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RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Rights And Responsibilities

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Rationale
Everyone, upon entering Canada, is protected under The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. These basic rights apply to permanent residents as much as they do to Canadian citizens. Immigrants may give up their rights by choice or by not knowing them. Knowing their rights puts new immigrants in control of their lives. Knowing the law is everyone’s responsibility. Everyone lives under laws that affect what you may, must and must not do.

Objectives
Participants will be able: • to become aware of the rights of Canadian citizens and permanent residents alike (given in the form of a hand-out); • to become aware that rights come with responsibilities; • to become aware of ways immigrants can access information and services.

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Rights And Responsibilities

Hand-out

REFERENCE NOTES FOR THE FACILITATOR

Rights and Responsibilities: What is expected of Canadians
. . . . Canadians believe strongly in the rule of law, and in equality; There is one federal criminal code that applies throughout Canada; In Canada, there is a separation of church and state; The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms establishes the basic principles and values by which Canadians live. The Charter is a fundamental part of Canada’s Constitution. It defines and guarantees personal rights in seven key areas:

1. Fundamental freedoms: freedom of conscience and religion; freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression; freedom of peaceful assembly; and freedom of association. 2. Democratic rights (the right to vote at 18 years of age) 3. Mobility rights 4. Legal rights 5. Equality rights 6. Official languages of Canada 7. Minority Language Education rights

None of these fundamental freedoms is absolute. They cannot be used to compromise the rights of other individuals. As an immigrant to Canada, you have the responsibility to understand and uphold the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This means defending your own rights and protecting the rights of others.

In Canada, all laws are made public. There are no secret laws. If you are accused of committing an offense under the law, it is not a defense to claim that you did not know you were breaking the law.

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What immigrants should also know: . children and older people that are not acceptable in Canada. If abuse or neglect can be proved. It is objectionable to most Canadians when any adult strikes a child. Everyone lives under laws that affect what you may. Some immigrants have difficulty recognizing that what they may think of as corrective disciplining of the members of their families may in Canada be seen as abuse. . 3 . Rights bring with them obligations. are legally obliged to report suspected child abuse. Some immigrants bring with them attitudes towards women. Knowing your rights puts you in control of your life. . . . which is a crime. People should know their rights. nurses. The abuse of wives by their husbands or children by their parents or other members of their families is a crime. etc. doctors. and that they can face charges if they do not. your right to freedom of religion means that you must respect the beliefs of others.Rights And Responsibilities Hand-out (cont’d) REFERENCE NOTES TO THE FACILITATOR (Cont’d) Knowing the law is your responsibility. the child or children may be taken from their parents and looked after temporarily in a foster home. Parents who thought they were just spanking their children have found that the law considers this abuse. your right to Canadian social services implies that you should pay your share of the taxes that finance them.. For example. Rights bring with them responsibilities to the community as a whole. and the parents have been punished. In other words: . must and must not do. . It is important for new immigrants to realize that teachers. Protection against physical harm and abuse extends to behaviour within the family in the privacy of their home. . For example.

Children 12 years of age and under can never be left alone at home. then both she and her children can receive legal protection. .Rights And Responsibilities Hand-out (cont’d) REFERENCE NOTES TO THE FACILITATOR (Cont’d) . However. If a woman and/or her children are being abused by the husband while she does her best to care for them. if she knowingly allows her children to be abused – even if she does not take part in the abuse – she may be charged under the law. Canadian authorities treat any physical assault on a wife in the same way as an assault upon any other person. shelter. . Spanking a child for so long or so hard as to raise bruises or welts. . . education. is a reason for women being granted legal protection from their husbands. Citizenship and Immigration Canada. (taken from A Newcomer’s Introduction to Canada. or the use of anything other than an open hand is a crime in Canada. clothing. The question of abuse is over and above parents’ legal obligation to provide their children with the necessities of life – food. 4 . though more difficult to define and prove. . They must always be in the adequate care of an adult. Canada has strongly-worded criminal laws forbidding assault on another person. Psychological abuse.

you want all other citizens to obey these laws. If we only agreed to follow laws that we liked. due process requires that you have the right to know 5 . Of course. Equality is one of the most important values in Canada. laws and policies even when they disagree with them. There is also a practical reason why we agree to follow the law. you have the democratic right and responsibility to work to change it. Police officers. if you don’t like a particular law or government program. . our society would always be in chaos. must follow the same laws as everyone else. B. They include: . buy or rent a home . It is up to your site coordinator to decide whether this text can be translated and distributed in the form of a hand-out to the participants) Canadians share a basic set of values. 1997. (adapted from The Citizenship Handbook – A Guide to Democratic Rights & Responsibilities For New Canadians. Citizens work to change laws they don’t like through the democratic process. deal with any government agency . It refers to the procedures that are used by courts. Civil Liberties Association. look for a job . Due process is closely connected to the idea of the rule of law. judges and politicians must obey the law as every other citizen. Respect for democratic decision making and «the rule of law». use public services . These procedures are created to make sure that people directly affected by their decisions are treated fairly and reasonably. All individuals are equal before the law and must be treated equally by the law. even if they don’t agree with them.C. regardless of their status in society. if you are accused of wrongdoing. Our laws protect you against unfair discrimination when you: . All citizens. When the government creates laws or programs that you do agree with. Canadian citizens respect democratic decisions. This is known as «the rule of law». rather than refusing to obey the law. «The rule of law» has other meanings as well. administrative tribunals and government decision makers.Rights And Responsibilities REFERENCE NOTES FOR THE FACILITATOR (This information is for your reference. For example.

