAs
Participating Restaurants: The Great Dane, Liliana’s, Yahara Bay
Distillery, Pancake Cafe, Tuscany Grill, Buffalo Wild Wings, Thai Noodle,
Benvenuto’s Italian Grill, Jordandal Cookhouse and Wildtree
Lyman Edward Reynolds,
Jr.
Fi t chbur g- Lyman Edwar d
Reynolds, Jr., passed away on
Sept. 5, 2013, due to complica-
tions of diabetes.
Lyman, known to the family as
"Buster," was born on July 27,
1953, to Lyman E. Reynolds, Sr.,
and Evelyn (Brewer) Reynolds at
St. Mary's Hospital, Madison.
He graduated from Oregon High
School in 1971. He then attended
MATC, receiving an Associate's
Degree in Auto Body Repair. He
was employed for many years
in autobody repair and recently
worked for the U.S. Postal Service
as a rural carrier.
Lyman is survived by his sisters,
Marijo (Tim) Sandlin, Oregon,
Laurel (Jerry) Sazama, Chippewa
Falls, Dianne, Madison, Maureen,
Belleville, and brother Daniel, of
Fond du Lac. He is also survived
by nieces and nephews, other
family members, friends and his
beloved cat, Elvis.
Lyman loved reading, going
to flea markets, vintage cars, and
restoring vintage bicycles. He
also enjoyed repairing antique
clocks.
A Memorial Mass was held on
Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013, at Good
Shepherd Catholic Parish at St.
Joseph Parish Site, 1905 W. Belt-
line Hwy, Madison, with Msgr.
Tom Baxter presiding.
Memorials may be made in
Lyman’s honor to his family.
Please share your memories at
CressFuneralService.com
Cress Funeral and Cremation
Service
3610 Speedway Road, Madison
238-3434
Lyman Reynolds
Obituary
Oregon School District
Board approves
preliminary budget
Scott De LarueLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Oregon School District
Board of Education moved closer
to approving the 2013-14 budget
and sparred on the parameters of
a meeting later this month to fur-
ther discuss “just cause” contract
language.
Monday night’s meeting was
marked by the release of prelimi-
nary budget numbers, and district
business manager Andy Weiland
gave a brief presentation on the
information at hand, noting that
several key pieces of data have
yet to be figured into the final
numbers: The annual audit of
the district is still being com-
pleted, state aid amounts won’t
be known until next month, stu-
dent counts are still ongoing for
another week, the district has yet
to begin negotiations with two
employee groups and the school
district’s equalized assessed val-
uation (EAV) will not be certi-
fied until next month.
Weiland said he believes the
district’s EAV will decrease
less than 2 percent for this year,
which will increase the mill rate
but not the spending authority
or tax levy. He said the mill rate
will likely increase to around
$12.54 per $1,000 of assessed
value, though he said the actual
effect on homeowners will vary,
depending on which municipal-
ity they live in and the amount of
economic change or increase in
market value within that munici-
pality.
Weiland said the overall num-
bers are not going to change
drastically from the preliminary
estimate, and he’s hoping for
some improvement.
“This budget is going to be
close to the final budget, but it’s
not the final budget,” he said.
“Hopefully I’ll be able to come
back in October and say (the mill
rate) is only going to be $12.40.”
Meeting matters
Board members were still at
odds with how to proceed with
talks on “just cause” language
for employees. Ultimately, they
decided to meet with union rep-
resentatives as a “committee of
the whole” at 6 p.m., Monday,
Sept. 30.
Rae Vogeler and Dan Krause
– the two newest board members
– have been vocal about altering
language in the district’s employ-
ee handbook approved last June.
At issue was a change made that
allows the district to fire or disci-
pline a teacher if its decision was
deemed “good and sufficient,” a
less stringent legal standard than
the “just cause” standard which
had been in place for years.
On Aug. 26, the board met
for more than two hours on the
issue, with Vogeler bringing
forth a proposal to reinstate the
“just cause” language, as well
as other changes aimed at giv-
ing staff more power to contest
district decisions to terminate or
discipline employees.
On Monday, she said she want-
ed a “meet and confer” discus-
sion, including representatives
from unions that represent dis-
trict employees.
“The whole idea here is that
we have a very thorough discus-
sion, we can look through pro-
posals, talk them through and see
where we can go, and possibly
merge some of the different lan-
guage,” she said. “This gives us
an opportunity to work together,
be a team, and collaborate.”
School board treasurer Lee
Christensen wanted instead to
“hash out” differences between
board members fi rst before
including union representatives
and others.
“Otherwise it could be a free-
for-all,” he said.
Board member Steve Zach sug-
gested holding the session ear-
lier in the month, in conjunction
with a Human Assets Committee
(HAC) meeting, but Vogeler was
opposed to that because not all
board members are on the com-
mittee.
By the numbers
Oregon School District – equalized value growth comparison
Year Equalized value % Growth Rate
2003 $1,212,505,009 + 8.44 12.66
2004 $1,381,113,620 +13.91 11.76
2005 $1,561,936,296 +13.09 10.68
2006 $1,793,000,405 +14.79 10.12
2007 $1,868,368,862 +4.2 10.63
2008 $1,950,931,665 +4.42 10.53
2009 $1,949,940,941 -0.05 10.94
2010 $1,904,225,861 -2.34 11.73
2011 $1,899,234,972 -0.26 11.99
2012 $1,867,284,597 -1.68 12.20
2013 $1,829,938,905 -2.0 12.54
If you go
What: Oregon School District
Board of Education meeting
When: 6:30 p.m., Monday,
Sept. 23
Where: Rome Corners
Intermediate School
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Bike the Barns fundraiser rolls through Brooklyn
Bike the Barns, Fair-
Share CSA Coalition’s
seventh annual Partner
Shares Fundraiser, will
have a Brooklyn destina-
tion on the route Sunday,
Sept. 15.
The annual event is a
bike tour that will take rid-
ers to community support-
ed agriculture (CSA) farms
around south-central Wis-
consin in support of the
Coalition’s Partner Shares
Program, a community ini-
tiative to improve access to
fresh, local fruits and veg-
etables that also supports
small family farmers.
The full ride visits four
farms and is approximately
70 miles. (A shorter route,
approximately 30 miles,
visits two farms. ) This
year’s ride will be located
south of Madison, high-
lighting Blue Skies Berry
Farm in Brooklyn.
Other featured farms are
Blue Moon Community
Farm (Stoughton), Tipi
Produce (Evansville) and
Scotch Hill Farm (Brod-
head).
The rout e st art s and
ends at Lake Leota Park in
Evansville. Registration is
full for the event.
The ride will be fueled
with gourmet food grown
by local farmers and pre-
pa r e d by c ommuni t y
favorites such as Monty’s
Blue Plate Diner, Batch
Bakehouse, Bloom Bake
Shop, Willy Street Co-op,
Metcalfe’s, Sassy Cow,
and Just Coffee, including
snacks, lunch, and After
Party refreshments.
All proceeds support the
coalition’s Partner Shares
Program and community
initiatives. Since Partner
Share’s inception in 1997,
it has increased access
to local food by connect-
ing more than 3,300 low-
income households with
over 120,000 pounds of
fresh, local food and pav-
ing the way for lasting con-
nections between families
and farms.
“Knowing your farm-
er and where your food
comes from is a powerful
way to make an impact on
the vitality of your com-
munity, health, and local
economy,” said Kiera Mul-
vey, FairShare’s excecu-
tive director.
Te Brooklyn
Community UMC
at 201 Church St. would
like to invite you to join
in Open Worship Sunday
and a Sunday School
Enrollment Event September 15
and 22 for anyone looking for a
warm and welcoming worship
experience and exciting Sunday
School programs. Sunday School is
at 8:30 a.m. with worship at 9:30 a.m.
Call 608-558-8700
Blessings to all;
Pastor Dave Pluss
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Snow Dogg • Western
The Boss • Salt Dogg
Double D Services in Verona will be having an
Open House
for you to come see what is available in snowplows
and accessories. Please feel free to stop by
Double D Services anytime
From Noon until 7:00pm
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
There will also be door prizes, food, and refreshments.
2737 Gust Road, Verona, WI 53593
Phone: (608) 845-3800 • Fax (608) 845-3801
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CARING DENTISTRY
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
General and
Cosmetic Dentistry,
Crowns, Bridges,
Implants, Veneers
Tooth Colored Fillings,
Whitening, Emergencies
New Patients Always Welcome
Mueller Dental Clinic
978 Park Street
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-0900
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for 15 Years!
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People’s United Methodist Church
103 N. Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Enrolling NOW
for Fall!
Early Childhood Music and
Movement Curriculum for Ages
Birth-5 Years and the Adults
Who Love Them.
For more information and free demo classes,
call or email: Eliza Tyksinski
at (608) 334-2795
or ejfamjam@gmail.com
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Scott GirarD
Unifed Newspaper Group
Barb Martin was looking
for a hobby while living in
Dayton, Ohio, with her hus-
band, who was in the Air
Force, and their children.
She took a class on mak-
ing stained glass, but found
it was a bit too “limiting”
for her, so she learned a
new technique for crafting
glass when they moved to
Wisconsin.
“When I came to Wiscon-
sin, I heard of this wonder-
ful thing called fuse glass,
so I took a class and have
been in love with it ever
since,” she said. “It allows
me to manipulate the glass
in ways I couldn’t with
stained glass.”
Once here, she helped
found a group called 14
South Artists, which will
hold its 10th Annual Fall
Tour Sept. 21-22 featuring
32 of the group’s 51 mem-
bers from the areas south of
Madison.
The group’s purpose is
“to promote the visual arts
in the communities and
rural areas of South Cen-
tral Wisconsin by providing
opportunities for artist-to-
artist interactions, educa-
tional programs and exhibi-
tions,” according to its mis-
sion statement.
Talents on the tour range
from painting, woodwork-
i ng or phot ogr aphy t o
sculpting, pottery or bead
making, which Martin will
demonst rat e duri ng t he
tour.
That and other demon-
strations on the tour will
offer a unique opportunity
for the public, according to
14 South Artists President
Ann Kleckner, who is a
glass artist herself.
“The artists are able to
show how they make things
so that people appreciate
the work and complexity
of making a piece of art,”
she said. “The real benefit
is education for the pub-
lic for them to learn and
see how things are created
and spark their interest in
maybe creating something
themselves.”
The tour this year will
also include a new “pass-
port program,” in which
tour-goers can get stamps
at each stop on the tour they
visit and then be entered
into a drawing for prizes
from the group’s artists.
Kleckner said her favor-
ite part of the group is the
“camar ader i e” and t he
number of perspect i ves
members get from each oth-
er on everything involved
in a career in art.
“It’s just a wealth of
information and it keeps me
more creative to hear what
other people are doing and
where they’re going with
their careers,” she said.
In a demonstration of that
camaraderie, Martin will
share her studio, which is
next door to her house in
Brooklyn, with four other
artists for the tour, offering
a diverse set of talents in
one spot.
Ji l l i an Cor i - Li pper t ,
another glass artist from
Oregon, said being a mem-
ber of 14 South Artists
does not necessarily require
being an artist.
“We certainly encour-
age non-artists to attend the
meetings and learn a little
bit more and get to know
the artists themselves,” she
said.
Area artists
• Rich Fizzel, Brooklyn
• Ann Kleckner, Brooklyn
• Bernie Lynch, Brooklyn
• Barbara Martin,
Brooklyn
• Dan Ott, Brooklyn
• Steve Wagner,
Brooklyn
• Mark Dilley, Fitchburg
• Sandra Haspl,
Fitchburg
• Bonnie Lubet, Fitchburg
• Victor Marsh, Fitchburg
• Jillian Cori-Lippert,
Oregon
• Paul Morrison, Oregon
• Dick Dornaus, Oregon
Photo by Scott Girard
Barb Martin makes fused glass in a studio right next door to her
Brooklyn house.
Local artists start
fall tour Sept. 21
Photo submitted
Previous Bike the Barns riders end the summer cycling season with a leisurely ride through southern Wisconsin’s picturesque country-
side fueled by farm-fresh gourmet food.
6
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
LUTHERAN CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
offce@communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 am & 10:15 am Worship service
at Oregon High School PAC
Quest for grades 1-6 during 10:15
service
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Reciprocate
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Friday, Sept. 13
• 10:30 a.m. - J.T. Nolan performance, Oregon
Senior Center; 835-5801
Sunday, Sept. 15
• 8:30 a.m. - Sunday School enrollment and open
worship, Brooklyn Community UMC, 201 Church
St., 558-8700
Monday, Sept. 16
•9-11 a.m., Wii bowling at the Oregon Area Senior
Center
Tuesday, Sept. 17
• 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Socializing potluck and
entertainment, Oregon Area Senior Center, 835-
3536
Wednesday, Sept. 18
• 1-1:45 p.m., “Get Fit with Gudie,” Oregon Area
Senior Center
Sunday, Sept. 22
• 8:30 a.m. - Sunday School enrollment and open
worship, Brooklyn Community UMC, 201 Church
St., 558-8700
• 1 p.m., Sunday Movie at Oregon Area Senior
Center, “The Jackie Robinson Story.”
