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Pro/E Wildfire 5 Weld Features

:
Best Practices Guide
December 2009

Table of Contents
Introduction..........................................................................................................................3 What is a weld feature & why should I use it?................................................................3 If this is so good, why hasn’t anyone used it before?......................................................4 Weld Features in Pro/E........................................................................................................6 Weld Feature Capabilities in Pro/E Wildfire 5:...............................................................6 Weld Feature Limitations in Wildfire 5:..........................................................................7 General Workflow...............................................................................................................8 User Interface (Wildfire 5).................................................................................................11 Weld Symbols & Drawings...............................................................................................17 Parametric Weld Symbols: ...........................................................................................17 Non-parametric Weld Symbols......................................................................................22 Controlling Weld Display..................................................................................................22 Weld Symbol Display in Models...................................................................................22 Surface & Light Weld Geometry Types........................................................................23 Standard Color For Welds.............................................................................................27 Suggested Layer Usage..................................................................................................28 Suggested Layer Usage For Weld Features in Drawings..............................................31 Mass Property Calculations of Weld Features...................................................................32 Weld Modeling Strategies .................................................................................................47 When should the weld feature be defined?....................................................................47 What is Edge Prep and should it be used?.....................................................................47 What are Weld Notches and should I use them?...........................................................49 At which level should the weld feature be included?....................................................50 Can welds be patterned? Should they be patterned?......................................................50 Are there other options for duplicating weld features?..................................................51 How should tack welds be handled?..............................................................................54 How should surface welds be handled?.........................................................................55 Continuous Weld Joints Spanning Gaps Between Plates..............................................56 Using Weld Features in Pro/MECHANICA..................................................................58 Modifying Weld Start/End Points..................................................................................59 Creating Intermittent Welds...........................................................................................64 Modeling Complex Weld Joints....................................................................................69 1

Associative Cross Sectional Weld Area........................................................................72 Tail Welds......................................................................................................................74 Modeling Slot Welds.....................................................................................................77 Downstream Usage............................................................................................................79 Programmatic Data Exchanges......................................................................................79 User-Defined Data Exchanges.......................................................................................79 Future Directions For Downstream Usage....................................................................84 Appendices.........................................................................................................................85 Appendix A: Weld-related config.pro options...............................................................85 Appendix B: Welding Parameters.................................................................................87 Appendix C: Suggested Weld Preferences Settings......................................................88 Appendix D: Suggested Layer Rules ............................................................................91

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Introduction
What is a weld feature & why should I use it?
A weld feature is a parametrically defined feature in the Pro/E model, similar to chamfers or holes, etc. By defining a set of relevant criteria in the 3D model, the weld feature becomes part of the solid model. The feature appears in the model tree and may be reordered and hidden or displayed just like other features. The appearance of the weld and the associated weld symbol may also be controlled to suit the user.

Figure 1

For many years, the most common means to define and communicate information about weld joints in the design and manufacture of a fabricated structure has consisted of using a standard set of weld symbols placed on a 2D drawing. These symbols are used by people trained to interpret these symbols to communicate details such as weld joint type, size, location, etc.

Figure 2

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this lack of visualization of the welded joint in the model may contribute to accessibility issues for both manual and robot welding operations. why hasn’t anyone used it before? The weld feature capability in Pro/ENGINEER was first introduced back in the mid 1990’s. so when working with suppliers that must provide a service for more than one customer. thus it attracted very little interest from a user community that was generally content with continuing the practice of communicating design intent with 2D drawings. 2-D drawings are normally completed later in the design cycle. In other cases. however the functionality was limited. If the welds were defined as the design is being developed. Another frequent problem is finding all of the welds in a complex drawing. there can potentially be misinterpretation of these drawing symbols. If this is so good. the developers had no incentive to improve it. They also had no clear direction on how it should be improved to make it a production design tool. and new versions of Pro/E were released. Weld symbol ‘standards’ vary from one company to the next. it is possible to define welds that are too large to fit within the space allowable in the design. the core modeling part of the software saw huge productivity improvements. Since the tool was basically sitting there unused. resulting in a condensed NPI cycle. this information could be utilized in a variety of downstream applications.There are a couple of problems associated with that system. With the weld represented by a 2D drawing symbol rather than actual geometry in the model. making the Pro/WELD module even less appealing than ever by comparison. Finally. assuming the definition of these weld features was fast and easy. This can result in poor fit-up during assembly. This causes delays in all subsequent tasks. 4 . As years passed. It is not uncommon for multiple drawing changes to be made just to ensure all welds are accounted for.

This purpose of this document is intended to clarify the best practices for getting started with the usage of Pro/E weld features for Caterpillar engineers. but setting up node-locked licenses was a hidden cost. In the earlier years. A couple of pilot projects were initiated to test out the capability that existed in the current version of the software (Wildfire 2) and to generate a list of requirements that would need to be fulfilled before the application was considered a viable alternative to the old practice of defining and communicating weld joints on the 2D drawings. removing that added expense and hassle of serving the licenses to users. there was a renewed interest in the potential benefits of defining welds as parametric features in the CAD models. to make matters worse. Culling out “nonessential” information that was already being communicated with 2D drawings was a necessary evil. Not only was the expense of ownership an issue. When Pro/WELD was thrown into the bucket of Pro/E software that was immediately available to all users at Caterpillar.2007 for further information) and worked with them to implement these changes. DN1053721. the Pro/WELD module was marketed as an additional module. The whole weld feature definition capability was rewritten for Wildfire 5. But improvements to both hardware technology and software algorithms have greatly reduced the need to be so judicious with the information contained in a design model. meaning that the customer had to pay extra for the rights to use that tool.Another factor in the lack of usage of the weld features in the CAD models was the performance of computer hardware and software. which in effect lumped all of these additional modules in with the core tools. Finally. A corporate team then followed up on this enhancement request list with the software developer (see TIC letter ASRP: Improved Weld Definition in CAD Models. In 2006 Caterpillar worked out a new software license agreement with PTC. 5 . users jumped through all sorts of hoops to minimize the amount of data that had to be processed and displayed to the screen. It is no longer necessary to dumb down the model in order to provide for efficient display repaints and model regenerations.