Second. Privacy: No one can know which political party we vote for in an election. our elected representatives must explain and justify their actions when they seek our support to represent us again. Co-operation and consultation: We value these methods because they produce the best laws and government programs for our society. . Unlike officials in some other societies. accountability also means that we as citizens have the right to participate in democracy by working to influence the creation of laws and government programs in a meaningful way.even though these methods may take more time to make changes in society or to resolve conflict. We use debate and discussion instead . Even our employers have no right to know what we do in our private lives away from work. Canadians believe that co-operation and peaceful methods are the best way to resolve conflicts. . Citizens have to do much more than simply vote in an election every four to five years. Privacy means that we control information about ourselves. It is an important value for our freedom as self-governing citizens.Rights And Responsibilities REFERENCE NOTES TO THE FACILITATOR (Cont’d) what rule you are accused of breaking and what evidence can be presented against you. unless we want to tell others. Decisions made after co-operation and consultation are more likely to receive support from citizens. Privacy is a key value in our democratic society because it is important to our freedom from interference by government and by other citizens. Non-violence: Canadians reject violence as a way of dealing with social or political change and conflict. Due process also requires that you have a meaningful opportunity to argue that you are innocent. 6 . No one can know how much money we have. unless we want to tell others. except Revenue Canada for tax purposes. Democratic accountability: We give our elected representatives the direct power to make laws for our society. our representatives always remain accountable to citizens. . rather than decisions made by just a few people. Democratic accountability has two meanings: Our elected officials are answerable to us for their actions. We reject violence as a way to resolve our disputes. . During election campaigns. We make better decisions when everyone who will be affected participates in the decision making. They reduce divisions among us but promote unity. These methods encourage Canadians to work together.

citizens should not and cannot rely only on government. you are encouraged to adopt the values discussed here. You must be a Permanent Resident. Without you and other citizens like you. . you will be a part of Canada’s unique democracy.You must learn about Canada. There are many opportunities for you to do this every day.You must have lived here for at least three years. 7 . . As a future citizen of Canada. Who can apply to become a Canadian citizen? • • • You must be 18 years of age or older to apply to become a Canadian citizen. a small number of elected officials and bureaucrats (employees of the government) would govern us. Canada’s democracy will be stronger if we respect these values and encourage other citizens to do so. . You must be in Canada legaly as a « permanent resident ».You must know English or French. and without your full participation in democratic life. In democracy. It is the responsibility of all citizens to care for these values and to protect them.Rights And Responsibilities REFERENCE NOTES TO THE FACILITATOR (Cont’d) As a future citizen. the law or our courts to guarantee and protect all our important values and traditions.

for instance. Drugs: Is it legal to purchase. Sexual harassment: Is it legal to make offensive comments or to have a behaviour of a sexual nature in the workplace? 8 . Bribery: Is it acceptable to bribe police officers or other public officials? .Rights And Responsibilities REFERENCE NOTES FOR THE FACILITATOR (This information is for your reference. (Khaht. Is it legal for infants/small children to ride in a car without being in a safety seat? . illegal in Canada.) . Is it legal to drive without a Canadian driving license? . Sex: Is it legal to have sex with minors and sex with adults without their consent? . School: Are children aged 6-16 required by law to attend school? . an organic medicinal drug used in the Horn of Africa is. Canada has laws that all citizens must respect and obey. Polygamy: Is it legal to be married to more than one person at a time? . Is it legal to drive or ride in a car without wearing a seat belt? . Is it legal to drive a car that is unregistered and uninsured? . Is it legal to drive after drinking alcohol? . Child care: Is it legal to leave children below the age of 12 unattended? . Motor vehicles: . What are some of the laws that exist in your own country? Questionnaire: In your country/ In Canada: . Female circumcision: Is it a legal/tolerated practice? . You may however consider the translation of these laws and its distribution to participants in the form of a hand-out) Suggested activity: Like any country. sell or use illegal drugs. Smoking: Is it legal to smoke in many public places? . Is it legal to ride a motorcycle without wearing a crash helmet? .

