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Kenya Maritime Authority

Standards for Maritime Transport Services in Kenya

2012

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CONTENTS Acronyms ........................................................................................................................................ 3 Terminologies ................................................................................................................................. 4 Background ..................................................................................................................................... 7 Maritime Industry Service Delivery Standards............................................................................... 9 Standards for maritime service providers ..................................................................................... 14 A. B. C. E. F. I. G. SHIPS AGENTS ........................................................................................................... 14 FREIGHT FORWARDERS ....................................................................................... 15 CONTAINER FREIGHT STATIONS ....................................................................... 16 CARGO CONSOLIDATORS ..................................................................................... 17 PORT SERVICES ........................................................................................................ 18 PORT OPERATION PROCESSES ..................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. KRA ............................................................................................................................... 20

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Acronyms

BL C11 C&F Agent C FS DO ETA ISPS KMA KPA MISLS KRA KWATOS N/A OGAs OSHA SMART SLA SUMATRA TBL TEU TON TRS UNCTAD WCO

Bill of Lading Customs entry amendment form Clearing and Forwarding Agent Container Freight station Delivery Order Expected Time of Arrival International Ships and Ports Security Kenya Maritime Authority Kenya Ports Authority Maritime industry service level standards Kenya Revenue Authority Kilindini water front terminal operating system Not Applicable Other Government Agencies Occupational Safety and Health Act Specific, measurable, achievable, reliable and timely Service level agreement Surface and Marine transport regulatory authority Through Bill of Lading Twenty foot equivalent Unit Metric ton – (1000 kilograms) Time Release Study/Series United Nations Conference on trade and development World Customs Organization

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Terminologies

1. Arrival rate - Number of ships arriving during a month, divided by number of days in the month 2. Waiting time – Total time between arrival and berthing for all berthing ships, divided by number of berthing ships 3. Service time – Total between berthing and departure for all ships, divided by number of ships. 4. Turn-round time - Total time between arrival and departure for all ships, divided by number of ships 5. Tonnage per ship – Total tonnage worked for all ships, divided by the total of ships 6. Fraction of time berthed ships worked - Total time that berthed ships were actually worked, for all ships, divided by the total time between berthing and departure. 7. Number of gangs employed per ship per shift - Total gross gang time, divided by total time that berthed ships were actually worked. 8. Tons per ship hour in port - Total tonnage worked divided by total time between arrival and departure. 9. Tons per ship hour at berth – Total tonnage worked, divided by total time between berthing and departure 10. Tons per gang-hour - Total tonnage worked, divided by total gross gang time 11. Fraction of time gangs idle - Total idle gang time, divided by total gross gang time 12. Yard density – Measures how effective the port space is used 13. Number of TEUs per Hectare – Measures how effective the port uses the land

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Introduction Kenya has 600 kilometers of coastline and inland water bodies that play important role in transportation. The country relies to a great extent on its ports for handling import and export trade. The port of Mombasa not only serves the bulk of the country’s international trade but handle needs of land-locked countries like Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, Southern Sudan and to some extent, Ethiopia and Somalia.

Legal Framework

Unlike some ports where efficiency in cargo handling is driven by competition among different suppliers of maritime transport services, in Kenya efficiency of the services is determined by mutual agreements or established procedures, some of which attract penalties. The trend has limitations particularly in cases where cost implication of certain parties’ failure to deliver is passed on to others.

Kenya Maritime Authority was set up in 2004 with the mandate to regulate, co-ordinate and oversee maritime affairs as provided for in the Merchant Shipping Act, 2009. Section 5 of the Act generally states that among the functions of the Authority is to carry out such functions as may be necessary to give effect to objects of the Act and particularly, inter alia to administer and enforce the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act and any other legislation relating to the maritime sector.

The Merchant Shipping Act empowers the Minister to make regulations for the granting/withdrawal of licenses for maritime service providers and for the purposes of oversight and monitoring service delivery in the maritime sector having regard to availability, quality, standards of service, cost and efficiency of production and distribution of such services.