Figure 3 • • • • • • • • The creation of intermittent fillet and groove welds is much easier now.Weld Features in Pro/E Weld Feature Capabilities in Pro/E Wildfire 5: • You can create and modify simple and compound welds in part and assembly mode. These processes can include such things as wire feed rates. A ‘Light” weld is essentially a datum curve while a “Surface” weld is represented by a surface quilt. and may be toggled back and forth between the two quite readily. Automated information about each weld feature is easily captured and provided to determine the amount of weld consumables required to fabricate the structure. Both weld features and the weld symbols may be hidden or displayed without impacting the weld BOM. Weld features can include pre-loaded system parameters such as Finish and Contour. helping to provide more precise mass property information of welded structures. Neither style is a solid protrusion but both are capable of reporting accurate mass properties about the weld joint. Libraries of weld processes may be developed and assigned to the weld features. as well as user-defined parameters. 3D weld symbols are available for viewing in solid model mode as opposed to only in 2D drawings which was the case in earlier releases. preweld and post-weld treatments. 6 . The weld geometry can be defined as light or solid weld features. Libraries of weld consumables can also be developed and assigned to the weld features. etc.

Weld volume and mass are still an approximation – not exact. a uniform weld crosssectional area is used to calculate the volume of the weld joint. The weld feature is recognized and may be utilized by Pro/MECHANICA. making it easier to set up models for analysis runs. Weld Feature Limitations in Wildfire 5: • SOLID protrusions of weld joints do not yet exist. There is no tack weld or surface weld capability yet. but it is not possible to use the weld joint geometry in FEA. Multiple welds of a similar design can be combined into a single symbol. Parametric weld symbols may also be shown in the 2D drawings. but weld cross-sectional area can vary through the length of the joint and in Wildfire 5. • • • 7 .• • • Libraries of customized (1E0099 compliant) weld symbols that are parametrically driven by the weld features may be developed and shown automatically in 3D and 2D mode. They provide a far more accurate value than the typical estimation of a given percentage of the structure mass. and a weld feature still cannot be intersected with a cut feature. You can get visual representations of the weld joints and all mass properties of the weld joints are available. Workaround techniques are provided in the Weld Modeling Strategies section of this guide. The ability to quickly flex a weld joint between the bounds of the weld size tolerance (LMC and MMC) does not yet exist.

Open a part or an assembly. The first two steps only need to be done once. Define the welding environment by defining welding materials.pro file. Prior to the actual weld feature creation: 1. As noted earlier.pro file that defines where these files are found. These defaults are then used every time you create a new weld feature. 4. much like in standard Pro/E. much of this can be set up to be defined by default in the config. processes. This problem has been reported as a software performance report #7381244. Define and save the preferences and defaults to a library directory. Change the Application to Welding mode. this task actually needs to be performed whenever the first weld feature in a model is defined. We anticipate that this problem will be resolved in a future build of Wildfire 5. Pro/E ignores the lines in the config. but generally speaking this setup work needs to be done one time only. There are several things that can be done upfront to initialize default settings for weld features. Locate the preference files in your configuration file so that Pro/E knows where to look for the default settings. There will be more detailed discussion on those two tasks later in this guide. You might possibly add new preference files or modify existing ones. If you need to override that.General Workflow Now that you know what you can and cannot do with respect to weld feature definition in Wildfire 5 let’s take a look at the general sequence of tasks required for the creation of new weld features. It is not required that these default settings be defined prior to the design session. 2. and parameters. but it does help to speed up the feature creation and also helps to ensure a more consistent and complete feature definition. Note: In the current build of Wildfire 5. 3. 5. then you can change the material or the processes and that will be modal 8 . preferences. The steps required to build a weld feature are listed below. Most of these steps will be described in greater detail later in this guide.

then you should be able to proceed normally. or curves. Determine if you want your weld to contain surface or light geometry. depending on which type of weld you want to create. etc.– it won’t change for the rest of the session unless you change it. so normally the only thing to really worry about is the actual weld feature. you will have additional information to complete to describe the segment length and pitch between segments. or you must change from By Reference to By Value in the Weld Cross section window. 9. etc). Determine if you want to weld. If your config option WELD_ASK_XSEC_REFS is set to YES. Define the weld dimensions. we will define edge prep and notches as common cut or chamfer features in the part or assembly model. The next time you restart Pro/E. The family table provides the functionality to create the cut in either the generic model or instances of the model. problems have been documented with this functionality. 10. spot weld . It is recommended not to use the family table function for welds at this time. 8. it will revert back to whatever your configuration file defines for default values. If defining an intermittent weld. you can change it from one geometry type to the other during the weld feature definition. 9 . this can be set up initially in the config. 7. 1 As noted earlier. or edges. 11. Choose the desired weld cross-section type. you will not be able to complete the weld feature until you define a plane for the weld cross-section. 12. This includes the shape of the weld crosssection as well as any start/end offset dimensions. Select the type of weld feature to create on the model (fillet weld. If the weld material already exists in the model. or a combination of the three. either from an existing weld feature or due to having been saved with weld materials already assigned. you will need to initialize the weld material type and preferences each time you begin to define weld features in a model. Select geometry on the model that describes the weld location. prepare edges.pro file. Until this problem is resolved. Again. This can be model surfaces.1 6. or create weld notches. Or. or it can be changed with preference settings. Determine the family table configuration. In most cases.

These are notes are part of the actual weld symbol annotation – not a separate annotation. After completing the welds for the part or assembly you may re-order the sequence of the welds as desired. Neither of these two components of the weld feature is absolutely essential – you can complete a weld feature successfully without either of these. Assign Weld Material and a Weld Process. the weld processes can be predefined in library settings so there could be default values for both Material and Process if desired. 16. 15. Once again. 10 . 14. you could get welding time from this. 17. however there appears to be more work that needs to be done before this value is considered useful. Assign any additional parameters if desired. But if you define a weld material. you can then get mass properties for the weld feature and if you define a process you can get additional weld process parameters defined and attached to that weld feature. Add any notes that you may want included in the tail of the weld symbol annotation. You can also generate either a bill of materials (BOM) or Pro/REPORT tables with weld parameters or both.13. In theory.

earlier versions will be omitted from the discussion here.User Interface (Wildfire 5) Since the functionality described in this guide refers to the enhanced Pro/WELD module that was introduced with Wildfire 5 version of Pro/E. Switch to the Welding application by using the Application Pull down menu at the top of the Pro/E user interface screen. To access the Welding Application. retrieve a model (part or assembly) in the Standard Pro/E mode. Figure 4 11 .

Figure 5 12 .Once the Welding application has been successfully initiated. redefined or deleted. weld features may be created.

There are a variety of weld types that may be defined: • • • • • • • • • • Fillet Weld Square Groove Bevel Groove Vee Groove J Groove U Groove Flare Bevel Groove Flare Vee Groove Plug & Slot Welds Spot Weld Figure 6 shows the key for the sidebar weld feature icons. Figure 6 13 .

it is possible to define a two sided weld joint. which could produce a “both sides” fillet weld or a double Vee groove weld.In many of the weld joint types. For example. Figure 7 14 . you can further refine the joint to add more information. on fillet welds and many groove welds.