race. they may receive more than they contribute. groups. Individuals are responsible for contributing to the health and welfare of society to the extent they are able. It is a reciprocal.Rights And Responsibilities Suggested activity # 1: brainstorming Develop a definition of Citizenship: . gender. if necessary) Taxes are part of the Canadian social welfare system: The social welfare system is provided by society to help people meet their social needs. ethnicity. at other times. «How would you describe a good citizen?» . Sometimes people contribute more to society than they receive. Write down participants’ comments and ideas on a flip chart/ board so everyone can see. or their ability to contribute to the social welfare system. communities. to learn to speak one or both official languages . «What can people do to make Canada a better country to live in?» . Other ways to ask the same question: . to pay taxes (explain the concept of taxes. Possible answers from participants will include: . . The best interests of all citizens are served without regard to their age. 9 . and regions on the other. Ask participants to try to answer the question: What does good citizenship means to you? . families. mutually beneficial relationship that exists between society on the one hand and individuals. to obey laws . «What makes someone a contributing member of society?» .

Good citizenship is really about fulfilling our responsibilities to ourselves.Rights And Responsibilities Good citizenship means: . to respect others . to obey laws. 10 . to set a good example . basic literacy . the community and society. to share our skills and knowledge . knowledge of the workings of the Canadian political system and awareness of major issues facing the country today. . to vote in elections . to help the less fortunate . to try our best . to be a productive member of society . to learn to speak one or both official languages and to pay taxes as well as: . The ideals of good citizenship apply to all members of Canadian society. At the end of this activity. . permanent residents and Canadian citizens. Good citizenship does not refer only to the rights and freedoms of individuals. For citizens to be effective and able to take part in the management of public affairs. . our families. to care for our families . to be a part of Canada . others. to care for the environment . to be loyal to Canada . the following skills are needed: . facilitator wants to ensure that participants understand the following points: Good citizenship… .

11 .Rights And Responsibilities Good citizenship requires: . A balance between rights. and a belief that one’s actions are for the benefit of society. Willingness to become an active and responsible member of society. knowledge and responsibility. . The three elements of participation. freedoms and responsibilities. .

the responsibility to recognize each other’s rights as citizens. citizens have both responsibilities and rights. . the responsibility to deal responsibly with those people we have given special authority.Rights And Responsibilities Suggested activity # 2: small-group activity In Canada. such as police and government officials. 12 . Question to be discussed in small groups: What are your responsibilities as future citizens of Canada? Facilitator complements participants’ answers with the following points: . . the responsibility to obey the law.

not all our freedoms and rights can be guaranteed by law. Without this commitment. the law alone is not enough to protect them.Rights And Responsibilities Democracy balances these responsibilities with many basic rights. The vitality of Canada’s democracy depends on all citizen’s commitment to our shared democratic values. 13 . Basic rules about respecting other people must also be a way of life for each of us. Of course. For democracy to succeed. the law which «guarantees» our rights would lose its democratic spirit. all citizens must make a personal commitment to democratic values and actively practice them in their daily lives. Our government officials must treat each of us with respect. and must honour the various rights and freedoms which we possess as citizens. Even when our rights are guaranteed by law.

and in return they are expected to carry out their responsibilities to society. 14 . freedoms and expectations in the different areas of citizenship. Therefore. freedoms and responsibilities can be divided into three main areas: Political. Civil. Participants are required to fill in the corresponding responsibilities which reflect the rights. Individuals enjoy rights and freedoms. . rights. Other freedoms and responsibilities. The written codes of conduct are our civil and political rights and obligations. freedoms and responsibilities are a set of standards or expectations that members of society have agreed to live by. Social Facilitator distributes a worksheet to each group. These expectations include both a written and an unwritten code of conduct. are governed by an unwritten or social code of conduct. Rights. freedoms and responsibilities come with being a member of a society. primarily social in nature.Rights And Responsibilities Suggested activity # 3: Rights.

clothing and shelter RESPONSIBILITIES 15 .Rights And Responsibilities Hand-out POLITICAL RESPONSIBILITIES RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS Right to vote Right to voice opinions Right to seek political office CIVIL RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS Right to be judged by the court Right to be treated equally Right to personal privacy Right to personal security RESPONSIBILITIES SOCIAL FREEDOMS AND EXPECTATIONS To be treated with dignity and respect To expect a clean and healthy environment To have adequate food.

Rights And Responsibilities

Hand-out

POLITICAL
RESPONSIBILITIES
To vote in elections To respect the opinion of others To take an active interest in the affairs of the country

RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS
Right to vote Right to voice opinions Right to seek political office

CIVIL
RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS
Right to be judged by the court Right to be treated equally Right to personal privacy Right to personal security

RESPONSIBILITIES
Know, respect and follow the laws of Canada Treat others equally Respect the privacy of others To obey Canada’s laws

SOCIAL
FREEDOMS AND EXPECTATIONS
To be treated with dignity and respect To expect a clean and healthy environment To have adequate food, clothing and shelter Support and advocate for social justice

RESPONSIBILITIES
Treat others with dignity and respect

Actively care for the environment

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Rights And Responsibilities

Suggested activity # 4:

small-group activity

Canadian society is based on a set of important values and traditions. How do you define the values and traditions in your country of origin?