Community calendar
Thursday, Sept 12
Progressives “Open Mic” (of
Sept. 5)
Friday, Sept 13
“Olbrich Botanical Gardens”
(of Aug. ‘10)
Saturday, Sept 14
“JT Nolan” Music @ Oregon
Senior Center (of Sept. 13)
Sunday, Sept 15
Worship Service: Hillcrest
Bible Church
Monday, Sept 16
6 pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
Board Meeting
Tuesday, Sept 17
“Alan Anderson Big Band”
@ Oregon Senior Center (of
Aug. ‘10)
Wednesday, Sept 18
“Northern Comfort” @
Senior Center (Sept. 17)
Thursday, Sept 19
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Sept. 16)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, Sept. 16
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:00 Rubber Stamping
9:00 Caregivers Support
12:00 Market Day Due
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
4:30 T.O.P.S. Weight Loss
Tuesday, Sept. 17
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
11:30 Silver Threads
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:15 Cont. Piano Class
2:15 Beg. Piano Class
Wednesday, Sept. 18
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Full COA Meeting
11:00 Protecting your PC
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
Thursday, Sept. 19
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
1:00 Card Party
1:00 Country Line Dancing
5:00 Market Day Pickup
Friday, Sept. 20
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
1:00 Get Fit
Monday, Sept. 16
Baked Chicken Stuffing w/
Gravy, Peas & Pearl Onion,
Tropical Fruit Salad, Multi
Grain Bread
VO-Veggie Lasagna
Tuesday, Sept. 17
Stuffed Green Pepper
Soup/Crackers, Chicken
Broccoli Rotini Salad,
Orange Juice, Roll, Ice
Cream Treat
VO-Meat Free Soup
Wednesday, Sept. 18
Chicken Salad on Whole
Wheat Bun, Creamy
Coleslaw, Fresh Apple,
Cherry Crisp
VO-3oz Sliced Cheese
Thursday, Sept. 19
Enchilada Casserole, Pinto
Beans, Shredded Lettuce w/
Tomato, Shredded Carrots
and French Dressing, Fresh
Banana, Coconut Cream Pie
V.O. Cheese Enchilada
Casserole
SO—Taco Salad
Friday, Sept. 20
Baked Fish, Baked Potato,
Vegetable Blend, Fresh Fruit,
W.W. Bread
VO-Baked Potato
Broccoli Cheese Sauce
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, Sept 12
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Sept. 9)
Friday, Sept 13
7 pm--LIVE--OHS Boys
Varsity Football vs Waunakee
Saturday, Sept 14
“Casey & Greg” @ Oregon
Library (of July ‘12)
Sunday, Sept 15
OHS Boys varsity Football vs
Waunakee (of Sept. 13)
Monday, Sept 16
“Bike Camp: MADSS” (of
July ‘10)
Tuesday, Sept 17
“Firefly” Oregon Juggling
Club (of Aug. ‘11)
Wednesday, Sept 18
“Soda Pups” @ Oregon
Library (of July ‘10)
Thursday, Sept 19
“Bubble Wonders” @
Oregon Library (of June ‘10)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
Rules of reciprocity are universal. Every society has both implicit
and explicit rules about giving back to those who have given to
us. We don’t usually notice these rules until we encounter dif-
ferent rules from other cultures, or when someone violates the
rules. The duty to reciprocate explains why we feel uncomfortable
at Christmas if someone has given us a gift and we don’t have
one for them. We’re likely to go out and buy something for them
in this case. Rules of reciprocity apply also to justice in punish-
ment, and the lex talionis or “eye for an eye” rule was probably
instituted as an attempt to limit our murderous impulses for
revenge. We shouldn’t always demand justice; sometimes mercy
is the more loving response. We also shouldn’t expect reciproc-
ity in giving in many cases as well. Parents give to their young
children knowing that their children don’t have the wherewithal to
reciprocate and sometimes we give anonymously knowing that
the other person would feel uncomfortably indebted if they knew
who gave to them. So, we should give generously, especially to
those in need, keeping in mind how our gift is likely to make the
other person feel.
– Christopher Simon for Metro News Service
“Do to others as you would have them do to you.”
Luke 6: 31
Want to get your community event or calendar item in the Observer?
Send an email with the information to:

ungcalendar@wcinet.com
Open Worship/Sunday School
enrollment
Brooklyn Community UMC at 201
Church St. is inviting people to join
in on an open worship Sunday and a
Sunday school enrollment event Sun-
day, Sept. 15 and Sunday, Sept. 22,
for anyone looking for warm and wel-
coming worship experience and excit-
ing Sunday School programs.
Sunday School is at 8:30 a.m. with
worship at 9:30 a.m. Call (608) 558-
8700 for more information.
J.T. Nolan and BBQ ribs
J.T. Nolan will be performing at the
Oregon Senior Center at 10:30 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 13.
He is a professional vocalist and
multi-instrumental musical entertain-
er with more than 30 years of perfor-
mance experience.
He plays ‘40s, ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s
pop, country and light jazz, and fea-
tures saxophone, trumpet, flute and
harmonica.
Enjoy a special meal of BBQ ribs
on the bone, baked potato, and pie.
Call Anne at 835-5801 to sign up for
the event.
Silver Threads Among the
Gold Club
What : Soci al i zi ng, Pot l uck &
Entertainment (NOT sewing, crochet-
ing or knitting)
When: 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues-
day, Sept. 17, and every third Tues-
day of the month at the Oregon Senior
Center. Entertainment at 1 p.m.
What to bring: Food item for pot-
luck and your own place setting.
Can’t bring a food item? A monetary
donation is appreciated. New mem-
bers, male or female, are always wel-
comed. Call Joanie at 835-3536 for
further information.
Sunday Movie - “The Jackie
Robinson Story”
In 1946, Branch Rickey put him-
self at the forefront of history when
he signed Jackie Robinson to the leg-
endary Brooklyn Dodgers, breaking
Major League Baseball’s infamous
color line.
But the deal also put both Robinson
and Rickey in the firing line of the
public, the press and even other play-
ers. Facing unabashed racism from
every side, Robinson was forced to
demonstrate tremendous courage and
restraint by not reacting in kind know-
ing that any incident could destroy his
and Rickey’s hopes. The movie will
be shown at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22
at the Oregon Area Senior Center.
Wooden shoe-carving
demonstration
At 10:45 a.m. Monday, September
23, people will get a chance to see tra-
ditional wooden shoe-carving at the
Oregon Area Senior Center.
In 28 minutes, Luke Traver hand
carves a wearable wooden shoe from
a log section using three traditional
tools: a side ax, block knife and spoon
auger.
At the same time, he shows a vid-
eo of historical information about
wooden shoes. A question and answer
period follows. He also includes pre-
sentations with stories, humor and
tap dancing, Appalachian clogging
in wooden shoes, interesting artifacts
and ice harvesting stories. Luke has
studied the art of wooden shoe carv-
ing from Bob Siegel, or “Sieg,” the
last master wooden shoe carver in
America.
Call Anne to sign up for this pro-
gram at 835-5801.
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
Wednesday, October 9, 2013
9:00 am-Noon - Expo
Noon-2:30 pm - Lunch, Entertainment & Bingo
FREE Admission - Open to the Public
Call 845-9559
for more information
Stoughton Wellness and Athletic Center
2300 US Highway 51-138, Stoughton, WI
5th Annual
N
eed A
B
ooth?
C
all us!
relevance for our students
in the community in which
they live.”
Knowl edge i n wat er
ecology can lead to jobs,
and Granberg said some
high schools in the state are
already adjusting their cur-
riculum to take advantage
of that.
“One of the sewerage
districts in Milwaukee has
started to use an appren-
tice program because they
realized they’re not getting
the employees they need
with skills,” he said. “So
they’re being proactive and
are getting high schoolers
involved.”
In response, some high
schools in the southeast-
ern part of the state have
r ecent l y st ar t ed wat er
ecology programs to help
prepare students for jobs
working with municipal
water supplies.
“(School leaders say)
‘How can we serve that
resource?’” Granberg said.
At OHS, nearly 100 stu-
dents sent in requests for
the water ecology classes
this fall, of which around
40 students are enrolled.
The hi gh demand was
unexpect ed, t o say t he
least.
“It was a small concern
of whether or not there
would be enough inter-
est, but it just blew up,”
he said. “It meets a real
niche in our student body;
those interested in environ-
mental sciences. It gives
a new avenue for them to
explore.”
The class is an example
of “project-based learning”
that is breaking the barri-
ers of traditional classroom
models, Granberg said,
and also making fieldwork
more productive.
“The students have a spot
where they can go and test
and learn how to do those
procedures,” he said. “Then
when they travel to Bad
Fish Creek or other loca-
tions, they already know
how to use the equipment
and can go and get readings
and get testing and learning
to do it.”
Plans for growth
Students from agriculture
education Jillian Beaty’s
fish and wildlife class are
coming up with a three-
year pl an t o i nt roduce
plants into the pond and to
landscape and improve the
habitat – a project that will
start next month. Schmidt
said some plants from the
school’s nearby old, small-
er pond (which is being
phased out) will be trans-
planted to save costs.
“( Beat y) as ked me,
‘What do you want i n
there?’ and I said, ‘biodi-
versity - as diversified as
you can make it,’” Schmidt
said.
Beaty said she’s look-
ing forward to collaborat-
ing and using the pond for
many projects in the future.
“Angel a has done an
amazing job on making this
project happen,” she said.
Schmidt said she’s look-
ing forward to the extra
learning that will now be
able to take place right out-
side her classroom door.
“It should be a lot of fun,
and I’m hoping it will be a
program that will grow,”
she said. “I figure 44 kids
in the first year is pretty
good – I guess a lot of kids
would like to get outside
and get their hands dirty
and check it out.”
Ecology: Could lead to jobs in the ecology field
Continued from page 1
physical office.
“It’s very efficient,” he
said.
So far, the move has
been a smooth transition
for the church, Pastor Eric
Wenger said.
Pastor moving
Wenger wi l l al so be
transitioning to a new site
location under Community
of Life in Green Bay. He
helped form Community of
Life in Oregon after being
at a Fitchburg church. He
and his family moved to
Green Bay to form another
church that will still have
ties to Community of Life,
but will eventually become
its own church, much like
the Madison mission site
which Haack is heading.
Wenger is still the lead
pastor and will drive back
on Sundays to do services
until the church finds his
successor.
Communi t y of Li f e,
which has about 100 peo-
ple in its congregation,
held a going away party for
the pastor and his family
on Sunday where people
got to say goodbye.
Haack said Wenger’s
passion for creating rela-
tionships with people and
connect i ng t hem wi t h
God have made him an
outstanding leader in the
church.
Church:
Continued from page 1
Scott De Laruelle photo
Oregon High School has a new pond, filled just last month, for students to study freshwater ecology. A new course starting at the school
this year had nearly 100 applicants.
8
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
A Family Calling
Wanless Auction Group sees growth
Mark IgnatowskI
Unifed Newspaper Group
The rising popularity of tele-
vision shows where people find
treasures hidden in their homes or
storage lockers is a reflection of the
growing second-hand retail indus-
try.
Lyle Wanless, owner and auc-
tioneer of Wanless Auction Group,
can attest to that.
“We have – right now – a lot of
business,” Wanless said. “We have
grown just astronomical.”
The company, based in Brook-
lyn for the past 23 years, has gone
from doing a few large farm auc-
tions per year, to one or two auc-
tions per week.
The economic dip and subse-
quent stagnant period has left a lot
of foreclosed homes and property
that needs to be liquidated, Wan-
less said. But technology and a
changing demographic have also
helped push sales.
“The technology has driven the
market,” Wanless said. “(And) we
have a different generation that’s
starting to buy off the Internet
now.”
Changing demographics and an
increase of online auctions are just
two major changes Wanless has
seen since he started. Wanless got
into the auction business after serv-
ing in the military, working as a
machinist, a stint as a dairy farmer
and teaching at UW-Platteville.
Wanless said he was drawn
to auctioneering because there
weren’t a lot of good businesses at
the time.
“I had seen a lot of things that
I didn’t like about the auction-
ing business,” he said, adding that
Wisconsin has only required licen-
sure of auctioneers for 12 years. “I
thought, ‘Here was an area where
people need better service.’”
Wanless said his family got into
the business to help people. Some-
times unfortunate circumstances –
death, family issues, and financial
problems – require people to get
rid of their property, Wanless said.
Those are some of the big reasons
people turn to auction businesses.
“We want to treat people like we
want to be treated,” Wanless said.
