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CHAPTER-I 1.

1 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY


Work-life balance can be defined as the perfect integration between work and life both not interfering with each other. In the current business world, people and organizations are working round the clock to meet the ever-growing demands. A slight delay in meeting the schedules or expectations is considered to be an organizational failure. To avoid delays and failures, employees are working hard and giving their heart and soul to achieve work-life balance which is creating an enormous pressure on them and hence they are forced to finish their jobs irrespective of time limit. The most-often used phrase among the employees is I dont have time or I have a hectic schedule. A day of 24 hours is no longer enough to perform workrelated and personal-related duties or responsibilities. The problem seems simple but difficult to solve and handle. Employees who have to play another role of daughter/son/spouse/parents are not able to manage their roles. Observing the day-to-day lives of many employees, two main issues to be addressed to achieve work-life balance are time and stress.

WORK LIFE BALANCE: THE HR PERSPECTIVE Introduction


The changing economic conditions and social demands have changed the nature of work throughout the world. Originally, work was a matter of necessity and survival. Throughout the years, the role of "work" has evolved and the composition of the workforce has changed. Today, work is widely viewed as a source of personal satisfaction. A good balance in work and life can play a phenomenal role in the attainment of personal and professional goals. The objective of this paper is to understand the various issues that have come to the forefront due to the dynamic nature of work.

Definition
Work life balance is about people having measure of control over when, where and how they work. There is a view that work-life balance only in the framework of what the company does for the individual. If an individual goes on working his or her best at work place but not really enjoying the same then happiness and satisfaction can never be achieved. Achievement can be viewed as motive of life while enjoyment is the fuel that drives that motive.

Efforts made by Organizations & Individuals


Organizations today have realized the importance of the employee-work-life balance and its importance in the efficiency of the employees. Organizations work-life balance, so that neither the work nor the employee's personal life work-life balances, so that neither the work nor the employee's personal life is affected. In offices also, efforts are being made to provide friendly work atmosphere for the employees by providing all sorts of refreshments available for the employee. The employees are given the freedom to have their own ways of doing the work. Maternity leaves and various holiday packages are being designed for the employees, and also various insurance schemes are there for the employees and their families. Organizations are trying to take care of all the overloads of the employees, so that the employees can better concentrate on the work, so that the employee can enjoy the work and can have a proper work life balance.
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The role of HR in achieving work-life balance


HR Managers therefore, need to take a strategic approach to the whole issue of work/life balance. They need to understand and quantify how work/life issues impact the bottom line measures of the business. They need to talk about work/life issues not as a soft option but as an essential business tool that will deliver: A reduction in absenteeism An increased ability to attract and retain talented employees Increased employee engagement, motivation and use of discretionary effort

Role of organization in achieving work/life balance


Work life and personal life are the two sides of the same coin. According to various work /life balance surveys, more than 60% of the respondent professionals surveyed said that are not able to find a balance between their personal and professional lives. They have to make tough choices even when their work and personal life is nowhere close to equilibrium. Traditionally creating and managing a balance between the work-life was considered to be a woman's issue. But increasing work pressures, globalization and technological advancement have made it an issue with both the sexes, all professionals working across all levels and all industries throughout the world. Achieving "work-life balance" is not as simple as it sounds. Work life and personal life are inter-connected and interdependent. Spending more time in office, dealing with clients and the pressures of job can interfere and affect the personal life, sometimes making it impossible to even complete the household chores. On the other hand, personal life can also be demanding if you have a kid or aging parents, financial problems or even problems in the life of a dear relative. It can lead Employers help their employees manage workloads The most important variable in work/life balance is the nature of the job itself. Jobs with autonomy, flexibility, meaning, manager support, and a chance for advancement often result in enhanced job satisfaction, commitment, and retention. But even the best and most supportive workplace cannot prevent the negative effects of too much work. Managers should keep the following tips in mind: Keep workloads realistic Schedule time accurately, manage resources wisely, prioritize tasks, and say "No" to projects that would overload the team. Review work processes and load distribution regularly to see if you can help lighten the burden. Remove interruptions Setting aside specific interruption-free periods during the work week can result in increased productivity and a less stressful work environment. Interruptions prolong the workday and are symptomatic of a crisis-centred, reactive approach to work. Outcomes of imperfect Work life balance Stress Physical Problem Relational Problems Hangover Unethical Practices Disturbed Families Decreased Performance Organization in Jeopardy
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1.2 INTRODUCTION TO THE INDUSTRY


The Indian textile industry is one of the largest in the world with a massive raw material and textiles manufacturing base. Our economy is largely dependent on the textile manufacturing and trade in addition to other major industries. About 27% of the foreign exchange earnings are on account of export of textiles and clothing alone. The textiles and clothing sector contributes about 14% to the industrial production and 3% to the gross domestic product of the country. Around 8% of the total excise revenue collection is contributed by the textile industry. So much so, the textile industry accounts for as large as 21% of the total employment generated in the economy. Around 35 million people are directly employed in the textile manufacturing activities. Indirect employment including the manpower engaged in agricultural based raw-material production like cotton and related trade and handling could be stated to be around another 60 million. A textile is the largest single industry in India (and amongst the biggest in the world), accounting for about 20% of the total industrial production. It provides direct employment to around 20 million people. Textile and clothing exports account for one-third of the total value of exports from the country. There are 1,227 textile mills with a spinning capacity of about 29 million spindles. While yarn is mostly produced in the mills, fabrics are produced in the powerloom and handloom sectors as well. The Indian textile industry continues to be predominantly based on cotton, with about 65% of raw materials consumed being cotton. The yearly output of cotton cloth was about 12.8 billion m (about 42 billion ft). The manufacture of jute products (1.1 million metric tons) ranks next in importance to cotton weaving. Textile is one of Indias oldest industries and has a formidable presence in the national economy inasmuch as it contributes to about 14 per cent of manufacturing value-addition, accounts for around one-third of our gross export earnings and provides gainful employment to millions of people. They include cotton and jute growers, artisans and weavers who are engaged in the organised as well as decentralised and household sectors spread across the entire country.

INDIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY STRUCTURE AND GROWTH Indias textile industry is one of the economys largest. In 2000/01, the textile and garment industries accounted for about 4 percent of GDP, 14 percent of industrial output, 18 percent of industrial employment, and 27 percent of export earnings (Hashim). Indias textile industry is also significant in a global context, ranking second to China in the production of both cotton yarn and fabric and fifth in the production of synthetic fibers and yarns. In contrast to other major textile-producing countries, mostly mostly small-scale, nonintegrated spinning, weaving, cloth finishing, and apparel enterprises, many of which use outdated technology, characterize Indias textile sector. Some, mostly larger, firms operate in the organized sector where firms must comply with numerous government labor and tax regulations. Most firms, however, operate in the small-scale unorganized sector where regulations are less stringent and more easily evaded. The unique structure of the Indian textile industry is due to the legacy of tax, labor, and other
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regulatory policies that have favored small-scale, labor-intensive enterprises, while discriminating against larger scale, more capital-intensive operations. The structure is also due to the historical orientation towards meeting the needs of Indias predominately low-income domestic consumers, rather than the world market. Policy reforms, which began in the 1980s and continued into the 1990s, have led to significant gains in technical efficiency and international competitiveness, particularly in the spinning sector. However, broad scope remains for additional reforms that could enhance the efficiency and competitiveness of Indias weaving, fabric finishing, and apparel sectors. Structure Of Indias Textile Industry Unlike other major textile-producing countries, Indias textile industry is comprised mostly of small-scale, nonintegrated spinning, weaving, finishing, and apparel-making enterprises. This unique industry structure is primarily a legacy of government policies that have promoted laborintensive, small-scale operations and discriminated against larger scale firms: Composite Mills. Relatively large-scale mills that integrate spinning, weaving and, sometimes, fabric finishing are common in other major textile-producing countries. In India, however, these types of mills now account for about only 3 percent of output in the textile sector. About 276 composite mills are now operating in India, most owned by the public sector and many deemed financially sick. Spinning. Spinning is the process of converting cotton or manmade fiber into yarn to be used for weaving and knitting. Largely due to deregulation beginning in the mid-1980s, spinning is the most consolidated and technically efficient sector in Indias textile industry. Average plant size remains small, however, and technology outdated, relative to other major producers. In 2002/03, Indias spinning sector consisted of about 1,146 small-scale independent firms and 1,599 larger scale independent units. Weaving and Knitting. Weaving and knitting converts cotton, manmade, or blended yarns into woven or knitted fabrics. Indias weaving and knitting sector remains highly fragmented, small-scale, and labor-intensive. This sector consists of about 3.9 million handlooms, 380,000 powerloom enterprises that operate about 1.7 million looms, and just 137,000 looms in the various composite mills. Powerlooms are small firms, with an average loom capacity of four to five owned by independent entrepreneurs or weavers. Modern shuttleless looms account for less than 1 percent of loom capacity. Fabric Finishing. Fabric finishing (also referred to as processing), which includes dyeing, printing, and other cloth preparation prior to the manufacture of clothing, is also dominated by a large number of independent, small scale enterprises. Overall, about 2,300 processors are operating in India, including about 2,100 independent units and 200 units that are integrated with spinning, weaving, or knitting units. Clothing. Apparel is produced by about 77,000 small-scale units classified as domestic manufacturers, manufacturer exporters, and fabricators (subcontractors).

Growth of Textile Industry India has already completed more than 50 years of its independence. The analysis of the growth pattern of different segment of the industry during the last five decades of post independence era reveals that the growth of the industry during the first two decades after the independence had been gradual, though lower and growth had been considerably slower during the third decade. The growth thereafter picked up significantly during the fourth decade in each and every segment of the industry. The peak level of its growth has however been reached during the fifth decade i.e., the last ten years and more particularly in the 90s. The Textile Policy of 1985 and Economic Policy of 1991 focussing in the direction of liberalisation of economy and trade had in fact accelerated the growth in 1990s. The spinning spearheaded the growth during this period and man-made fibre industry in the organised sector and decentralised weaving sector. Size of Textile Industry in India The textile industry in India covers a wide gamut of activities ranging from production of raw material like cotton, jute, silk and wool to providing high value-added products such as fabrics and garments to consumers. The industry uses a wide variety of fibres ranging from natural fibres like cotton, jute, silk and wool to man made fibres like polyester, viscose, acrylic and multiple blends of such fibres and filament yarn. The textile industry plays a significant role in Indian economy by providing direct employment to an estimated 35 million people, by contributing 4 per cent of GDP and accounting for 35 per cent of gross export earnings. The textile sector contributes 14 per cent of the value-addition in the manufacturing sector. Textile exports during the period of April-February 2003-2004 amounted to $11,698.5 million as against $11,142.2 million during the same period in the previous year, showing an increase of around 5 per cent. Estimates say that the textile sector might achieve about 15 to 18 per cent growth this year following dismantling of MFA.

ROLE OF INDIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY IN THE ECONOMY Textile industry plays a significant role in the economy. The Indian textile industry is one of the largest and most important sectors in the economy in terms of output, foreign exchange earnings and employment in India. It contributes 20 per cent of industrial production, 9 per cent of excise collections, 18 per cent of employment in industrial sector, nearly 20 per cent to the countrys total export earnings and 4 per cent ton the GDP. The sector employs nearly 35 million people and is the second highest employer in the country. The textile sector also has a direct link with the rural economy and performance of major fibre crops and crafts such as cotton, wool, silk, handicrafts and handlooms, which employ millions of farmers and crafts persons in rural and semi-urban areas. It has been estimated that one out of every six households in the country depends directly or indirectly on this sector. India has several advantages in the textile sector, including abundant availability of raw material and labour. It is the second largest player in the world cotton trade. It has the largest cotton
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acreage, of about nine million hectares and is the third largest producer of cotton fibre in the world. It ranks fourth in terms of staple fibre production and fourth in polyester yarn production. The textile industry is also labour intensive, thus India has an advantage.