What is important?
What a person considers important is often influenced by personal values and by the values of one’s own community. Yet people in other countries may consider different things important. Looking at what you consider important and why will help you compare your values to those held by other people.

What are the most important things in your life? Make a list on the chart, ordering them from most to least important.

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Rights And Responsibilities Hand-out

What’s important to you?
Most important ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ Least important

Why? What influenced your choices?

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etc. Participants discuss what might be important for Canadians: (What is important for Canadians will be similar to what is important for the participants: families. As a future Canadian. peace. liberty and freedom of expression. 19 . Others may be new to you. education. . Respect for cultural differences and the principles of equality. Canadian values are also manifested in the country’s collective national institutions: . Our laws and government programs reflect our traditions and values as a society. health care. Or perhaps the government in your country prevented you and your fellow citizens from practicing these values. standard of living.Rights And Responsibilities Suggested activity # 5: In Canada. You may even think they are wrong. you may find some of our laws and government programs strange. the Canadian health care system reflects the principle of universal medical care based on need rather than on the ability to pay. You may be familiar with many of these values and traditions. .) Add the following: What is important for Canadians? . the Canadian legal system recognizes the right of everyone to be treated fairly and equally before the law. .

You also have a responsibility to adjust to Canadian values and our way of life. This change has happened quite recently. especially men. Canadians are now working hard to make this value of gender equality a reality in all aspects of our society. Group 1: What is the role of women in Canada? Group 2: What is the role of the media in Canada? Group 3: Should you. Canadian society considers women as equal partners in the family. Citizens have a responsibility to respect Canadian values. in the business world. Suggested activity # 6: small-group activity Facilitator divides the group into smaller groups. and in public life. as a new citizen. you have a responsibility to understand the values that are reflected in our laws or programs. Answer to group 1: What is the role of women in Canada? Canadian society considers women as equal to men. particularly in terms of family responsibilities.Rights And Responsibilities But as a future citizen. Each group defines the roles of certain groups of people and organizations in Canada. In many societies women are considered inferior to men. worry about participating in the democratic process? All answers are recorded on the flip chart or board and addressed. Some new Canadians. 20 . will need to adjust to this value and learn to respect women as equals.

Almost all citizens or their ancestors at one time were new Canadians. If someone threatens to do this. Answer to group 3: Should you. and frequently criticize public officials. 4. it is normal to have these feelings. radio and television – monitor the actions of our governments very closely. No one can take away your or your family’s citizenship just because you are critical of a government or its programs. 2. Politicians are becoming more responsive to the needs of cultural communities. there are many groups willing to help you. you might think that it is not wise for you to become involved in political matters. Canada recognizes that new Canadians sometimes need help in adjusting to their new home. as well as the right to demand changes. programs and policies. Politicians recognize that in a democracy.Rights And Responsibilities Answer to group 2: What is the role of the media in Canada? In some countries. You should take pride in that heritage. Journalists can risk imprisonment and even torture for criticizing their government. All levels of government and many private organizations offer 21 . There are four reasons not to worry: 1. 3. worry about participating in the democratic process? As a new Canadian. even if they disagree with them. magazines. Their role is to promote government accountability. The vote of a new Canadian is just as important as the vote of a native-born Canadian. They comment on government actions. However. Our nation has been built by new Canadians just like you. Canadian media – our newspapers. as a new citizen. Since the media also give close attention to the concerns of citizens. each person has an equal vote in deciding who forms a government. they can play a powerful role in social change. Because you are new to Canada. Accountability means that citizens have the right to review government actions. New Canadians make many important contributions to Canadian society. Canadians respect other citizens’ rights to speak out and raise concerns. Freedom of expression is one of the most important values in our society. public officials are rarely criticized by citizens or the media.

scenarios . Facilitator reads the text to the class. the facilitator will provide them with the information when they rejoin the larger group. Facilitator distributes the hand-out «Our family» to each participant. such as translation services. . Each group chooses a volunteer to write down the answers and report back to the larger group. you can turn to government and private agencies for help and support. Facilitator requires participants to collect particular information from the video presentation. If you ever feel discouraged from stating your concerns or needs about a government program or law. .Rights And Responsibilities assistance. . Suggested activity # 7: video presentation Canada Day To Day video – Segment # 5: The government. Facilitator chooses 2 scenarios for each group (9 scenarios are provided for the facilitator to choose from) . . Responses are discussed at the end of the presentation. the family and the law . 22 . It is not a test. Facilitator gives a list of questions relating to the video presentation to participants. Facilitator tells participants that they should try to answer the questions on the basis of their own knowledge and experience. If they don’t know the answers. Suggested activity # 8: small-group activity .

Rights And Responsibilities Our Family The __________family has been in Canada for over four years now. They live in a small townhouse and are saving to buy a bigger home. 23 .__________ was an accountant in her country of origin. __________ was a teacher in his country of origin but now he drives a taxi during the day and studies English two nights a week. but now she works in a convenience store on weekends and looks after her five-year-old daughter and four-monthold baby during the day. Mrs. They are still learning about life in Canada and the following are some of their day-to-day experiences living in Canada. Mr.