For the purpose of administering the Act, the Merchant Shipping (Service Providers) Regulations of 2011 recognizes the need to formalize obligations of various parties through identification of levels of expected delivery of their services. Services would then be provided based on agreed service levels. In this context, it becomes clear for consumers to know what to expect from various suppliers of maritime transport services in the country.
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With agreed standards, it then becomes possible within an established accountability framework to ensure adherence to agreed minimum levels of service delivery. The cost implication arising from any failure to deliver as per agreed minimum service levels can then be dealt with by the party which failed to deliver. This will apply to both private and public entities engaged in one way or another in clearance of cargo at the port of Mombasa. The key public agencies involved in the clearance of cargo are Kenya Revenue Authority, Kenya Ports Authority, Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Services, Kenya Bureau of Standards, Kenya Railways and Kenya Police. In line with provisions of the Constitution, Article 232, services of the public agencies must depict high standards of professional ethics; Efficient, effective and economic use of resources; Responsive, prompt, effective, impartial and equitable provision; Involvement of the people in the process of policy making; Accountability for administrative acts; Transparency and provision of timely and accurate information; Article 10 of the Constitution requires public agencies to adhere to national values and principles of governance which include the rule of law, democracy, participation of the people, equity, inclusiveness, good governance, integrity, transparency, accountability and sustainable development. As provided for in Article 46 of the Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, consumers have the right to goods and services of reasonable quality; to the information necessary for them to gain full benefit from services; to the protection of their health, safety, and economic interests and to compensation for loss or injury arising from defects of services. This Article applies to goods and services offered by public entities and private persons. The position is further strengthened by Article 21 which recognizes the fundamental duty of the State and every state organ to observe, respect, protect, promote and fulfill the rights and fundamental freedoms in the Bill of rights. In the context of the forgoing, establishment of standards for maritime transport services and compliance with those standards is a fundamental constitutional requirement. It gives effect to the realization of seamless, efficient and cost effective services for users in the rapidly growing economy of the region. The standards define an agreed position on what constitutes a reasonable service is to which all parties have to commit into delivering as per the established standards.

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Background

The Port of Mombasa is the largest in East Africa. It is the main gateway for the import and export of goods to countries of the East African Community (EAC) and its neighbors such as Democratic Republic of Congo, Southern Sudan and Southern Ethiopia. The port is no longer restricted to its original function as an interface between water-front cargo and transit services. If the port has to serve its rightful place in the rapidly growing economy of the region, the entire supply chain has to be seamless, efficient and cost effective. Therefore linking the port waterfront services to inland transport corridor is fundamental to trade facilitation and regional integration. Cargo transit time between the port and the final destination is a critical indicator in attracting more ships and more traffic. In the changing global shipping, ship owners are investing in bigger and faster ships to benefit from economy of scale. This has put increased pressure for better port infrastructure. Given that transportation of most of the region’s cargo is contracted by overseas sellers and buyers, there is minimal influence of cargo owners on competitiveness of local maritime transport services. Cargo owners are locked into the services of key providers such shipping lines, ships agents, port service providers, CFSs, cargo consolidators and customs that they hardly contract for the services. In such an environment, a clear understanding of obligations of the various service providers is necessary. Maritime industry standards that are independently monitored will improve accountability and promote efficiency of maritime transport services in the region. A good and efficient transport system facilitates economic growth and regional integration through trade. In this context, KMA in response to the increasing trend of transferring inefficiency costs to parties not responsible for the associated operations developed maritime industry standards in consultation with all stakeholders. Full implementation and compliance with the standards will positively impact on availability, quality, standards, cost and efficiency of maritime transport services in the country for the better. Status of maritime services at the port of Mombasa The port of Mombasa has consistently experienced positive growth rate in the volume of traffic handled with Kenyan cargo contributing 70% of the total port traffic. Improved political stability and trade in the neighboring countries is exerting pressure on the demand for port services. Transshipment cargo is now turned down due to capacity constraints which limit the port’s potential as a regional hub port. Dwell time at the port of Mombasa is still measured in days and not hours. The current dwell time is about 7 days. In the cargo clearance procedures, service providers transfer cost of delays to other parties not responsible for the associated operations. This is partly responsible for the high cost of transport logistics in the region compared to other parts of the world.