1.3 INTRODUCTION OF THE ORGANIZATION Ahill roopa processing mills is a unique, versatile industry and is dedicated to the continues improvements in producing different types of processed fabrics by providing excellent services through motivated qualified and dynamic team of people. They ensure that the products are produced according to the customers requirements and expectation. Ahill roopa processing mills is renowned in local and international markets due to its excellent services, timely delivery of Quality finished products to their valued customers. Ahill roopa processing mills philosophy of continues improvements relies on an intensive training programs regular meetings, discussions which emphasis the employees direct involvement. Their aim is to respond to our customers ever-changing needs in the more effective way. There is no doubt that ahill roopa is one of the leading companies in textile export in India, but they achieve this position after many years of hard work and entering efforts. In ahill roopa there is a modern and sophisticated processing plant consisting of singeing, shearing, continues bleaching, dyeing, mercerizaing and calendaring both normal and friction. Printing department is equipped with two rotary printing installations from j-Zimmer Austria, having all modern arrangement to handle cotton and polycot ton fabrics. It can produce printed fabric up to 280 cm finished width in maximum of 8 colored design. Machinery of laboratory is imported from foreign countries to ensure the quality of the product according to the standards set by the customers. The laboratory is playing its key role in all the departments in providing 100% correct result in all fields of processing department. An other factors that counts much in the success of ahill roopa is the strict rules and regulations of the organization. The credit of this goes to the human resources department. The management and the employees have to abide by these rules and regulation in every circumstance. The shifting time, Lunch time and the HR department very strictly observers closing time. One thing that is the positive point for inexperienced persons that ahill roopa offers variety of training programs for the peoples coming from different institutions and fields. In the entire department the peoples from different institutions and fields get proper training for the betterment of their future. The computer system has increased the efficiency and effectiveness of work by decreasing work time, load and labour.ahill roopa is not arranged computer system in their organization but they also managed special short term training programs for the employees so that they can use the computer system properly. The other factor is the design studio of ahill roopa. The designers of ahill roopa are very skilled persons and they are expert in their fields. The design store is producing very well, innovation and unmatched designs, which really play important role in popularity. HISTORY OF THE ORGANIZATION: Ahill roopa processing mills is one of the manufacturers and registered leading exporter of textile goods in india.It is exporting high quality products.

Ahill roopa processing mills is one of the manufacturers and exporters of textile in india.Specializing in home textile printed, dyed, bleached fabrics, an apparel and fashion garment, ahill roopa is exporting quality to virtually all parts of the world. With latest State-ofthe art machinery and equipment, it is a complete printing, dyeing, finishing and stitching plant. Three huge spinning mills, a high caliber weaving unit and a made-up/garment unit is working under one roof. The unit is capable of producing high quality with a capacity of 150 kilometer of finished cloth every day. Counts arent all that counts! While counts reflect on the durability of the cloth, what reflect on the aesthetics of the end-user are the design, color combination and mood of the fabric print. That is why; ahill roopa never under estimates the importance of an enchanting design. Their design department is not only well equipped with latest computers and peripherals but also manned with a highly sensitive and sensible team of designers. These designers are based on unique but fascinating combination of age old traditional motifs and futuristic surreal forms given their customers a wide range to choose from. Widening this choice further is their design library, one of the largest in India, offering an extensive range from timeless floral and geometric to intriguing contemporary designs and colours. A sizeable percentage of ahill roopa processing mills, daily textile production by the meter are converted in house into a ready, saleable retail product.ThereCut & Sew division enjoys the cutting edge in assembling . From a fiber to a finished product, nothing gets spared from our ultra-sensitive, extra vigilant laboratory. Equipped with the most modern and precision equipment, products are frequently subjected to tests against most relevant international standards at every stage of manufacture. Tests are conducted to control shrinkage (dimensional change), pilling resistance, and abrasion, color fastness and washing fastness etc.

1.4 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY PRIMARY OBJECTIVES:


o To analyze whether employees able to balance their work and family life.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES:
o To find out the factors which helpful to employees to balance their work and family commitment. o To find out the factors which obstruct the employees to balance their work and life balance. o To study the work relative attributes which cause stress. o To identify the additional work provision given by the companies.

1.5 SCOPE OF THE STUDY


To understand the need of work life balance, one first needs to understand about work life imbalance, as with the understanding of the origin, causes and effects of this imbalance, the balancing act becomes easier. The corporate world of today is exceedingly demanding. The work culture varies from organization to organization. Today the deadlines are getting tighter and an individual's job is not only to match that deadline but also to give quality output. Due to this work pressure it becomes exceedingly difficult to maintain a family life. It becomes very difficult to have the engagement of mind with the engagement of body. In every individual's life there are four stakeholders- own personality, job, family and society. So it is very important to give equal importance to all the stakeholders.

1.6 LIMITATAIONS OF THE STUDY


1. The respondents are the first limitation, because they feel the interviewer is a person who is sent by a management. So, that they are not ready to give the fact so the result may be wrong. 2. Time given for collecting and analyzing the data is not sufficient. 3. The result of the research is confined to Ahill Roopa Processing Mills only and does not Applicable to any other organization. 4. Being it is time constraint the sample size is restricted to 500 only. 5. Due to non-cooperation of some respondent, the accuracy of the study may be affected. 6. Since the employees were busy with their work and due to strikes there was delay to meet the respondents.

.2 Review of Literature
A literature is a body of text aims to review the critical points of current knowledge on a particular topic, the literature review usually precedes a research proposal, methodology and results section. Its goal is to bring the reader up to date with current literature on a topic and forms the basis for other goals, such as future research that may be needed in the area.