What are some unacceptable reasons? Racial.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 1: Taxi Line-up Mr. A family came out of the hotel.__________ has been driving a taxi for almost seven months. What are some social conventions about line-ups in society? In stores? Banks? Buses? 2. he was the second taxi in line waiting for a fare at a taxi stand outside a downtown hotel. What are some acceptable reasons for the family to choose the second taxi instead of the first? Are there any acceptable reasons? Preference? Language barrier? 4. What responsibilities do clerks or stores have to respect this informal arrangement? 3. Issue: respect and dignity of the person 1. looked around and then got into his taxi instead of the first taxi in line. religious discrimination? 5. How would the driver of the first taxi feel? 24 . The family said they are free to take whichever taxi they want because they are paying for it. age. Yesterday. gender. He told the family that he could not take them because they have to take the first taxi in line.

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)? Scenario 2 . 26 . Human Rights.1.Jimmy’s Store & Information on employment standards (consult with provincial offices as employment standards differ from province to province). & Whose responsibility is it to ensure that this convention is well understood by both the service provider and the service user? & What have some service providers done to ensure that lining-up is encouraged (taking a number.4 Notes on the Scenarios Scenario 1 .Rights And Responsibilities 4.Taxi Line-up & Social Convention about line-ups in Canadian Society. & Other CPI guides with information related to employment rights and issues: Employment Issues. etc. An introduction to the Canadian Justice System. giving your name on a first-come first-served basis. & How an individual might feel when not acknowledged and respected.

This morning her boss told her that he would have to let her go because the store is not busy enough. employment issues. Would it make any difference if Mrs. __________ could only work certain hours? 4.__________`s boss dismiss her for the given reason? 2. They said they were sorry that she lost her job but that her husband is working and her young children probably need her at home.__________ because others feel that he has young children and her husband is working? 3. Issues: respect and dignity of the person. What responsibilities does society have to protect its workers? 27 .__________ was the last person hired? First person hired? 5. George and Mike. Would it be fair to lay off Mrs.___________ has been working at Jimmy’s Convenience store on weekends for almost a year. When she checked with her co-workers Abdul. She was given two weeks notice. Could Mrs. What if Mrs.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 2: Jimmy’s Store Mrs. gender issues 1. she found out that she was the only one who was laid off. What responsibilities do employers have before laying off a worker? 6.

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Human Rights. & Whose responsibility is it to ensure that this convention is well understood by both the service provider and the service user? & What have some service providers done to ensure that lining-up is encouraged (taking a number.)? Scenario 2 . & How an individual might feel when not acknowledged and respected. & Other CPI guides with information related to employment rights and issues: Employment Issues.4 Notes on the Scenarios Scenario 1 . etc.Taxi Line-up & Social Convention about line-ups in Canadian Society. giving your name on a first-come first-served basis.Rights And Responsibilities 4.Jimmy’s Store & Information on employment standards (consult with provincial offices employment standards differ from province to province). 29 . An introduction to the Canadian Justice System.1.

he was talking on the phone. with a counselor at the employment office. 30 .__________ had an appointment this morning at 8:30 a. She had made arrangements with a friend to look after her children and she arrived on time. writing something on a pile of paper. She could see the counselor from where she was waiting. then went to talk to his co-workers. She waited for over an hour and still the counselor had not called her in.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 3: Employment Office Mr. The counselor did not look busy. She wanted to know if she could apply for unemployment insurance benefits. Mrs. Finally.m.__________ was so angry and frustrated that she just left without meeting with the counselor. attend a program to improve her language skills and get some office-type experience.

Rights And Responsibilities 31 .

__________ was not asking for services from a government office? 2. 3. 32 . Could the counselor have a good reason for keeping Mrs. respect and dignity of the person 1. __________ have done besides leaving? Would it have made a difference if Mrs.Rights And Responsibilities Issue: equal opportunity and access to services.__________ waiting? What responsibilities do clients and service providers have if they are going to be late? What could Mrs.

The type of vaccines used and how it is administered may vary from province to province. Family physicians may also have information on vaccinations. How can individuals help solve this problem? Scenario 4 Vaccinations & Residents generally will contact their local public health services for infant.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 3 . Many people still feel that they have not been treated fairly or equally. What happens when individuals feel that they are not important or are not treated with dignity and respect? The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees basic human rights and freedoms to all members of society but many incidents of every day living cannot be protected under the Canadian Charter. adults (every 10 years). 4 to 6 years. The recommended schedule for vaccinations does not change very much across Canada. pre-school and adult vaccinations. 2 months. & & 33 .Employment office & & Examine the social convention of being late for appointments or keeping someone waiting or a service. 14 to 15 years.

