WE GET RESULTS!

FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT
Vol. 42, No. 20 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 September 18, 2013
On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com
Tickets: 802-476-8188, www.barreoperahouse.org
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235/75R15XL...$101.95
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Gordon Clapp In
ROBERT FROST: THIS VERSE BUSINESS
229-0492 lostnationtheater.org
See Pages
9 & 21
In This Week’s
WORLD
FINAL
4 SHOWS
SEPT. 19-22
SECTION TWO
CVMC’s 2013 Charity Golf
Classic to Raise Funds for
Cancer Patient Fund
PAGE 05
Granite City
Grocery
Invites the
Community
to “Own It”!
PAGE 16
History of the Vermont State
House at Montpelier
PAGE 13
Hunters Looking Forward to
Start of Vermont’s Archery
Deer Season Oct. 5
PAGE 3B
page 2 The WORLD September 18, 2013
 ALLI UMS  HARDY LOCAL MUMS  FALL ASTERS 
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D
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S
Route 302
Between Barre & East Barre
479-1445
OPEN EVERYDAY
Jackie Abts, Owner
 4” MUMS  HYACI NTHS  PATI O MUMS 
Dr. Mahlon A. Bradley joins Dr. John T.
Braun at Central Vermont Orthopaedics
specializing in Orthopaedics and Sports
Medicine.
“I care for active patients of all ages, from
young athletes to active seniors, and look
forward to becoming an integral part of
the central Vermont community.”
Dr. Bradley provides orthopaedic care for athletes of
all levels: young and old, weekend and professional
athletes as well as Olympic contenders. He does
arthroscopic procedures and joint replacement of
the shoulder, hip and knee and reconstruction of
the shoulder, elbow, knee and ankle.
Dr. Bradley has been Team Physician for several
high school teams, a long time Team Physician for
U.S. Figure Skating and one of the U.S. Olympic
Team Physicians at the 2002 Winter Olympics.
He was a national competitive figure skater and
on the U.S. International Figure Skating Team.
Dr. Bradley is accepting new patients.
Please call 802.225.3970 for an appointment.
MAHLON A. BRADLEY, MD
Undergraduate - Harvard University
Medical School - Northwestern Medical School
General Surgery Internship
New England Deaconess Hospital, Boston, MA
Orthopaedic Surgery Residency
Tufts/New England Medical Center, Boston, MA
Chief Residency Orthopaedic Surgery
New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, MA
Board Certification
American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
American Board of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine


CENTRAL VERMONT
ORTHOPAEDICS
A CVMC Medical Group Practice
1. ORTHOPAEDICS &
SPORTS MEDICINE
Mahlon A. Bradley, MD
130 Fisher Road, at CVMC in
Medical Office Building B, Suite 2-3,
Berlin VT 05602

OFFICE HOURS
BY APPOINTMENT
Monday through Friday
Call 802.225.3970
2. SPINE SURGERY
John T. Braun, MD
Sarah Britton, ANP
CVMC Orthopaedic & Rehab Center
244 Granger Road, Berlin VT 05602
OFFICE HOURS
BY APPOINTMENT
Tuesdays and Wednesdays
Call 802-225-3965
For more information about
Central Vermont Orthopaedics
please visit our website:
www.cvmc.org/ortho


Central Vermont
Medical Center
Central to Your Well Being / www.cvmc.org
Dr. Bradley is an Orthopaedic
Surgeon specializing in
Sports Medicine, a former
Olympic Team Physician,
a former competitive
figure skater on the
United States International
Figure Skating Team,
a husband and a dad.
GENTLE, CARING ATMOSPHERE
85 WASHINGTON STREET
BARRE
476-7162
Tooth Whitening Veneers
White Fillings Root Canals
Implants Snoring Relief
Extractions Dentures
Crowns Bridges
MOST MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED
ACCEPTING NEW DENTAL PATIENTS
JAMES J. CRUMBAKER, DDS
Norwich University Announces New
Director of Communications
Norwich University is pleased to
announce that Kathy Murphy-Moriarty has
been hired as Director of Communications
and Marketing for the university’s Office of
Communications. Murphy-Moriarty previ-
ously served as the Chief Marketing Officer
for the State of Vermont.
“We are thrilled to have Kathy at the
helm of our communications team as we
prepare for our bicentennial in 2019 and our
third century of service to the nation,” said Dave Whaley, Vice
President for Development and Alumni Relations. “With her expe-
rience and successful track record, Norwich’s brand will be in very
good hands.”
Murphy-Moriarty is responsible for managing the Norwich
brand and developing, implementing and evaluating a comprehen-
sive outreach strategy. She oversees a 12-person team that is
responsible for advancing the university’s reputation, enrollment,
alumni engagement, and fundraising.
“I take great pride in serving the Norwich community while
supporting all this leading institution stands for,” Murphy-
Moriarty said. “With two centuries of military tradition, a history
of leadership development and a broad range of graduate and
undergraduate degree programs, Norwich continues to make a real
difference in today’s world.”
Carey Promoted to CNB Office
Supervisor
Community National Bank (CNB)
President Stephen Marsh recently
announced the promotion of Jackie Carey
to Montpelier Office Supervisor. CNB has
been serving Washington County since
2001 after the opening CNB’s first office at
95 State Street in Montpelier.
Jackie joined CNB in 2008, as a teller in
the Montpelier office. She later assumed
the responsibility of Teller Trainer sharing
her knowledge, expertise and love of customer service with new
tellers. Jackie has taken part in several community activities and
has continued her education by taking the Principle of Banking
course through the Northern New England Center for Financial
Training. Jackie expressed, “I love my job because I really enjoy
visiting and taking care of our customers on a daily basis.”
Before starting her banking career, Jackie was a Family
Readiness Coordinator while her husband was a commander in the
military. Jackie and her husband Michael reside in Barre with their
four cats.
■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
Bobby Petrocelli to Speak at
SHS this Wednesday
This Wednesday,
September 18th, all parents,
community members, and
families with middle and
high school age students are
welcome to a presentation
by Bobby Petrocelli, to be
held at 7pm in the Spaulding
High School auditorium in
Barre.
Bobby Petrocelli is an international speaker, author, coach,
teacher, and noted authority on positive life-changing issues. He is
a certified professional speaker and holds an M.A. in Counseling.
He is also the nephew of Boston Red Sox great Rico Petrocelli.
His powerful talk combines his energy and genuine passion to see
people succeed as he shares his amazing story about how his life
changed drastically in 10 seconds!
SHS/BTC students involved in Students Against Destructive
Decisions (SADD) had the pleasure of seeing Bobby at the
National SADD conference, and members thought he could have
a powerful impact for the central Vermont community. He has
authored and co-authored fourteen books, including his best sell-
ers, 10 Seconds Will Change Your Life Forever and Triumph Over
Tragedy! Over the last 20 years, 5,500 audiences worldwide have
been inspired by his expertise and riveting personal story.
This event is free and open to all. More information may be
found at www.10seconds.org
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 3
page 4 The WORLD September 18, 2013
What’s New in Business…
Liesel Manchester - Owner
First time clients
receive 50% off
their first service
No restrictions
33 Valley View Road (off Berlin Street) • Berlin, Vermont
119 North Main St.
Barre, VT 05641
Phone: 802.476.4002
www.goodfellowsvt.com
GOODFELLOWS
FINE JEWELERS
Free PANDORA Bracelet
with $100 purchase of PANDORA Jewelry.*
September 19-23 (Closed Sundays)
*Free sterling silver Clasp or Bangle Bracelet ($65 US
retail value). While supplies last, limit one per customer.
Charms sold separately. See store for details.
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Prices go up after Sept. 23!
Bolton Valley and Smugglers’ Notch Resort have joined forces to offer
full-time college students an unrestricted, all access pass to both
Bolton & Smuggs for just $249 if you purchase by Halloween 2013.
Season long ski & snowboard leases
for all ages starting at $99.
Adult: $569
Youth (7-17): $159*
Senior (65-74): $299
*When purchased with parent’s
Adult All Access Season Pass.
NEW for 2013-14!