Figure 8 For additional information on defining intermittent welds. Figure 9 15 . After selecting a weld type for creation.It is also possible to further refine a fillet or groove weld joint to be an intermittent weld. see the ‘Case Studies’ section of this guide. Figure 9 shows the Shape definition window for single bevel groove welds. the weld dialogue box allows users to define placement references. weld shape and size.

please see Appendix B. The values for most of these are automatically populated as the features are defined. Figure 10 The list of system-defined weld parameters is fairly lengthy.The weld feature interface provides the opportunity to define weld process information too. Figure 11 For a complete listing of all of the system defined welding parameters. 16 .

17 .Weld Symbols & Drawings Parametric Weld Symbols: With the Wildfire5 release of Pro/E you now have the ability to see a preview of the weld symbol as the feature is being defined in the model. This is the parametrically-driven symbol that appears in Part/Assembly mode and may be shown in Drawing mode.

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this symbol is set up to conform to either the ANSI or ISO standard weld symbols (Caterpillar weld symbols are very similar to the ANSI standard. 19 .Figure 12 By default. After completing the feature definition. but not identical). the weld symbol shows up on the screen as a 3D annotation.

Figure 13 Another new feature here is the ability to modify the weld feature by selecting values from the weld symbol annotation and modifying the Figure 14 corresponding value as shown in Figure 14.One interesting aspect of the display of weld symbols in assembly mode: If there are subassemblies that also contain weld features. those subassembly weld symbols appear in a much smaller font to help distinguish between the welds in the current assembly. 20 . The model needs to be regenerated after the change in order for the weld feature to get updated.

additional work will be required to set up the custom symbols library. In order for these parametrically-driven symbols to conform to the Caterpillar 1E0099 standards.The symbol may be shown in Drawing mode as well (this capability has been available in all releases of Pro/E). 21 .

Figure 15 The downside of this is that all annotation elements (which includes GTOL callouts. miscellaneous 3D notes. other than possibly an edge or surface leader line attachment reference. the 2D symbols defined in Drawing mode are entirely unassociated with that weld feature. If weld features have been defined in the model. however it should be understood that these symbols are NOT associative to any model feature. 22 . etc) in the model are going to be toggled on or off. Controlling Weld Display Weld Symbol Display in Models Weld symbols are essentially just 3D annotations that are driven parametrically by information embedded in the weld feature.Non-parametric Weld Symbols We still have the ability to show Caterpillar 1E0099 compliant symbols in 2D drawing mode in the same manner we have with previous releases of Pro/E. The display of all weld features may be easily toggled by using the “Annotation Element Display” icon in the toolbar.

If you wanted to switch from one geometry type to the other. Generally speaking.the mass properties. Both types are simply a cosmetic display option used to represent the welded joint. feature parameters and all other aspects of the weld feature are the same regardless of which Geometry Type is selected. edge geometry was required for reference when defining Light welds and surface geometry was required for Surface (or “Solid”) welds. In past releases of Pro/E. 23 . Neither choice will impact any of the rest of the information embedded in the feature .Surface & Light Weld Geometry Types A weld feature may be displayed as either of these two options. a different set of references were required depending on which Geometry Type was desired. Toggling from one to the other is simply a matter of picking the corresponding radio button on the Options tab. This is no longer the case with Wildfire 5 release of Pro/E. it was necessary to select all new geometry references.

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Figure 16 25 .

26 . then toggling the geometry type of weld A to Light will cause a regeneration failure for weld B.The default behavior for Geometry Type of welds may be controlled in the config.pro file with the following line: WELD_GEOM_TYPE_DEFAULT …… SURFACE (or LIGHT) You can convert any single weld feature from one geometry type to another through the feature definition interface. or you can convert multiple weld features at one time using Edit > Weld> Convert. Figure 17 NOTE: If weld A has been initially defined with the Surface geometry type and has been selected as a reference for weld B.

a charcoal gray color seems to work well too.pro option: weld_color 0 0 0 This setting results in welds that are pure black as shown in Figure 22.Standard Color For Welds The method for assigning a default color for the Surface-type weld features is by using the following config. That can be achieved by setting the option to this setting: weld_color 80 80 80 You can also set up standard appearance for Light Welds to change color & line thickness. 27 . Figure 18 If you have a black background and would prefer to see a slight contrast.

however there should be no change on the weld symbol annotation. reordering. As noted earlier.Suggested Layer Usage Suggested Layer Usage For Weld Features in Models The ability to display weld symbols parametrically driven by weld features in the part & assembly models was added with the Pro/E Wildfire 5 release. If there are more than a couple of weld features in the model. you can turn off the symbol annotations in the mode by toggling the icon for Annotation Element Display. you can imagine how quickly the screen gets cluttered with these symbols. Info. 2 28 . the behavior of this tool is such that the weld symbols appear on the display by default. In most cases it would be desirable to see the weld feature but not the weld symbol in part and/or assembly mode2. 2009 to make the symbol hidden by default and only appear when the weld feature is selected for some operation (Edit. Figure 19 An enhancement request was submitted to PTC in October. In order to manage these features as desired. we can collectively manipulate features including such operation as deleting. so this isn’t exactly the desired result either. the surface quilt for all weld features in the model would be affected. If this layer is hidden. the following workaround technique using layers in Pro/E is suggested. etc). we require two layers in every part or assembly model that contains weld features: • 10__WELDS • 11_WLD_SYM The first layer will contain all the surface quilts associated with the weld features. or hiding and unhiding them as necessary. suppressing. Until the default behavior of weld symbol display changes. In this release. These quilts can be automatically assigned to the 10__WELDS layer by using Layer Rules. By associating items with a layer. This layer configuration has no bearing on weld symbols created in the drawing as non-parametric weld symbols. but until they make that change this workaround using layers is recommended. Layers have long been used in our models as an organizational tool. but this turns off all annotations – not just the weld symbols. Redefine. The surface quilts for all weld features created when this layer resides in the model are automatically added to this default layer.