It also seems like a lot of bother to take him to the public health clinic in the middle of winter.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 4: Vaccinations It has been four months now since the family welcomed their new baby home. __________ was not able to find out much about vaccinations from the phone call. She has not taken him yet to get his shots because he seems so healthy and happy. The receptionist kept asking Mrs. 34 . Then she told Mrs. Mrs.__________ to hold the line while she answered another call.____________ that her baby should have already had some of his vaccinations to protect him from dangerous childhood diseases. A friend was visiting yesterday and told Mrs. Maybe the shots will make him sick or do something bad to him. they told her that the earliest appointment was over a month away and that the clinic was only open three days a week. When she phoned the clinic last week. __________to repeat her questions about the shots because she could not understand her.

Rights And Responsibilities Issue: equal opportunity and equal access to services. What are the responsibilities of a parent for their children’s health care? What are the responsibilities of the public health workers to ensure that clients receive information and services? What responsibilities does society have to protect its members? Why are social services provided to members of society? When social services are provided to members of society free of charge. 35 . 4. 2. parental responsibilities 1. 5. where does the money come from to pay for these services? 3.

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They do not know what to do because Mr. Besides. They are worried because they did not have these meetings in their country of origin unless a student was in real trouble. When they ask her about school. she tells them that she plays with other children.__________ will have her baby with her. They feel that schools in Canada are very different from what they are used to. Sometimes she comes home complaining about being bothered by other kids. __________’s five-year-old daughter is attending kindergarten this year. how could they talk with the teacher? What would they say? 37 . she brought home a notice about a parent/teacher interview. Yesterday.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 5 School Interview Mr.__________ will be working and Mrs. their English is so limited. They are very proud of her but they are also very worried about her because she might be learning things that they do not approve of. and Mrs. She brings home a lot of notices but it is hard to understand what they are about because some words are not even in the dictionary.

parental responsibilities 1. What are the responsibilities of a parent for their child’s education? Progress? Problems in school? Behavior? Attitude? Volunteering in the schools? What are the teacher’s responsibilities to keep parents informed of their child’s progress? Between report cards? Parent/teacher interview? What freedoms do parents have? What should parent’s reasonable expectations be? What about children’s? School system? Teachers? 2. 38 . 3.Rights And Responsibilities Issue: equal opportunity and equal access to services.

Rights And Responsibilities 39 .

40 . Contact your local school board office for information regarding translation and interpretation services in your school district.School Interview & & & Parent-teacher interviews are held regularly for all children to discuss the child’s progress. Some schools have an informal “buddy” system while other school boards may have a more formal multilingual translation and interpretation service.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 5 .

4. Issue: responsibility to contribute to the common good of all members of society 1. He called the taxi dispatcher to give his location and to ask them to phone the police and an ambulance. He realized that the lone driver was bleeding very badly. 3.__________ has no first aid training and was not sure what to do next. Mr. Then he. Do members of society have a responsibility to help others in emergencies? Floods? Fires? Crimes? Should members of society expect others to help? What reasons might prevent someone from helping? Would you like others to help you in emergencies? Why and why not? What responsibility does society have in case of emergencies? Natural disasters? 2.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 6: The Emergency Mr.__________ was driving to pick up a customer when the car in front of his taxi was hit by a truck making a turn.. He stopped his taxi to see if anyone needed help.. 5. 41 .

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no one has to help.The Emergency Contact one of the St. help only if it’s OK with them • If injured person is unconscious. don’t try things you don’t know • Help stop bleeding. the date.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 6 . what you have done. ambulance and let them know where you are. John’s Ambulance provincial or local offices for additional information on emergency procedures. what happened. 43 . What to do at the scene of an accident: This is voluntary. etc. smoke. poisonous gases. • Control traffic. • Check for dangers • Make sure you are safe from fire. and write down what happened. breathing emergencies • Call police. consent for help is not needed as long as help intended to save a life or preserve health • If injured person asks that you stop helping: then do so promptly • Do only what you know how to. and sign your name. how many people need help • Check again to see if there’s anything else you can do explain to the police or medical people what you know. get help • Ask injured person if it’s OK to help them.

late at night? Does it matter how often this happens? Are disagreements over noise regulated by city bylaws. Mr. They live in a townhouse so noise is sometimes a problem. and Mrs. what can be done about these conflicts? 2. and Mrs. 4.__________ are not sure of the local laws covering noise. social convention. or both? What reasons might prevent someone from helping? When the freedom of individuals to enjoy loud music interferes with other’s freedom to enjoy peace and quiet. and Mrs.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 7: Neighbors Mr.__________’s neighbors seem nice enough and they get along most of the time. responsibility to respect the freedoms of others What freedoms do individuals have to enjoy peace and quiet in their home? What are people’s freedoms to enjoy loud music during the day. 3. 44 . living in a healthy environment. Mr. Their neighbors have complained about the children’s crying at night. Issue: 1.__________ are disturbed by the loud music their neighbors play in the daytime and evenings. during the evening.