2.1 CONCEPT RELATED TO WOK - LIFE BALANCE


Judge, boudreu, and Bretz (1994) rated the work-family policies available to these employees and found that more comprehensive benefits were associated with lower work-to-life conflict. But not work-to-life conflict. Thompson, Beauvais, and Lynees (1999) also found a significant, negative association between the availability of work-life-practices and work-to-life conflict, While Frye and Breaugh (2004) identified a negative relationship between perceptions of the usefulness of organizational work-to-life conflict. A number of researchers have found that use of flexible working hours is associated with lower of work-to-life conflict. Thomas and Ganster (1995) found perceived control served as a mediating mechanism by which family-supportive policies influenced A non-directional measure of worklife conflict, and demonstrated that family supportive organizational perceptions mediated the link between use of work-life conflict. Ashforth, keinet, and fugate,s (2000) work on boundary theory and role transition suggests that because workers have different preferences for integration versus segmentation of work and family roles, certain Wok-life practices may be ineffective in reducing inter-role conflict if they do not cater to a workers particular arrangements has been shown to benefit some workers, whereas for others particularly those with greater family responsibilities it appears to blur the boundaries between work and home. Ryan and Kossek (2008) , implemented attributes including supervisor support for use and university of practice availability will affect the degree to which work-life practice are seen by employees as fulfilling their work-life needs and signaling support from the organization. Organizations featuring an entrenched long-hours culture and unaccommodating attitudes among managers and co-workers tend to discourage employees from making use of the work-life practices ostensibly available to them. Lewis and Smithson (2001) indicated that perceived entitled to work-life practices is not widespread among European employees, particularly those in nations with low levels of statuary regulations concerning the balance of work with family or personal commitments. For instance, study participants in Ireland and the UK did not feel entitled to employer support for child care, and perceived entitled to flexible hours or parental leave was contingent upon the participants view of whether such practices were practical for the organization, in terms of time, operation and costs. Give the current absence of compelling data to demonstrate perceived entitled to work-life practices, therefore, the social exchange explanation for the positive effects of worklife practices among non-users cannot be discounted. Allen and Russell (1999) in their research found that employees who used work-life balance practices were perceived by co-workers as having lower levels of organizational commitment, which was thought to affect the subsequent allocation of organizational rewards such as advancement opportunities and salary increases. Casper, fox, sitzmann and landy (2004) showed that supervisors generally had poor awareness of work-life practices in their organization, and this influenced their ability to refer employees to these practices. Research has also demonstrated that factors completely unrelated to employees requests to use work-life practices can have a profound influence on the likelihood
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of those request being granted. For example, female managers are more likely than male managers to grant requests for alternative work arrangements. Powell & Mainiero (1999) supervisors with greater parental responsibilities have been found to exhibit more flexibility in helping employees balance their work and home commitments, while supervisors with a greater need for control have been found to display less flexibility in this regard. Casoer and buffardi (2004) speculate that such perceptions of support are a psychological mechanism though which work-life practices influence behavioral, intentions, explaining why even employees who have no need of work-life practices are still more attracted to organizations offering them. According to signaling theory, when decisions need to be made with incomplete information available, individuals use observable characteristics to form inferences about unobservable characteristics, Spence (1973). During the recruitment process, job candidates may therefore use the presence of work-life balance practices as signals for work-related supports that are important to them in choosing an organization. Frone and Yardley (1996) determined that employees with young children and those with height level of family-to-work conflict deemed organizational work-life balance practices as more important than did employees without these characteristics. Rau and Hyland (2002) found that individuals with high levels of conflict between work and family were more attracted to organizational that provided opportunities for telework. Rothbard, Dumas, and Phillips (2005) in their research found that employees preferences for segmentation versus integration of work and family roles predicted attraction to work-life practices, who preferred to keep their work and family lives separate being more satisfied with the provision of flexible hours rather than onsite childcare. These studies suggest that individual differences among employees can moderate the appeal of work-life balance practices offered by organizations. This is consistent with the person organization fit perspective, which posits that individual differences are key predictors of the qualities a job candidate will find attractive in an employing organization. Kossek and Nichols (1992) study of onside children found no effects of children centre use on supervisor ratings of employee performance, although self-ratings of performance users indicated higher level s of quality and greater ability to balance multiple roles then among non users. In a study of 55 firms that permitted administrative employees to bring their children to work when childcare arrangements broke down or were otherwise unsustainable, company representtatives reported that this work-life balance practice helped to maintain employee productivity.

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CHAPTER-III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
RESEARCH DESIGN The descriptive research was used for this researcher especially to describe the characteristics of the employees working in the organization. A research design is the arrangement of condition for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in purpose are descriptive is nature. The research design used here is descriptive research as the study depicts the current state of affairs. Data Collection Method There are two methods of Data collection, a. Primary Data collection method b. Secondary Data collection method In this research, both the data collection methods are used. a) Primary Data Primary Data refer to information obtained firsthand by the researcher on the variable of interest for the specific purpose of the study. The primary data collection was done through the questionnaire method from the respondents. The questionnaire was given to the respondents and they were asked to fill them up. Necessary help was rendered whenever they found it difficult to answer. b) Secondary Data Secondary Data refers to information gathered by someone other than the researcher conducting the current study. In this study, Secondary data were collected from company profile, books, journals and internet SAMPLE DESIGN All the items under consideration in any field of inquiry constitute a Universe or Population. The researcher must decide the way of selecting a sample or what is popularly known as the sample design. A sample design is a definite plan determined before any data are actually collected for obtaining a sample from a given population. Population The total of 800 employees in Ahill roopa processing mills constitutes the population for this study. Sample Size A Sample of 500 employees was chosen for this study. Sampling Technique In this study, simple random sampling method was adopted for selecting the respondents. STATISTICAL TOOLS PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS: Percentage analysis is the method to represent raw streams of data as a percentage (a part in 100 percent) for better understanding of collect data. Number of Respondents Percentage analysis = x 100 Total Number of Respondents

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WEIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD: Weighted average is a kind of arithmetic mean of a set of number in which some elements of the set carry more importance (weight) than other. In NAM weight is assigned to the average. Where, Weight-age Score = WiXj wi = Weight age value xj= No. of respondents HENRY GARRETT RANKING METHOD: Hendry Garrett ranking method is used to find the factor which affecting the employee attrition. 100(Rij 0.5) HRM = Nj Where, Rij = Rank given for ith item j th individual Nj = Number of items ranked by jth individual CHI SQUARE TEST: The Chi-Square test is one of the simplest and most widely used non parametric tests in statistical work. This test is used to find whether the two attributes, are associated are not. The quantity 2 describes the magnitude of the discrepancy between theory and observation. ( 2 ) = (oij Eij ) 2 / Eij Where, Oij = observed frequency Eij = Expected frequency Degree of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) Where, r= Number of rows c= Number of columns

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CHAPTER IV ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 4.1 PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS


TABLE NO: 4.1.1 AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS Age in years No. of respondents Percentage of respondents Below 20 years 31 6 21-30 years 216 43 31-40 years 204 41 41-50 years 49 10 Above 50 years 0 0 500 100.0 TOTAL

S.no 1 2 3 4 5

Inference: From the above table it is inferred that, 6% of the respondents are belonged to the age group of below 20 years, 43% of the respondents are belonged to the age group of 21-30 years, 41% of the respondents are belonged to the age group of 31-40 years, and the remaining 10% of the respondents are belonged to the age group of 41-50 years. Finally it is concluded that majority 43% of the respondents are belonged to the age group of 21-30 years. TABLE NO: 4.1.2 GENDER OF THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 Gender Male Female TOTAL No. of respondents 311 189 500 Percentage of respondents 62 38 100.0

Inference: From the above table it is inferred that, out of 500 respondents, 62% were male, and remaining 38% of the respondents were female. Finally it is concluded that majority of 62% of the respondents gender were male.