Using this strategy. If this layer is hidden (and the previous layer is not hidden). we could build sub-layers for symbols. As with the previous layer. we can automatically assign all weld symbol annotations to this layer using Layer Rules3. however. Hiding a feature (or a component of a feature) only changes the display. as opposed to a drawing-based product definition. 29 . If both of these layers are hidden. Figure 20 To further refine this layer strategy. It is not difficult. This is a layering strategy that is being adopted by other companies that are endeavoring to get to a model-based product definition. The actual weld features would still remain visible in the display. then neither the weld symbol nor the surface quilt that visually represents the weld feature will be visible on your screen. we could un-hide only the weld symbols for a given operation as needed. assigning each weld feature to a sub-layer by operation or by a distinct region of the model. these information about these weld features will still be included in the Weld BOM. This layer assignment would require that the person manipulating the model have an idea about which weld features would be contained in a single weld operation and there is no way to automate this Figure 21 so the feature assignment to these layers would require more manual interaction with the Layer Properties menus than is usually required. but it would require some level of familiarity with the 3 A suggested set of Layer Rules for these two layers is included in the appendix of this Guide.A second layer (11_WLD_SYM) would contain only the weld annotation symbols. only the weld symbols would be hidden.

Figure 21shows an example where the layer containing all weld features symbols is unhidden. 30 . Figure 22 The downside of this is the weld symbol in part or assembly mode will never be displayed unless you unhide the corresponding layer. Of course. but standardizing on layer usage before this tool gets into widespread use is probably a good idea. but only the weld symbols from one of the sub-layers for weld symbols is unhidden.fabrication processes and attention to the layer/feature assignment task. weld features and weld symbols may be hidden individually too.

Since those quilts have been hidden in drawing mode. Figure 23 31 . then this scenario is easily accomplished by hiding the layer for the weld feature quilts (10__WELDS) and making sure the other layer (11_WLD_SYM) is not hidden.Suggested Layer Usage For Weld Features in Drawings The typical behavior we would like to see with welds symbol in Drawing mode is hidden weld feature geometry and un-hidden weld symbol annotation. The only downside of this is that the weld symbol leader lines were probably originally attached to the weld surface quilts. the leader lines for the weld symbols may need to be reattached so the arrowhead isn’t hanging in space. If we have applied the layer structure as suggested in the previous section.

Mass Property Calculations of Weld Features Pro/E calculates the mass of a weld joint by using the product of three factors: • • • Joint length Density of the weld filler material Cross-sectional area of the weld If any of these 3 factors are missing or incorrect. this variation is unaccounted for. If there is some variation in the joint which causes the area to fluctuate through the length of the weld joint. There are a couple of ways to define the area of the weld. If the correct geometry has been identified. Figure 24 Weld Cross-Sectional Area: This factor is the only one that may require some special attention by the designer. no additional information is required. The first two factors are fairly automatic and require very little attention from the designer. Density: If the weld feature has been defined using a pre-defined Weld Material. however all of these methods will only provide the area of a single cross-sectional area of the weld joint. No additional information is needed. 32 . Weld Length: This value is automatically determined by the geometry referenced in the weld definition. Any changes to the model which alter the length of the weld geometry will automatically update this factor of the weld mass. the returned value for weld volume and mass will obviously be incorrect as well. the density factor of the weld mass properties is automatically factored into the calculations.

That mass calculation is only as good as the quality of the input data though. 33 . The hardcoded value for the weld cross-sectional area must be as accurate as possible and the density needs to be declared with a good weld material. You can refer to the Case Studies section of this guide for a method to ensure the weld cross-sectional area is as accurate as possible and automatically updates with design changes.There are two different ways that may be used to define a weld cross-sectional area: Method #1: Using the Weld Cross Section By Value option Figure 25 This method quickly allows you to get a good approximation of the weld mass calculated and included into the mass properties of the model.

Method #2: Using the Weld Cross Section By Reference option Figure 26 This method is more closely tied to the weld feature parameters. NOTE: With the current build of Pro/E Wildfire 5. It takes more time to define all of the associated weld parameters correctly up front. 34 . The resulting difference in the mass property calculations is not significant. the weld joint parameters for Jgroove and U-groove welds is not accurate in the sense that there is no way to account for the radii at the bottom of these two types of weld joints. however this problem has been reported to PTC and should be fixed in a later release. the suggested technique for getting the mass properties for welds is to use Method #1. but should provide automated updates to the mass calculations in the event that the weld joint geometry changes. At this time.

including the assembly name. weld type.Weld Info Welding information provides general data about welding design features. welding materials. and any welding processes assigned. The following information about weld features in the design may be obtained: • • • • • • Overall attributes of welds Length of weld joints Length of weld wire required to make the welds Mass of welds Parameters assigned to each weld feature Weld Bills of Materials for the assembly This information is all accessed from the ‘INFO’ pull-down menu: Figure 27 Weld – This option allows the selection of a weld feature (or multiple weld features) and displays information to the screen and also writes out a text file to the local working directory 35 . mass properties.

Mass is in kg and Time is in seconds. as are intermittent welds. If no process is defined.000 units. the time value defaults to -1.Figure 28 The ‘Length’ value being reported in this case is the actual length of the joint. then that is accounted for in the Length calculation. 36 . a ‘Time’ value would be reported. so in this case Length is in mm. If a weld process had been defined for this weld feature. If the weld has a stop or start that ends somewhere other than the end of the joint. All units are inherited from the design model. Volume is in mm3.

these parameters are available for exporting out to other applications. Generally speaking.Parameter Info – This option (much like the previous option) allows the selection of a single weld feature. Figure 29 37 . or multiple weld features. and then displays the parametric information embedded within those features.

or the length or weld filler material required to complete all the welds in the current model that use the selected filler material.Weld Length Info – The third option from the Welding Info menu provides for the ability to display either just the length of a weld feature. Figure 30 38 .

Weld Mass Info – Like the previous option. Figure 31 39 . selecting ‘Mass’ allows the ability to report either the mass of a selected weld feature. or the collective mass of a specified weld filler material for all features using that filler material in the current model.

40 .Weld BOM Info – The final option from the Welding Info menu provides for the ability to get a quick report for all of the welds in the current model as well as a summary of all weld features.

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42 .Figure 32 .

Welding material parameters are stored with the model. You can assign a welding material to a weld. Use the shortcut menu to change a welding material assignment from within a weld feature. Each welding material is defined by its name. the metal used. These libraries are divided into three groups: • Weld Material • Weld Process • Weld Preferences Figure 33 Weld Material Welding material (identified in the Model Tree by this icon ) provides the filler material necessary to create a weld bead. Define and work with welding materials almost exclusively in the Weld Materials dialog box. You can reuse a welding material in any welding model by saving it in your working directory. and one welding material can be assigned to multiple welds. To avoid having to delete the weld 43 . and optional attributes such as diameter and length which you define. you must also delete the weld that uses that material.Weld Preferences In Wildfire5 it is possible to set up libraries of weld items to be used in defining the weld features. or choose Edit Definition to edit the weld by adding or changing a welding material. When you delete a welding material that is assigned to a weld feature.