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& Scenario 9 . & & Scenario 8 . even if the tree is on your property.Garbage & Contact your municipal office to find out about hazardous waste depots and programs in your community. In most towns and cities. freedoms and responsibilities as a property owner. city noise bylaws regulate the freedom of individuals. contact your municipal offices land use or planning department.Neighbors & Individuals have all the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms only to the extent that these rights and freedoms do not interfere with the rights and freedoms of others. Some cities have a restriction on cutting down mature trees.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 7 . 46 .The Tree & To find out about city bylaws and your rights. contact your municipal office or the police station in your community. To find out about specific city bylaws.

4. and Mrs. Their neighbors said they liked the tree and would hate to see the tree removed. what can be done about these conflicts? 47 . a large tree shades the yard. When the freedom of property owners to control their property interferes with the freedom of neighbors to enjoy their property. What freedoms do individuals have to manage their own property? What freedom do others have to preserve a community’s character? Are disagreements over personal freedoms regulated by city bylaws. they decided to have the large tree removed and told their neighbors of the plans.__________ felt that since the tree was in their yard.__________ always wanted a garden. social conventions or both? What are the responsibilities of the homeowners to maintain the character of the neighborhood? Does the city have any responsibility to make sure trees are protected? 2. So. Mr. 3. Issue: The freedom to live in a healthy environment and the responsibility to maintain it 1.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 8: The Tree Mr. and Mrs. But in this home. they could do whatever they wanted.

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Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 7 . freedoms and responsibilities as a property owner.The Tree & To find out about city bylaws and your rights. To find out about specific city bylaws. city noise bylaws regulate the freedom of individuals. contact your municipal office or the police station in your community. even if the tree is in your property.Neighbors & Individuals have all the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms only to the extent that these rights and freedoms do not interfere with the rights and freedoms of others. & Scenario 9 . Somme cities have a restriction on cutting down mature trees. & & Scenario 8 . contact your municipal offices land use or planning department. In most towns and cities.Garbage • Contact your municipal office to find out about hazardous waste depots and programs in your community. 49 .

They mentioned this to their neighbors who then told them about the annual hazardous waste collection and paint exchange program at a nearby fire hall.__________ wanted to clear out their storage area to add an extra bedroom in their home. rusty old cans of chemical cleaners.Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 9 Garbage Mr. bottles of insecticide and some unused pastes and powders from the baby room renovations. 50 . and Mrs. They found pails of leftover paint. A few days later. They packed it all into a cardboard box and left the box out along with their bags of household garbage. they noticed that the garbage pick-up took their bags of garbage but left the box of storage room garbage.

What responsibilities does industry have to clearly label and mark hazardous wastes? 5. What freedoms do individuals have to dispose of unwanted material? What are the responsibilities of individuals to ensure that hazardous waste materials do not poison our soil and ground water? What responsibilities do societies have to make sure hazardous waste disposal sites are available to the general public? 3. 4. Are there other products available that are not hazardous chemicals and do not pose a disposal problem for users? 51 . 2.Rights And Responsibilities Issue: The freedom to live in a healthy environment and the responsibility to maintain it 1.

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53 . Somme cities have a restriction on cutting down mature trees. even if the tree is in your property.Neighbors & Individuals have all the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms only to the extent that these rights and freedoms do not interfere with the rights and freedoms of others. contact your municipal offices land use or planning department. In most towns and cities.The Tree & To find out about city bylaws and your rights. To find out about specific city bylaws.Garbage • Contact your municipal office to find out about hazardous waste depots and programs in your community. contact your municipal office or the police station in your community. & & Scenario 8 .Rights And Responsibilities Scenario 7 . city noise bylaws regulate the freedom of individuals. & Scenario 9 . freedoms and responsibilities as a property owner.

54 . etc. Two examples of social expectations. religions. % • respecting differences of opinion and freedom of expression • making sure that individual freedoms do not interfere with the freedoms of others. Freedoms and Responsibilities Social expectations. with dignity and respect. recognizing the accomplishments of the individual and not having certain expectations based on stereotypes. Being treated with dignity and respect. freedoms and responsibilities.. Living in. and the responsibility to treat others with dignity and respect is one of the most important areas of social expectations. and looking after. customs. Respecting diversity of cultures. and treating others. freedoms and responsibilities are: % % Being treated. freedoms and responsibilities affect all of us both in our individual actions and as members of society.Rights And Responsibilities Social Expectations. It means: % Acknowledging the individual. a clean and healthy environment.

• taking initiative in promoting and learning about care of the environment. • participating in community recycling programs. 55 .Rights And Responsibilities The freedom to live in a clean and healthy environment implies the responsibility to look after the environment so that others can enjoy it as well. • car-pooling when possible. Some of the responsibilities of individuals to ensure a clean and healthy environment: • disposing of dangerous chemicals in a responsible manner. • volunteering for community “clean up” programs. • • • • • • • • • air and water quality standards public health garbage collection local parks household pet control appropriate land use guidelines snow removal parking noise control.

