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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

Project Management & Construction Services

Austin, Texas 78722

Standard Programming Checklist for Renovations University of Texas at Austin


(Portions of this document adapted with permission of UT OFPC) This check list is a tool designed to help professional service providers and in-house designers better program and establish the scope of renovation projects of up to 2 millions dollars and new construction up to 1 million dollars.

For the purposes of this document the following definitions will be used:
Programming Briefly stated, programming is the process of collecting, analyzing, synthesizing and documenting all (or most) of the requirements for a project prior to beginning design. For the purpose of this definition Design consists of three distinct phases: Schematic design, Design Development, and Construction Documents that occur after the program with scope of work is established.

What Programming is and is not (taken from Problem Seeking by William Pena): Programming is problem seeking; design is problem solving. Programming is analysis; design is synthesis. Programming is NOT design. Programming is the process of distinguishing between wants and needs.
Scope of Work

In broad terms, the Scope of Work is what is produced by the process of Programming. The Scope of Work is the main deliverable of the programming process and contains the information needed to design a project. That information should include but not necessarily be limited to: Establish client goals and scope Space and functional relationships Site selection (if a new building or structure) Determination of the cost and schedule for the project

How to Use This Checklist This document is a checklist for what should be contained in a typical program. By addressing all of the applicable items listed, the designer will have developed a program and estimate ready to support a formal funding request as well as the final design. These guidelines are generic. Like most checklists, this document cannot address every possible issue. In addition, there are probably parts that do not apply to a particular project. If this is the case, skip over those items, and include any information that is specific to the program needs of the owner/client. Minimum Program Requirements

The Minimum Program Requirements are as follows: a. A concise one to two page Executive Summary that includes the program goals and client description of use. b. A concise description of program scope. c. Copies of supporting drawings or sketches. d. Preliminary estimate using the A&E Standard Estimating format including a differentiation between wants and needs wants being separated as possible alternates. e. Client/User Signoff of the approved preliminary scope, budget and schedule (Refer Appendix G for sample of Client/User Signoff Document).
Programming Check list The Checklist to follow is intended to aid the Programmer in producing a thorough yet concise program and estimate. The intent is to help identify the tasks to be completed by the Programmer and the tasks that are the responsibility of the Owner/Client. Please note that the list is broad in scope, and not every item will apply to each project. Additionally, an Appendix of planning resources with links to the A&E server has been included to aid in the programming effort these are listed the Appendix located at the end of this document.

Ow ner Pr ogr am me r
Programming Schedule Establish the schedule with the client for completing the program for estimate. Generally, PMCS allows 30 days for Priority projects and 60 days for Routine. However , this time line may vary based upon complexity and need.

General What is the general need and intent for this project? What is the users description of his or her work and how are the spaces to be used? How many people will use the spaces? What are their positions and functions? Is there a budget limit for the project, and what is the amount? What is the desired delivery date for the project? Is it realistic based upon the scope? Is the proposed location one that will support the need or jeapordize the need? Are the proposed spaces vacant or will additional work be required prior to construction to relocate occupants? Will there be a need for phasing of the project? Will there need to be accreditations, certification, performance test etc. of the completed spaces? Are there special performance requirements for the spaces? Example: Seasonal requirements, security telecommunicaion, humidity, room pressure and clean requirements room, acoustical, EMF, vibration, etc? How will the new space use impact the present infrastructure and building systems? Which systems will need modification What are the objectives for the successful outcome of the project?

Specific Space and Adjacency Requirements Identify all areas included in and affected by the project Include adjacency diagrams and/or schematic layouts Detailed requirements for each room (see Appendix B Room Data Sheet Template): Space detail sheet Functional relationship diagram Room data sheet List of furnishings and equipment Description of finishes and level of quality Description of special access issues

Evaluation of Existing Conditions Existing Drawings - Make copies of pertinent drawings for the current building (resources A&E CAD Records, A&E plan room, Utilities plan room) Renovation Area - Identify the extents of the renovation area What is the current room usage will the proposed program change the current function of the space (affects Code and whether the room is capable of supporting an alternate function) VFA documentation - review the current status of the building condition using the VFA web link. Identify items to be reused or salvaged before and during the renovation. Does relocating these items require UT transportation Services? If so add the cost to the project budget.

Do the items require special utilities like power, data, lab gasses, and special structural support? Are the items to be salvaged?