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Although introduction of Container Freight Stations, Kilindini Waterfront Terminal Operations System (KWATOS), SIMBA system for on-line customs declaration and 24 hour port operation have improved the cargo clearance process, the systems sometimes break down and CFSs delay transfers to their premises within. The associated penalties arising from such failures are imposed on other parties. In the long run, achieving meaningful trade facilitation gains require comprehensive ‘whole of the chain’ reforms and effective cooperation and information sharing amongst all parties. Since port congestion has a direct effect on the efficiency with which waiting ships are serviced, CFSs will remain relevant until port infrastructure will have been expanded. However, double handling of containers and ferrying them around a very crowded town centre places a layer of inefficiency that can only be addressed by building of appropriate ’off-take’ infrastructure. At the moment, there are weak or non-existent structures for addressing inefficiencies, low service quality and the proliferation of charges. A number of distinct but complementary service providers deliver cargo to importers with minimal accountability over delays in the logistics chain. There has been minimal mechanism for joint consultations on challenges that impact negatively on service delivery. As a result, importers are exposed to cost structures and unplanned expenses that reduce competitiveness of Kenyan goods in foreign markets and raise the cost of imported goods. In the Merchant Shipping Act, 2009, provision was made for the regulation and orderly development of merchant shipping and related services. Efficiency of maritime transport services and orderly development of merchant shipping and related services are covered in the regulations. However, there are no agreed levels of performance and structures for holding parties accountable in the fulfillment of their respective obligations in the flow of cargo. An importer may be penalized for delays in the transfer of a container to a CFS or a systems failure in KPA, KRA or Ships Agents. Importers are often penalized for delay of vessels at the port, an activity they hardly influence. The cost implication of such inefficiencies is partly responsible for the high cost of transportation in the region estimated at 30 – 42% of the value of goods. The fact that importers pay for other service providers’ inefficiencies creates complacency among parties responsible for the inefficiencies. Accountability structures arising from industry maritime industry service level standards and a monitoring mechanism for service delivery has the potential to make service providers across the entire supply chain improve their current performance. This will not only reduce existing complacency but have cost of inefficiencies borne by parties responsible for the inefficiencies. Stakeholders would be able to know why for example a shipping line charges a particular cost for a service and the necessary sanctions needed to address the problem.

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Maritime Industry Service Delivery Standards In order to serve the needs of traders, maritime service providers have to adjust to the changing requirements and expectations of the public, customers, governments and other stakeholders. Increased drive towards more visibility, accountability and transparency in operations is becoming a critical factor in successful delivery of maritime transport services. In the region, transportation is contracted by overseas sellers and buyers and local consignees have little influence on competitiveness of the services. As a result, most service providers do not pay the needed attention to the cost implication of their inefficiencies in the flow of cargo. The industry standards are meant to provide quantifiable measurements, agreed to beforehand, that will reflect the critical success factors in the delivery of maritime transport services. The process involves establishing a pre-defined business process, the requirements for the process, a quantitative/qualitative measurement of the results and comparison with set goals. Structures will then be developed for investigating variances and weaknesses in the processes and putting in place the necessary resources to address shortfalls in service delivery in the key services of shipping lines, ships agents, container freight stations, cargo consolidators, port services, empty container depots and other government agencies. The single window system upon implementation will simplify, harmonize and expedite cargo clearance and trade documentation processes. It is anticipated to facilitate effective follow up on the flow of cargo and thereby create a framework of service delivery from which it will be possible to hold each service provider accountable for its obligations including cost implication arising from failure to meet its obligations. Through stakeholders’ consultation, an assessment of the current state of performance was established upon which service standards were developed. Annexure 1 contains the respective Maritime industry service level standards for the various maritime service providers. SCOPE These standards cover the extent of services provided by maritime service providers as stipulated under the first schedule of the Merchant Shipping (Maritime Service Providers) Regulations, 2011. Empty Container Depot Means a common user facility with handling facilities licensed to offer services for handling and temporary storage of empty containers and whose specific duties are:      Receipt and temporary storage of empty containers Issuance and delivery of empty containers Inspection of returned containers Estimation of container damage costs Issuance of interchanges for containers received and issued
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Submission of daily reports of container movement to respective shipping line through their agents.