Senior Plus (75+): $29
Night Pass (All Ages): $119
HAPPINESS IS...
a season pass to your
LOCAL MOUNTAIN.
boltonvalley.com • 1.877.9BOLTON
• 1,700 RODS, CUSTOMS
& MACHINES
• Superprize Giveaways
• NSRA Sunday $weep$take$
• Vintage Parts Swap Meet
• Commercial Exhibits
• Arts & Crafts
SPECTATOR DISCOUNTS TO:
PRIZES AWARDED TO
REGISTERED PARTICIPANTS
CHAMPLAIN VALLEY EXPOSITION
Burlington, Vermont
The Most Spectacular Rodding Event!
For more information, call (209) 474-0103 • http://www.nsra-usa.com
GATES OPEN
FRI : 8:30 - 5:00
SAT: 8:00 - 5:00
SUN: 8:30 - 2:00
• SENIORS • MILITARY• NSRA MEMBERS &• UPS Employees (all with proper ID)
Sept. 20,
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2013
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We Ship
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“A
Quality
Family
Farm
Shop”
OPEN
DAILY
8:30AM
to
6:00PM
Vermont
Handcrafts
Gifts
Vermont
Cheese
Maple Farm
Tour
Maple
Products
802-223-5757 • 1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N (follow signs)
Manghi’s Bread and
Cate Farm
Tomatoes
A
t B
ragg Farm
...
C
reem
ees for everyone
and a H
arvest of
G
ood Things!
And of course...
“World’s Best”
Maple Creemees,
Shakes & Sundaes
Served Daily 8:30 - 6:00!
www.BraggFarm.com
• Hardy Vermont Mums
have arrived
• Bob & Jini’s Pumpkins
• Vermont Apples and
Cider Donuts
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 5
McIntosh and
Cortland Apples
All New! Dakin Farm
Frozen Mac & Cheese
with Cabot Cheddar...
unbelievably good!
Best Maple Place In Vermont!
223-2740 • www.morsefarm.com
1168 County Road, Montpelier, Vermont
Just 2.7 miles up Main Street from the round about
OPEN 7 DAYS
8:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friends meet friends at Morse Farm!
%
OFF
End of Summer SALE
40
HOOKER’S FURNITURE
HOOKER’S
FURNITURE
856 US Rte 302, Barre VT 05641 - 802-476-3141
2931 Waterbury-Stowe Rd, Waterbury Ctr., VT 05677 - 802-244-4034
M-F 9-5:30, Sat 9-4:30 (Waterbury Store Closed Tues)
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FOR 24 M
ONTHS W
ITH
ANY SET OVER $799
SAVE UP TO
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per pc.
Sold in sets
HURRY! SALES ENDS SATURDAY!
8” Brown
IQ Rubber Logger
Industrial Quality Composite
Comfort Safety Toe
9” Black Oiled 9” Bay Apache
FREE T-SHIRT
with your Chippewa Boot purchase
(while supply lasts)
Only Chippewa Classics are
handcrafted in the USA
EVERY SUCCESSFUL
HUNT
BEGINS AT LENNY’S
Williston 879-6640 | St. Albans 527-0532 | Barre 476-7446 | lennyshoe.com
REACH
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Call June (NOW!) at
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FOR
The 12th Annual CVMC Fall Foliage
Charity Golf Classic will be held Tuesday,
October 1, 2013 at the Country Club of
Vermont in Waterbury Center. All pro-
ceeds from this year’s tournament will go
to benefit the CVMC Cancer Patient
Fund, which assists patients undergoing
radiation therapy or chemotherapy at
CVMC.
A diagnosis of cancer ripples across all
aspects of a person’s life, affecting more
than just their physical wellbeing. For
many cancer patients the financial burden
of cancer treatment makes it difficult to
meet basic needs, like buying food or
paying rent or utility bills. These finan-
cial challenges, in turn, can impact their
ability to follow through on getting the
critical medical care that they need.
At the National Life Cancer Treatment
Center and Central Vermont Oncology, our staff
has created a special Patient Fund to assist patients.
“Today, quality cancer care goes beyond medical
treatments,” said CVMC’s Patient Navigator
Theresa Lever. “We are there for our patients
before, during and after their treatments, helping
them overcome obstacles and using a variety of our
resources in traditional and creative ways to help
reduce their stress and make this difficult time in
their lives a little easier.”
Participants in CVMC’s Charity Golf event not
only support a great cause but enjoy a wonderful
day of golf on one of Vermont’s top golf courses.
The 18-hole, 4-member team scramble tournament
is a fast, fun format that allows participants to enjoy
CVMC’s 2013 Charity Golf Classic to
Raise Funds for Cancer Patient Fund
The 12th Annual CVMC Fall Foliage Charity Golf Classic will be
held Tuesday, October 1, 2013 at the Country Club of Vermont
in Waterbury Center.
the Country Club of Vermont’s pristine fairways
and greens during peak fall foliage.
A wide variety of both individual and corporate
sponsorship opportunities are still available (non-
golfers can consider a cash or in-kind donation).
Eagle Sponsors this year are Bond Auto Parts,
CBMVT Cleaning Services, Connor Contracting,
Control Technologies, E.F. Wall & Associates,
Kinney Pike Insurance, New England Service
Group, NICOM Coatings, People’s United Bank,
Transamerica Retirement Solutions, and Union
Mutual of Vermont.
To download a registration form, go to www.
cvmc.org/golf, or contact Christine Petterssen at
charitygolf@cvmc.org or 802-371-4196.
What’s New in Business…
Your Sears Hometown Store
on the Barre-Montpelier Rd.
is pleased to welcome
Ron Clark
to our
Sales and Management Team
Ron brings 28 years of experience in
retail appliance sales, service and parts.
Ron has a strong background and
knowledge in luxury appliances as well.
A native and resident of
Central Vermont, Ron is an avid
outdoorsman and lives locally with his
wife Kris. Stop by and say hi.
1598 U.S. ROUTE 302 • BERLIN • 802-479-2541
M-Th 9-6:30 • F 9-7 • Sat 9-6 • Sun 10-4
Website: www.searshometownstores.com/
At Sears Hometown Store - Barre
and save more with Facebook Friday Coupons
Hard to believe, but true - for just $20!
See participating merchants list at: www.ShopCentralVt.com
Subscribe online at: www.ShopCentralVermont.com
Funds Awarded for Conservation Local Projects
A new information kiosk at a town forest, an
improved shelter at a nature center, trail design ser-
vices, and on-the-ground verification of wildlife corri-
dors will all be made possible in part through grants
recently awarded to local conservation commissions by
the Association of Vermont Conservation
Commissions.
Grants were awarded to groups in the following
towns: Dorset, Fayston, Plainfield and Warren.
“Local conservation commissions – who take on
real-world projects like these in their own communities
– make conservation happen in Vermont. These proj-
ects are great examples of local conservation efforts
where small projects can make a big difference,” said
Jake Brown, chair of the AVCC.
Another AVCC board member, who works with
conservation commissions as part of his job at the
Department of Fish and Wildlife, said that he’s seen
effective and committed Conservation Commissions
across Vermont achieving impressive results.
“I am excited to support and sustain this local ener-
gy with our small grants program,” said Jens Hilke.
“It’s money well spent.”
The total awarded in 2013 through AVCC’s Tiny
Grant program $2,270. AVCC has offered the grant
program for several years and plans to continue to do
so in the coming years.
For nearly two decades, the non-profit AVCC has
supported the growth and success of local conservation
commissions, acting as a clearinghouse for information
for local conservation commissions, publishing a
newsletter, maintaining an on-line listerv, and holding
an annual meeting. Last year, AVCC and the Vermont
Natural Resources Council became affiliated.
Conservation Commissions are non-regulatory bod-
ies designed to advise planning commissions and select
boards on natural resources issues. Often these com-
missions get involved in natural resource inventories
and land management of town-owned lands as well as
many other types of projects.
Grant Details
Dorset: Dorset Conservation Commission - $600 for
a new informational kiosk and sign at a railhead into
the Cutler Memorial Forest. The town of Dorset has
kicked in an additional $600 for the $1,200 project.
Fayston: Fayston Natural Resources Committee -
$600 to go toward the construction of a shed roof addi-
tion to an existing shelter to provide seating and a
gathering space for people using a nature center that is
adjacent to the Chase Brook Town Forest and the Mad
River Bike Path.
Plainfield: Plainfield Conservation Commission -
$600 for a trail consultant to design, map and develop
cost estimates for the development of a trail system in
the 28-acre town forest.