The company recently held a
seized motorcycle auction in Fitch-
burg for a local bank. The auction
drew bidders from near and far,
both online and in person. There
were several dozen buyers on the
property, along with more than
10,000 hits on the online auctions.
About 600 bidders registered and
75 of those bidders participated in
serious bidding on that Saturday.
Running an auction takes a good
call – which Lyle provides – but it
also takes the whole family to make
the operation run smoothly, Lyle
said. Lyle’s wife, Ann, does the
book keeping for the business. She
acts as the clerk by making sure
appropriate paperwork like con-
tracts, bills of sale, titles, licenses
and more are up to date and pro-
vided to each buyer and seller. She
collects payments – cash, check or
credit – for the items sold, as well.
“She’s really my right-hand
lady,” Lyle said. “I couldn’t keep
up with all the paperwork.”
Their sons – Dean and Douglass
– also help out running auctions
online and marketing the items to
different potential buyers.
“I’m very fortunate to have the
family support that I do,” Lyle
said.
Despite the recent growth, Lyle,
who is in his early 70’s, said he
wasn’t sure what will happen to
the business in the next decade or
so. He said his goal is to someday
retire from auctioneering.
“I don’t think I’ll be doing this
forever,” he said. “(But) I have fun
doing it.”
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1425A-A
Even If You Lose Your Job,
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current situation and work with you face-to-face
to develop a strategy that can help you keep your
retirement on track.
To make sense of your retirement savings
alternatives, call today.
Chad M Winklepleck, AAMS®,
CRPC®
Financial Advisor
.
911 North Main Street
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-0697
Chris Erfurth
Financial Advisor
.
990 Janesville St Unit 2
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-1618
Amid recent market volatility, we’ve seen substantial upswings and downturns. But
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Financial Advisor
911 North Main St., Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-0697
Chris Erfurth
Financial Advisor
990 Janesville St., Unit 2, Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-1618
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Member SIPC
Business
In brief
Gardocki earns
fellowship award
The Academy of General
Dentistry (AGD) is pleased
to announce that Oregon
dentist Theresa Gardocki
DDS, FAGD received the
Academy of General Den-
tistry’s Fellowship Award
dur i ng t he AGD 2013
Annual Meeting and Exhib-
its, held from June 27-30 in
Nashville, Tenn.
The AGD Fel l owshi p
Award is presented to den-
tists who seek to provide
the highest quality of dental
care by remaining current
in their profession, accord-
ing to a news release from
AGD.
To receive this honor, a
dentist must complete 500
hours of continuing dental
education, pass a compre-
hensive exam, and fulfill
three years of continuous
membership in the AGD.
Sienna Crest - Oregon
celebrates 15 years
Sienna Crest-Oregon, is
celebrating its 15th anniver-
sary this month.
For the past 15 years
Si enna Cr est has been
known as a local resource
for older adult care.
Since opening its first
home in 1998, Sienna Crest
now operates eight assisted
living and memory care
homes, two of which are
located in Oregon. The
other home locations are in
Marshall, Fort Atkinson,
Dodgeville, Darlington,
Mineral Point, and Platte-
ville.
The facility has filled its
month with entertainment,
activities, and of course the
beloved Bingo.
For more information
i nvol vi ng t he event s at
Si enna Crest or Si enna
Meadows Memory Care
call or stop by 981 Park St.
or call 835-7781.
Chamber class offered
The Oregon Chamber of
Commerce will again offer
evening computer training
and info sessions on top-
ics relevant to small busi-
nesses.
The next class tackles
LinkedIn and Facebook at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29.
This class will introduce
participants to the social
media phenomenon and
how these tools can posi-
tively impact a business.
Classes are $6 for cham-
ber members and $12 for
non-members.
Call 835-3697 or e-mail
j udy@oregonwi . com t o
register.
Village of Oregon
Planning Commission gives
nod to business expansion
Village of Oregon Planning Commission members gave approval
last week for a building addition to All Color Powder Coating, Inc.
The company, a custom powder coating business on N. Burr Oak
Ave., plans to add about 18,000 square feet of space for operations
and another 4,000 square feet of garage space for trucks.
All Color Powder Coating president Mark Mortensen said the
impetus for the expansion was to add the garage and storage space
to keep trucks out of the elements during the winter months.
“We wanted to do it and make sure that we built it the way we
wanted,” Mortensen said, adding that this will likely be the last
addition to this building. The addition is the fourth phase, with two
other additions already part of the building.
“It’s the addition that was always planned, with the exception of
the … build out for the truck storage,” he said.
The additional 4,000 square foot garage area put the building over
the original plan for expansion that was approved in the late 1990’s,
he said. For that reason, the county plans to review the company’s
stormwater run-off plan.
Internal drains in the building will drain to the sewer, Mortensen
said.
The commission approved the expansion pending a photometric
review showing where lighting on the exterior of the building will
be located.
– Mark Ignatowski
Photo submitted
Breaking ground at Headquarters
Dan Bertler of Supreme Structures, left, and Jamie Bush, owner of Headquarters Pub & Grill,
break ground on the new building earlier this month. The restaurant will be located at 101
Concord Drive on the corner of Hwy MM and Concord Drive in Oregon.
Wanless Auction
Group
455 - 8784
4658 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI 53521
wanlessauctiongroup.com
Photo by Mark Ignatowski
Lyle Wanless calls an auction in Fitchburg last month. Lyle and his family have been
in the auction business for more than 23 years.
Online
See and hear a live call
by Lyle Wanless.
ConnectOregonWI.com
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, September 12, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Different strokes
Young Panthers improve
averages from 2012
AnthonY Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
An improvement of over 100
strokes from last year’s Wisconsin
Dells Invitational to this year was
just the beginning for Oregon girls
golf this season.
After head coach Ben Cowan went
through the stats for the girls, he real-
ized each individual was improving
three to five strokes per nine holes,
which he said is really the goal for
this season.
And it rings true in one of the
toughest sectionals in the state. On
Monday, Oregon traveled to Maple
Bluff Country Club for the Crusade
Fore a Cure Invitational, and it had to
take on No. 1 Verona, No. 2 Middle-
ton, No. 4 Madison Memorial, No.
6 Madison Edgewood, No. 7 Green
Bay Notre Dame, No. 9 Janesville
Parker and No. 10 Milton.
Oregon, an honorable mention in
the Wisconsin Golf Coaches Asso-
ciation rankings, finished with a 380
which put them eighth overall and
ahead of Milton by 12 strokes. That
was a 49-stroke jump from 2012
when the Panthers were 18th out of
19 teams.
“We have Taylor who is new this
year and is a good player, but the
girls worked hard,” Cowan said.
“Morgan (McCorkle) and Jenny
(Johnson) played golf everyday this
summer. They played in the Federa-
tion stuff in the spring, so they got a
jumpstart. It goes to show that if you
practice, you will get better.”
At Maple Bluff, many of the
scores were elevated due to intensely
tough greens that the girls weren’t
used to seeing. Cowan said that it
hurt on the putting, but it was the
chipping that really became trouble.
A chip that might normally stop four
to five feet from the cup was ending
up nine to 10 feet from the cup on a
regular basis.
“You are not going to make those
all day,” Cowan said. “If the pros
don’t do it, we are not going to do it.”
Freshman Taylor McCorkle led
Oregon with an 87, while sophomore
Jenny Johnson finished with a 93.
Senior Morgan McCorkle shot a 94,
and junior Ashley Brechlin finished
the scoring with a 106.
Every single scoring varsity golfer
improved from last season’s score at
the same invitational. Even sopho-
more Olivia Davis – who was in
the tournament as an individual –
improved on her score with a 106.
But when it comes to competing
with the schools on top of the charts
at the moment, Cowan said there is
no pressure to do so, and the girls
are just out there having fun and see
what happens.
“That is the important part, that
you can actually see improvement,”
Cowan said. “But whether we make
it through regionals or out of section-
als, I don’t think it really matters to
us. We are just working to get better.
That is the cool thing about coaching,
the little a-ha moments where it is
like, ‘I can do this. I can hit the shot. I
do feel confident.’
“That is really what our team is all
about. We have fun. We have zero
expectations on winning because we
compete against the top teams in the
state, and that makes it an enjoyable
season.”
Madison Edgewood won the
Volleyball
Panthers
move to 2-0
in conference
AnthonY Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
Oregon girls volleyball is yet
to lose a set in Badger South
Conference play after sweep-
ing Monona Grove 3-0 (25-11,
25-18, 25-17) last Thursday on
the road.
Senior outside hitter Maddy
Gi t s l ed t he
Panthers (11-
2 overall, 2-0
Badger South)
with 13 kills,
11 digs and two
blocks. Junior
middle hitter
Ri l ey Ros e-
meyer added
10 kills, while
senior libero Madi Klonsinski
also picked up 11 digs.
Senior outside hitter Regan
Pauls collected two aces, and
senior setters Jamie Wood and
Dani Loomis picked up 16 and
14 assists, respectively.
The win sets up a showdown
with defending conference
champion Madison Edgewood
(9-2, 1-0) at 7 p.m. Thursday at
Edgewood High School.
After the Milton win, Rose-
meyer talked about knocking off
one good team at a time, specifi-
cally pointing out Edgewood as
the team to beat if the Panthers
were to remain on top of the
Badger South.
Belleville tourney
Oregon finished runner-up
Aug. 31 at the Belleville tourna-
ment at Belleville High School.
Gits picked up 55 kills during
the tournament, while Rosemey-
er picked up 32.
Wood (74 assists) and Loomis
(42 assists) were the leading set-
ters, while Pauls and Klonsinski
each picked up 13 aces.
Klonsinski also led with 43
digs, while Gits and Loomis
added 24 each.
Monona Grove invite
Oregon traveled to Monona
Grove High School Saturday
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Oregon sophomore Leah Koopman cruised to a 6-0, 6-0 victory against Stoughton’s
Marissa Despins at No. 1 singles last week. The Panthers won three of four singles match-
es to take the Badger South Conference dual 5-2.
Girls golf
Girls tennis
Oregon rolls behind three set wins
JeremY Jones
Sports editor
Oregon girls tennis pulled out
a pair of three set matches on
the road Thursday to take a 5-2
Badger South Conference win
at Stoughton.
Having already won three of
four singles matches, the Pan-
thers’ fate rested solely in the
hands of its two underclassmen
doubles teams last week.
Needing to win at either No. 2
or 3 doubles to take the match,
Oregon instead took both.
Sophomores Jesse Bartelt
and Madeline Bjerke outlasted
Stoughton freshman Anna Nel-
son and Ting Thompson to cap
the evening with a 6-2, 4-6, 6-1
victory at No. 3 doubles.
“We’ve had several close
matches already and not all
of them have gone their way,”
Oregon co-head coach Eric
Gavinski said. “We’re show-
ing every match that we are
improving because now we are
winning those tight matches.”
Freshmen Katherine Pliner
and Renee Lawandowski closed
out the victory with a 6-3, 5-7,
7-6 (7) win over seniors Alyssa
Ramos and Amara McCune.
“We only needed one of
those matches, to get both
really showed a lot of heart,”
Gavinski said. “Two doubles
especially not only had to play
a third set, but a tiebreaker as
well. They really played awe-
some.”
Sophomore Leah Koopman
cruised to a 6-0, 6-0 win over
Vikings’ No. 1 singles Marissa
Despins, while Michelle Peter-
son tacked on a 6-1, 6-2 victory
at No. 2 singles.
Newcomer Kenzie Torpy
helped the Panthers sweep the
top three flights, taking her No.
3 singles match 6-4, 6-1 against
Natalie Clerkin.
Stoughton freshman Ken-
dra Halverson won the Vikings
lone singles match, defeating
Oregon junior Claire Massey
6-2, 6-2.
Fellow freshman Payton Kahl
and Sarah Benoy added Stough-
ton’s other win, taking their
No. 1 doubles match by the
same score against juniors Kaci
Bausch and Cassandre Krier.
Turn to Golf/Page 11 Turn to Panthers/Page 11
Gits
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Freshman Taylor McCorkle putts on the 18th hole Monday during the Crusade Fore a Cure golf meet at Maple Bluff Country
Club. She finished 10th overall with an 87.
Turn to Tennis/Page 11
10
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
JeremY Jones
Sports editor
Josh Christensen spent
at least part of his summer
in a fashion much different
than his Oregon boys cross
country teammates.
Entering his junior sea-
son, Christensen opted to
travel to Crested Butte,
Colorado not for a vaca-
tion but to participate in
a running camp over 20
days.
So far this season the
ext ra mi l es have real l y
benefited Christensen who
covered Sat urday’s 5K
Randy Marks Cross Coun-
try Course in 17 minutes,
57 seconds for a team-best
43
rd
-place finish.
“I couldn’t do it without
my t eammat es, ” Chri s-
t ensen sai d. “I al ways
like to start out conserva-
tive, but with Chris, Ben
and Dan trying to pull me
along and run faster the
first mile – that’s really
helpful.”