Port Service Provider Means a person, in Kenya, engaged in the business of providing services at the port facility, quay side, warehouse or other terminal facilities in connection with a common carrier or a water carrier:  all procedures relating to a vessel’s entry and departure, pilotage and berthing;  the provision of port services through port operators, customs and other government agencies, firms or private individuals;  the procurement and processing of documents and activities required for the dispatch of cargo;  procurement on behalf of ship-owners marine surveys, provision of ship stores, supplies, fresh water, cleaning of cargo holds, fumigation, supply of bunkers, ship repairs and other related services;  import and export shipments;  signing bills of lading, contracts of affreightment and issuing documents relevant to handling of cargo;  booking international sea passages and formalities for passenger's or tourist's embarkation or disembarkation;  attendance to marine casualties and arranging for salvage;  purchasing or forwarding ship's spare parts and stores ;  collecting freight or charter hire where appropriate and all related financial matters;  customs and cargo documentation and forwarding of cargo;  procuring, processing the documentation and performing all activities required related to dispatch of cargo;  supply of services to a ship while in port; and  such other services as the Authority may from time to time specify. Container Freight Station: Means a common user facility with cargo handling equipment licensed to offer services for handling and temporary storage of import laden containers, and motor vehicles under customs control.      Storing containerized and non-containerized cargo, empty containers and imported motor vehicles; Stuffing and stripping of containers; Loading and unloading of containers onto and off trailers; Receiving and delivering of containers; Any other operations relevant to the activities of a container freight station;

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Clearing and Forwarding Agent Means any person licensed to act as an agent under section 145(1) of the East African Community Customs Management Act, 2004        Receiving advance notification of shipments, or other documents from banks, shippers or consignees as required; Preparing and processing import and export declarations Clearance and handling of shipments in accordance with the Customs import and export regulations; Arranging for warehousing the goods; Arranging dispatch of goods as per the directions of the customer; and Handling freight and other monies advanced by customer for purposes of clearance of shipments from a customs area; Any other operations relevant to the activities of a freight clearing and forwarding agent;

Ships Agent: Means a person licensed by Kenya Maritime Authority and appointed by a ship operator, including a shipowner or charterer, to act as its agent in Kenya in providing any of the services specified under regulation 2  all procedures relating to a vessel’s entry and departure, pilotage and berthing;  the provision of port services through port operators, customs and other government agencies, firms or private individuals;  the procurement and processing of documents and activities required for the dispatch of cargo;  import and export shipments;  signing bills of lading, contracts of Affreightment and issuing documents relevant to handling of cargo;  booking international sea passages and formalities for passenger's or tourist's embarkation or disembarkation;  collecting freight or charter hire where appropriate and all related financial matters;  customs and cargo documentation and forwarding of cargo;  procuring, processing the documentation and performing all activities required related to dispatch of cargo; Kenya Revenue Authority An agency of the Government mandated to:  Collect and issue receipt of all revenue;  Administer and enforce all provisions of the written laws set out in Part I of the First Schedule and for that purpose, to assess, collect, and account for all revenues in accordance with those laws:

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Administer and enforce the provisions of the written laws set out in Part II of the First Schedule relating to revenue and for that purpose to assess, collect and account for all revenues in accordance with those laws. Advise the Government on all matters relating to the administration of, and the collection of revenue under the written laws or the specified provisions of the written laws set out in the First Schedule; and Perform such other functions in relation to revenue as the Minister may direct.

Cargo Consolidator Means a person who accepts less than container load shipment from individual shippers and then combines them for delivery to the carrier as full container for shipment        Purchasing of transportation services from a carrier and offering such services for resale to persons The paying of port – to- port or multimodal transportation charges Entering into Affreightment agreements with underlying shippers. Issuing of Bill of Lading or equivalent documents Paying of lawful compensation to ocean freight forwarders. The Leasing of container; or Entering into arrangements with origin or destination agents