Code Compliance - What areas in the building are known not to comply with current building codes how does this affect the program and budget? (See Appendix A List of Key Stake Holders: Fire Codes) ADA does the accessible route to the area comply with Texas Accessibility Standards (parking, entry and egress, public phones if present, drinking fountains, and toilets) Key building Codes to consider - NFPA 101 and NFPA 45 (Standard on Fire Protection for Laboratories using Chemicals) Is the building sprinklered? Will the project require modification of the existing systems? Will the project require adding a sprinkler system? Hazardous materials Determine if hazardous materials are in the project area and include a budget estimate for corrective work. (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Asbestos, Lead) Use existing surveys or request new testing of the proposed spaces for possible Asbestos, lead, or mold. Mechanical & Plumbing Systems - Are the building mechanical and plumbing systems able to support the proposed functions? (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holderss: UT Zone and Operations Shops, UT Utilities, A&E Engineering Department Head) Identify project requirements and equipment that may require specialized and controlled delivery of mechanical services. Fume hoods and exhaust fans are the building supply air and exhaust systems capable of supporting new hoods. Are the existing systems problematic, at maximum capacity, or near their capacity? What plumbing utilities are available and what is the current capacity of the various systems? Electrical Systems Are the building electrical systems able to support the proposed functions and equipment load? (Appendix A Stake Holder List: A&E Electrical Engineering) Data/Telecom What is the status of the building data system? (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Data/Telecom) Are the data closets at capacity? If so will new switches be required. Are wireless systems available? Will additional transmitters and receivers be required? Fire Protection Systems Are the building fire protection systems able to support additional devices? (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Fire Alarms, and UT Fire Marshall)

Special Program Considerations Multi-media Conference/Classrooms What is the occupancy and how will they be seated? Is there a need for a clear line of sight for all occupants? What audio-video equipment will be used? Will there be a need for a smart lectern with controls for the equipment? Will there be two-way teleconferencing? Will an audio-visual media

specialist be needed for the design? What equipment will be used? (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders:Computers/Technology) Code Review Complete a Code review of the existing space and building area. Does the proposed project change the usage of the existing space? Does the project increase the occupant load? (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Fire Codes) Acoustical Isolation and Noise Level Thresholds What will the acoustical properties of the spaces be? Will sound attenuation be needed? Will an acoustical engineer be needed? A helpful website is http://www.acoustics.com/ Will the project affect the exterior of the building If so, it is important to review the proposed changes with UT Campus Planning (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Campus Planning) Project/Client furnished Equipment Identify which equipment will be a project cost and which will be client provided. Identify all MEP and data requirements as well as Special Program Considerations (review the remainder of this check list). Project/Client Furnished Furniture Identify which furniture will be a project cost and which will be client provided. Identify all electrical and data requirements. Security What are the security needs for the project? If a lab note that BSL 3 through 4 have increasingly higher security requirements. (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Security Systems) Data/Telecom Determine data and phone needs for the project (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Data/Telecom) FCMS (Remote Monitoring) Is remote monitoring of equipment required? If so determine if the building supports remote monitoring. (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders) Chemical Use - Ask the researcher to provide a complete list of chemicals and quanities that he/she will be using (see Appendix C for a Chemical Inventory Spreadsheet). This list will be used to determine if the lab must comply with NFPA 45 and will establish need for special storage and design considerations. Perchlorates require special isolated fume hoods and fans as well as specialized wash down of hood and ductwork. Quantities of flammable/combustible liquids and hazardous gasses stored and in use need to be evaluated using NFPA 45 and NFPA 30. Quantities determine additional design and safety constraints. Use of acids are specialized room finishes required? Bio Safety Level (BSL) What type of pathogens will be used inside the lab? Will animals be housed inside the BSL? References: CDC-NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories 4th Edition, from US Dept of Health and Human Services; US Department of Agriculture Guidelines. Determine if the lab is BSL1, BSL2, BSL3 or BSL 4 and follow CDC and USDA requirements (also see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Lab Safety) Radioisotopes - (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Radiation, and Lab Safety) Fume hoods - will the project require fume hoods and vented cabinets? If so verify if the existing conditions can support them (see Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders: Lab Safety/Fume Hoods, and Lab Safety)