Warren: The Warren Conservation Commission -
$470 to help fund field verification of wildlife corri-
dors identified in a 2008 inventory that was done with
results to be used to prioritize future conservation
action including easement and land purchases as well
as outreach to landowners.
■ ■ ■
page 6 The WORLD September 18, 2013
BARRY STONE
South Burlington, VT
78-year-old tennis player. Heli-skier.
CLINICAL TRIAL
WONDER KID.
EXPERIENCE HEALTH CARE THAT ASPIRES TO BE AS
EXTRAORDINARY AS THE PEOPLE IT SERVES.
A life-altering heart condition put Barry Stone at risk for a stroke. He was concerned about
disrupting his active routine. But Barry’s cardiologist, Dr. Daniel Lustgarten, works at
a university hospital that pioneers new treatments. As part of a clinical trial available only
in select hospitals around the country, Dr. Lustgarten inserted a tiny device directly into
Barry’s heart to keep blood from cloting. Now Barry hits the slopes—and the courts—with
confidence because of the advanced care available at Fletcher Allen. Learn more about
the clinical trials we offer, and see what Barry has to say
at FletcherAllen.org/Barry.
In service to the PATIENT, COMMUNITY and MEDICINE since 1879.
SM
( 802) 847-0000 |
CLIENT
Fletcher Allen
Health Care
JOB NO.
005918
DESCRIPTION
Barry Stone
PUB
Washington World
MATERIAL DUE DATE
09-13-13
INSERTION DATE
09-19-13
Mech Size
6.78”w x 10”h
BLEED
NA
LINE SCREEN
Newspaper
COLOR
4 color
QUESTIONS CALL
Ben Jordan
251.476.2507
005918-Barry-Washington Wrld.indd 1 9/12/13 2:24 PM
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Paul Hutchins of Rock of Ages accepts the Leadership Givers
Appreciation Award on behalf of Bob Pope. Presenting the award is
Wanda French, GMUW Board Member.
GMUW Launches Annual Campaign
Appreciation Award Given to Bob Pope
Local companies and individuals have always been strong sup-
porters of Green Mountain United Way because they recognize the
impact that this local organization has on its communities. One of
those staunch supporters is Bob Pope of Swenson Granite and
Rock of Ages. For years, Bob has donated in various ways to
GMUW because he sees the value of the contributions that the
United Way makes to our local people.
With sincere thanks to Bob, GMUW has presented him with a
Leadership Givers Appreciation Award. Accepting for Bob, who
was unable to attend at the time of the award, was Paul Hutchins
of Rock of Ages. Presenting the plaque was Wanda French, mem-
ber of the Board of Directors at GMUW.
GMUW is officially kicking off its 2013 – 2014 fundraising
campaign on September 18 at a breakfast at The Steak House on
the Barre-Montpelier Rd. Additional awards will be made at that
time for those who excelled in last year’s campaign and events.
Those awards are the Community Impact Award, the Business
Community Impact Award, the Community Spirit Award, the
Worksite Coordinator Award and the Campaign Champion
Award.
At the breakfast, Campaign Chair Catherine Hamilton, Ph. D.,
Vice President of Planning at Blue Cross Blue Shield of VT,
announced this year’s goal as $600,000 and the campaign theme
of Give ‘Til It Feels Good.
For more information about GMUW and how to participate in
the campaign, visit www.gmunitedway.org or call their Berlin
office at 802-229-9532.
CCTA Announces New Websites for
Urban and Rural Services
The Chittenden County Transportation Authority (CCTA) has
announced the launch of two new websites to support its urban
services and the rural services it provides outside Chittenden
County as the Green Mountain Transit Agency (GMTA).
In July 2011, CCTA and GMTA became one unified organiza-
tion, making CCTA the state’s first and only regional transit
authority. With a combined service area of five counties and routes
operating in eight of Vermont’s 14 counties, CCTA felt it was
important to revamp its websites to not only provide better and
easier to access information for passengers, but to also more
clearly connect CCTA and GMTA as a single organization.
With a shared design and layout on both sites, passengers trav-
eling between the CCTA and GMTA service areas using theirinter-
regional commuter services will enjoy more consistent informa-
tion and formats. Other specific improvements include integrated
trip planning through an online Google Transit interface, an online
pass/ticket store, and specific information on the available region-
al connections.
The public are invited to visit the new sites at cctaride.org and
gmtaride.org to learn more about the available services and how to
use CCTA’s extensive public transportation network throughout
northwest and central Vermont.
■ ■ ■
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 7
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15 Cottage St., Barre • 479-4309
The Benefit Shop
15 Cottage St., Barre 479-4309
Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!
We look forward to seeing you soon, and thank you for
your patronage.
Closed for Renovations
The CVMC Auxiliary Bene-Fit Shop will be closed
October 29th through November 6th.
New Shop Hours
We will reopen Wednesday, November 7th with new shop hours:
Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm
Saturday 9am-2pm.
New Shop Hours:
Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm
Saturday 9am-2pm
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802-479-2007
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Hours: Wed.-Fri. 10am-6pm, Sat. 8am-1pm
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Girls on the Run VT Hires New Director of Marketing,
Communications & Development
VCGN presents Grow It! Garden Leader Workshop September 26th in Barre
Girls on the Run Vermont is pleased to announce that Anne
Lawrence Guyon has joined the organization as the new Director
of Marketing, Communications and Development.
Girls on the Run is an international organization that inspires
girls to be healthy, confident and joyful through an experience-
based fitness, team-building and life-skills course. Serving girls
from 3rd through 8th grade, the program fosters a sense of self-
esteem, character, collaboration and community involvement in
over 140 locations throughout Vermont. The 24-lesson curricu-
lum, which takes place each spring, is augmented by a local com-
munity service project and culminates in 5K run/walks held in
Southern, Central and Northern Vermont,
Ms. Guyon brings to her new post over 20 years of experience
in marketing, PR, communications and development, along with a
lengthy career as a freelance journalist who has written for the
New York Times, the Washington Post and the Boston Globe. An
avid runner herself, she first learned about Girls on the Run, and
witnessed the positive benefits firsthand, when her daughter par-
ticipated in the program. She is thrilled to be joining GOTRV,
which is based in Brattleboro.
Nancy Heydinger, Director of GOTRVT, is delighted to have
Ms. Guyon aboard. “This is a really exciting time at Girls on the
Run, because we’re growing as an organization on a lot of fronts,”
said Heydinger, “with more girls participating every year, a fantas-
tic new curriculum about to launch and ideas for other activities
throughout the year being developed. With Annie’s combination of
marketing, PR and fundraising expertise, and her deep passion for
what Girls on the Run does for girls across Vermont, it’s a great fit
for the organization as we approach our 15th year of helping pre-
pare girls for a healthy, happy future.”
With over 3,000 enthusiastic participants annually, programs at
Girls on the Run are facilitated by volunteer coaches who are
parents, teachers and community members seeking to help girls
understand themselves, make healthy choices, connect with each
other and contribute to the world at large.
A 501(c)3 non-profit that depends on donations from individu-
als, local businesses and corporate sponsors, Girls on the Run
welcomes anyone interested in serving this vital cause. For more
information about volunteering, participating or donating, contact
Nancy Heydinger via nancy@girlsontherunvermont.org or by
calling 802-246-1476. Or visit www.girlsontherunvermont.org.
The Vermont Community Garden Network (VCGN) is present-
ing the third workshop of its three-part state-wide Community and
School Garden Leader Workshop series, in partnership with
Charlie Nardozzi and local partner, Food Works at Two Rivers
Center. The Grow It! series includes workshops, networking
opportunities, and technical assistance for local garden leaders.
This spring and summer, garden leaders gathered to learn and
share at seven locations around the state. Once more this fall
VCGN will be touring the state to bring people, ideas and resourc-
es together. The fall workshops will look at how to build and foster
more sustainable and responsive gardens, programs, and people.
Also included will be opportunities to discuss best ways to
enhance Vermont’s state-wide community and school garden net-
work.
The fall workshop in Barre is Thursday, September 26, from
n n n
4pm to 8pm, including a light dinner. The workshop will take
place at Highgate Apartments at 121 Highgate Dr., Barre.