Shipping line Means any person who provides sea transport using his own or chartered vessels or hires slots or space from other vessels in operation or managing the business of shipping  Offering of scheduled liner services for cargo carriage.  Availing of containers for export of cargo  Delivery of shipments to designated consignees in as good condition as received.  Ensuring of the issuance of bills of lading to all cargo shipped on board his vessel  Offering of seaworthy and well manned vessel at any given time of ships voyage. Escalation Any service failure by any of the parties shall be amicably resolved between concerned parties but in the event that they do not agree on a position, KMA shall be called upon to arbitrate in generating a reasonable and fair resolution. Force Majeure  No party shall be held liable for failure to perform its obligations under these standards if such failure is as a result of Acts of God (including fire, flood or rainy conditions reasonably resulting to paralysis of cargo operations, earthquake, storm, hurricane or
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other natural disaster), war, invasion, act of foreign enemies, hostilities (regardless of whether war is declared), civil war, rebellion, revolution, insurrection, military or usurped power or confiscation, terrorist activities, nationalization, government sanction, blockage, embargo, labor dispute, strike, lockout or interruption or failure of electricity or telephone service.  If a party asserts Force Majeure as an excuse for failure to perform the party's obligation, then the non performing party must prove that reasonable steps were taken to minimize delay or damages caused by foreseeable events, that the party substantially fulfilled all executable obligations, and that the other party was timely notified of the likelihood or actual occurrence of an event described in Clause 9.1.1. These standards shall be binding on the parties to them and their respective successors and permitted assigns. Provided that neither of the parties to it shall be entitled to assign these standards or any of its rights and obligations under these standards without the consent of the other (which consent either party may in its absolute discretion withhold). No exercise or failure to exercise or delay in exercising any right power or remedy vested in either party under or pursuant to these standard shall constitute a waiver by that party of that or any other right power or remedy. These standards constitutes the irreducible minimum between the parties in relation to their subject matter and supersedes all prior standards and understandings whether oral or written with respect to that subject matter and no variation of these standards shall be effective unless reduced through formal consultation among maritime service providers.

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Standards for maritime service providers A. SHIPS AGENTS Main Activity 1 Submission of Manifest/Bay plans and other cargo clearance documents Processes Bay plan and Manifest information are internally verified and lodged in KPA’s KWATOS system and KRA Simba System; Hard copies of manifests are printed and distributed to KPA, Long Room, KRA headquarter for TBL, Police, KMA, KRA investigation department and CFS; Arrival notices are printed and posted/emailed/faxed to notify party; Cargo release invoices are issued to clients upon submission of required documents and duly endorsed original bill of lading; Issuance of original delivery order to clearing agent; Submission of electronic Delivery Order copies to KPA and CFS; For CFS destined cargoes, CFS release order is issued; Once the manifest is registered and approved, clients are advised of the manifest numbers through internet, email and notice boards Service level standards Lodgment of electronic Manifest/ bay plans within 48hrs prior to vessel arrival
Lodgment of hard copy Manifest within a minimum of 48hrs prior to vessel arrival (intended to be 72 after amendment of the Act) Activity to happen seven (7) days prior to vessels’ ETA Invoices to be issued three (3) hours.

Delivery Order to be issued one (1) hour upon settlement of the invoice Submission to be done three (3) hours after issuance of delivery order. To be issued within forty eight (48) hours before the vessels’ arrival The notification of manifests number to be done within one (1) hour upon registration and approval by KRA

2 Loading of export cargo 3 Submission of C11 to Customs and Port Authorities

Loading list to be submitted at least six hours prior vessel’s berthing Form C11 together with supporting documents Submission to be effected six (6) hours upon request are submitted to customs headquarters, first for physical then online approval upon payment of a penalty; The same KRA approved documents are Submission done electronically submitted to KPA for approval upon payment of a penalty;
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B. FREIGHT FORWARDERS Main Activity 1 Importers obligations 2 Preparation and Lodging of entries for cargo removal Processes Submission of documents by importers Service level standards Importer to submit documents to a freight forwarder 7 days before a ships’ arrival

The freight forwarder receives the relevant Preparation and Lodging of entries to be completed cargo documents from the importer, prepares before arrival of the vessel customs entries and lodges same in the Simba System. Payment on duty The duty payable should be done within half (1/2) a day after receipt of the same from the cargo owners. Notification of importer on KRA’s approval The notification should be done within half (1/2) hour status Notification to the cargo owners on release of The notification should be done within half (1/2) hour cargo and payable port charges Payment of Port charges The Port charges payable should be done within half (1/2) hour after receipt of the same from the cargo owners. Booking of truck and collection of the position Should be done within one (1) hour after payment of slip port charges.