Automobile insurance. It refers you to the «Citizenship and Immigration Canada». . Facilitator explains and writes on the flip chart or board the three levels of government: federal. Participants look for specific services such as «Human Resources Development Canada» for information on: Immigrant Services Employment. Facilitator explains that different levels of the Canadian government provide services that newcomers can access on arrival. Participants look into the BLUE PAGES for the following services: Immigrant services: . Facilitator distributes the Blue pages – It’s easy to contact your government (from the telephone book) to each group. Can be found under «federal» and «provincial» government pages. provincial and municipal. . Check «Immigration» under «Index-Government Listings». Facilitator explains that the BLUE PAGES of the telephone book will help them access the services provided by the different levels of government and that they are presented in the BLUE PAGES in the same order. 56 . Health Insurance (Medicare) Private medical insurance in the BLUE PAGES handed out to each group. . . . Language classes Immunization. . The number is: 1-888-242-2100.Rights And Responsibilities Suggested activity # 9 small-group activity Rights of permanent residents: . Call «Centre Main Number» for information. Legal aid . . Driver and Vehicle Licensing. .

. . Can be found under «Education…. It refers you to the «municipal» government pages. Parent-Baby Information Line . . Check under «Immunization» and dial the regional number or. Check under the name of the Ministry of Education & Training.» Call «General Information» for assistance. Check under «Driver and Vehicle Licensing» The number is: 613-731-3731 (for Ottawa residents) 57 .e. . Check under «Ministry of Transportation». There are different numbers for different services such as: . . The number is: 1-800-387-5514 Immunization/ Other medical services: . This section number (CAN 79) refers to «Human Resources Development Canada» . School Immunization . Multicultural Health Coordinator . You fill find «Employment and Insurance» and a section number to refer to. Check under «Health Department». . . Look for «Immunization» in the «Index-Government Listings». . Adult Health Programs . . . . There are different numbers for different inquiries: «General Employment Inquiries» (i.Rights And Responsibilities Employment: . Driver and Vehicle Licensing: . etc. Can be found under «federal» government pages. . AIDS/ Sexual Health Information Line . . Social Insurance card) «Job Order Desk» «Income Security Programs» Language classes: . Check «Employment» under the «Index-Government Listings». . . Check under the «provincial» government pages. Check under the «provincial» government pages. Prenatal Classes .

There are «Insurance Brokers». Check under «provincial» government pages. . . dial 1-800-361-7620. «Insurance consultants». You will find «Assurance automobile – voir Société de l’assurance-automobile du Québec». Check «Insurance» in the «Alphabetical Index» (pink-trimmed pages) in the Yellow pages. You can call or go in person. Look for «Assurances» in the «Alphabetical Index». . dial 1-800-561-9749. . dial 1-800-268-1153 or go in person to the «Customer Service» address mentioned in the Blue Pages. Check under «Health Insurance cards» – ONT 613. . For Quebec residents: . There you can get your license plates. In the Hull-Ottawa Region Yellow pages.. . Check under «Société de l’assurance-automobile du Québec». For Ontario residents: . Check under «Régie de l’assurance-maladie du Québec». «InsuranceGeneral» (which offers a wide range of insurance services). . Provincial Medicare Plan: . Automobile insurance must be obtained privately. check the address. . For information. . etc. Look for «Health» in the «Index – Government Listings». drivers’ license (with your photo) as well as your automobile insurance. . . this information can be found in pages 126-127. Application forms to the provincial health care system are also available in pharmacies and medical offices. Check in the «provincial» government pages. For information. . For Ontario residents: . You will find «Assurance-maladie – voir Régie de l’assurancemaladie du Québec» . .Rights And Responsibilities Automobile insurance: . . . For «General Inquiries». . For Quebec residents: . . Look for «Assurances» in the «Alphabetical Index». 58 . Look under the listing «ONT 613» and locate «Health Insurance (OHIP). . Check in the «provincial» government pages. . If you want to go in person.

Cannot be found in the «provincial». . In the Hull-Ottawa Region Yellow pages. Check under «Insurance-Life & Health». You can call or go in person. . Check under «Legal Department». The number is: 613-238-7931 (for Ottawa residents) 59 . . . Can be found in the «provincial» and «municipal» government pages. Coverage is the same as the medical card. this information can be found on page 127. . Legal Aid: . For Canada/Quebec-bound visa holders: . Immigrants have access to free medical coverage from the first day they arrive in the province of Quebec. «federal» or «municipal» pages.Rights And Responsibilities Private Medical Coverage: . . Check under «Insurance-Life & Health». For Canada visa holders: . they can present their visa or IMM 1000 document to the medical officer. Immigrants (except for «convention refugees») to other provinces must get private medical insurance coverage for their first three months in Canada (or until they receive their provincial Medicare card). . Check in the Yellow pages under «Insurance». Although they do not yet have a Quebec medical card. . .