TABLE NO: 4.1.4 MARTIAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 Marital status Married Unmarried TOTAL
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No. of respondents 345 155 500

Percentage of respondents 69 31 100.0

Inference: From the above table it is inferred that, 69% of the respondents had married and the remaining 31% of the respondents had Unmarried. Finally it is concluded that majority 69% of the respondents had married.

TABLE NO: 4.1.5 EDUCATIONAL LEVEL OF THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 4 Educational level Upto SSLC HSC UG Degree PG Degree TOTAL No. of respondents 189 236 67 8 500 Percentage of respondents 38 47 13 2 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 38% of the respondents had studied up to SSLC, 47% of the respondents had studied HSC, 13% of the respondents had studied UG Degree and the remaining 2% of the respondents had studied PG Degree. Finally it is concluded that majority 47% of the respondents had studied HSC.

TABLE NO: 4.1.6 WORKING EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 4 Working experience Less than 2 years 2-4 years 4-6 years 6-8 years TOTAL No. of respondents 257 206 33 4 500 Percentage of respondents 51 41 7 1 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 51% of the respondents were having the working experience of less than 2 years, 41% of the respondents were having the working experience of 2-4 years, 7% of the respondents were having the working experience of 4-6 years and the remaining 1% of the respondents were having the working experience of 6-8 years. Finally it is concluded that majority 51% of the respondents were having the working experience of less than 2 years.

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TABLE NO: 4.1.7 INCOME LEVEL OF THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 4 5 Income level Below Rs.10000 Rs.10001-Rs.15000 Rs.15001-Rs.20000 Rs.20001-Rs.25000 Above Rs.25000 TOTAL No. of respondents 313 166 14 4 3 500 Percentage of respondents 62 33 3 1 1 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 62% of the respondents had earning the income of below Rs.10000, 33% of the respondents had earning the income level of Rs.10001Rs.15000, 3% of the respondents had earning the income of Rs.15001-Rs.20000. 1% of the respondents had earning the income level of Rs.20001-Rs.25000 and the remaining 1% of the respondents had earning the income level of above Rs.25000. Finally it is concluded that majority 62% of the respondents monthly income had below Rs. 10000.

TABLE NO: 4.1.8 FAMILY NATURE OF THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 Family nature Joint family Nuclear family TOTAL No. of respondents 95 405 500 Percentage of respondents 19 81 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 19% of the respondents were belonged to the joint family and the remaining 81% of the respondents were belonged to the nuclear family. Finally it is concluded that majority 81% of the respondents were fall under the category of nuclear family.

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TABLE NO: 4.1.9 MEMBERS IN THE RESPONDENTS FAMILY S.no 1 2 3 Family members 2 Members 3-4 Members 5-6 Members TOTAL No. of respondents 401 71 28 500 Percentage of respondents 80 14 6 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 80% of the respondents family size had only 2 members, 14% of the respondents had 3-4 members, and the remaining 6% of the respondents family size had 5-6 members. Finally it is concluded that majority 80% of the respondents family size had only 2 members in the family.

TABLE NO: 4.1.10 NUMBER OF DAYS WORKING IN A WEEK BY THE RESPONDENTS S.No 1 2 Number of days 6 days 7 days TOTAL No. of respondents 474 26 500 Percentage of respondents 95 5 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 95% of the respondents had worked normally 6 days in a week and the remaining 5% of the respondents had worked all the days in a week. Finally it is concluded that majority 95% of the respondents had worked normally 6 days in a week.

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TABLE NO: 4.1.11 HOURS WORKING IN A DAY BY THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 4 Number of hours 7-8 hours 8-9 hours 9-10 hours 10-12 hours TOTAL No. of respondents 272 144 69 15 500 Percentage of respondents 54 29 14 3 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 54% of the respondents had worked for 78 hours in a day, 29% of the respondents had worked for 8-9 hours in a day, 14% of the respondents had worked for 9-10 hours in a day and the remaining 3% of respondents had worked for 10-12 hours in a day. Finally it is concluded that majority 54% of the respondents had worked for 7-8 hours in a day.

TABLE NO: 4.1.12 TRAVELLING TIME BY THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 Travel time Less than half an hour Nearly one hours Nearly 2 hours TOTAL No. of respondents 313 176 11 500 Percentage of respondents 63 35 2 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 63% of the respondents had spent less than half an hour for travelling, 35% of the respondents had spent nearly one hour for travelling and the remaining 2% of the respondents had spent nearly 2 hours for travelling. Finally it is concluded that majority 62% of the respondents had spent less than half an hour for travelling.

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TABLE NO: 4.1.13 PREFERENCE OF WORKING SHIFT BY THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 Preference General shift Night shift TOTAL No. of respondents 498 2 500 Percentage of respondents 99 1 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 99% of the respondents had preferred to work in a general shift and the remaining 1% of the respondents had preferred to work in a night. Finally it is concluded that majority 99% of the respondents had preferred to work in a general shift. TABLE NO: 4.1.14 TIRED OR DEPRESSION OF WORK BY THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 4 Tired or depression because of work Always Often Sometimes Rarely TOTAL No. of respondents 345 124 29 1 500 Percentage of respondents 69 25 5 1 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 69% of the respondents had always tired or depression because of work, 25% of the respondents had often tired or depression because of work, 5% of the respondents had sometimes only tired or depression because of work and the remaining 1% of the respondents had rarely tired or depression because of work. Finally it is concluded that majority 69% of the respondents had always tired or depression because of work.

TABLE NO: 4.1.15 TIME SPEND AT WORK BY THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 4 Time spend Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied TOTAL No. of respondents 18 92 374 16 500 Percentage of respondents 3 74 19 4 100.0

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INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 74% of the respondents had satisfied with the time spend at work, 19% of the respondents had neutral, 4% of the respondents had dissatisfied and the remaining 3% of the respondents had highly dissatisfied with the time spend at work. Finally it is concluded that majority 74% of the respondents had satisfied with the time spend at work.

TABLE NO: 4.1.16 MISS OUT QUALITY OF TIME WITH THEIR FAMILY AND FRIENDS S.no 1 2 3 4 5 Miss out quality of time Always Often Sometimes Rarely Never TOTAL No. of respondents 341 141 14 3 1 500 Percentage of respondents 68 28 2.8 1 0.2 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 68% of the respondents had stated always miss out quality of time with their family and friends, 28% of the respondents had stated often, 2.8% of the respondents had stated sometimes, 1% of the respondents had stated rarely and the remaining 0.2% of the respondents had stated never miss out quality of time with their family and friends. Finally it is concluded that majority 68% of the respondents had miss out quality of time with their family and friend is always.