The workshops are designed for community and school garden
leaders and open to anyone working with a community or school
garden. The cost is $30 each, with a sliding scale based on ability
to pay—organizers want to ensure that everyone can attend. Please
register ahead. Registration information is available at www.vcgn.
org or by calling (802) 861-4769.
The Grow It! Garden Organizer Training Series and related
technical assistance are made possible with generous support from
Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, New England Grassroots
Environment Fund, Windham Foundation, Ben & Jerry’s
Foundation, The Bay and Paul Foundations, and Vermont Agency
of Agriculture.
The Vermont Community Garden Network helps community
and school groups all over Vermont start, sustain, and grow gar-
dens, building strong local food systems and vibrant educational
page 8 The WORLD September 18, 2013
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Route 5, Lyndonville, VT
Mon. thru Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed
1-877-489-0485
296 Meadow St., Littleton, NH
4584 U.S. Rte. 5, Newport, VT
The PlayCare Center
is now open from 6:30 AM
to 5:30 PM. We are also
now offering flexible
scheduling which allows you
to set your own schedule.
Contact Jenny at
229-2869
for a tour and information.
Present this ad and receive 10% off your
child's first 3 months of enrollment.
Your Local
Office Solution Center

59 North Main St.- Barre, VT
www.CopyWorldVT.com &
info@CopyWorldVT.com
802 476-3615 - Fax 888-647-1615
NEW! Be a VIP, join the Club!
And Expanded Retail & More Printing Services
Our Fall Colors Book Sale continues through October 19!
Come by to browse. We’ve got thousands of books arranged by
subject, from new best-sellers to antique treasures. Hard backs $2,
paperbacks $1, pocket paperbacks 50¢, DVDs and CDs $2.
Our Film Discussion Series: Books to Film begins September
25. Join Library Director Richard Bidnick one Wednesday each
month at 7 pm to view and discuss a film. In 2013 the films will
be: September 25: Eye of the Storm (Australia); October 30: Angel
(UK-France-Belgium); November 20: Separate Lies (UK).
On Wednesday, September 18, 6:30pm, Poetry Reading and
Book Signing with George Lisi. Through the Gate of Trees –
poetry of awakening is an uplifting and deeply healing keepsake
of awakened relationship with the Earth and our own true nature.
On Thursday, September 26, 6:30pm, Reading and Book
Signing with Julia Lynam. Treasures on Your Doorstep is about
this local author’s journey of discovery in national parks. During
her career as a National Park Ranger, Julia discovered many ways
to get the most out of our 401 National Park properties, and this
book is her way of sharing these secrets. “These are places that
people of the United States have decided are worth preserving
because they tell the story of our heritage and our natural environ-
ment. Let’s discover, enjoy and support them,” Julia says.
On Saturday, September 21, join us for Yoga Fest! Kids
Celebration of the International Day of Peace. Studio Zenith in
Montpelier joins us in joyful collaboration for a peace party. Yoga
for kids aged birth to 6 is offered from 10-10:45am. Story time and
crafts follow in the Children’s Library at 11am. Older yogis (ages
7-14) can practice at the 11:00-11:45 class session. Teacher
Chrissy Lefavour is launching her wonderful new Kids Yoga
series at Studio Zenith and this is your free sneak peek! First tim-
ers most welcome. Bring a mat if you have one… Pre-registration
strongly recommended. 223-4665
To mark Vermont Archaeology Month, Charlie Paquin will
conduct his ever-popular Pre-Historic Pottery Workshop on
Saturday, September 28 at 1pm. This hands-on workshop teaches
the techniques used to make pottery vessels by Native Americans
living in Vermont many years ago. Ages 7 to 10 with adult.
Limited to 14 children. Pre-registration required. 223-4665
The Dark Knight Comics Club returns to the Kellogg-
Hubbard Library with co-facilitators Ben t. Matchstick and Ash
Brittenham. Comic book enthusiasts and artists ages 7-17 will
assemble Wednesdays from 3:30-5pm starting September 25th.
Together we will take on drawing, writing, and collaborating on
our own comics. Bring your creative spark, your favorite comics,
and your penciling prowess as we generate characters, stories, and
epic tales. As author Jack London once said, “You can’t wait for
inspiration, you have to go after it with a club.” Wednesdays,
September 25-November 20. (except Oct. 30)
See you at the Library!
Kellogg-Hubbard
Library News
Montpelier
The Barre Area Senior Center has two more trips coming up this
fall. On October 24, we will take a scenic train ride through the
beautiful Green Mountains. The cost of the trip is $70 per person
and includes transportation to and from the White River Junction
train depot, a 2-hour train ride, and a box lunch on the train. On
November 11, the Barre Area Senior Center will be taking a day
trip to Indian Head Resort in New Hampshire. The price for this
trip is $75 per person and includes holiday entertainment, cocktail
reception, deluxe luncheon buffet, photo & gift from Santa, floor
show & dance band. All trips are open to the public and we wel-
come you to join us.
Our next monthly luncheon is Thursday, September 26 at noon.
Our volunteer cook Damian Hutches from the Cornerstone Pub &
Kitchen will be preparing a delicious meal of macaroni & cheese.
The cost of the luncheon is just $6 per person. Rae from MVP will
be giving a presentation on Medicare Basics. If you have ques-
tions about Medicare, now is the time to get them answered!
Please call ahead to sign up.
Lots of activities are starting up this fall at the senior center!
Young at Heart Singers resumed on Tuesday, September 17 and
will continue practicing weekly, Tuesdays at 1pm. French lessons
will begin on October 8 at 10am and will continue every Tuesday
through the fall. Cathy Hartshorn returns for her “Write Your
Story” group every Thursday at 9am beginning October 10th.
Space for classes is limited, please call to sign up for French les-
sons or the Write Your Story group.
As always, we welcome you to visit us and take part in activi-
ties at 135 N. Main St., call us at 479-9512, visit our website,
barreseniors.org, email us at director@barreseniors.org and now
“like” us at facebook.com/BarreSeniors.
Barre Area Senior Center
135 N. Main St., Barre • 479-9512
New Hours as of July 1, 2012: Mon-Thurs 9-3, Fri 9-12
GFPL’s annual foliage weekend Books and Beyond Sale will
take place at the library on Friday, October 4 from 2-7pm, and on
Saturday, October 5 from 9am-3pm.
We offer a large assortment of fiction and nonfiction, as well as
children’s and young adults’ books -- all from donations and
library de-aquisitions. Come and pick up that book you have
always wanted to read, or even find the perfect gift! Along with
current titles, we have many “elderly/interesting” collectible
books published in the 1800’s and up. Book sellers are welcome!
Most books are sold by donation, with some having suggested
prices. The “Beyond” part of the sale is always a surprise, though
puzzles are a sure thing! All profits benefit Groton Library.
802.584.3358, grotonlibraryvt@gmail.com.
Open Hours: Mon 2:30-7pm, Wed 10am-4pm, Thurs 10am-
12pm, Fri 2:30-7pm, Sat 10am-12pm.
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/
GrotonFreePublicLibrary
Groton Free
Public Library
Upcoming Events
Story Time and Playgroup: Wednesdays from 10 to 11:30am.
Join Sylvia Smith for story time, and follow up with Melissa
Seifert for playgroup. For children birth to age six, and their
grown-ups. We follow the Twinfield Union School calendar and
do not hold the program the weeks Twinfield is closed
Writing and Reading Film Series: Thursday, Sept. 19, 7pm.
In this 2006 film, Will Ferrell plays an IRS agent who discovers
he is a character in a novel after he overhears a narrative voice.
With help from an English professor, he learns that his author
always kills her main characters. He must find her and persuade
her to write a different ending for his story. With Dustin Hoffman,
Emma Thompson, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Queen Latifah. For the
title or more info, e-mail Jaquithpubliclibrary@gmail.com, visit
www.marshfield.lib.vt.us or call (802)426-3581.
Art and Author Night: Friday, September 20 at 6pm
The art of Helen Rabin will be shown followed by a reading of
the work of Jules Rabin. Refreshments will be served.
Monthly Book Group for Adults: Fourth Mondays at 7pm.
Starting September 23 with the book City of Women by David
Gillham. New members are always welcome, and it’s only one
hour a month! The Book Group runs during the school year. For
copies of the book, please stop by the library.