Both values must be defined in units recognized by the current model. Processes are stored with the model. Welding processes are defined almost exclusively in the Weld Processes dialog box. Within a welding model. type = Integer) needs to be defined for the wire-feed-speed rate. then delete the welding material. This parameter is understood to be the travel rate of the welding torch down the length of the joint. ensure design consistency. When you define a welding process you can: • • • • • Apply company or industry specifications Assign a machine type Indicate a treatment Specify a feed rate4 Establish acceptable weld length and root opening size You can further customize your welding process by assigning optional and userdefined parameters. 4 In the Wildfire 5 version of Pro/E.feature. you can assign and un-assign welding processes at any time in your design. 44 . un-assign the welding material from the weld feature first. each welding process is defined by its name and parameters. welding processes are defined before you create any welding features. there is only one system defined parameter for ‘Feedrate’. You can reuse a saved welding process in any welding model. Typically. You can streamline the creation of welding designs. and save time by defining processes. A second user-defined parameter (WFS. However. Weld Process A welding process is identified in the Model Tree by this icon . which will typically be mm/sec.

Examples of welding process parameters: Figure 34 A complete list of all of the system-defined weld parameters is included in Appendix B. 45 .

46 . Welding preferences are defined almost exclusively in the Weld Preferences dialog box. When you define a welding preference you can: • • • • • • • • Set measurements that determine weld shape Set an intermittent weld scheme Select predefined weld materials and processes Indicate a field weld Define weld finish and backing Select a predefined appearance Optimize how weld geometry and edge preparation are depicted Indicate family table creation Suggested settings for Weld Preferences may be found in Appendix C . The preferences you define remain active for the current session. The options available differ based on the weld type and standard. Default values depend on the units you have set in the pro_unit_length configuration option.Weld Preferences Welds created in sequence often share common characteristics. with no need to define them for each weld. Defining preferences lets you define options that can be applied to many welds.

There may have been some valid reasons for doing this. etc. Since there is so little experience in the usage of this tool. The reason for collaboration at this point is simply a matter of determining the structure and hierarchy of piece parts. vee groove welds. This is typically the way we model edge preparation.meaning the cuts or chamfers that would typically be used to define the edge prep can be omitted and defined parametrically instead. better practices may develop with time. but could help to reduce changes later. rounds or chamfers. but at this point. Once the BOM is relatively mature. it would be wise to review the design in a CPPD meeting with someone that can shed some light on a weld sequence. but the reasons for actually modeling the edge prep features offset any of those. Commonly used for bevel groove welds. Figure 33 shows the edge preparation is modeled as a chamfer feature in the part model. it appears to be advisable to build the assembly model using normal design practices. that’s a tricky question. What is Edge Prep and should it be used? Edge Prep refers to the removal of material along the edges of parts for the purpose of achieving additional penetration in a weld joint. In earlier releases of Pro/E it was possible to define edge prep virtually in the weld feature . By modeling the edge prep as cuts. subassemblies and top level assemblies. This is not required.Weld Modeling Strategies When should the weld feature be defined? At this point. the mass properties of the models will be more precise and the visual communication of the design intent is better. Figure 35 47 .

it is probably a good idea not to use the capability. this also adds considerable complexity to the process and given the fact that our data management system struggles with complex file relationships in Pro/E.It is possible to have Pro/E automatically define a Family Table instance for cases where you would want to have distinct model where the edge prep geometry appears. This is configured with a few options in the config setup file. While this might be useful if you wanted to set up multiple variations of weld joints for a single assembly. 48 .

You can only combine weld notches and edge preparations if you simultaneously create a weld feature. Figure 36 Typically what we see at Caterpillar is that these types of cuts are simply made as normal cut features in the part mode. if desired.What are Weld Notches and should I use them? A weld notch is essentially nothing more than a clearance opening that enables you to place a component in an assembly without interfering with a previously existing weld joint (the notch is circled in Figure 34). The idea is that if you use Standard and UserDefined notch shapes this will enable you to automate and standardize the weld notches in your design. 49 . You can create single weld notches or you can combine weld notches with edge preparation and weld features. We have the option of defining these notches as special features within the Pro/E Welding application. so usage of weld notch features in the Welding application is seldom (if ever) advisable. ensuring design consistency and saving you time.

At which level should the weld feature be included?
The weld features should be created as features in the level where they will be performed. As stated earlier, in some cases this might be at the piece part level, but usually welds will be located in the assembly.

Can welds be patterned? Should they be patterned?
Weld features certainly can be patterned. If the weld feature references a part that has been patterned in the assembly, then it is simple to refer to that pattern to create weld features that automatically correspond to every instance.

Figure 37

The harder question is, should welds be patterned? There is no question that patterning a weld is a very efficient way to create similar weld joints in an assembly. For example, it took about a minute to define the first weld feature in the assembly shown in Figure 31 and less than 30 seconds to add all 16 of the other instances, so this is definitely a time saver. The downside to this is that reordering welds that are part of a pattern could be problematic. If the gussets were placed using a pattern table, it isn’t too difficult to modify that table so that the sequence of parts added to the assembly matches the actual assembly/welding sequence, but if the pattern was created as a simple dimensional pattern, then it could prove to be much more troublesome to get the weld sequences modified. It becomes a question of speed vs. flexibility. Under the current set of conditions where we really do not have any downstream application use of the weld features in Pro/E, it probably makes more sense to define similar components 50

using patterns so that the reference pattern option can be used when defining associated weld joints. If the function of weld process engineering using the Pro/E weld features gets implemented at Caterpillar, then the better choice will probably be to define the welds without referencing the patterns. There are other ways to quickly duplicate existing weld features on similar joints that may be more desirable if dealing with the patterns and weld sequence numbers becomes too problematic.

Are there other options for duplicating weld features?
If you choose not to utilize the reference pattern option to quickly define weld features, there are some other options that are available to help create features efficiently and consistently. The first option is to use the Weld Preferences as described earlier in this guide. This allows you to set up default values for various types of welds so that there will be a set of pre-defined values entered for all required fields. Once the feature has been placed you can make any desired modifications. The second option is to simply use Edit> Copy and Edit> Paste or Edit> Copy and Edit> Paste Special. In order to use this option, you would need to have a pre-existing model in your session that has weld features similar to the one you want to add to your current model. One possible way to use this option efficiently would be to create a weld template model that contains all of your frequently used weld features. Bring that model up into session so you can copy weld features from that template model into the active design. NOTE: If you do use this COPY & PASTE function for welds, be very careful to make sure that you are in the WELDING application in the design model when you perform the PASTE operation. Pro/E will abort the session if you are in Standard mode and try to paste a weld feature into the active model. This software bug was reported to PTC in November 2009 and should be resolved in a future build. The reference number for the call was C7389294. Another commonly used option for reusing existing features is to set up and apply User-Defined Features (UDFs) for frequently used feature types. This option does not work for weld features in the current version of Pro/E.