TABLE NO: 4.1.17 RESPONDENTS STRESS MANAGEMENT METHODS S.no 1 2 3 4 Methods of stress management Yoga Meditation Entertainment Music TOTAL No. of respondents 4 24 47 425 500 Percentage of respondents 1 5 9 85 100.0

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INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that, 1% of the respondents had doing yoga to manage their stress, 5% of the respondents had doing meditation, 9% of the respondents had engaged in entertainment and the remaining 85% of the respondents had engaged in music to manage their stress. Finally it is concluded that majority 85% of the respondents had stated engaged in music to manage their stress.

TABLE NO: 4.1.18 BENEFITS PROVIDED BY THE ORGANIZATION TO THE RESPONDENTS S.no 1 2 3 4 Benefits Telephone for personal use Counseling services for employees Health program Transportation TOTAL No. of respondents 57 5 1 437 500 Percentage of respondents 11.4 1 0.2 87.4 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above table, it is found that 11.4% of the respondents were having telephone for personal use as an additional work provision, 1% of the respondents were having counseling service, 0.2% of the respondents are having health programs and the remaining 87.4% of the respondents are having transportation as an additional work provision. Finally it is concluded that 87.4% of the respondents were provided with the additional provision provided in the organization is Transportation.

TABLE NO: 4.1.21 RESPONDENTS HAVE ANY STRESS IN WORK PLACE S.no 1 Yes/no Yes No. of respondents 500 Percentage of respondents 100.0

INFERENCE: From the above it is inferred that 100% of the respondents had stress in their workplace.

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4.2 WEIGHTED AVERAGE


TABLE NO: 4.2.1 FACTORS HELP RESPONDENTS TO BALANCE THEIR WORK
S.no 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Factors Flexible working time Holiday and Leave Support from co-Workers Comfortable with current position Compensation Permission for family emergencies and events Better workplace and resources Paid parental leave Job Sharing Negative attitude of manager Frequent travelling away from home Weekend work Negative attitude of family members Poor working condition Misunderstanding with managers / supervisor VH 224 355 265 183 263 331 269 272 276 0 0 1 0 0 1 H 246 107 196 252 187 153 213 159 192 1 1 0 1 1 0 M 30 38 38 62 48 16 18 68 32 128 58 23 23 41 34 L 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 182 161 186 177 199 211 VL 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 189 280 290 299 259 254 Total 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 Weighted average 438.8 463.4 445 422.4 441.8 463 450.2 440.2 448.8 188.2 156 147.2 145.2 156.8 156.6 Rank 8 1 5 9 6 2 3 7 4 10 13 14 15 11 12

INFERENCE: From the above it is clear that most of the respondents gave more weightage to the factor is holiday and leave.

4.3 Henry Garnett ranking


S.no 1 2 3 4 5 6 Ranking Illness of a family members Excessive work load Not enough time to sleep Family conflict Poor performance from co-workers Time spend away TABLE NO: 4.3.1 RANKING THE CAUSES STRESS 1 2 3 4 5 6 29 105 174 67 24 21 98 55 39 76 93 46 71 42 35 30 107
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6 141 95 83 42 43 44

7 76 37 60 65 114 74

8 18 22 16 9 28 39

9 8 7 8 5 11 8

84 69 48 61 56 73

100 72 83 70 75 38

7 8 9

from family Fried from job Depression job dissatisfaction

10 85 0

30 88 0

66 102 1

22 84 3

11 38 13

25 19 8

28 7 29

267 51 50

31 26 396

TABLE NO: 4.3.1(b) RANKING THE CAUSES STRESS


S.no 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Ranking Illness of a family members Excessive work load Not enough time to sleep Family conflict Poor performance from co-workers Time spend away from family Action taken by the managers Depression job dissatisfaction 1 594 2871 10395 17226 6633 2376 990 8415 0 2 2058 9604 5390 3822 7448 9114 2940 8624 0 3 4462 6887 4074 3395 2910 10379 6402 9894 97 4 8064 6624 4608 5856 5376 7008 2112 8064 288 5 9500 6840 7885 6650 7125 3610 1045 3610 1235 6 13254 8930 7802 3948 4042 4136 2350 1786 752 7 7068 3441 5580 6045 10602 6882 2604 651 2697 8 1656 2024 1472 828 2576 3588 24564 4692 4600 9 728 637 728 455 1001 728 2821 2366 36036 Total 47384 47858 47934 48225 47713 47821 45828 48102 45705 Mean Value 94.77 95.72 95.87 96.45 95.43 95.64 91.66 96.20 91.41 Rank 7 4 3 1 6 5 8 2 9

INFERENCE: From the above Table No. 1 (B) it is observed that Family conflict was ranked as the major stress cause by the respondents that obtained a Garrett score of 48225 points. It was followed by Depression which was placed second with a Garrett score of 48102 points. Sleepless was given third place with a Garrett score of 47934 points. Heavy work load was given fourth place with a Garrett score of 47858 points. Not able to spend time with family members was given fifth place with a Garrett score of 47821 points. Co-workers poor performance was given sixth place with a Garrett score of 47713 points. Illness of family members was given seventh place with a Garrett score of 47384 points. Action taken by the managers was given eighth place with a Garrett score of 45828 points. Job dissatisfaction was given ninth place with a Garrett score of 45705 points. From the above analysis it could be concluded that the most important causes stressing the employees during balancing the life is family conflict and depression. At the same time factors like managers action and job dissatisfaction shows very low in creating stress to the employees during work life balance.