Secretary of State’s Office to Host
National Voter Registration Day Open
House
Secretary of State Jim Condos invites Vermonters to join him at
the National Voter Registration Day Open House to be held at the
Secretary of State’s Office on Tuesday, September 24th.
“Vermont has an impressively high registration rate with 90.5%
of all eligible Vermonters registered (compared to 75% national-
ly), however, it is important that we maintain our effort to educate
all Vermonters on their voter rights,” stated Secretary Condos.
Secretary Condos, with the help of his Elections staff, will be
registering eligible voters as well as answering questions on elec-
tions. The Secretary of State’s Office will provide light refresh-
ments and take away materials.
Secretary Condos adds that, “Given the Supreme Court’s ruling
this summer on the Voting Rights Act, it is especially important
that each citizen understand the voting process and their rights,
which is why I urge all Vermonters to join me on the 24th.”
The Open House will take place on Tuesday, September 24th
from 2pm-7pm at the Secretary of State’s Office, 128 Main Street,
Montpelier. All members of the public are welcome.
If you have elections related questions or questions about your
voter rights but cannot attend the open house, please call the
Elections Division at (802) 828 – 2363 or email SoS.VoterReg@
Sec.State.VT.US.
Green Mountain Power recently installed a pole behind the bleachers at
Spaulding High School football field. Eventually, the pole will receive
the massive voltage necessary to light the entire athletic fields. For now
it will supply power to the four light poles that will be erected around the
football field and track in the spring/summer of 2014.
■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 9
Buying gold, silver
and coins
We will evaluate your estate jewelry, sterling
flatware, tea sets and coin collections.
We will answer any question you have about
your item. If you are unsure if your estate jewelry
is authentic or costume, we will test your gold,
platinum, silver and diamonds to find out its purity
and if it's real. We base the value on the piece,
and the current market price of gold, silver and
platinum when you walk in the door.
John Kirby, Owner • (802) 777-5550
9 South Main Street, Waterbury (Next Door to Arvad's)
Owner John Kirby is a 1997 graduate of the American Numismatic Association,
Colorado Springs, for coin grading, certification and authentication.
Green Mountain
Coins & Estate Jewelry
Receive the highest payout in the area...GUARANTEED.
We now accept
~Financing Available To Qualified Buyers~
Oil & Propane Service LLC
Boilers - Furnaces - Water Heaters
Space Heaters - GasLines
Oil Tanks - Coal & Wood Boilers
PREFERRED PREFERRED
POPS
Serving Washington County
& the Mad River Valley
preferred.pops@gmail.com
DENNIS SMITH
802-476-8278
FAX: 802-461-4361
Locally Owned & Operated
“We just had our second child at CVMC and
had yet again a wonderful experience. Dr. Horan
and the nursing staff did a great job. Charlotte
was a fast delivery and everyone worked together
beautifully to ensure she arrived safely and well.
We are very happy. Thank you.”
Charlotte Grace Patno was born on August 15
and weighed 7lb/8oz. Her happy parents, Cody
and Kate Patno are thrilled to have a lovely
daughter and her brother Lukus, almost 2,
seems willing to adjust. The extended Patno
family celebrates grandchildren - there are
22 total - and Charlotte Grace is very much
celebrated as the second girl ... finally! We
expect there is one cousin in particular celebrating her birthday! The happy Patno family lives in Barre. We wish them
every happiness.
CENTRAL TO NEW LIVES
MORETOWN
A daughter, Madelyn Geno Kent, on August 8 to Danielle (Geno) and
Adam Kent.
NORTHFIELD
A son, Jack William Christiano, on August 7 to Christine (Finch) and
Greg Christiano.
PLAINFIELD
A daughter, Kira Jeane Livingston, on August 8 to
Amy Bergeron and Josh Livingston.
WILLIAMSTOWN
A son, Dylan Martin DeForge, on August 9 to Shelby
(Townsend) and Brian DeForge.
A son, Kemroge Thomas Mason, on August 25 to
Tiffany (Corbett) and Kemroge Mason.
A son, Raiden James Smith, on August 4 to Mandy
(Bennett) and Robert Smith.
WOODBURY
A daughter, Elizabeth Ann Smith, on August 7 to
Jamie (Wright) and Raymond Smith, Jr.
Central To Your Well Being / www.cvmc.org
Central Vermont Medical Center
Central Vermont Medical Center’s August 2013 Babies
BARRE
A son, Carter James Fuller, on August 6 to Amanda (Fair-King)
and Kyle Fuller.
A son, Jaxson Ernest Ray Jewett, on August 5 to Amanda (LaBelle)
and Scott Jewett.
A son, Lincoln Reed Renzelleo MacAulay, on August 6 to Karissa
(Renzello) and Joshua MacAulay.
A son, Xavier Paul George, on August 21 to Tracy Goddard and
Nathan George.
JEFFERSONVILLE
A daughter, Laycie Jay Tobin, on August 6 to Shyler Thompson
and Riley Tobin.
MIDDLESEX
A son, Ezekiel Ray Hamilton, on July 30 to Sarah and Michael
Braun Hamilton.
MONTPELIER
A son, Aiden Leon Carey, on August 6 to Corrie (Schrum) and
Patrick Carey.
V MORE & MORE
Central Vermont Women’s Health - 371-5961. Call 371-4613 to schedule a Garden Path Birthing Center tour.
Best Hospital
Stevie, RN, CBE,
IBCLC, Lactation
Consultant
Mary, RN,
Ob Nurse
Colleen Horan,
MD, Ob/Gyn
Deborah
Jerard, MD,
Pediatrician
GOTTA GO...GOTTA GO...GOTTA GO...
BINGO
Sat., Sept. 28 • 3-6PM • 15 Blackwell St., Barre
to Benefit Barre Sculpture Studios and Studio Place Arts • Info.: 479-7069
Kristin Schuyler
Robert Frost: This Verse
Business by AM Dolan, per-
formed by Emmy-Winner
(and Tony-Nominee) Gordon
Clapp (NYPD Blue,
Damages, Eight Men Out,
Glengary Glenn Ross, etc) at
Lost Nation Theater is a hit!
This is a special opportu-
nity to see an amazing
nationally known actor give
an amazing performance in a
script that reintroduces us to
one of America’s greatest
artist-entertainers: Robert Frost.
The private and public faces of America’s
most beloved poet are revealed in this mesmer-
izing tour-de-force, which has had audiences
leaping to their feet at the end of the show, clam-
oring for second and sometimes third curtain
calls for the amazing Mr. Clapp.
Here are a few excerpts from the critics and
audience rave reviews:
• “This Lost Nation Theater production is a
Must-See! Clapp’s charisma never faltered and
75 minutes seemed like 25!” - Broadway World
• “I met Robert Frost!” – Susan Plunkett
Dunning
• “Frost truly came
alive… downright enter-
taining… not only an eve-
ning of great poetry, it’s an
intimate visit with a great
man.” - Times Argus
• “ A b s o l u t e l y
Fabulous!” – Sylvia
Buzzell
• What a great per-
formance! ...what a treat to
see Robert Frost in person.
I never thought I would
meethim,butnowIfeelas
ifIhave.”-DakGustal
• “LNT’sFrost-Spectacular”-The Herald
Robert Frost: This Verse Business has just a
few performances left. Be sure to see it!
Performances are 7pm Thursday, September
19; 8pm Friday & Saturday, September 20 & 21;
and 2pm Sunday, September 22.
Get tickets by phone – 802-229-0492; online
at lostnationtheater.org/box or at the Montpelier
City Clerk’s Office.
Sponsored by Capitol Copy, Brian P Graphic
Arts, City of Montpelier, National Life Group,
The Point-FM, The Times Argus, Vermont Arts
Council, and WDEV-Radio Vermont.
Audiences and Critics Respond to LNT’s
Robert Frost: This Verse Business
New Tracker
Makes it
Harder for
Ticks to Hide
in Vermont
Wonder where the ticks are
lurking in your community?
The Health Department’s
new“TickTracker”providesa
place to report tick sightings
online and to view a map of
tick activity in Vermont. The
Tick Tracker is crowd-sourced
and anyone can contribute by
posting where and when they
see ticks at http://healthver-
mont.gov/ticktracker.