Truck should be availed one (1) hour after obtaining the position 3 Interaction with Surrendering of the negotiable BL together Surrendering to be done within five (5) hours upon shipping Agents with the cargo owners’ clearance authorization receipt of all relevant documents letter. Issuance of an invoice of destination charges The invoice should be issued within half (1/2) a day by the shipping agent upon surrender of the bill of lading Payment of shipping charges Payable charges made within four hours after receipt of the invoice from the shipping agent Issuance of delivery order Delivery Order to be issued within 4 four hours of receipt of payment A maximum of seven (7) for all processes provided documents are submitted 7 days before a ship’s arrival.
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Proceed to Avail truck at the loading point

C. CONTAINER FREIGHT STATIONS Main Activity Processes Service level standards Collection within 48 hours before ETA of vessel 1 Collection of CFSs to arrange for collection of manifests manifests Lodging of CAMIS approval request List prepared within a period of two hours after receipt 2 Documentation of manifest and KRA manifest number process Generation of pick up order and payment of Should be undertaken within 4 hours after approval of port charges CAMIS of Avail trucks to the loading zone Transfer to be within forty eight (48) hours from the 3 Evacuation containers from discharge of a container the port 4 Cargo release to Acceptance of original DO with copy of Immediate receipt of documents whenever they are approved customs entry submitted Owners Issuance of invoice for charges Within one hour of receipt of DO and approved entry Issuance of receipt for payment Verification of cargo Issuance of CFS gate pass Loading of the container on the truck Within one hour of receipt Cargo must be placed for verification within one (1) hour upon request by importer and/or the agent Activity to take place within one (1) hour after request by the agent Loading should be within one (1) hour after the truck has been availed for loading

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D. 1 Main Activity Receipt of empty containers from the importer

EMPTY CONTAINER DEPOTS Processes Issuance of call number slips to the trucker. Offloading of the container from the truck Service level standards Issuance to be within half (1/2) hour upon request

Offloading to be done half (1/2) hour after truck enters the depot premises Ascertain the condition of the container and Ascertainment and issuance should be done within one Issuance of inward interchange report (1) hour upon offloading. Immediately on receipt. Shipping lines to submit request one (1) day prior to request Should be sent once on a daily basis Repatriation to be done immediately upon receipt of request from the shipping line

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Delivery of Identify and set aside food grade containers empty containers for Prepare a list of readily available food grade export containers and submit to the principal Repatriation of the actual requested containers Empty by the shipping lines. Container repatriation E. CARGO CONSOLIDATORS

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Main Activity Receipt of documents from port of origin

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Processes The notification of arrival of shipment to the consignee Payment of shipping charges and securing of delivery order Submission of Submission of Consolidation/House Manifest manually/electronically to both KPA and KRA Consolidation/ House Manifest Invoicing and Preparing shipping charges invoice and preparation of notification of same to consignee. delivery orders Delivery order is then released to the consignee after payment has been secured The specimen delivery order is then sent to the relevant CFS Notification of the Cargo owners/ surveyors on container stripping at the CFS.

Service level standards Notification to be done within half (1/2) hour Activity to be done within 48 hours prior to vessel arrival To lodge manifest with twenty four (24) hours after lodgment of ocean manifest by line Activities should be done within one (1) hour upon receipt of relevant cargo clearance documents from the consignee Delivery order should be issued within half (1/2) upon receipt of payment from the consignee. To be sent within one (1) hour upon issuance of delivery order to consignee Notification should be done within twenty four (24) hours after arrival of the container at the CFS
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F. KENYA PORT AUTHORITY a) Operation Services
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Main Activity Ships’ arrival and berthing Ships turn-round time

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Waiting rate

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Berth Occupancy

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Working time over time at berth Dwell (containerized cargo) time

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Gang productivity (tons/gang – shift) Ship Productivity (tons/shipday)

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Processes Pilotage and berthing of vessels Containerized vessels General cargo vessels Tankers Containerized vessels General cargo vessels Tankers Containerized vessels General cargo vessels Tankers Containerized vessels General cargo vessels Tankers Imports Exports Empties Transshipment Dry Bulk Cargo General cargo Motor vehicles Dry Bulk Cargo General cargo Motor vehicles
Containerized vessels