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TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.4.1 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Age of the Respondents Upto 20 years 21-30 years 31-40 years 41-50 years Total 1 21 (5.83) 150 (41.7) 161 (44.7) 28 (7.8) 360 Influence 2 9 (6.77) 62 (46.6) 42 (31.6) 20 (15.0) 133 Total 3 1 (14.3) 4 (57.1) 1 (14.3) 1 (14.3) 7 31 216 204 49 500

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (57.1%) among the respondents having 21-30 years category and the same is as its minimum (14.3%) among the respondents of Upto 20 years & 31-50 years category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (46.6%) among the respondents having 21-30 years category and the same is as its minimum (6.7%) among the respondents of Upto 20 years category. On the other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (44.7%) among the respondents having 31-40 years category and the same is as its minimum (5.83%) among the respondents of Upto 20 years. In order to find out the relationship between the age and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below. Null Hypothesis (Ho) Alternative Hypothesis (H1) : There is no significant relationship between age of the respondents and level of influence : There is significant relationship between age of the respondents and level of influence Chi-Square Tests TABLE: 4.4.1(b) Factor Age Calculated 2Value 12.460 Table Value 12.592 D.F 6 Remarks No Significant at 5% level

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1)

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INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the calculated chi-square value (12.460) is greater than the table value (12.6) and the result is non significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is rejected and alternative hypothesis H1 is accepted. From the analysis it is concluded that there is no close relationship between the age of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance.

TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.4.2 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENDER OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Gender of the Respondents Male Female Total 1 220 (61.1) 140 (38.9) 360 Influence 2 3 86 5 (64.7) (71.4) 47 2 (35.3) (28.6) 133 7 Total 311 189 500

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (71.4%) among the respondents having Male category and the same is as its minimum (28.6%) among the respondents of Female category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (64.7%) among the respondents having Male category and the same is as its minimum (35.3%) among the respondents of Female category. On the other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (61.1%) among the respondents having Male category and the same is as its minimum (38.9%) among the respondents of Female. In order to find out the relationship between the gender and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below.

Null Hypothesis (Ho) Alternative Hypothesis (H1)

: There is no significant relationship between gender of the respondents and level of influence : There is significant relationship between gender of the respondents and level of influence

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Chi-Square Tests TABLE: 4.4.2(b) Factor Gender Calculated 2Value .778 Table Value 5.99 D.F 2 Remarks No Significant at 5% level

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the Calculated chi-square value (.778) is greater than the table value (5.99) and the result is non significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is accepted and alternative hypothesis H1 not is accepted. From the analysis it is concluded that there is no close relationship between the gender of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance. TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.4.3 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Marital status 1 Married Unmarried Total 250 (69.4) 110 (30.6) 360 Influence 2 90 (67.7) 43 (32.3) 133 3 5 (71.4) 2 (28.6) 7 345 155 500 Total

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (71.4%) among the respondents having Married category and the same is as its minimum (28.6%) among the respondents of Unmarried category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (67.7%) among the respondents having Married category and the same is as its minimum (32.3%) among the respondents of Unmarried category. On the other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (69.4%) among the respondents having Married category and the same is as its minimum (30.6%) among the respondents of Unmarried. In order to find out the relationship between the Marital status and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below. Null Hypothesis (Ho) : There is no significant relationship between marital status of the respondents and level of influence Alternative Hypothesis (H1) : There is significant relationship between marital status of the respondents and level of influence
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Chi-Square Test TABLE: 4.4.3(b) Factor Marital status Calculated 2Value .163 Table Value 5.99 D.F 2 Remarks No Significant at 5% level

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the Calculated chi-square value (.163) is greater than the table value (5.99) and the result is non significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is accepted and alternative hypothesis H1 not is accepted. From the analysis it is concluded that there is no close relationship between the marital status of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance. TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.4.4 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EDUCATION LEVEL OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Influence Education level Upto SSLC HSC UG Degree PG Degree Total 1 119 (33.1) 179 (49.7) 55 (15.3) 7 (1.9) 360 2 67 (50.4) 54 (40.7) 11 (8.3) 1 (0.8) 133 3 3 (42.9) 3 (42.9) 1 (14.3) 0 (0) 7 189 236 67 8 500 Total

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (42.9%) among the respondents having Upto SSLC & HSC category and the same is as its minimum (0%) among the respondents of PG Degree category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (50.4%) among the respondents having Upto SSLC category and the same is as its minimum (0.8%) among the respondents of PG Degree category. On the other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (49.7%) among the respondents having HSC category and the same is as its minimum (1.9%) among the respondents of PG Degree.

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In order to find out the relationship between the Educational level and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below. Null Hypothesis (Ho) : There is no significant relationship between educational level of the respondents and level of influence Alternative Hypothesis (H1) : There is significant relationship between educational level of of the respondents and level of influence Chi-Square Tests TABLE: 4.4.4(b) Factor Educational level Calculated 2Value 14.036 Table Value 12.6 D.F 6 Remarks Significant at 5% level

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the Calculated chi-square value (14.036) is greater than the table value (12.6) and the result is significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is rejected and alternative hypothesis H1 is accepted. From the analysis it is concluded that there is close relationship between the educational level of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance. TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.4.5 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORKING EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Working experience Upto 2 years 2-4 years 4-6 years 6-8 years Total 1 171 (47.5) 160 (44.4) 26 (7.2) 3 (0.8) 360 Influence 2 82 (61.7) 43 (32.3) 7 (5.3) 1 (0.8) 133 Total 3 4 (57.1) 3 (42.9) 0 (0) 0 (0) 7 257 206 33 4 500

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (57.1%) among the respondents having Upto 2 years category and the same is as its minimum (0%) among the respondents of 4-6 years & 6-8 years category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (61.7%) among the respondents having Upto 2 years category and the same is as its minimum (0.8%) among the respondents of 6-8 years category. On the
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other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (47.5%) among the respondents having Upto 2 years category and the same is as its minimum (0.8%) among the respondents of 6-8 years. In order to find out the relationship between the working experience and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below. Null Hypothesis (Ho) : There is no significant relationship between working experience of the respondents and level of influence Alternative Hypothesis (H1) : There is significant relationship between working experience of the respondents and level of influence Chi-Square Tests Table: 4.4.5(b) Factor Working experience Calculated 2Value 8.393 Table Value 12.6 D.F 6 Remarks No Significant at 5% level

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the Calculated chi-square value (8.393) is greater than the table value (12.6) and the result is non significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is accepted and alternative hypothesis H1 is not accepted. From the analysis it is concluded that there is no close relationship between the working experience of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance. TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.4.6 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INCOME LEVEL OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Income level Upto 10000 10001-15000 15001-20000 20001-25000 Above 25000 Total 1 216 (60) 125 (34.7) 14 (3.9) 3 (0.8) 2 (0.6) 360
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Influence 2 92 (69.2) 39 (29.3) 0 (0) 1 (0.8) 1 (0.8) 133