“Once you report ticks in
your area, it shows up on a map
so that everyone can know
where they might want to take
extra precautions when spend-
ing time outdoors,” said Erica
Berl, an infectious disease epi-
demiologist.“It’snottoolateto
report – adult ticks are most
active in the spring and fall.”
The site also has links to
information about tick-borne
diseases and preventing tick
bites.
The deer tick, which can
transmit Lyme disease, has
become the most frequently
found tick in Vermont. Cases of
Lyme disease reached an all-
time high in 2011, with more
than 500 reports of people who
were likely exposed in the state.
In2012,therewere367report-
ed cases with likely exposure.
The role of climate change
could be a factor in the growing
numbers.
“Climate change may
increase the likelihood that new
tick-borne diseases will spread
into our region, so monitoring
the tick population could help
provide an early indication of
emerging health threats,” said
Heidi Hales, program chief of
the Health Department’s
Climate Change Adaptation
program.
The Health Department is
also working to raise aware-
ness about Lyme disease. A
deer tick must be attached for
about36hoursbeforetheLyme
disease bacterium can be trans-
mitted. Prompt removal can
prevent illness, so everyone
should get in the habit of check-
ing themselves for ticks at least
once a day. Lyme disease can
be effectively treated with anti-
biotics. Left untreated, the dis-
ease can be serious and affect
the skin, heart, nerves or
joints.
“People are always asking
us, where are the ticks?” Berl
said.“AndsimilartotheHealth
Department’s crowd-sourced
map of blue-green algae, now
we can show them.”
For more information on
tick-borne illness visit: http://
healthvermont.gov/prevent/
zoonotic/tickborne/Tickborne_
diseases.aspx
E-mail us!
Classified
& Display
ADS
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display Ad
Is Even Easier!
Our E-mail address is
sales@vt-world.com
Please include contact person
& payment info
( Only)
479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
page 10 The WORLD September 18, 2013
WANTED TO BUY
Older Items & Antiques
Call before you have a tag sale!
We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls, Pottery, China, Glass, Vases,
Candlesticks, Sterling, Coins, Costume Jewelry, Toys, Jugs, Crocks,
Canning Jars & Bottles, Lamps, Prints, Paintings, Knick-Knacks,
Holiday Decorations, etc., etc.
Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations
Rich Aronson • 802-563-2204 • 802-595-3632 CELL
Contacting Congress
U.S. Rep. Peter Welch
Mailing address:
30 Main St.,Third Floor, Suite 350
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.welch.house.gov
Phone: (888) 605-7270 or (802) 652-2450
U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders
Mailing address:
1 Church St., Second Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 862-0697
U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy
Mailing address:
199 Main St., Fourth Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 863-2525
Dirty Tile? Dirty Grout?
Call today for an answer to your problem!
802-505-1452 hssvt@yahoo.com
HardSurfaceSolutionsVT.com
403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Tel.: (802)479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753
Fax: (802)479-7916
email: editor@vt-world.com or sales@vt-world.com
web site: www.vt-world.com

Publisher: Gary Hass and Deborah Phillips. Classified Manager:
Ruth Madigan. Bookkeeping: Lisa Companion, Candy McLeon.
Receptionist: Darlene Callahan. Copy Editor: Laura Rappold.
Production Manager: Christine Richardson. Production: Kathy
Gonet, Laura Rappold. Sales Representatives: Kay Roberts,
Robert Salvas, Mike Jacques. Circulation: Aeletha Kelly.
Distribution: Jim Elliot, Gary Villa.
The WORLD is published by WORLD Publications, Inc. in
Berlin, Vermont. The WORLD is distributed free, and serves the
residents of Washington and north-central Orange counties. The
WORLD is published every Wednesday.
The WORLD assumes no financial responsibility for typographical
errors in advertising but will reprint in the following issue that part
of any advertisement in which the typographical error occurred.
Notice by advertisers of any error must be given to this newspaper
within five (5) business days of the date of publication.
The WORLD reserves all rights to advertising copy produced by
its own staff. No such advertisement may be used or reproduced
without express permission.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Closed
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Subscriptions: $8.00/month, $48.00/6 months, $96.00/year. First
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GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION
GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION
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CENTRAL
VERMONT
CHAMBER
OF
COMMERCE
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Tel.: (802)479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753
Fax: (802)479-7916
email: editor@vt-world.com or sales@vt-world.com
web site: www.vt-world.com
GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION
As a CVC Gold Standard publication you may run the Gold Standard
logo until your current audit expires. Should your publication
achieve Gold Standard scoring in future audits you may continue to
run the Gold Standard logo, or convert to the traditional CVC audit
logo if Gold Standard scores are not achieved. Publishers with
“current” audit status may display the CVC logo in their publication,
and on marketing materials. Please refer to the CVC Service
Conditions Agreement regarding logo usage upon audit expiration.
If you have any question please call (800)262-6392.
GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION
GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION
GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION
MEMBER
CENTRAL
VERMONT
CHAMBER
OF
COMMERCE
“Central Vermont’s Newspaper”
The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning pub-
lic issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may be
subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should
also contain the name of the author and a contact telephone
number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our
advertising department at 479-2582; non-profit rates are
available.

Some Important Facts About Literacy
Editor:
September 23-29 is National Adult Education and Family
Literacy Week and a good time for all of us to tune into a few facts
about literacy. Did you know that……?
- More that 30 million adults in the U.S. - 14% of the country’s
adult population - cannot read, write, or do basic math above a
third grade level.
- Each year, American employers spend more than $125.9 bil-
lion on training, including remedial reading writing, and math
skills.
- States that raise high school graduation rates experience sig-
nificant declines in incarceration rates. A 1% increase in the high
school completion rate of all men ages 20 to 60 would save the
U.S. as much as $1.4 billion per year in reduced costs from
crime.
- Fifty percent of the chronically unemployed are not function-
ally literate.
- Single mothers who lack a high school degree are much more
likely to be on welfare than women who have a high school
degree.
Central Vermont Adult Basic Education (CVABE) works to
impact these dismal statistics and help people improve their lives
by providing adult education and literacy services to all in
Washington, Orange, and Lamoille counties. For 48 years CVABE
has provided free, personalized, and confidential academic ser-
vices to adults and teens age 16 and older. Our services range from
teaching basic math, reading and writing to high school comple-
tion to college and work readiness to instruction for those learning
the English language.
Do you know someone who has been putting off getting a GED,
or someone who needs to improve her reading skills, or someone
who has trouble balancing his checkbook? Support your neigh-
bors, local community and CVABE’s mission by referring those
you know who can use CVABE’s services. You can also volunteer
your services or make a tax deductible financial donation. Call
476-4588 to find out which of CVABE’s six Learning Centers is
closest to you and to learn more about how you can play a vital
role in improving our nation’s well-being by improving adult lit-
eracy in your own community.
All the facts listed are published by ProLiteracy, the largest
adult literacy and basic education membership organization in the
U.S., of which CVABE is a proud member. For more information
on how adult literacy is affecting every facet of our lives, visit our
website www.cvabe.org and refer to ProLiteracy under “Links.”
Gale Rome
Volunteer/Communications Coordinator
Central Vermont Adult Basic Education
ACS to Discontinue Man to Man
Prostate Cancer Support Group
Editor:
Two years ago, the American Cancer Society began carefully
analyzing all its programs, services and fundraising initiatives in
an effort to maximize the organization’s efficiency and effective-
ness in fighting cancer. As part of this effort, the Society’s Board
of Directors made the very difficult but strategic decision to phase
out several programs during 2013. One such program is Man to
Man, a support group aimed at men with prostate cancer. These
programs have been a wonderful service that improved the lives of
those we served. We are extremely grateful to the passionate vol-
unteers who have supported the Society by helping us deliver Man
to Man in Central Vermont.
In 1997, Fred Cook, now a 17-year prostate cancer survivor,
founded the Central Vermont Man to Man chapter following his
cancer treatment to bring men together with the purpose of sharing
their experiences and offering hope and healing. As a dedicated
volunteer with the American Cancer Society, Fred tirelessly gave
his time and energy to support and guide hundreds of newly diag-
nosed cancer patients.
The American Cancer Society thanks Fred for his dedication to
helping prostate cancer patients in Central Vermont and his advo-
cacy on their behalf. He has made a difference in the lives of many
people in his community and the Society is honored to have him
as a volunteer.