51

When should similar welds be combined?
The ability to combine multiple sets of welds of a similar type is another new capability that presents both advantages and disadvantages. By combining multiple joints into a single weld feature, it makes creation and modification of the welds quick and efficient.

Figure 38

The downside of this is when the process for manufacturing these welds needs to be handled individually rather than as a group. In that case, the welds would need to be broken out from the group into individual weld features.

52

Figure 39 Note how the length of weld for the single weld feature now reports the total length of both similar welds that were combined into one feature. however it places limitations on the weld processing capabilities. Like in the previous case. 53 . this is a way to get many weld features defined quickly.You can also combine multiple weld joints that are similar into a single weld features. That may or may not be an issue.

How should tack welds be handled?
At this point, there is no option to define tack welds specifically within the Pro/WELD module. Annotation features may be used to indicate where take welds are to be placed if necessary.

Figure 40

54

How should surface welds be handled?
There is also no option for defining a surface weld as defined by section 8.9 of Caterpillar Specification 1E0099. ”Surfacing involves overlaying a specified area with a weld deposit. The two most common applications for arc weld surfacing are hard-facing (for wear resistance) and buttering (to provide a ductile, crackresistant transition layer).” One method that could be used to communicate a surface weld in the Pro/E model would be to define a surface feature in the model in the area where the surface weld is to be placed. Define and attach a 3D annotation using the weld symbol library

Figure 41

This will not have the weld feature parameters embedded in it like a regular weld feature and will not roll up into the weld BOM or be available for Info interrogation like all of the legitimate weld features, but might be useful for visually communicating a surface feature in the model until such time as the Surface weld becomes available as a regular weld feature type.

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Case Studies
Continuous Weld Joints Spanning Gaps Between Plates
One of the problems frequently faced when attempting to model welds in Pro/E is this issue of creating a weld that extends continuously across gaps between components. A simple example of this is shown below where we would like to extend a fillet welds all round this area.

Figure 42

If you were to pick the surface indicated on the flat plate as the Side 1 reference and the other two surfaces for the Side 2 references, the result would be like that shown below, an interrupted weld joint with two segments.

Figure 43

56

This groove weld needs to be reordered so that it comes before the fillet weld in the Model Tree. Figure 44 57 .To resolve this problem you will need to define a groove weld that fills in the gap between the two bent plates. then redefine the fillet weld feature so that the surface of the groove weld is added as the third Side 2 reference.

but with Wildfire 5. 58 . In the past the analyst would have to select geometry that was being joined by the simulation connection. Figure 46 The results of using this type of weld geometry in Pro/MECHANICA are currently undergoing closer investigation. and therefore is not recommended at this time.Using Weld Features in Pro/MECHANICA When running Pro/MECHANICA structural analyses on a model. but it appears that this type of weld definition does not provide an accurate picture of how a welded assembly behaves since it has no stiffness or surface area. This may still be accomplished the old way. it is possible to use that information to make connections between assembly parts joined by welds. Figure 45 If a weld feature has been defined in the model. it is necessary to define the default interface type to be Free rather than Bonded. weld features from the model may be used to automate the simulation connections. In order to use this capability. assembly components are joined together with “simulation welds”.

Pro/E extends a weld as far along the joint as possible until it reaches a non-tangent surface or curve. but that default behavior may be overridden to include or exclude references as needed. Figure 48 59 . By default.Figure 47 Modifying Weld Start/End Points It is often necessary to stop a weld before the end of the edges or surfaces being referenced.

In this case. so remove the check from that box and select the desired references. we want to override that and select each face we want to include as a weld reference surface. Figure 49 By default. the box is checked to ‘Allow tangent propagation’ which means that if you select a surface for a weld reference.In the following example you will see how you can override the default behavior to quickly get the desired results. it will extend that weld as long as it finds tangent faces. Figure 50 60 . In this case though. we want to define a 5mm fillet weld from point A to point B.

Figure 51 Use the pull-down option next to the Start box (the default option is ‘Chain End’). Highlight Joint1 and pick the Details button.Since we don’t want to extend the weld down the entire length of the faces at the ends of the joint. we will need to edit the Start and End points for the weld ends. You must enter a negative value here. then enter the desired value to offset from the end of the joint. 61 .

Figure 52 62 .

Figure 53 63 .Repeat that step for the End of the joint and the results are as shown below.

we will choose the icon for bevel groove welds. As discussed earlier. Figure 54 Set up the basic weld by selecting the desired reference geometry. it would result in a bevel groove weld that extended the length of the reference edge. and related options. defining the feature shape parameters. an intermittent 5mm bevel groove weld will be constructed. you can select the little arrow next to the groove weld icon on the toolbar to expand that set of tools. 64 . The first step is to define the basic bevel groove weld. If you were to complete the operation at this point. In this case. But since you want to define this as an intermittent weld joint.Creating Intermittent Welds In this first example. a little more information needs to be included.

In this particular instance. some other icons will be activated. 65 . or you can further refine this so that the first segment starts offset from the end of the joint. Use the pulldown to access the ‘pitch length’ option. Figure 57 You can complete the weld at that point.Figure 55 When you pick the Intermittent weld icon (still within the weld definition mode). Figure 56 After that you can enter the segment length. In this case. we will modify the end offset from the default value of zero to -16mm. we want to define a weld that has segments 50mm long with a pitch distance of 100mm. then enter the desired pitch length.

Figure 58 Here is the result of that feature definition: Figure 59 66 .

you need to select one side or the other to offset the start point. Figure 61 67 . Highlight the Joint and use the Details button to modify the starting point of that joint. we will make an intermittent 3mm staggered fillet weld. Figure 60 Once the basic intermittent welds have been defined.In this second example.

Figure 62 Note that the resulting length. Figure 63 Figure 64 68 . volume and mass for that weld are for both sides of the weld feature.

Figure 65 Figure 66 69 .Modeling Complex Weld Joints In this example we have a U-groove joint that joins the bent plate with the casting. The references we have available to use when defining a J-groove are: Side 1: Chain (edges or curves) Side 2: Chain OR Surfaces If the tangent chain on the edge of the bent plate is selected as the Side 1 reference and the series of surfaces on the casting that the weld would be attached to are used for the Side 2 reference the resulting weld appears to not fill the entire joint. This will be an 8mm weld that extends from point A to point B.