He’ll have to get out fast
if he hopes to reach his
goal of 16:59.
“That’s going to be a lot
of pushing for me, but I’m
going to try and pull a few
of my t eammat es al ong
with me so we can get a
good pack down there,”
Christensen said.
Running a PR 17:44 in
his first meet this season,
it would be a drop of near-
ly 45 seconds.
Sophomore Chris Cutter
crossed the 5k-finish line
18 seconds later in 57
th

place.
Oregon boys cross coun-
try brought home a plaque,
taking second place in the
Division 2 portion of the
race with a score of 52 and
an average time of 18:13.
The Panthers (283) fin-
ished 10th overall (out of
22) as a team.
Junior Ben Vogt, who
led the team last week in
West Bend, crossed the
fi ni sh l i ne as t he Pan-
thers’ third runner Sat -
ur day i n 18: 17. Juni or
Ryan Barry and seni or
Daniel Rau rounded out
the top five scorers for
Or egon t i ed i n 18: 18.
Juniors Sam Horsnell and
James Skiles also compet-
ed on varsity.
“We ran as a team, that’s
kind of what we set out
to do,” head coach Erik
Haakenson said. “We had
a lot of teams from our
conference and section-
als here, so this is a real-
ly good test to see where
everybody is at.”
Defending state champi-
on Madison West won the
meet, besting rival Madi-
son La Follette (65-77)
thanks in part to the first-
place finish of junior Olin
Hacker.
Madison Memorial (127)
and t he host Wi l dcat s
(133) rounded out the top
four schools.
Oregon’s junior varsity
team placed ninth of 21
teams.
The Panthers travel to
the Yahara Hills Running
Course for the Madison
West Invitational on Satur-
day. JV boys competition
gets underway at 4 p.m.
followed by the boys var-
sity race at.
Girls
Seni or Val er i e Jones
l ed t he Pant hers t o t he
4K finish line of Satur-
day’s Verona Invitational
in 17:42 – good for 37th
place.
S o p h o mo r e E mma
Hughes, running her first
varsity race, was just off
t he pace, r eachi ng t he
finish line three seconds
behind Jones in 39
th
place.
Though she didn’t run
a varsity race a year ago,
head coach Doug Debroux
told Hughes she would be
this season’s secret weap-
on during the track and
field season last spring.
“Emma did a great job
training with the distance
gi r l s dur i ng t he t r ack
season, ” he sai d. “She
dropped over seven min-
utes at West Bend from a
year ago and four minutes
at Verona.”
Fellow sophomore Mad-
die LeBrun (18:54) and
s eni or Kat i e Boehnen
(18:56) were only separat-
ed by two seconds and one
spot, taking 79
th
and 80
th

place.
“Katie may be a pleasant
surprise to those outside
the program, but I saw her
almost everyday this sum-
mer leading our girls on
team runs,” Debroux said.
Freshman Carolyn Vogt
rounded out the top five in
her varsity debut, taking
84
th
in 19:12.
Sophomores Bree Pad-
dock and Kayla Wiedholz
also competed on varsity.
Oregon got some good
news last week as sopho-
more Jen Brien has only
a bad sprain and resumed
practice.
So p h o mo r e Co n n i e
Hanson, who ran on JV,
would have finished as the
Panthers third runner Sat-
urday with her 18:40. As a
result she will be running
varsity at the team’s next
meet.
“I t ’ s a young gr oup
that’s going to be push-
ing each other every week
for those varsity spots,”
Debroux said. “It should
make things exciting.”
Middleton (52) took top
honors pl aci ng al l fi ve
varsity scorers within 12
places and 52 seconds of
each other. Madison West
(57) and Madison Memo-
rial (84), which had the
top two varsity runners in
junior Siena Casanova and
senior Meghan Silberna-
gel, rounded out the top
three schools.
Conf er ence/ sect i onal
rival Stoughton took fourth
(148), while Fort Atkinson
(218) and Monona Grove
(260) also finished ahead
of Oregon’s 12
th
place 319
– as did sectional rivals
Verona (213) and Badger
(286).
Oregon travels to Deco-
rah, Iowa, at 9:30 a.m. Sat-
urday for the All American
Invitational at Luther Col-
lege.
The meet features mid-
dle school, high school and
collegiate races.
Are you paying too much
for auto insurance?
American Family rates are more
competitive than you might think.
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850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office – Madison, WI 53783
amfam.com

© 2012 002098 – Rev. 11/12
Are you paying too much
for auto insurance?
American Family rates are more
competitive than you might think.
Call me today to find out.
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office – Madison, WI 53783
amfam.com

© 2012 002098 – Rev. 11/12
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BREITBACH
CHIROPRACTIC
Serving the Community Since 1961
167 N. Main St., Oregon
Dr. John E. Breitbach
HOURS:
Monday, Tuesday and Friday
8 am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-6 pm
Wednesday
8 am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-5 pm; 7-9 pm
Saturday 8 am-11 am
835-5353
www.breitbachchiropractic.com
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Supporting Organizations
The Village of Oregon Public Works, The Oregon Police Department, Oregon Police Explorers, Oregon High School Girl’s and Boys Swim
Team, Oregon High School Soccer Team, Oregon School District Grounds and Custodial Staff, Oregon Athletics Department, Oregon
National Honor Society, OCSC Parents, Oregon Area Fire/EMS District, and After School Clubs
Dedicated Individuals of the OKT Board and their Families
Ken & Tara McKelvey, Tom Eithun, Ann Rule, Rebecca Mueller, Deb Kapalzinski, Ed & Carol Shirk, Jeff Rau, Cynthia Majors, Jackie Eisele,
Nancy Ciambrone, Wendi Jacobson, Troy Semenic, Ann Cox, Tammy Henn, Tom Vos, Cahty Liewen, Billie Farrar, Erika Wiedler, Stacy
Charles, Jim & DiDi Thomason, Catherine Stang, Karen Martin, Clint Kreckman, Kaara Rohrer, Ida Dempich, Jeff & Brenda Vondra, Larry &
Meghan Konapacki and Steve Newton
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3
8
0
Panther boys race to second place in D2 portion of Verona invite
Cross country
Photo by Jeremy Jones
(At left) Josh Christensen ran to a team-best time of 17 minutes, 57 seconds Saturday at the Verona
Invitational. Christensen finished 43rd overall as the boys finished 10th overall out of 22 teams;
(above) Senior Valerie Jones paced the girls teams with a time of 17:42 – good for 37th overall.
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
and defeated DeForest in the
championship 2-0 (25-22,
25-20).
The win avenged an earlier
2-1 loss (21-25, 25-22, 7-15)
to DeForest in the tourna-
ment.
In the championship, Gits
picked up 13 kills, while
Rosemeyer collected seven.
Wood (13) and Loomis (9)
led in assists. Pauls picked
up three aces, and Rosemey-
er picked up three blocks.
Klonsinski led with 11
digs, while Gits and Loomis
added 10 and eight, respec-
tively.
In the earlier loss, Gits had
nine kills, while Wood and
Loomis picked up 12 and 10
assists, respectively. Wood
added two aces, and Rose-
meyer had six blocks.
Klonsinski (12) and Pauls
(nine) led in digs.
Oregon also defeated Mad-
ison West 2-1 (25-12, 25-10,
14-15), Tomah 2-1 (24-26,
25-15, 15-12) and Monona
Grove 2-0 (25-22, 28-26).
Against West, Gits picked
up 10 kills, while Rosemeyer
added seven. Woos and Loo-
mis had 12 and 10 assists,
respectively, and Klonsinski
picked up four aces.
Rosemeyer led with two
blocks, and Klonsinski and
Wood added six digs each.
Against Tomah, it was
Gits (15) and Rosemeyer
(10) leading again in kills,
while Loomis and Wood
each had 12 assists.
Klonsinski added three
aces, and Pauls (13) and
Klonsinski (11) led in digs.
Finally, Gits led with 17
kills against Monona Grove,
while Rosemeyer picked up
12. Wood (18) and Loomis
(15) led in assists, and Pauls
collected 12 digs.
Klonsinski added two
aces.
invitational for the fourth time
in four years with a 343, while
Verona took second with a
351. Madison Memorial was
third with a 355.
Edgewood’s Caroline Lake
(74), and Tess Hackworthy
(77) finished first and second
overall. Notre Dame’s Jessie
Staed was third (78) after win-
ning a scorecard playoff with
Verona’s Jessica Reinecke.
The Panthers continue the
season at 3:30 p.m. Monday
against Madison Edgewood at
Foxboro Golf Course before
traveling to Monona Golf
Course at 4 p.m. Tuesday to
take on Monona Grove.
Morgan Stanley
Oregon traveled to Univer-
sity Ridge Golf Course Sept.
4 to compete in the Morgan
Stanley Shootout, and it fin-
ished 10th with a 369.
Morgan McCorkle led the
Panthers with an 83, while
Johnson shot an 88. Taylor
McCorkle added a 93, and
senior Jessica Nankivil shot a
106.
Cardinal Invite
The Panthers played similar
competition at Pleasant View
Golf Course Saturday in the
Cardinal Invitational, and it
tied for eighth place with a
347.
Johnson led the way with an
81, while Morgan McCorkle
shot an 83. Taylor McCorkle
was next with an 86, while
Brechlin finished with a 110.
Stoughton 160, Oregon 175
Oregon traveled to Stough-
ton Country Club Tuesday for
a Badger South Conference
dual against the Vikings and
fell 160-175.
Mor gan and Tayl or
McCorkle each had a 40,
while Johnson picked up a 46.
Brechlin finished the scoring
with a 49.
Stoughton was led by
senior Becky Klongland with
a 36.
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Golf: Top 10 finishes
Continued from page 9
Panthers: Volleyball wins Monona Grove Invitational
Continued from page 9
Boys soccer
Girls swimming
Second-half dominance over No. 5 Milton leads to 3-1 win
AnthonY Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
Senior defender Jon Con-
duah received a pass from
junior defender Spencer Pear-
son and knocked a header
into the upper right corner of
the goal Tuesday to tie fifth-
ranked Milton in the 42nd
minute.
The host Panthers, ranked
as an honorable mention, were
trailing after a slow start, but
Conduah’s goal jumpstarted
the Panthers into being a more
aggressive, ball-controlling
bunch in a 3-1 win.
“We start out slow for some
reason and have to figure
that out,” Conduah said. “We
came out in the second half
and improved our intensity,
and I think that goal really
helped us pick up the momen-
tum. We just tend to play bet-
ter in the second half for some
reason.”
Milton started the scoring
with a goal by sophomore
midfielder Sean Grote in the
30th minute with an assist
from senior forward and cap-
tain CJ Curtis.
But Oregon piled on the
opportunities in the second
half, and iced the game in the
70th minute with a penalty
kick by junior forward Nick
Steidemann.
Steidemann dribbled past
three defenders before being
tackled in the box from behind
for the PK.
Sophomore midfielder AJ
Breitbach scored Oregon’s
second goal in the 53rd min-
ute with an assist to Steide-
mann.
Head coach Kevin May
said this was the first game
that Oregon was able to
bounce back from a slow start
this season, and he hopes it
leads to a full 80 minutes like
the second half.
“When we want to play
well and we want to win, that
second half display is exactly
what we can do,” May said.
“We can move the ball well.
We can score goals.
“We can communicate to
make sure they don’t have
good opportunities. It is just a
switch they have to switch on
earlier.”
Senior goalie Jere Bauer
picked up one save for Ore-
gon. Drew had six.
Oregon (4-2 overall, 1-0
Badger South) plays in the
Hartland Arrowhead tourna-
ment Friday and Saturday. It
travels to Stoughton at 7 p.m.
Tuesday for another Badger
South Conference matchup.
Oregon 2, Baraboo 0
Steidemann and Breit-
bach each scored a goal last
Thursday in a 2-0 win over
Baraboo.
Senior midfielder Sam
Mosiman collected assists
on both goals. Bauer had one
save.
Oregon unable to keep pace with state runner-up
JeremY Jones
Sports editor
Winning is nothing new for the Mil-
ton girls swimming team, but it contin-
ues to be what the Panthers are striving
to do consistently.
Oregon was unable to take an event
or match the depth of the visiting Red-
hawks, who finished runner-up at last
year’s WIAA Division 2 state meet,
Tuesday falling 118-52 victory.
“We’re taking baby steps,” head
coach Karissa Kruszweski said. “We
knew we would have to fight for every
point and went out there and did that.”
Despite being unable to win any of the
evenings 11 events, the Panthers man-
aged to outscore Milton in the 200-meter
freestyle where sophomore Hannah Rau
(2:27.85) and freshmen Grave Przybyl
and Kelsey Kipp went 2-3-4.
Abby Schmitt, Quincey Newton,
Allie Greene and Willow Kugel opened
the meet by taking second in the 200
free relay (2:19.37).