The American Cancer Society and its community partners will
continue to provide support and information to men diagnosed
with prostate cancer in a variety of new ways. The Society pro-
vides online tools at cancer.org to help newly diagnosed patients
navigate treatment. Patients and families can call the Society’s
National Cancer Information Center anytime, day or night, at
1-800-227-2345 for day-to-day help, emotional support, informa-
tion and resources.
Prostate cancer patients may also contact Theresa Lever at
CVMC at 802-225-5449 for information about local support
activities. Kindred Connections, a peer support group for all those
touched by cancer, also has a local chapter in Central Vermont at
1-800-652-5064.
Leigh Sampson
American Cancer Society
Williston
Front Porch Forum Now Available in Every Vermont Town
■ ■ ■
The Vermont Council on Rural Development (VCRD) and
Front Porch Forum (FPF) jointly announced last week that Front
Porch Forum has expanded and is now available statewide in
every Vermont town and neighborhood. The announcement was
made possible after significant investment by VCRD’s Vermont
Digital Economy Project and software development by Front
Porch Forum.
Front Porch Forum is a free community-building service that
allows neighbors to connect with one another. It is moderated and
members are clearly identified as they share postings about all
sorts of topics. Everyday Vermonters use FrontPorchForum.com
to connect with their neighbors and build community by sharing
postings on a range of issues and topics with the people who live
nearby. FPF is a Vermont-based online service with nearly 60,000
households participating already.
To register or to find out more information about the Vermont-
grown community-based social media platform, any Vermonter
can go to FrontPorchForum.com and register. The service is free
and very popular in dozens of Vermont towns that have been using
■ ■ ■
continued on next page
PUBLIC NOTICE
BULLETIN BOARD
This space will be reserved for all town offices to post their
notices such as... Tax Notices • Water/Sewer Due • Hours • Etc.
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 11
WILLIAMSTOWN
REPUBLICAN CAUCUS
Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013
at 7:00 PM
Behind the Scenes Cafe
STATE OF VERMONT
SUPERIOR COURT
WASHINGTON UNIT
PROBATE DIVISION
DOCKET NO. P-1085-8-
13WnPr
IN RE THE ESTATE OF:
MICHAEL GEORGE
SHANNON
LATE OF:
BERLIN, VERMONT
NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
To the creditors of the estate of
MICHAEL GEORGE SHANNON,
late of Berlin, Vermont.
I have been appointed to adminis-
ter this estate. All creditors having
claims against the decedent or the
estate must present their claims in
writing within four (4) months of
the frst publication of this notice.
The claim must be presented to
me at the address listed below
with a copy sent to the court.
The claim may be barred for-
ever if it is not presented within
the four (4) month period.
Dated: Sept. 9, 2013
Signed: Michael P. Shannon
P.O. Box 510
Barre, VT 05641
Tel: (802) 917-3472
Name of Publication: The WORLD
Publication Date: Sept. 18, 2013
Address of Court:
Washington Unit Probate Court
10 Elm Street, Unit #2
Montpelier, Vermont 05602
STATE OF VERMONT
SUPERIOR COURT
WASHINGTON UNIT
PROBATE DIVISION
DOCKET NO. 1029-7-13WnPr
IN RE THE ESTATE OF:
GERALDINE G. DECELL
LATE OF:
WOODBURY, VERMONT
NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
To the creditors of the estate of
GERALDINE G. DECELL, late
of Woodbury, Vermont.
I have been appointed to administer
this estate. All creditors having
claims against the decedent or the
estate must present their claims in
writing within four (4) months of
the frst publication of this notice.
The claim must be presented to
me at the address listed below
with a copy sent to the court. The
claim may be barred forever if it
is not presented within the four
(4) month period.
Dated: Sept. 11, 2013
Signed: Wilma L. Duke
Executor
64 Batten Hill Road
East Calais, VT 05650
Tel: (802) 456-8853
Name of Publication: The WORLD
Publication Date: Sept. 18, 2013
Address of Court:
Washington Unit Probate Division
10 Elm Street, Unit #2
Montpelier, Vermont 05602
BARRE SUPERVISORY UNION #61
NOTICE
All children and youths, ages 0-21 years who are residents of the
Barre Supervisory Union, are eligible to receive an appropriate
education at public expense, regardless of any handicaps they
may have. The Barre Public School System may be unaware of
all resident children and youths with disabilities. If you know of
a child who may be eligible for special education services and
is not in school or otherwise being educated at public expense,
please notify the school system by calling or writing to:
Donald E. McMahon
Director of Special Services
Barre Supervisory Union #61
120 Ayers St., Barre, VT 05641
476-5011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Washington Planning Commission
Monday, October 7, 2013
7:00 p.m. at the Municipal Building
2895 VT Route 110
For the purpose of reviewing and hearing comments
concerning the
PROPOSED REVISED
WASHINGTON TOWN PLAN
Immediately following will be a
Zoning Board of Adjustment Meeting
Agenda
1. To consider application for a Variance from Mark
Rader at 5325 W. Corinth Rd. (Parcel #3029.000)
for the installation of a 120 ft. tilt down tower
(wind turbine).
2. To consider application for a Variance from
the Calef Memorial Library, 2964 VT Route 110
(Parcel #7109.000) to build an addition to make
the library handicapped accessible. They are
requesting a 9 ft. variance from the 50 ft. buffer
strip in Article VI General Regulations, Section B.
MISCELLANEOUS
HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS WANTED
for
Central Vermont Rotary
“Last Chance” Yard Sale
Saturday, Oct. 5
at The WORLD
Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Must be in good shape.
Call Gary at The
WORLD 479-2582
or bring to The
WORLD at 403 US
Rt. 302 (B-M Rd.),
Berlin
No large appliances or furniture
GOTTA GO...GOTTA GO...GOTTA GO...
BINGO
Sat., Sept. 28 • 3-6PM • 15 Blackwell St., Barre
to Benefit Barre Sculpture Studios and Studio Place Arts • Info.: 479-7069
Kristin Schuyler
INCREASE YOUR COMPETITIVE EDGE
IN THE JOB MARKET
CCV
Participate in the Governor’s Career Ready Program
OPEN HOUSE – CCV Montpelier
Monday, September 23 from 12:30 - 1:30 pm
Thursday, September 26 from 2:30 - 3:30 pm
CLASS DATES September 30 - November 14
Mondays & Thursdays, 12:30 - 3:30 pm
CLASS AVAILABLE AT NO COST TO PARTICIPANTS.
Contact Kelly Young
at 802.828.4060 or
kelly.young@ccv.edu
www.ccv.edu/career
I
can’t think of anything more important
to me than old age! No one ever told me
about old age and how it was going to
change my life and everything that I had
believed was true, and that I would have to
change all my thinking.
First, let me tell you that with a few ex-
ceptions, old age sucks! I know that many of you will disagree
because when you get old, you are defnitely smarter. I certainly
agree. However, at least for me, my body has given up and I have
become an old crippled woman in a matter of months. And, trust
me, I hate it! It isn’t that I mind getting old, it is that it happened so
fast and I didn’t see it coming.
I would be very remiss if I didn’t mention leg cramps when I
discuss old age. I get such terrible leg cramps that wake me up, like
I have been hit by a bomb. And although I leap out of bed, gobble
down my faithful Hyland’s Leg Cramps pills and gulp down tonic
water as Malcolm rushes for an ice pack, I really don’t enjoy the
experience. I hate leg cramps for obviously many reasons but the
prime one is I never see them coming! And I frmly believe that
if you can fgure out a cure for leg cramps you can be the richest
person in the world.
The other part about growing or being old is this; you are dis-
criminated against and really treated as if you are stupid or a dope
and need someone to help you through life’s daily issues. I don’t
know about you, but I don’t want or need anyone to join me when
I am talking to my doctor, etc. And believe it or not, lots of young
people think that the senior citizen who is in line ahead of them is
obviously old, stupid and unworthy of any respect. Can you imag-
ine behaving like that toward a senior when you were young?
Think back and no one has been more interesting or exceptional
than the elderly Eleanor Roosevelt or Nelson Mandela. And there
are so many more senior citizens and elder statesmen who have
changed our country for the better. So, although I am trying to
crawl my way through old age, I will assure you that even though
it isn’t the way I thought it would be, I am going to soldier on and
pretend that old doesn’t mean incompetent... maybe just a little
slower!