Total 3 5 (71.4) 2 (28.6) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 7 313 166 14 4 3 500

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (71.4%) among the respondents having Upto 10000 category and the same is as its minimum (0%) among the respondents of 15001 -20000 & 20001-above 25000 category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (69.2%) among the respondents having Upto 10000 category and the same is as its minimum (0%) among the respondents of 15001 -20000 category. On the other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (60%) among the respondents having Upto 10000 category and the same is as its minimum (0.6%) among the respondents of Above 25000. In order to find out the relationship between the income level and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below. Null Hypothesis (Ho) Alternative Hypothesis (H1) : There is no significant relationship between income level of the respondents and level of influence : There is significant relationship between income level of the respondents and level of influence Chi-Square Tests TABLE: 4.4.6(b) Table Value 15.5 D.F 8 Remarks No Significant at 5% level

Factor Income level

Calculated 2Value 7.907

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the Calculated chi-square value (7.907) is greater than the table value (15.5) and the result is non significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is accepted and alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected. From the analysis it is concluded that there is no close relationship between the income level of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance. TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.4.7 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FAMILY NATURE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Family Nature Joint family Nuclear family Total Influence 2 24 (18.0) 109 (82) 133
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Total 3 0 (0) 7 (100) 7 95 405 500

1 71 (19.7) 289 (80.3) 360

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (100%) among the respondents having Nuclear family category and the same is as its minimum (0%) among the respondents of joint family category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (82%) among the respondents having Nuclear family category and the same is as its minimum (18.0%) among the respondents of Joint family category. On the other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (80.3%) among the respondents having Nuclear family category and the same is as its minimum (19.7%) among the respondents of joint family. In order to find out the relationship between the family nature and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below. Null Hypothesis (Ho) Alternative Hypothesis (H1) : There is no significant relationship between family nature of the respondents and level of influence : There is significant relationship between family nature of the respondents and level of influence Chi-Square Tests TABLE: 4.4.7(b) Factor Family nature Calculated 2Value 1.843 Table Value 5.99 D.F 2 Remarks No Significant at 5% level

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the Calculated chi-square value (1.843) is greater than the table value (5.99) and the result is non significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is accepted and alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected. From the analysis it is concluded that there is no close relationship between the family nature of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance. TWO WAY TABLE AND CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS TABLE: 4.2.8 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FAMILY MEMBERS OF THE RESPONDENTS AND LEVEL OF INFLUENCE (TWO-WAY TABLE) Family Members 2 members 3-4 members 5-6 members Total 1 285 (79.1) 53 (14.7) 22 (6.1) 360
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Influence 2 109 (82) 18 (13.5) 6 (4.5) 133

Total 3 7 (100) 0 (0) 0 (0) 7 401 71 28 500

The above table shows that the percentage of high level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (100%) among the respondents having 2 members category and the same is as its minimum (0%) among the respondents of 3-6 members category. The percentage of medium level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (82%) among the respondents having 2 members category and the same is as its minimum (4.5%) among the respondents of 5-6 members category. On the other hand, the percentage of low level of factors influencing on work life balance of employees are at its maximum (79.1%) among the respondents having 2 members category and the same is as its minimum (6.1%) among the respondents of 5-6 members. In order to find out the relationship between the family Members and factors influencing work life balance of employees, a chi-square test was employed and the result of the test is given below. Null Hypothesis (Ho) : There is no significant relationship between family members of the respondents and level of influence Alternative Hypothesis (H1) : There is significant relationship between family members of the respondents and level of influence Chi-Square Tests TABLE: 4.4.8(b) Factor Family Members Calculated 2Value 2.387 Table Value 9.49 D.F 4 Remarks No Significant at 5% level

Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1)

INTERPRETATION: The above table divulge that the Calculated chi-square value (2.387) is greater than the table value (9.49) and the result is non significant at 5% level. Hence the null hypothesis is Ho is accepted and alternative hypothesis H1 is rejected. From the analysis it is concluded that there is no close relationship between the family members of the respondents and their level of influence toward work life balance.

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CHAPTER-V FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS


5.1 FINDINGS
Majority 43% of the respondents are belonged to the age group of 21-30 years. From the analysis 62 % of the respondents gender were Male. Majority 69% of the respondents had married. 47% of the respondents educational level is HSC Inferred that 51% of the respondents were having the working experience of less than 2 years It is found out that 62% of the respondents monthly income had below Rs. 10000. From the analysis 81% of the respondents were fall under the category of nuclear family. Majority 80% of the respondents family size had only 2 members in the family. Inferred that 95% of the respondents had normally worked for 6 days in a week. Majority 54% of the respondents had worked for 7-8 hours in a day. From the analysis 62% of the respondents had spent less than half an hour for travelling Majority 99% of the respondents had preferred to work in a general shift. It is found out that 69% of the respondents had always tired or depression because of work Majority 74% of the respondents had satisfied with the time spend at work Inferred that 68% of the respondents had always miss out quality of time with their family and friends. It is found out that 85% of the respondents had stated engaged in music to manage their stress. Majority 87% of the respondents were provided with the additional provision provided in the organization is Transportation. From the analysis most of the respondents gave more weight age to holiday and leave Inferred that 100% of the respondents had stress in their workplace. From the analysis family conflict occupied the high position in the causes of stress.

5.2 SUGGESTIONS

TIME MANAGEMENT is one of the best solutions which can help to reduce the imbalance between the personal and the work life of the employees. Prioritizing the tasks and planning the activities can help to take out some free time which can be utilized for other purposes. Taking some time out for hobbies and leisure activities, spending time with loved ones can help to beat the stress. Sharing the responsibilities will help and don't commit for something which is practically impossible. To remain competitive, and to retain their most talented employees, companies must provide more than a good salary and others facilities which are needed to employees. Companies have started implementing like Childcare, Wellness programs, Financial planning.

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5.3 CONCLUSION
Thus, work-life balance can bring a huge transformation at the organizational and individual levels. It helps an organization to inherently build a strong value system, which is attributed to the work life balance enjoyed at the employee. Therefore, it is important for employees to maintain a healthy balance between work and their private lives. This will help them achieve their personal and professional goals as well the organization they are working for. Work-life balance is an issue of great importance that has to be addressed by the organizations at the earliest. After all employees are the greatest asset and the organization performance is affected by employee performance. The HR department of the organization and the employees together must work out strategies to help attain work-life balance which makes the organization the happiest place to work.

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