Kugel (29.7) went on to finish runner-
up in the 50 free, while Rau (5:13.9)
came in second in the 400 free.
Abby Schmitt took second in the 100
butterfly (1:18.40) and 100 backstroke
(1:18.01).
Oregon’s 200- (Kipp, Rau, Schmitt
and Kugel) and 400-meter relay teams
(Kipp, Greene, Newton and Kugel) add-
ed second place finishes in 2:03.98 and
4:37.69, respectively. The Panthers, had
more than 12 personal best times.
“We had some tough practices last
night and this morning, but the girls
need to start believing they can get up
there and compete with these teams,”
Kruszweski said. “Coming out of this
meet with a lot of second-place finishes,
it’s helping the girls build that confi-
dence.”
Oregon travels to McFarland for a 6
p.m. dual on Tuesday, Sept. 17.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior defender Jon Conduah (8) and junior forward Nick Steidemann (10) celebrate Oregon’s first
goal in the 42nd minute Tuesday against Badger South rival and fifth-ranked Milton. Conduah scored
and Steidemann picked up the assist. The Panthers, ranked as an honorable mention, won 3-1.
Stoughton Invitational
The Panthers’ traveled back down
Hwy. 138 Saturday for the annual
Stoughton Invitational where the girls
placed third as a team behind Racine
Case and Manitowoc.
Koopman took second place at No.
1 singles, falling to Manitowoc soph-
omore Bailey Budnik 6-0, 6-0.
It was a finish matched by Peter-
son, who fell 6-3, 6-1 to Racine Case
senior Melanie Vidian in the No. 2
singles championship.
Massey (No. 4 singles) as well as
Bartelt and Bjerke (No. 3 doubles)
both finished third.
Oregon returns to action at 4:15
p.m. Thursday at home against Mon-
roe. The Panthers continue their con-
ference season Tuesday, Sept. 17 at
Fort Atkinson.
Tennis: Panthers drop Vikings, take third at invite
Continued from page 9
12
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
U
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Legals
MINUTES OF THE
REGULAR MEETING OF THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF THE
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
HELD ON AUGUST 26, 2013
The regular meeting of the School
Board of the Oregon School District was
called to order by the President at 6:36
PM in the Rome Corners Intermediate
School in the Village of Oregon, Dane
County, Wisconsin. Upon roll call, the
following board members were present:
Mr. Wayne Mixdorf, Mr. Dan Krause, Mr.
Lee Christensen, Mr. Jeff Ramin, Ms. Rae
Vogeler, Mr. Steve Zach and Ms. Courtney
Odorico. The following board members
were absent: none. Administrators pres-
ent: Dr. Brian Busler, Mr. Andy Weiland,
Dr. Anita Koehler, Mrs. Candace Wei-
densee, Mr. Jason Zurawik, Mr. Dan Rikli,
Mrs. Shannon Anderson, Dr. Leslie Berg-
strom, Mr. Jon Tanner, Ms. Jina Jonen,
Ms. Kelly Meyers, Ms. Mary Kramer, Ms.
Kerri Modjeski, and Ms. Amy Miller. Ms.
Jayne Wick was present for note taking.
Proof in the form of a certifcate by
the Oregon Observer of communications
and public notice given to the public and
the Oregon Observer and a certifcate of
posting as required by Section 19.84 Wis-
consin Statutes as to the holding of this
meeting was presented by Ms. Odorico.
Mr. Krause moved and Ms. Vogeler
seconded the motion to proceed with
the meeting according to the agenda as
posted. Motion passed by unanimous
voice vote.
A. CONSENT CALENDAR:
Mr. Ramin moved and Mr. Krause
seconded the motion to approve the fol-
lowing items on the Consent Calendar.
1. Approve minutes of the August
12, 2013 meeting;
2. Approve vouchers in the amount
of $820,237.14;
3. Treasurer’s Report ending June
30, 2013;
4. Staff Resignation of Nicole
Petroff, Music Teacher at PVE & RCI;
5. Staff Assignments –
* Michelle Arnett, .50 Interim 1st
Grade Teacher at BKE;
* Jenna Coleman, .90 Interim Ad-
vanced Learner Teacher (TAG) at PVE;
* Lisa H. Eiche, 1.0 Interim 3rd Grade
Teacher at NKE;
* Alyssa Loest, 1.0 Interim Music at
BKE;
* David Spaeth, 1.0 Social Studies/
Science at OMS;
* Katie Stauss, 1.0 FTE Math at OMS;
* Rebecca Pioreck Holder, .50 FTE
Interim Reading at OHS;
* Change in contract for Jodie Mc-
Coy from .50 FTE to 1.0 FTE 6th grade
teacher at RCI.
6. Field Trip Requests – none;
7. Acceptance of Donation – Lion’s
Club Donations of Supplies and $400
cash;
8. Open Enrollment Exception Ap-
plications.
In a roll call vote, the following mem-
bers voted yes: Mr. Ramin, Mr. Krause,
Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach,
Ms. Vogeler and Ms. Odorico. Motion
passed 7-0.
B. COMMUNICATION FROM PUB-
LIC:
* Carleen Bechen, 381 Union Rd,
Oregon, spoke in favor of Ms. Vogeler’s
proposal for the handbook to include
Just Cause wording;
* Gwen Maitzen, resident of Oregon
School District, 1233 Union Road, urged
the Board in favor of just cause in the em-
ployee handbook;
* Barbara Skiles, 855 Foxfeld Road,
Village, urged member to vote in favor of
Just Cause in the employee handbook;
* Matt Zibell, resident of own of Rut-
land, spoke in support of keeping Just
Cause wording in the employee hand-
book;
* Charles Uphoff, 2475 Lalor Road,
Fitchburg, spoke in favor of restoring the
contract with Just Cause wording;
* Beth Duvick, teacher at RCI – urged
board members to vote for Just Cause;
* Mike Wunsch, resident of Village of
Oregon asked the Board to vote in favor
of Just Cause in the handbook;
* Nancy Murphy – Town of Oregon-
spoke regarding the Just Cause lan-
guage in the employee handbook and
also talked about the Recruitment policy
being voted on later in the meeting;
* Tim LeBruns – thanked the Oregon
School District and the Oregon School
Board for their support of OASIS and the
hockey rink;
* Steve Staton, Village of Oregon
resident asked the Board to fnd middle
ground and to work on a solution for
having Just Cause in the employee hand-
book.
C. ACTION ITEMS:
1. Precision Retirement Donation/
Bruce Nelson: Mr. Mixdorf moved and
Mr. Christensen seconded the motion to
accept the donation of $5,000 from Preci-
sion Retirement to be used for scholar-
ship purposes. In a roll call vote, the fol-
lowing members voted yes: Mr. Mixdorf,
Mr. Krause, Mr. Zach, Ms. Vogeler, Mr.
Ramin, Mr. Krause and Ms. Odorico. Mo-
tion passed 7-0.
2. Employee Handbook: Standards
of Termination, Non-renewals and Disci-
pline: Ms. Vogeler moved and Mr. Krause
seconded the motion to accept Ms. Vo-
gelers Proposal to Section 6 of the Em-
ployee Handbook.
Mr. Zach moved to call the question
(Ms. Vogeler’s motion). Mr. Zach’s motion
dies due to lack of second.
After discussion, there was one
change on page 3 under Employee disci-
pline where the word “not” was inserted
in the second sentence - to read….It may
not include oral or ……. Also on page 4
under section B Non-Renewal of a Teach-
er or Administrator Contract, the phrase
“a non-probationary “ was added to the
second sentence…to read as “ In addi-
tion, the decision to non-renew a non-
probationary employee must meet the
standard of just cause. Ms. Vogeler add-
ed those changes as a friendly amend-
ment to her motion. Mr. Krause agreed
with the friendly amendment.
Mr. Zach further moved to call the
question. Mr. Christensen seconded the
motion. In a roll call vote, the following
board members voted yes: Mr. Zach, Mr.
Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf and Ms. Odori-
co. The following members voted no: Ms.
Vogeler, Mr. Ramin and Mr. Krause. Mo-
tion fails 4-3. (Needs 2/3 vote)
Ms. Vogeler moved and Mr. Ramin
seconded the motion to refer Ms. Vo-
geler’s original motion and take Ms. Vo-
geler’s proposal and refer to committee
of the whole within 30 days to work as
a group and then send to the next regu-
larly scheduled meeting after the meeting
of the whole to take action. In a roll call
vote, the following members voted yes:
Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr.
Zach, Mr. Krause and Mr. Christensen
and Ms. Odorico. Motion passed 7-0.
At 9:21 the Board took a 5 minute
recess.
3. 2013-2014 Transportation Con-
tracts; Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Chris-
tensen seconded the motion to approve
the 2013-2014 Conditions of Payment for
Transportation Services as presented. In
a roll call vote, the following members
voted yes: Mr. Zach, Mr. Christensen, Mr.
Krause, Mr. Mixdorf, Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ra-
min and Ms. Odorico. Motion passed 7-0.
4. 2013-2014 Food Service Pricing;
Mr. Christensen moved and Mr. Krause
seconded the motion to hold lunch prices
at the same level as 2012-13 for the 2013-
2014 school year. In a roll call vote, the
following members voted yes: Mr. Chris-
tensen, Mr. Krause, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach,
Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ramin, and Ms. Odorico.
Motion passed 7-0.
5. 2013-2014 CESA #1 Contract: Mr.
Mixdorf moved and Mr. Zach seconded
the motion to approve the CESA 1 con-
tract as presented. In a roll call vote, the
following members voted yes: Mr. Mix-
dorf, Mr. Zach, Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ramin,
Mr. Krause, Mr. Christensen and Ms.
Odorico. Motion passed 7-0.
6. Approval of Annual Meeting Agen-
da: Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Mixdorf sec-
onded the motion to approve the Annual
Meeting as presented. Motion passed by
unanimous voice vote.
7. Approval of Ground Rules for An-
nual meeting: Mr. Zach moved and Mr.
Mixdorf seconded the motion to approve
the Ground Rules for the Annual Meeting.
In a role call vote, the following members
voted yes: Mr. Zach, Mr. Mixdorf, Ms.
Vogeler, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Christensen, Mr.
Krause and Ms. Odorico. Motion passed
7-0.
8. 2013-2014 66.0301 Contract with
McFarland School District for Data Ser-
vices and 4K Administration: Mr. Zach
moved and Mr. Krause seconded the
motion to approve the 66.0301 shared
services agreements for the Database
Specialist and the Pre-K Ready for Learn-
ing Coordinator with the McFarland
School District. In a roll call vote, the
following members voted yes: Mr. Zach,
Mr. Krause, Mr. Mixdorf, Ms. Vogeler, Mr.
Ramin, Mr. Christensen and Ms. Odorico.
Motion passed 7-0.
9. From Policy:
a. 442 Distribution/display materi-
als by students (old 8.48): On behalf of
the policy committee, Mr. Ramin moved
to approve policy 442 and delete the old
policy 8.48. In a roll call vote, the follow-
ing members voted yes: Mr. Ramin, Mr.
Krause, Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr.
Zach, Ms. Vogeler and Ms. Odorico. Mo-
tion passed 7-0.
b. 812 Distribution and display of
Community materials (old 9.10): On be-
half of the Policy Committee, Mr. Ramin
moved to delete old policy 9.10 and ap-
prove policy 812. In a roll call vote, the
following members voted yes: Mr. Ramin,
Mr. Krause, Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf,
Mr. Zach, Ms. Vogeler, and Ms. Odorico.
Motion passed 7-0.
c. 817 Recruitment of Students: On
behalf of the Policy Committee Mr. Ramin
moved to approve policy 817. In a roll
call vote, the following members voted
yes: Mr. Ramin, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach,
Mr. Krause, Mr. Christensen and Ms.
Odorico. Ms. Vogeler abstained. Motion
passed.
D. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Student
Achievement
1. RCI, OMS & OHS Goal Reports
(Work Session) – Goal Reports were
delayed and will be on the next meeting
agenda.
E. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Other Topics
None.
F. INFORMATION ITEMS:
1. OEA President – no information
to report.
G. CLOSING:
1. Future Agenda was established.
2. Check Out
H. ADJOURNMENT:
Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Mixdorf sec-
onded the motion to adjourn the
meeting. Motion passed by unani-
mous voice vote. Meeting adjourned at
10:21 p.m.
Jeff Ramin, Clerk
Oregon School District
Published: September 12, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
MINUTES OF THE
SPECIAL MEETING OF THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF THE
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
HELD ON AUGUST 28, 2013
The special meeting of the School
Board of the Oregon School District was
called to order by President Odorico at
6:37 PM in the Rome Corners Intermedi-
ate School in the Village of Oregon, Dane
County, Wisconsin. Upon roll call, the fol-
lowing board members were present: Mr.
Jeff Ramin, Mr. Dan Krause, Mr. Wayne
Mixdorf, Ms. Rae Vogeler, Mr. Lee Chris-
tensen, Mr. Steve Zach and Ms. Courtney
Odorico.