Environmental Chambers - Will the existing MEP systems support a new chamber. Will the chamber be part of the project cost? What are the design requirements of the chamber (to establish a budget). Electromagnetic Field Shielding (aka EMF or RF Shielding) Will the spaces hold instrumentation and equipment sensitive to electromagnetic or radio frequency fields? Will the spaces need shielding from these? A helpful website is http://www.emfservices.com/emf-shielding.htm. Clean Rooms - Determine if a prefabricated clean room will be constructed or an existing space converted into a clean room. Existing MEP constraints may dictate the need for installing a prefabricated clean room: Determine if the client understands the difference between a Clean Room and a Clean Space. Identify the Clean Room Classification needed. Will the building MEP systems support modifications to construct the clean room? Vibration Will vibration sensitive equipment be used? If so verify the equipment requirements and building suitability. Note - approprite analysis of the building vibration characteristics may be required. Vivariums What animals will be housed, i.e. rodents, birds, primates etc? References: (AALAS) American Association for Laboratory Animal Science; US Department of Agriculture Guidelines. Is there need of a barrier free facility? Is there need of diurnal lighting? What type of caging system will be used? What type of cage washing equipment will be needed? Will an autoclave be needed? Will a surgery suite be needed? Are there acoustical requirements? What type of special finishes is needed?

Appendix Contents
Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D Appendix E Appendix F Appendix G List of Review Stake Holders Sample Room Survey Sheet Sample Equipment List Sample Code Review Spread Sheet NFPA Guide to Lab Applicability Sample Chemical Inventory Spreadsheet Client/User Signoff

Appendix A List of Review Stake Holders


Main Campus
UT Project Manager (UTPM): Name: Phone: Fax: E-mail: Client: Name: Phone: Fax: E-Mail: Professional Service(s) Provider: Name: Firms Name: Phone: Fax: E-Mail: UT Architect: Name: Phone: Fax: E-mail: UT Engineer: Name: Phone: Fax: E-mail: UT Construction Inspector (UTCI): Name: Phone: Fax: E-mail: UT Interior Designer: Name: Phone: Fax: E-mail UT Planner: Name: Phone: Fax: E-mail: General Contractor Site Superintendent: Company Name: Superintendent Name: Phone: Fax: E-mail: Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Contractor Project Manager: Company Name: Project Manager Name: Cell: Fax: E-mail: Building Manager/Facilities Contact: Name:

Cell:

Phone: Fax: Cell: E-mail: Affected Building Occupants: Name: Phone: Fax: Cell: E-Mail: Fire Marshall: Name: Karl Shrader Phone: 471-2034 Fax: Cell: E-Mail: U.T. Abatement Shop: Name: Phone: Fax: Cell: E-Mail: Utilities: Name: Phone: Fax: Cell: E-Mail: U.T. Telecommunications: Name: David Silverstrim Phone: 471-4939 Fax: Cell: E-Mail: U.T. Safety Coordinator: Name: Phone: Fax: Cell: E-Mail: Fire and Police: Officer William Pieper Phone: Fax: 471-7505 Cell: 289-0370 Call UT Police at 471-4441 first, then call the Austin Fire Department 911(but not from a campus phone) Environmental Health & Safety: Name: Erle Janssen Phone: Fax: Cell: E-Mail: Zone # ____ and Contact: Name: Phone: Fax: Cell: E-Mail: Landscape Services: Name: Phone: Fax: Cell: E-Mail: Fire Safety Shop: Name: Tammy Swaton Phone: 471-2197 Fax: Cell: E-Mail: Locks & Keys: Name: Sam Works Phone: 232 3358 Fax: E-Mail: sworks@austin.utexas.edu U.T. Custodial: Name: Sally Moore Phone: 471-5072 Fax: E-Mail: Parking & Transportation Coordinator (Main Campus only): Names: Cell:

Cell:

Phone: Fax: E-Mail: Signage: Name: Phone: Fax: E-Mail: Maintenance Warranty Coordination: Name: Jim Crump Phone: 475-9726 Fax: E-Mail: Furniture Shop: Name: Sandy Justice Phone: 471-3335 Fax: E-Mail: Campus Planning: Name: David Rea Phone: 475-7475 Fax: E-Mail: Accessibility: Name: Jim Boyce Phone: 899-3192 Fax: E-Mail: Technology: Name: Kurt Bartelmehs Phone: 232-9090 Fax: E-Mail:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

Cell:

PRC Contacts
FCMS/Fire Alarms: Name: Richard Franks Phone: 471-3595 E-Mail: Warranty Coordination: Name: David Houston Phone: 471-3608 E-Mail: Custodial Services: Name: John Sanchez Phone: 471-1901 E-Mail: Controls: Name: Don Henry Phone: 471-8619 E-Mail: Electrical: Name: Ron Waldrep Phone: 471-3606 E-Mail: Plumbing: Name: Steve Huber Phone: 471-6444 E-Mail: Grounds: Name: John Pinson Phone: 471-3609 Fax: Cell:

Fax:

Cell:

Fax:

Cell:

Fax:

Cell:

Fax:

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Fax:

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Fax:

Cell:

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E-Mail: Road Maintenance: Name: Steve Kelley Phone: 471-3609 E-Mail: Maintenance & Construction: Name: John Daude Phone: 471-3602 E-Mail:

Fax:

Cell:

Fax:

Cell:

After Hours (Building Emergencies): (512) 471-2020

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Appendix B Sample Room Survey Sheet


Refer to AE_Data on Three/AE_Standards/Forms Index 3-08-05

Date: Project Title and CP Number: Room Designation:

Function of space: Square Footage Required: Number of Occupants and Positions: Required Adjacencies: Finishes (Identify Level of Finish): Furnishings (Project Cost & by Others): Multi- Media: Equipment list (Use Spread Sheet Appendix C): Temperature Considerations: Acoustical Considerations: Light Level Considerations: Utilities Required: Data/Telecom: Security Considerations:

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Appendix C Sample Equipment List


Refer to AE_Data on Three/AE_Standards/Forms Index 3-08-05
CP# xxxxxxxx

Appendix C
Building Name- Number Sample Equipment List Project Name

Project Scope - Equipment and Furnishings


Electrical req. Mechanical req. Included in Project Budget Existing or other budget

Equipment 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Details

Special needs

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13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29

30

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Appendix D Code Review Spread Sheet


CP# xxxxxxxx

Appendix D
Building Name- Number Sample Code Survey Project Name

Project Scope - Code Summary


NFPA 101 Life Safety Code 2003 International Building Code 2003

Primary Building Codes Exterior Fire Separation Distance Type of Construction Number of Stories Fire Protection Systems Occupancy types Common Path Max Distance Travel Max Distance Dead End Limits Fire Resistance Requirements exterior bearing walls interior bearing walls exterior non-bearin gwalls structural frame permanent partitions vertical openings

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floors roofs Plumbing requirements

Ada requirements

Space Requirement Summary


room no. Occupancy Type Occupant load factor Max Occupant Load Required egress widthinches Provided egress widthinches

Room Name

sq ft

Special needs

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Appendix E Guide for Determining Applicability of NFPA 45 (2000) to a Laboratory Setting


(Note: Always verify current accepted Code with Fire Marshall prior to programming exercise. If it is determined the lab falls under NFPA 45 refer to Appendix F Sample Chemical Use Sheet)

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Appendix F Sample Chemical Use Sheet


CP# xxxxxxxx

Appendix F
Building Name- Number Sample Chemical & Hazard Inventory List Project Name

Project Scope - Chemical & Hazard Inventory List


Chemical Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Storage Type Location of Storage NFPA 45 Limits NFPA Hazard Class Guide No. Hazard Class ID No.

Amount

IBC Limits

Special Needs

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17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

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Appendix G Sample Client/User Signoff Document


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Project Management / Construction Services Austin, Texas 78722

APPROVAL TO PROCEED TO NEXT PHASE OF DESIGN


Current Project Phase (Check One): o Programming Phase o Schematic Design o Design Development o Construction Documents Project Name and CP#: Project Manager: Client (Monetary Authority): User: Professional Service Provider:

WE THE UNDERSIGNED APPROVE PROCEEDING TO THE NEXT STAGE OF DESIGN/CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS BASED UPON THE FOLLOWING SCOPE OF WORK, BUDGET, AND SCHEDULE: 1) DRAWINGS AND/OR WRITTEN SCOPE OF WORK DATED (list documents and attach): 2) ESTIMATED COST AT THIS PHASE OF DESIGN (attach estimate): 3) SCHEDULE ESTABLISHED FOR PROJECT (attached) 4) ADDITIONAL REVIEW COMMENTS IF ANY (attached) CLIENT:___________________________________________________DATE:__________ USER:_____________________________________________________DATE:___________ PROJECT MANAGER: ______________________________________________DATE:__________ PROFESSIONAL SERVICE PROVIDER: ______________________________DATE:___________ Attachments: cc: Project file Client (monetary authority) User Bill Throop, Associate Director, PMCS

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Section Manager Project Manager PSP

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