Service level standards Vessels berth within a day upon arrival. 3 days 4 days 2 days < 1 day/vessel < 1 day/vessel < 1 day/vessel < 65% < 65% < 65% Closer to 1 Closer to 1 Closer to 1 4 days 4 days 2 days 14 days 500 tons/gang – shift 400 tons/gang – shift 400 units/gang – shift 4, 500 tons/ship-day 3,600 tons/ship-day 1, 500 units /ship-day
25 < 65% 1500 Compliant Compliant 0.625 65 hours (for container vessels at the Container Terminal)
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Moves/crane hour (net SSG) Yard Density TEUs her Hector ISPS code requirements OSHA requirements Fraction of time gangs idle Service time (hour per ship)

b) Documentation Services Main Activity Processes Container ship Registration of manifest in KWATOS system planning, loading and off loading Receipt of Bay plan and loading list from the shipping lines Planning for loading and offloading Import cargo Receipt of DO from Shipping Line Placing of containers for verification/scanning delivery Issuance of online release after receiving the entry copies and the original DO Receipt and interface of pick up order Generation of a ticket for cash payment
Issuance of invoice for charges Arrival of truck at gate and generation of the position slip Loading of the container on the truck Generation of the gate pass and Equipment Interchange Report Verification of cargo

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Service level standards Registration should be done immediately the manifest has been approved by KRA
Should be received 48 hrs before the vessel arrival. Planning should be done 48 hours before arrival. Should be done 3 hours after request 3 hour after receipt of the necessary documents Half an hour after request by a clearing agent One hour after on line request by the clearing and forwarding agent ½ hour after payment of the port charges One hour after the truck entering the port ½ after the container has been loaded on the truck

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Cargo must be placed for verification within one (1) hour upon request by importer and/or the agent On daily basis Export cargo Posting of accepting vessels on the KPA website acceptance Generation of port charges 30 min after upon lodgment of pre-advice by the exporter Off loading of the container from the truck ½ hour after reaching the export stacking area. Reconciliation and generation of the loading list ½ hour after offloading of the truck to effect loading operation Port CFS Notification to the CFS on the containers 48 Hours before the vessels arrives. nominated to the CFS interaction (KPA Generation of the pickup order for the CFS bound Within one hour upon request containers nominated Processing of the port charges and securing of One hour upon request cargo) payment on line Generation of the position slip ½ hour after payment of the port charges
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Loading of the container on the truck Generation of the gate pass Port interaction Generation of position slip with empty container Off loading of the container depots Delivery of empty container to Port pre-stacking yard

One hour after the truck entering the port ½ after the container has been loaded on the truck 0ne hour after securing wharfage charges from the shipping line ½hour after the truck enters the port Delivery of ¾ of the pre-advised containers 48 hours prior to arrival of vessel.

G. KRA Main Activity Customs cargo clearance for Imports Processes Receipt of the manifest from the ships Agents/cargo consolidators and registration of the same through Simba system registering of customs entry Confirmation of payment of the relevant duties and taxes from the clearing and forwarding agent Passing of the entry
KRA sends targeting regimes KPA/CFS online CAMIS Approval Physical cargo verification/Scanning and reporting by KRA Generation and issuance of customs release order to KPA/CFS online Customs cargo registering of customs export entry clearance for Passing of export entry Supervision of stuffing and sealing of the exports container at the shippers premises Releasing of shipping order and customs export entry. Issuance of shipping certificate

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Service level standards Registration and issuance of manifest number should upon receipt.
Real time Confirmation receipt of payment from the bank should be real time Customs entry entries processed and passed/rejected within 2 hours upon confirmation of receipt of payment. Real time One (1) Hour after lodging by the CFS operator Verification/scanning and reporting within three (3) hours upon receipt of folder from the C&F Agents Online issuance in real time after verification/ or scanning Real time To be done one (1) hour after registration KRA to avail an officer within three (3) hours upon request. Activity should happen within one (1) hour upon lodgment of entries Issuance should be done within one (1) hour after loading

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