The following board members were
absent: None.
Administrators present: Dr. Brian
Busler, Mr. Andy Weiland, Ms. Jina
Jonen, Ms. Shannon Anderson, Ms. Les-
lie Bergstrom, Mr. Jon Tanner, Ms. Kerri
Modjeski and Ms. Jayne Wick.
Proof in the form of a certifcate by
the Oregon Observer of communications
and public notice given to the public and
the Oregon Observer and a certifcate of
posting as required by Section 19.84 Wis-
consin Statutes as to the holding of this
meeting was presented by Ms. Odorico.
Mr. Krause moved and Mr. Ramin
seconded the motion to proceed with
the meeting according to the agenda as
posted. Motion passed by unanimous
voice vote.
A. DISCUSSION ITEM/WORK SES-
SION:
1. Oregon School District Facilities
Master Plan (Policy 137): Mr. Tim Prince
and Mr. Matt Breunig from Findorff and
Mr. Larry Bray and Mr. Matt Wolfert from
Bray Architects led a discussion with the
Board on the District’s Facilities Master
Plan.
B. ADJOURNMENT:
Ms. Vogeler moved and Mr. Ramin
seconded the motion to adjourn the
meeting.
Motion passed by unanimous voice
vote. Meeting adjourned at 9:07 P.M.
Jeff Ramin, Clerk
Oregon School District
Published: September 12, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
MINUTES OF THE
SPECIAL MEETING OF THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF THE
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
HELD ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2013
The special meeting of the School
Board of the Oregon School District was
called to order by President Odorico at
7:00 A.M. in the District Meeting Room at
the District Offce, 123 East Grove Street,
in the Village of Oregon, Dane County,
Wisconsin. Upon roll call, the following
board members were present: Mr. Dan
Krause, Mr. Wayne Mixdorf, Ms. Rae
Vogeler, Mr. Lee Christensen, Mr. Steve
Zach and Ms. Courtney Odorico.
The following board members were
absent: Mr. Jeff Ramin.
Administrators present: Dr. Brian
Busler, Mr. Andy Weiland, Ms. Jina Jonen
and Ms. Jayne Wick.
Proof in the form of a certifcate by
the Oregon Observer of communications
and public notice given to the public and
the Oregon Observer and a certifcate of
posting as required by Section 19.84 Wis-
consin Statutes as to the holding of this
meeting was presented by Ms. Odorico.
Mr. Mixdorf moved and Mr. Zach
seconded the motion to proceed with
the meeting according to the agenda as
posted. Motion passed by unanimous
voice vote.
A. ACTION ITEM:
1. Ratifcation of Board/OEA 2012-
2013 Contract: Mr. Krause moved and
Mr. Zach seconded the motion to ratify
the 2012-2013 Board/OEA Contract Set-
tlement as presented in the Tentative
Agreement dated June 6, 2013. In a roll
call vote, the following members voted
yes: Mr. Krause, Mr. Zach, Ms. Vogeler,
Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf, and Ms.
Odorico. Motion passed 6-0.
B. ADJOURNMENT:
Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Mixdorf sec-
onded the motion to adjourn the meeting.
Motion passed by unanimous voice vote.
Meeting adjourned at 7:07 A.M.
Jeff Ramin, Clerk
Oregon School District
Published: September 12, 2013
WNAXLP
JeremY Jones
Sports editor
Big plays early continued
to plague the Oregon football
team last week in a 49-20
Badger South Conference
loss at home against Monona
Grove.
Oregon answered the Silver
Eagles’ opening possession
touchdown when Matt Samp-
son raced 49 yards to cap a
four-play 71-yard drive.
The Panthers, however,
went on to surrender 21-unan-
swered points on five plays
by the MG offense, including
a 34-yard touchdown run and
58-yard strike against double
coverage on the first play
from scrimmage on back-to-
back drives.
Already with one score in
the game, Silver Eagle senior
quarterback Tyler Blang
ripped off 34 yards on a quar-
terback draw.
Monona Grove junior wide
receiver Trey Powers, who
had 155 yards on five catch-
es and three touchdowns,
out leapt Panther defenders
against single and even double
coverage with scores of 58, 47
and 19 yards.
Despite getting better, with
two sophomores playing
defensive tackle and senior
Alex Neal moving from
safety to inside linebacker,
head coach Dan Kissling said,
“we’re young at those posi-
tions and it shows.”
Monona Grove, which
hasn’t lost a conference game
in the past four seasons,
scored one more time to go up
35-7 before halftime.
“That’s been kind of a
theme for us the whole sea-
son – giving up big plays,”
Kissling said. “Scoring that
touchdown to tie the game it
was just like we came back
out and had those mental
lapses and gave us those big
plays.”
Despite the final score,
Kissling said there were some
positives as the Panthers only
allowed one touchdown in the
third quarter.
The Silver Eagles’ defense
held Oregon to 94 yards pass-
ing, though Oregon did rack
up 231 yards rushing on 35
carries as Sampson paced the
team with 83 yards on seven
carries.
“Good teams are going
to try and stop our bread
and butter, but we can’t be
shellshocked,” Kissling said.
“The guys need to trust and
buy into what we do.”
Buying in was exactly what
Kissling saw his team doing
early in the third quarter as
Sampson capped a six-play,
73-yard drive with a 5-yard
touchdown run.
Despite the game being
well out of hand, sopho-
more Lucas Mathews helped
Oregon end the game on a
positive, scoring on a 53-yard
touchdown run with nine sec-
onds remaining.
“If we could play three or
four quarters, the way our
D played in the third quar-
ter tonight, we’ll be OK,”
Kissling said. “Even next
week. We’ll be OK.”
Oregon (1-2) hosts Wau-
nakee (1-2) at 7 p.m. Friday.
The Warriors are coming off
a 28-21 loss to Mount Horeb/
Barneveld.
“It doesn’t get easier for
us,” Kissling said. “We are
going to have to pull together
and ride it out as a team.”
Panthers continue to be burned by big plays against MG
Football
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Oregon senior linebacker Matt Sampson (34) is unable to bring down Monona Grove sophomore running back Toren Young during the
second quarter of Friday evening’s 49-20 loss against the Silver Eagles. Sampson rushed for touchdown runs of 54 and 5 yards in the
loss, but the Panther’s defense continued to struggle, giving up pick plays.
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
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143 notices
FREE FIREWOOD cut your own. Evans-
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THEY SAY people don’t read those little
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Legals
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
CIRCUIT COURT,
DANE COUNTY, NOTICE TO
CREDITORS (INFORMAL
ADMINISTRATION) IN THE
MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ROSA J. ALLEN
Case No. 13PR589
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for Informal Admin-
istration was fled.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
September 22, 1928 and date of death
July 12, 2013, was domiciled in Dane
County, State of Wisconsin, with a mail-
ing address of 3614 Old Stage Road,
Brooklyn, WI 53521.
3. All interested persons waived no-
tice.
4. The deadline for fling a claim
against the decedent’s estate is Novem-
ber 29, 2013.
5. A claim may be fled at the Dane
County Courthouse, Madison, Wiscon-
sin, Room 1000.
Lisa Chandler
Probate Registrar
August 19, 2013
Michael D. Greiber –
Kammer & Greiber, S.C.
702 DeWitt St., Ste. A
Portage, WI 53901
MDG/aea
(608) 742-3234
Bar Number: 1030938
Published: August 29,
September 5 and 12, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
PLAN COMMISSION AGENDA
TUESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 17, 2013
6:30 PM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
1. Call Plan Commission meeting to
order.
2. Approval of minutes from the last
meeting.
3. Public Comments.
4. Discussion and possible Action
re: TORC procedures.
5. Update on Anderson Park.
6. Discussion and possible Action
re: Town’s Submittal Application for Land
Division, Rezones and CUP.
7. Communications.
8. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Post: September 9, 2013
Published: September 12, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
AGENDA
OREGON TOWN BOARD
WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2013
6:30 P.M. (NOTICE: DATE AND
TIME CHANGE)
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
6:30 P.M. BOARD MEETING
1. Call Town Board meeting to order.
2. Discussion and possible Action re:
Eagle Scout proposals and Anderson
County Farm Park.
3. The Town Board will meet in closed
session pursuant to Wis. Stat. § 19.85 (1)
(C) to discuss personnel.
4. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to
amendment after publication. Check the
offcial posting locations (Town Hall,
Town of Oregon Recycling Center and
Oregon Village Hall) including the Town
website at www.town.oregon.wi.us or
join the Town?s e-mail list to receive
agendas at townoforegon@mailbag.
com. It is possible that members of and
possibly a quorum of members of other
governmental bodies of the town may
be in attendance at any of the meetings
to gather information; however, no
action will be taken by any governmental
body at said meeting other than the
governmental body specifcally referred
to in the meeting notice. Requests
from persons with disabilities who
need assistance to participate in this
meeting or hearing should be made to
the Clerk?s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Post: September 10, 2013
Published: September 12, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
ANNUAL MEETING
AGENDA 2013
ROME CORNERS
INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL
SEPTEMBER 23, 2013
6:30 P.M.
1. Call Meeting to Order: Courtney
Odorico
2. Elect Chairperson of the Meeting
3. Appointment of Parliamentarian
4. Adoption of Ground Rules
5. Minutes of the Last Annual Meet-
ing
6. Superintendent’s State of the Dis-
trict Report
7. Financial Report
8. Books have been audited by
Johnson Block & Co., Inc.
9. Presentation of the Proposed Ex-
penditure Budget $ 51,428,844
10. Adoption of the Tax Levy $
22,955.451
Irrepealable Debt Retirement Levy
$3,426,381
Current Operation and Other Fund
Levy $19,529,070
11. Establish salaries of Board Mem-
bers
Current salaries are:
President $ 1,350
Vice-President $ 1,000
Clerk $ 1,000
Treasurer $ 1,000
Member $ 900
Committee Work $ 500 (Human As-
sets, Policy Governance, Physical As-
sets, Financial Assets)
12. Old Business
13. New Business
A. Set the time and date of the next
annual meeting: Board recommends the
fourth Monday in September at 6:30 PM.
That would be September 22, 2014
14. Adjournment
Thank everyone for coming. Final
motion needed for adjournment.
Notice is hereby given that a major-
ity of the Oregon School Board is expect-
ed to be present at the Annual Meeting.
Published: September 12 and 19, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
MINUTES OF THE
SPECIAL MEETING OF THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF THE
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
HELD ON AUGUST 13, 2013
The special meeting of the School
Board of the Oregon School District was
called to order by President Odorico at
6:03 PM in the Rome Corners Intermedi-
ate School in the Village of Oregon, Dane
County, Wisconsin. Upon roll call, the fol-
lowing board members were present: Mr.
Jeff Ramin, Mr. Dan Krause, Mr. Wayne
Mixdorf, Ms. Rae Vogeler, Mr. Lee Chris-
tensen, Mr. Steve Zach and Ms. Courtney
Odorico.
The following board members were
absent: None.
Administrators present: Dr. Brian
Busler, Mr. Andy Weiland, Ms. Jina
Jonen, Ms. Sarah Boatman, Mr. Jon Tan-
ner, and Ms. Jayne Wick.
Proof in the form of a certifcate by
the Oregon Observer of communications
and public notice given to the public and
the Oregon Observer and a certifcate of
posting as required by Section 19.84 Wis-
consin Statutes as to the holding of this
meeting was presented by Ms. Odorico.
Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Christensen
seconded the motion to proceed with
the meeting according to the agenda as
posted. Motion passed by unanimous
voice vote.
Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Ramin sec-
onded the motion to move to meeting of
Committee of the whole. In a roll call vote,
the following members voted yes: Mr.
Zach, Mr. Ramin, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Chris-
tensen, Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Krause and Ms.
Odorico. Motion passed 7-0.
A. DISCUSSION ITEM/WORK SES-
SION:
1. Employee Handbook: Standards
of Termination, Non-renewal, and Disci-
pline: Discussion held.
2. Meet and Confer with OEA and AF-
SCME about Standards for Termination,
Non-renewal and Discipline. Discussion
held.
B. ADJOURNMENT:
Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Christensen
seconded the motion to adjourn the
meeting.
Motion passed by unanimous voice
vote. Meeting adjourned at 8:25 P.M.
Jeff Ramin, Clerk
Oregon School District
Published: September 12, 2013
WNAXLP
Published: September 12, 2013
WNAXLP
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14
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
CAREGIVERS WANTED: Comfort
Keepers is seeking qualified, compas-
sionate individuals to help assist the
elderly in the Madison area. If you have
experience caring for those in need, give
us a call. CNA/personal care experience
preferred. Driver's License Required.
608-442-1898
EXPERIENCED CONCRETE Finisher
Must have valid drivers license. Com-
petitive wages. Health, dental available,
608-884-6205
MADISON AREA Road Maintenance
Company accepting applications for CDL
drivers and laborers. Full time beginning
now thru October. For more information
call 608-842-1676.