In this case. Figure 67 We could refine that last strategy a bit to come up with something that appears a little more realistic and if it were to be used to develop additional geometry for FEA. In this example 70 . the mass properties are correct. The mass properties could be identical (assuming the weld cross-section was defined By Value in both cases rather than By Reference). But if the appearance is important for shop floor viewing or potential downstream use by FEA. This time the references for Side1 and Side2 are both set to Chain. In this case we could use a datum curve for the Side1 Chain reference. the weld appears to fill the entire joint. then it might be worth the trouble. This requires 2 construction features: a sketched curve and a Projection of that sketch upon the surfaces of the casting where the sketched curve would intersect.Of course the weld cross-sectional area may be defined properly so that while the appearance of the weld joint may look wrong. you can try another strategy.

the mass properties will not change (assuming the weld cross section was defined using By Value and that value was the same in all three instances.Figure 68 Once again. 71 .

so even if you take the trouble to define a relation such as this. the weld volume (and mass) are still only approximations.Associative Cross Sectional Weld Area As noted earlier in this guide. the variability associated with weld deposition. The following workaround is one technique that can be used to address this potential problem. either due to miscalculation or from subsequent changes to the model. and the simple fact that weld size can vary within a tolerance range. The purpose of this is just to save the engineer the trouble of calculating the area in an area where the geometry might be complex and to ensure that the area updates if design changes come along later. when you assign the weld cross-sectional area using the By Value method. Figure 69 It is understood that all weld volumes are approximations due to changes in casting profiles. there is a risk of that value being wrong. 72 .

not the total combined length.Combining Similar Welds Just like on the detailing side of Pro/E. Figure 70 You can select the weld features to combine either from the display or from the Model Tree. we can combine welds of a similar type such that a single weld symbol point to both instances. 73 . Note that the weld length shown in the combined symbol is only the length of each one of the instances.

Tail welds are meant to be continuous extensions of the fillet welds. the weld joint is not displayed accurately. and Pro/E does calculate the mass properties of the weld. In the image below. Note that the 74 . you can see two identical 10mm fillet welds. you can define such a weld joint. however if the weld is defined using the ‘Surface Weld’ option. and the length is specified in a drawing note. The weld joint in the foreground has a 50mm extension on the left end of the joint.Figure 71 Tail Welds As described in 1E0099: “Tail welds are extensions of fillet welds onto a plate to improve fatigue strength. so volume and mass for these joints will be reported oversized. One other thing to note here is that the tapering of the weld size is not accounted for. The height is specified as the height at the end of a length away from the joint.” With the current version of Pro/E. Tail welds gradually taper from the height of the fillet weld to the specified height within the specified length.

but visually they are both identical. which is what we would expect to see.Length and Mass for the first fillet weld are both larger values that the second weld. Figure 72 75 .

Figure 73 76 .If the ‘Light Weld’ option is used. This problem was reported to PTC and should be addressed in a future build of Pro/E Wildfire 5. then you can see that the extension of the weld is accurately portrayed.

pick the icon for Plug/Slot Welds Figure 74 Select the icon circled in Figure 74 . In this example. Here is a quick explanation of the references that are required when building a Slot weld.Modeling Slot Welds While not exactly complicated. so we will define the slot weld to be 8mm thick. The Side Surfaces will be all of the ‘side wall’ 77 . This allows you define the slot weld using the Base Surface and the Side Surfaces as your geometry references. First. for some reason this particular type of weld has always been a bit counterintuitive to define. Figure 75 The Base Surface is the geometry of the non-slotted component which will be welded (indicated in Figure 75). the plate is 9mm thick. This means that the weld will be 8mm deep from the base surface.

Figure 77 78 . Note that the Slot weld is called a ‘Plug Weld’ in the Model Tree. or use the Details button to gather surfaces using the ‘Seed & Bounds’ technique. Figure 76 The results are shown in Figure 76. You will need to use the Control key in order to select multiple references here.surfaces of the slot.

At Caterpillar we use Pro/TOOLKIT to define linkages between the CAD models and other external applications when these interactions are not otherwise available. but even if we could convince PTC to customize their tools to suit all of our specific needs. Since the usage of weld features in the CAD model is in it’s infancy at Caterpillar. but we do have a few options available right now. Programmatic Data Exchanges The ideal scenario would be for us to get everything we need out of native Pro/E.Downstream Usage Information from the CAD model can be used to drive many downstream applications. We have a limited ability set up communications with outside applications.htm 79 . An alternative to this is setting up user-defined data exchanges. User-Defined Data Exchanges Programmed data exchanges are relatively easy for the user. thus removing the dependence on drawings and redundant data entry. If weld features exist in the CAD model. Some external applications provide the ability to read in data from Pro/E directly. and in those cases it is relatively easy to pass weld feature data along. This is not an insignificant task and maintenance of these programs sometimes gets to be troublesome.com/support/index. but for a full explanation of the tools.ptc. however these can be expensive and time consuming to develop. most of this work is still in the very early phases. Three techniques that can be used to interact with external applications include: • • • Weld Reports Excel Analysis Features MathCAD Each of these methods will be highlighted in the following pages. the aPriori software can automatically extract the data that it needs to calculate and assign a corresponding cost figure for that weld joint. the time required to get these enhancements is often unacceptable. please refer to http://www. These interactions can be one-way (exported from Pro/E only) or they can be two-way. One example of this is the aPriori cost estimating software. but it does give us the ability to customize the base tool to provide added functionality to meet requirements demanded by Caterpillar users.

Weld Reports Pro/REPORT is an application mode within Pro/E that provides for the ability to generate associative tables of data on a 2D drawing sheet. 2009. The tables are defined to a generic . but was reported as non-functional on Oct 28. 80 . Shown in Figure 77 is an example of a typical customized Report table. etc. We should be able to also include other pieces of user-defined information that may be included as part of the weld feature. the data in the table is automatically populated with the information that has been embedded in each weld feature. such as number of passes. The call number with PTC is C7357280. Note: This capability (including user-defined parameters in Report Tables) is supposed to work.tbl file. These tables can be defined to display various bits of information about a welded assembly model. weld gas. but when the table is inserted in the Report file and the model is referenced in the Report. Figure 78 In this case all of the parameters are predefined to exist within Pro/E.

You can export data out of Pro/E so that the data used outside of Pro/E is in sync with the CAD model. 81 .Once the Report file has been created and the desired table has been included and populated with weld feature data. The limitations with this method are: a) The kinds of data that are valid for export are limited b) You cannot change that data and update the model or use that data to generate new data to be stored back into the CAD model The first limitation has been reported to PTC as a software issue. the information in the table can be exported out of Pro/E as a text file or as a comma delimited file that is easily read into a spreadsheet. Figure 79 This technique is only a one-way data exchange. The second limitation may be addressed with the following types of User-Defined data exchange methods.