OREGON HOUSEHOLD HELP:
Need part-time help, 20 hours per week.
Monday-Friday, 2pm-6pm. $11. per
hour. Primary work is housecleaning
and watching two children after school.
Proven experience in housecleaning
and babysitting demonstrated by
references is necessary. E-mail:
householdhelpinoregon@gmail.com or
call 608-561-8636.
PAOLI CAFE & Grocery looking for
cooks, servers, customer service/sales.
Willing to train, email resume to paolilo-
calfoods@tds.net
PATIO & SKI SALES.
We are now accepting applications for
half-time sales positions in our casual
furniture area in the summer and ski/
sportswear department in the winter.
If you enjoy working with people,
have a flair for color & design and like
winter sports, please visit our store.
Positions are year-round with flexible
shifts of 15-25 hrs/wk on weekdays
and weekends. Chalet is a fun and
friendly place to work. We have great
appreciation for our employees and
customers. We offer a paid training
program, generous base salary with
commissions, incentives and other
great benefits. Apply in person or
send resume to:
Chalet Ski & Patio,
5252 Verona Rd, Madison, WI 53711
608-273-8263

SEWING MACHINE Operator:
Sewing medium weight fabrics on
Industrial Sewing Machine. Some
sewing experience necessary. Apply
in person: Gallagher Tent & Awning
Co. 809 Plaenert Dr. Madison 53713

SUPERIOR SERVICE Transportation
has immediate openings for local-
regional & part-time drivers. You must
have at least 2yrs of class A-CDL
experience with an acceptable MVR. If
you would like to run a consistent lane
and be home weekly call 608-325-6903
or send resume:
to superiorservice@tds.net.
TAXI DRIVERS must be friendly, reliable
and clean driving record. Must be at least
23 years old. 608-873-7233
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Part time,
days only. Become a part of our
growing Team! Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
434 heaLth care, human
serVices & chiLd care
CNA'S/NURSES NEEDED: For various
home care cases. INTERIM HEALTH-
CARE of WI is hiring compassionate,
dependable home healthcare workers
in Stoughton, Oregon, Verona, Belleville
and Cambridge! To join our team or for
more information contact: Laura Moench,
HR. 608-238-0268 lmoench@interim-
healthcare.com
440 hoteL, Food & BeVeraGe
KOFFEE KUP RESTAURANT LOOK-
ING FOR RESPONSIBLE COOKS,
DISHWASHERS AND WAITSTAFF. 355
E. MAIN, STOUGHTON
449 driVer, shiPPinG
& WarehousinG
COMPANY DRIVERS WANTED
Sign on bonus
Stoughton Trucking is expanding and
now accepting applications. Class A
CDL, Minimum 2 years OTR experience.
Must have a good
driving record. Health/Dental & Vision
If you meet these requirements please
call Tom
At 608-873-2933 or 800-635-2158
X-2933
DRIVERS: YOU Know What You Want!
Fleetmaster is where you get it! Flatmas-
ter Express has steady freight, regular
home time & much more! Need drivers
for Dedicated Run. Home Daily! Benefits,
Bonuses. Class A CDL, 12mos Exp.
Good MVR-Call 866-878-8335 Or apply
today at FleetmasterJobs.com
508 chiLd care & nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stoughton
/ Pleasant Springs Licensed Family Child-
care 22 yrs. exp. Quiet acre lot. Summer
& Fall Openings Available Summer Field
Trips - Kindergarten Readiness Music Pro-
gram - Indoor Platform & Slide Teacher
Directed $160 p/week Call: 873-0711
Location - Experience - Rates All on our
website at: www.browndeerdaycare.com
CHILDCARE PROFESSIONAL with
30 years of experience is opening new
family daycare in Stoughton. 3 openings
available in loving home for children
ages 6 weeks to 3 years.
For more information call
Julie at 873-1926.
TWO FULL-TIME, IN-HOME DAYCARE
OPENINGS AVAILABLE provided by
Cele Blackburn who has 30+ years of
experience. My home is conveniently
located off
Cross Country Road in Verona. Open
7:30 am-5:45 pm. Monday through
Friday. $225.00 per week. Call for an
interview: 608-848-9593
516 cLeaninG serVices
WANT SOMEONE to clean your house?
Call DOROTHY'S SWEEP CLEAN. We
are Christian ladies that do quality work.
Dependable and have excellent refer-
ences. Call 608-838-0665 or 608-219-
2415. Insured.
532 FencinG
CRIST FENCING FREE ESTIMATES.
Residential, commercial, farm, horse.
608-574-1993 www.cristfencing.com
548 home imProVement
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your basement
needs! Waterproofing? Finishing? Struc-
tural Repairs? Humidity and Mold Control?
Free Estimates! Call 888-929-8307 (wcan)
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Fall-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
European-Craftsmanship
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a
sensible price. Free estimates,
Insured, Polite, Professional.
608-873-9623
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

RECOVER PAINTING offers all car-
pentry, drywall, deck restoration and all
forms of painting. Recover urges you
to join in the fight against cancer, as a
portion of every job is donated to cancer
research. Free estimates, fully insured,
over 20 years of experience. Call 608-
270-0440.
550 insurance
SAVE ON AUTO INSURANCE from the
major names you know and trust. No
forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call
Ready for my QUOTE now! Call
888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 LandscaPinG, LaWn,
tree & Garden Work
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 ProFessionaL serVices
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Electrical Repair
and Installations.
Call 800-757-0383 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs
Call 800-981-0336 (wcan)
568 seWinG & aLterations
THE STITCHER FIXER Sewing Machine
Service and Repair. Monticello 608-214-
5641
576 sPeciaL serVices
CELLO LESSONS Openings for
cello students in the Verona area. Ages
9 and up, all ability levels. Free trial
lesson. Call Becky at
608-333-3977
601 househoLd
NEW MATTRESS SETS from $89.All
sizes in stock! 9 styles. PlymouthFurni-
tureWI.com 2133 Eastern Ave. Plymouth,
WI Open 7 days a week (wcan)
602 antiques & coLLectiBLes
MONROE UNIQUE ART- Bali, Sri Lanka,
Russia, Iran, Africa - Framed Collector
Prints! Large wicker patio set like new,
tables, vintage chairs, Christmas decor.
Dishes: Favonal, Raffaellesco, Talavera,
Wedgewood, Limoges. Place: 1150 4th
Ave West, Monroe, WI - across from
Brennan's. September 13, 12-5, Septem-
ber 14-15, 8-5.
NEW STORE OPENING!
TREND.QUILITY
312 W Lakeside St, Madison
Tuesday-Thursday 11-6
Friday-Saturday 10-6
Revisited home decor and more.
One of a kind selections!
606 articLes For saLe
BURGUNDY RECLINER/LIFT chair less
than 6 months old 608-884-9372
FOOSBALL TABLE - hardly used & in
great condition $75.00. Baker's Rack
- $40.00 Bar with 2 stools, top has
removable glass shelf & inside has 4
glass shelves, this was used outside for
1 summer $65.00 Call 873-8106
646 FirePLaces, Furnaces/
Wood, FueL
DRY OAK and Cherry Firewood For
Sale. Contact Dave at 608-445-6423 or
Pete 608-712-3223
648 Food & drink
CANNING TOMATOES AVAILABLE.
Full bushel $25. Call Tom
608-279-2855

ENLOY 100% GUARANTEED delivered-
to-the-door Omaha Steaks! Save 74%
plus 4 free burgers - The Family Value
Combo Only $39.99. Order today. 1-888-
676-2750 Use Code: 48643XMT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff79 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! Fresh-dipped berries starting
at $19.99! Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
652 GaraGe saLes
BELLEVILLE AREA MOM'S FALL
RESALE EVENT
Saturday, Sept. 14th 8am - Noon
Belleville Intermediate School
Gym, 102 S. Grant "Everything
Kids" -- infant through young adult.
Halloween, Christmas, Shoes,
Accessories, Furniture, Toys, Books,
Upscale Household.
Select adult team items.
Watch craigslist.com for details.
Participants Welcome!
Call 608-712-9245
OREGON 2006 Timber Lake Rd.
(off Schneider near MM) Sept 12-14,
9am-5pm. Multi-family. Antique
dresser. Collectibles including ELVIS,
Norman Rockwell, Precious Moments,
Avon, Thomas Kinkade and MORE.
Packer items, jerseys and collectibles
(many new), craft supplies, DVDs,
games, books for all ages. Ladies size
12-18. Kids clothes, winterwear. Toys,
carseat. Gardening, kitchen, home
decor, lots of seasonal/holiday decor.
Many miscellaneous items - No Junk!
OREGON 667 Stonebriar Ln.
September 13th, 8-5 and September 14th
8-12. Cranberry Glass, dishes, Quilting
books, patterns, baskets, antiques,
Christmas, Easter, Halloween, Women
clothes, shoes, purses. Twin size
Butternut wood w/Swedish design etching
on headboard, dishes, crocks, jugs.
OREGON 908 Harding St. Sept 19-3pm-
7pm, Sept 20-21, 7am-5pm. Clothes,
shoes, beanie babies, vinyl records, CD's,
jewelry, vintage items: teacups, chinaware,
silver plated mirror, comb, brush set, china
tea service, decorative glassware.
STOUGHTON- 1334 N Page. Friday
September 13, 8am-5pm. Fall and Holi-
day decorating items; ladies winter coats,
S-XL, sweaters, shoes, purses. No sum-
mer reruns, all Fresh for Fall
STOUGHTON- 1733 Hildebrandt Sep-
tember 13-14, 8am-3pm. Antique furni-
ture, stove, fridge, washer/dryer, house-
hold items, living room set.
STOUGHTON- 1936 W Main (corner of
Hoel & Main) Huge Garage Sale. 9/12
Noon-6pm, 9/13 7am-5pm, 9/14 7-? See
Craigslist
STOUGHTON- 1937 W Main Sept 12,
11am-6pm. Sept 13, 7:30am-6pm, Sept
14 8am-? Furniture-Entertainment Cen-
ters, kids clothes up to adults, House-
hold- Books-misc
STOUGHTON- 275 Taylor Ln Sept 13-14
8am-4pm. Hugh indoor Sale
STOUGHTON- 3571 Lakeview Dr. Sept
13-14, 8am-4pm. Collectibles - pop bot-
tles, mason jars, Elvis, lots of jewelry, etc.
Canoe, gun cabinet, old fly rod, wildlife
prints, turntable, boombox, lots of misc.
Also complete set-up for wood carving -
tools, books, wood etc.
STOUGHTON- 738/742 Kensington
Square, 9/12 9-5, 9/13 9-5, 9/14 9-12.
Dehumidifier, upright freezer, stampin-
up(cheap), children-adult clothes, Boyds
dolls and lots more. Four families. Check
Craigslist.
664 LaWn & Garden
3'-12' EVERGREEN & Shade Trees.
Pick up or Delivery! Planting Available!
DETLOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444
(wcan)
666 medicaL & heaLth suPPLies
ATTENTION SLEEP Apnea sufferers
with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP replace-
ment supplies at little or no cost. Plus
Free home delivery. Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection. 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no
activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd
waterproof alert button for free and more.
Only $29.95 per month. 877-863-6622
(WCAN)
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 musicaL instruments
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 Pets
Cats and Kittens for adoption. Healthy,
friendly. 608-848-4174 www.Angels-
Wish.org. Verona.
676 PLants & FLoWers
PROFLOWERS SEND BOUQUETS for
Any Occasion! Birthday, Anniversary or
Just Because! Take 20% off your order
over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/
ActNow or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
688 sPortinG Goods
& recreationaL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 eLectronics
DIRECTV OVER 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Call now! Triple Sav-
ings. $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade
to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!
Start saving today. 800-320-2429 (wcan)
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/mo
for 12 mos. High Speed Internet starting
at $14.95/month (where available)
SAVE! Ask about same day installation!
Call now -
800-374-3940 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone, Satellite. You've got a choice!
Options from ALL major service provid-
ers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today.
888-714-5772 (wcan)
696 Wanted to Buy
TOP PRICES
Any kind of scrap metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick-up
Property Clean Out
Honest/Fully Insured/U Call-We Haul
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 rentaLs
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON SECOND Floor Two-bedroom
apartment with laundry room, garage
and security entrance. All appliances,
water and sewer, lawn and snow remov-
al included. No dogs. Security deposit.
Lease Rent $800. 713 S. Main St. Call
835-5072
STOUGHTON- 2 b/4 unit on dead end st.
One up, remodeled bath, kitchen, dish-
washer, micro-stove-ref. window blinds-
oak-floors storage coin laundry. Heat,
water/sewer included. $715/mo 1 month
deposit. One cat okay. 561-310-5551
720 aPartments
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
OREGON DOWNTOWN LOCATION
1 Bed, 1 Bath, Appliances, A/C, Laundry,
Storage, $650./month. Heat included.
608-206-7596
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
740 houses For rent
COOKSVILLE AREA House 2 bedroom,
1 small bath, newly remodeled. Hard-
wood floors. New appliances. No Pets
No smoking. 2 car garage. Avail October
1. 608-490-0926
750 storaGe sPaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work
schedules.
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
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• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere
24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time.
Training provided. www.WorkServices7.com (CNOW)
HEALTH AND BEAUTY
ARE YOU A 45-79 YEAR OLD WOMAN WHO
DEVELOPED DIABETES WHILE ON LIPITOR? If you
used Lipitor between December 1996 and the Present
and were diagnosed with diabetes while taking Lipitor,
you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H.
Johnson Law toll-free. 1-800-535-5727 (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefts! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079 (CNOW)
NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in
trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certifed
courses and offer ìBest-In-Classî training. ï New
Academy Classes Weekly ï No Money Down or Credit
Check ï Certifed Mentors Ready and Available ï Paid
(While Training With Mentor) ï Regional and Dedicated
Opportunities ï Great Career Path ï Excellent Benefts
Package. Please Call: (602) 842-0353 (CNOW)
Drivers - Day Cab Drivers Wanted. Competitive Pay.
Frequent Home Time & OTR. Join the deBoer team
now! deBoer Transportation 800-825-8511 Apply
Online: www.drivedeboer.com (CNOW)
Get more home time on Transport America’s regional
runs. Great miles, equipment + extras. Enjoy Transport
America’s great driver experience! TAdrivers.com or
866-204-0648. (CNOW)
Regional Runs Available- CHOOSE the TOTAL
PACKAGE from MARTEN TRANSPORT: Regular,
Frequent HOME TIME; TOP PAY BENEFITS, Monthly
BONUSES, Automatic DETENTION PAY & more!
CDL-A, 6 mos. Exp. Req’d. EEOE/AAP 866-322-4039
www.drive4marten.com (CNOW)
Gordon Trucking- A better Carrier. A better Career.
CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed Up to $5,000 Sign-
on Bonus! Starting Pay Up to $.44 cpm Full Benefts
Excellent Hometime No East Coast EOE Call 7 days/
wk! GordonTrucking.com 866-565-0569 (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
September 12, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10 X 5 - 10 X 30
24/7 Access/Security lit.
Short/long term leases
608-334-1191
801 oFFice sPace For rent
North Industrial Park has office space for
rent .Utilities included. High speed internet
available. Reasonable rent. Call 873-8170
NORTH INDUSTRIAL Park has office
space for rent. Utilities included; high-
speed Internet available. Reasonable
rent. Call 873-8170.
OREGON OFFICE SPACE for rent. 500
sq ft, 2 room suite with signage. Available
October 1.
120 Janesville St. Call 608-575-1128
Alice
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE. The
Oregon Observer Classifieds. Call 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
820 misc. inVestment
ProPerty For saLe
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 80 wooded
acres. $69,500 OBO. Montreal River runs
through land. CFR taxes. Terms available.
More land available 715-478-2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 40 wooded
acres. $29,500 OBO. CFR taxes. Terms
available. More land available 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
840 condos &
toWnhouses For saLe
STOUGHTON 3-BEDROOM Townhome.
2.5 bathrooms, garage, full basement,
deck, large yard. All appliances. Cen-
tral air. Abundant storage. Utilities paid
by tenant. References. Pets considered.
Deposit is $1200. 608-772-0234 Available
October 1.
845 houses For saLe
MT. HOREB 3 Bedroom home, land
contract. $12,000 down.
608-335-6008
870 residentiaL Lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895
THE OREGON OBSERVER CLASSI-
FIEDS, the best place to buy or sell. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
965 hay, straW & Pasture
PLANED WHEAT for sale. Bagged or
bulk. Call 608-290-8994.
970 horses
CENTRAL WI HORSE SALE. Clark
County Fairgrounds. September 18-21. 4
days Horses & Equipment. Neillsville, WI
www.centralwihorsesale.net
715-238-8088 R Reineck (wcan)
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
990 Farm: serVice
& merchandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer
unless changed because of holiday
work schedules. Call now to place your
ad, 845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559, 873-
6671 or 835-6677.
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
Now hiring for a variety of care-
giving shifts & a part-time activity
assistant. Shift and weekend
differentials, paid training and
an array of benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
www.elderspan.com
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
Activity Assistant
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ESTIMATOR
VP Buildings, a subsidiary of BlueScope Buildings North America, has an immediate opening for
an estimator at its Evansville, Wisconsin Service Center.
The successful candidate will be responsible for assisting the Builders and District Managers with
their quotes and supporting technical information. Will work to develop “Value Engineering”
alternative proposals for owner-developed designs, to increase the chance of VP’s success
obtaining such projects. Will make recommendations on product usage and will provide data
required to suppliers to obtain prices on special purchase items. This individual will consult
with Engineering and Production on pricing, design, and production feasibility, assist Builders
and District Managers with the computer design process and work with the estimating team to
insure quote quality and accuracy. Must be capable of managing large workloads, comfortable
with multi-tasking and be willing to support our Safety Performance initiatives.
Candidate must have a Technical school degree in Construction Management or a design
discipline, including Mechanical or Civil Engineering course work, or have extensive training
in detailing, including building-related CAD experience. We desire a minimum of 5 years of
experience in detailing, estimating, or experience in a closely related feld.
Candidate must also possess good verbal and written communication skills.
If you qualify and are interested in exploring a career with a leader in the metal building industry,
email your resumé and cover letter to:
WIHR@bluescopesteel.com
Or mail your resumé to:
Human Resources Department
VP Buildings, Inc.
136 Walker Street
Evansville, WI 53536
Equal Opportunity Employer
M/F/D/V
Loaders
2nd and 3rd Shifts
We are looking for loaders to help collect, stage and load our products
on fatbed trailers to be shipped to our customers throughout the United
States and Canada.
The successful candidate will have high-capacity overhead crane
experience in an industrial or military setting. Experience operating heavy
duty material handling equipment is desired. Experience with equipment
such as mobile cranes, Lulls or high-capacity fork lifts helps qualify you
for this position. CDL desirable but not required. Must be willing and able
to work weekend overtime during busy times.
Candidates must have a good safety record, good attendance record and
verifable work references. Must pass a pre-employment drug test and
criminal background check. Starting base wage is $15.60 per hour, plus
an additional .45 cents for 2nd shift or an additional .50 cents per hour
for 3rd shift. Wage increases every six months until top base pay rate is
reached. Benefts include health and dental insurances, free life insurance,
immediate 401(k) participation with generous Company match, vacation
and paid holidays, gym membership and more.
If you are looking for a regular full-time position with variety and
responsibility, apply in person to complete the application materials.
BlueScope Buildings, N.A.
136 Walker St.
Evansville, WI
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Check out our Industry Leading Benets!
40% Proft Sharing • 401k Program • Cash Bonuses
Incentive Programs • Vacation Pay • Sick & Disability Pay
Medical/Dental/Vision • Life Insurance • Group Cancer &
Accident Policies • Scholarship Program • More!
NOW HIRING!
Oregon & Stoughton Stores
Guest Service Co-Workers
• Full & Part Time • 1st/2nd/3rd Shifts
• $9.90 - $12.60 per hour (based on experience)
Shift Leader
• $11.70 - $15.05 per hour (based on experience)
Assistant Food Service Leader
• $10.60 - $13.70 per hour (based on experience)

Apply online: www.kwiktrip.com
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Wagon Unloaders
and Corn Sorters
Days, Evenings and Weekends Available
Call O’BriEn FArmS, inC.
552 Glenway road, Brooklyn, Wi 53521
(608) 835-3564 or (608) 455-6615
Help Wanted for Seed Corn Harvest
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Full-Time Sales Representative
&
Full-Time Inside Sales/Support Specialist
Competitive pay, 401K, vacation time, health,
and dental insurance.
To apply and Learn more about
Purple Cow Organics, go to:
www.PurpleCowOrganics.com
and click on “careers”
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1,500 SIGN-ON BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreen’s stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues.-Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
* Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Beneft Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
* 401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
* Paid Holidays & Vacation
* Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have 18 months tractor
trailer exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certifcate from an
accredited driving school and meet all DOT requirements.
Send resume to b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
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Web Designer
Are you a skilled web designer? Does working in an
ever changing, fast-paced environment excite you? Are
you a self-motivated person with creative ideas? If you
answered yes to all three of these questions, you might
be the TH Media’s next Web Designer.
This Web Designer position is located in Dubuque,
IA. Responsibilities include developing, testing, and
auditing of THonline, other TH Media websites, and
our mobile site. In addition, this person should also
be skilled in print design, provide a high level of timely
and accurate customer service, and stay abreast of the
latest trends as it relates to web development.
To be considered for this position, you must have
a two-year college degree in a related feld (or the
equivalent in experience) and one to three years’
experience with Web site creation, design and online
publishing. Additionally, experience with content
management systems is a plus.
For consideration, apply online at
http://www.wcinet.com/careers
TH Media, a division of Woodward Communications,
is an Equal Opportunity Employer
MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATOR - HEAVY
UW-Madison is recruiting for two Motor Vehicle Operator –
Heavy positions at the Physical Plant Waste and Recycle
(3083 HWY MM, Fitchburg) and Business Services (1061
Thousand Oaks Trail, Verona.) Starting pay is $12.069 per
hour plus excellent benefits. Duties include safely and effi-
ciently operating state-owned dump trucks, rubbish packers,
fork lifts, etc.; perform light maintenance of vehicles. Must
possess or be able to obtain upon appointment a valid com-
mercial driver’s license. Most positions require Class B with
airbrake endorsement and some require hazardous materials
endorsement. Special examination/application materials can
be downloaded from:
http://www.ohr.wisc.edu/COB/CurrentUWEmployment.html.
Deadline for receipt of materials is September 17, 2013. The
employment register established from this recruitment will
be used to staff vacancies statewide during the next 6
months or longer.
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook as “Oregon Observer” and then LIKE us.
THI NK LOCAL FI RST!
YOUR LOCAL BUSI NESSES THANK YOU!
If you would like to see your
ad in this spot, contact
Linda Trecek at
835-6677 or
oregonsales@wcinet.com
Meat • Produce • Deli • Bakery
Groceries • Frozen • Dairy • Organic
Beer • Liquor • Wine
Main Street, Oregon • (608) 835-3939
Full service
grocery
store
right down
the street!
Locally Owned
Since 1978
112 Janesville Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 835-8276 • Fax: 835-8277
Mon. & Fri. appointment only
Tues. & Thur. 10am-6pm, Wed. 12pm-6pm, Sat. 9am-12pm
Gerlach
Wholesale Flooring
Support Your Hometown Businesses
Buy Local
• Carpet • Ceramic • Laminate
• Vinyl • Wood
• Residential & Commercial Installation
Free Estimates!
Call for an appointment today!
Trust The Office That
Knows Living Trusts
Focused Practice: We concentrate our practice on
estates, trusts and wills.
• Plan who will get your assets and when.
• Choose who is to be in charge.
• Disinherit that special someone.
Client Reviews: “Honest, fair and was well acquainted
with the law in our situation… We will certainly use his
services again.” -LN
“Excellent! Very down to earth and
easy to talk w/regarding a tough
subject! Thanks!” -DJ
Call to set up your
living trust today.
268-5751
Dan Krause
Protecting your legacy.
815 North Main Street, Oregon • 608-835-3191
Hours: M-F 8:30-8:00; Sat. 8:30-4:00; Sun. 9:00-2:00
“FALL” FOR OUR
AUTUMN HOME DECOR!
GRAND OPENING
Any Hair Cut
$
7
99
Wax
$
5
00
Full service family oriented
hair salon
Hours: Mon & Fri 9am-6pm, Tue-Thur 9am-8pm,
Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 10 am-3pm
954 Janesville St., Oregon WI
835-2500
September Special
Buy A Spa Pedicure Get One 1/2 Off
Expires September 30, 2013
835-1900
Hours: M-Tu 11am-8pm, W 10am-6pm,
Th 8am-8pm, F 10am-6pm, Sat 8am-2pm
106 Spring St., Oregon
New Client
Special
Receive one
express manicure
with your first
service.
($20 value)
Loyal Client
Special
Try any new
service and
receive a free
express manicure.
($20 Value)
Spa Manicure/
Spa Pedicure
$
59 Reg.
$
69, Save
$
10
NEW Full Set of
Acrylic Nails
$
50 Reg.
$
60, Save
$
10
BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY!
787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to Bill’s Foods)
835-3666 • www.cuttingedgehairetc.net
Massage Special
Massage with Tricia.
Introductory offer of
$
55 (regularly
$
60)
for a 1 hour massage and
$
35 (regularly
$
40) for a ½ hour massage.
16 - The Oregon Observer - September 12, 2013