In this simple example.Excel Analysis Features Another possible way to get weld feature data out of Pro/E and make it available for manipulation with an external application is by using the Excel Analysis feature. Outside of Pro/E an Excel spreadsheet is defined to read in the data from Pro/E. weld joint sizes and weld process data tied to weld features in the CAD model are exported from Figure 80 Pro/E via the Excel Analysis feature. Inside Excel calculations are performed and data is retrieved from a table. The calculations and retrieved data are automatically fed back into Pro/E. Figure 81 82 .

but MathCAD is much more developed specifically for this purpose. you can access it directly within the Pro/E environment. matrix analysis. 83 . Figure 82 Some of the advantages of using MathCAD are: • clarity of notation (readability) • clarity of dependencies (verification) • unit analysis (error checking) • breadth of calculation tools (completeness) • Engineering-appropriate graphs. and data support Complex equations can be written that use information from the CAD model and return modified data. MathCAD allows you to define mathematical equations and tie these equations with the CAD model. You can also utilize predefined equations already embedded within MathCAD. plates and shells. image analysis. containing more than 1. Also included are all 37 tables of formulas from Roark’s and dozens of detailed example problems worked out in MathCAD so this is another good option for reusing weld data for design optimization. The complete 6th edition of Roark’s Formulas for Stress and Strain is included within the MathCAD environment. much like you could do with Excel Analysis features. curved beams.MathCAD A few years ago PTC acquired ownership for this third party software application.000 separate design cases covering straight beams and bars. If licensed to run MathCAD from your computer. or generate new data that can be sent back into Pro/E in the form of a parameter.

these intelligent models will become available in the future. cost. In the coming years we plan to work with the CAD supplier and OLP software vendors so that the programmers may use the weld features directly out of the Pro/E model and drastically reduce the time required to create new programs or make changes to existing ones when design changes occur. 84 . Software used at Caterpillar for plant layout could very well be gathering information about welded components directly from the Pro/E models as input for optimization of factory layouts. The current version of WPM uses 2D information from Pro/E to help define and communicate welding processes. Down the road we could tools embedded tools which are used to come up with initial weld sizes and optimize on things like manufacturability. Oversized welds can be a big contributor to unnecessary cost as well as quality problems stemming from distortion. etc. the ability of external applications to read in Pro/E data and use it. and the limitations of the Pro/TOOLKIT. but the potential for reusing the weld data is promising. Weld sizing at this time basically consists of using rules of thumb or rigorous FEA studies to come up with weld size callouts. In the future we could be pulling the logic for defining the welding processes into the CAD model and using that information for other applications.Future Directions For Downstream Usage At this point in time we have a few options for driving downstream applications with weld features in the CAD model as discussed earlier. We have already used simple test case Pro/E models with weld features to simulate weld distortion and are working with the software provider to develop improvements within MECHANICA Thermal so that we can quickly visualize and quantify the effects of a moving heat source in the CAD environment. we can see that the potential for using the weld features in our CAD models as well as the importance of having these features fully defined in the model as opposed to continuing to rely on 2D weld symbols in drawings. While we still have a long way to go. We can currently export Pro/E models with weld features as lightweight ‘models’ to be used by shop personnel as instructional aids for setting up tooling and robots. Today we import CAD geometry and programmers refer to detailed drawings and weld procedures as input for defining off-line robot welding programs. eliminating the need to re-enter data in other applications. weight. While these images are currently simple 3D images with no embedded parametric data tied to the weld features. We are currently limited by the functions provided in Wildfire 5. Modifying designs and welding procedures could quickly help to build business plans for capital expenditures.

Appendices Appendix A: Weld-related config. 0. 0 … this results in a weld color of solid black for Surface type weld features] weld_dec_places … Number of decimal places to display in weld parameters weld_edge_prep_driven_by … Specifies if the edge preparation feature is created at the part level or the assembly level weld_edge_prep_groove_angle … Default value for angle cut value weld_edge_prep_groove_depth … Default value for edge preparation depth weld_edge_prep_instance … Determines whether a family table instance is created automatically for edge preparation weld_edge_prep_name_suffix … Specifies suffix name for family table instances created during edge preparation weld_edge_prep_root_open … Default value for edge preparation root opening weld_edge_prep_visibility … Specifies visibility for edge preparation features for generic and instances 85 .pro options weld_ui_standard … Specifies weld standard to be either ANSI or ISO [Suggested setting –> ANSI] add_weld_mp … Specifies whether welds are included when calculating mass properties [Suggested setting –> YES] pro_weld_params_dir … Directory where Pro/ENGINEER searches when looking for weld parameter files weld_ask_xsec_refs … Specifies whether x-section references are asked for when creating weld features weld_color … Defines weld feature color [Suggested setting –> 0.

Figure 83 86 . a folder has been set up to hold all of the preferences files (C:\home\ProE_Weld_Configs). In an actual production facility installation. this would probably be stored to a central library location where all users could use these predefined files and a set of super-users would have the ability to author and save changes to the library. In this example.Figure 77 shows a set of welding configuration options that were used to build most of the models shown in this User Guide.

These parameters are created automatically and loaded with the corresponding values as a particular weld feature or weld process is created. Figure 84 87 .Appendix B: Welding Parameters This is the list of pre-defined system welding parameters.

Figure 79 shows the settings for a typical general weld preferences file. default values for commonly used weld features can be pre-set.Appendix C: Suggested Weld Preferences Settings By defining weld preference files and declaring them in the config. You may need to go in and modify some of the information.pro file. but much of it will be loaded with at least a reasonable value.pro with the following entry: Figure 85 88 . making it much easier to build complete weld features from these templates. This file would typically be created once then saved to a location called out in the config.

it can be saved to a common folder and the location saved in the config. Figure 86 Once the weld fillet preference file has been set.Figure 80 shows a typical preference file setup for fillet welds.pro file with a line like this: 89 .

Figure 81 shows a typical preference file setup for groove welds.Likewise. Figure 87 90 . 2009. Note that there is currently no option for declaring any distinctions for different kinds of groove welds. This limitation was presented to PTC in the form of a software enhancement request (tracking number E7394437) in November.

Appendix D: Suggested Layer Rules In the section of this guide dealing with layers for welds. This can be automated by including these two layers with a set of predefined Layer Rules for each. it was mentioned that weld quilts and weld symbol annotations should be placed on two specific layers. These are defined with the following settings: Figure 89 91 . The Layer Rule for the 10__WELD can be defined with the following settings: Figure 88 There should be two Layer Rules for the 11__WLD_SYM layer.