T
he Whigs occupied
the statehouse for
almost twenty years
beginning with Silas Jeni-
son in 1835, with the Democrats winning only
one election, in 1853. In addition to the Whigs,
Democrats and Anti-Masons, a splinter party
had come upon the Vermont political scene.
The Liberty party grew out of the organized
anti-slavery movement in the state, which had
begun with the founding in Middlebury of an
Anti-Slavery Society in 1834.
The society, in its frst annual report, de-
clared, “We therefore proclaim war with slav-
ery, our weapon is truth - our basis, justice - our
incentive, humanity - our force, moral power
- our watchword, onward - our hope of success,
in God.” Abolitionist speakers were met with
resistance, in some cases. In 1835 anti-slavery
lectures by Samuel May were broken up in
Montpelier and Rutland.
In 1837 the society resolved that “American
slavery in principle is under all circumstances a fagrant sin.” In
1840 the society resolved that “the ministers who... oppose the
case of emancipation or remain silent on the subject, are unworthy
of support or confdence as religious guides or teachers.”
During the late 1830s, abolitionist petitions poured into the
Reiss’s Pieces
By Judy Reiss
Senate Report:
Anti-Slavery Sentiment
by Senator Bill Doyle
n n n
United States Congress. Most of
the petitions related to the exis-
tence of slavery in the District
of Columbia, and the domestic
slave trade. As a result, a “gag
rule” was adopted by Congress
that required that petitions on
the subject of slavery be laid on
the table without action.
Congressman William Slade,
who had received many such
petitions from his constituents
in Vermont, rose to address the
U.S. House of Representatives
and said:
“We must not bury these
petitions. And let me way
to you gentlemen, that
such a policy will certainly
defeat itself. You cannot
smother investigation of
this subject. The spirit of
free inquiry is the master spirit of the age.”
Senator Bill Doyle serves on the Senate Education Committee
and Senate Economic Affairs Committee, and is the Senate Assis-
tant Minority Leader. He teaches government history at Johnson
State College. He can be reached at 186 Murray Road, Montpelier,
VT 05602; e-mail wdoyle@leg.state.vt.us; or call 223-2851.
Quaker woman protects Reverend Samuel J. May at an
anti-slavery meeting in Montpelier in 1835.
since 2006. New forums start in “registration” mode, and once 100
residents sign up, the new forum becomes fully functional.
The service is an extremely helpful local communication tool.
Each FPF helps neighbors share recommendations, find lost pets,
welcome newcomers, inform about local events, and engage in
healthy and civil debate about important local issues. In times of
need, such as around natural disasters, Front Porch Forum
becomes an even more powerful tool. This is key to why VCRD
and the Vermont Digital Project invested in Front Porch Forum.
“The Vermont Council on Rural Development was an early fan
of Front Porch Forum, because we could see all the community
benefits that the service was providing in Burlington neighbor-
hoods and then throughout Chittenden County,” said Paul Costello,
Executive Director, Vermont Council on Rural Development.
Through e-Vermont, VCRD was able to leverage the expansion
of Front Porch Forum to 30 new towns, bringing additional bene-
fits to local businesses. Then, after Tropical Storm Irene, it became
clear to Costello and VCRD that Front Porch Forum enabled com-
munities by providing an easy volunteer organizing tool that was
already at everyone’s fingertips.
“It was amazing how people shared tools and lent each other
aide through this vehicle,” said Paul Costello. “We’ve been talking
to FPF co-founder Michael Wood-Lewis for three years about how
we could help bring Front Porch Forum to every town in the state.
Today, with the support of the Economic Development
Administration, we are doing it.”
“It’s humbling to see how Vermonters support each other when
given an easy way to communicate with neighbors,” said Michael
Wood-Lewis. “Every day across the state, we witness people ral-
lying to help neighbors cope with all sorts of challenges... house
fires, new babies, losing a job, finding an affordable after-school-
care option... you name it.”
Over the last six months, Wood-Lewis and the team at Front
Porch Forum have been focused on enabling expansion of the
service. This February, FPF had 47,000 active members across 90
Vermont towns covering about half of the state. Now FPF is avail-
able statewide in all 251 towns and 57,000 members partake with
hundreds more signing up every week.
Additional information is available at FrontPorchForum.com
and at this recent post by the Vermont Digital Economy Project:
http://vtrural.org/programs/digital-economy/updates/front-porch-
forum-for-every-town .
Front Porch Forum continued from previous page
n n n
Thought for the Day: “Hollywood
is a place where they’ll pay you a
thousand dollars for a kiss and 50
cents for your soul. I know, because
I turned down the first offer often
enough and held out for the 50
cents.” -- Marilyn Monroe
page 12 The WORLD September 18, 2013
CELELLI, ELAINE T., 89, of Northfield, died September 1, at
the Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. She was born in New
York City on Jan. 23, 1924, the daughter of Michael and Antoinette
(Spinelli) Fornara. She is a graduate of Franklin K. Lane High
School in Brooklyn, N.Y., class of 1942. She married John Sollano
in New York City in 1948. He predeceased her in 1982. She mar-
ried Eugene Celelli in Rhinebeck, N.Y., in 1990. He died Sept. 3,
2008. She was a member of St. John The Evangelist in Northfield
and St. Thomas The Apostle in New York. Elaine had worked a
few positions in New York City, but dedicated her time as a wife
and mother. She enjoyed knitting, reading, playing piano and
spending time with her daughter, grandchildren and great-grand-
children. Survivors include her daughter, Marguerite Moore of
Northfield; two grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; one
great-great-grandson; many nieces and nephews. A memorial
Mass will be celebrated at St. John The Evangelist on Vine Street
in Northfield on Saturday, Sept. 21, at 11am.
COTE, MARSHA LYNN, 41, of Moretown, died
September 4, at her home. She was born May 6,
1972, in Berlin, the daughter of Carlos Marshall
Gray Jr. and Johanne (Demingware) Gray. She
graduated from Harwood Union High School in
1990, and later attended Champlain College. On July
13, 2000, she married John R. Cote Jr. in Waterbury.
She worked as a psychiatric technician for the Vermont State
Hospital in Waterbury, Middlesex, and Morrisville. She was a fan
of the Dallas Cowboys and the Boston Red Sox. She enjoyed
camping at the ocean. Survivors include her husband, John
Raymond Cote Jr. of Moretown; a son, John Raymond Cote III of
Moretown; a stepdaughter, Heidi Latour of Barre; three grandchil-
dren; her parents, Johanne and Carlos Marshall Gray of Moretown;
a brother, Christopher Gray of Moretown; her maternal grand-
mother, Gloria Demingware of Moretown; and many aunts,
uncles, and cousins.
BOYCE, MARCIA LOUISE, 71, of Randolph, died September
7, at her home. She was born March 24, 1942, in Syracuse, N.Y.,
the daughter of Cecil and Doris (Planck) Group. She married
Madison Boyce. She worked for the State of New York as a code
enforcement officer before moving to Randolph. She was a master
gardener and a volunteer at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph.
Survivors include her husband, Madison Boyce of Randolph; two
sons: John Mowins of Bosque, N.M., and Jeffrey Mowins of
Indianapolis, Ind.; two daughters, Jeanne Dombrowski of
Lancaster, N.Y., and Sandra McKeever of Wingdale, N.Y.; and
five grandchildren. She was predeceased by a son, Madison
LeMay Boyce. A celebration of her life will be announced at a
later date.
FOURNIER, GISELE A., 85, a longtime resident
of East Barre, passed away September 5, at Fletcher
Allen Health Care. Her family was at her bedside.
Born in Barre Town on Jan. 6, 1928, she was the
daughter of Eugene and Marie Antoinette
(Chapdelaine) Couture and had attended the Holy
Ghost School in Graniteville, and graduated as class
valedictorian of Sacred Heart School in Newport, in 1945. Gisele
had worked as a bookkeeper in the granite industry for over 50
years, including Jones Bros., Beck and Beck, and was business
manager for Kinfolk Memorials in East Barre for over 30 years,
holding this position at the time of her death. On Sept. 11, 1954,
she married Leo J. Fournier. They made their home in East Barre.
Leo predeceased her on Jan. 17, 1985. Gisele was a loving mother
and grandmother who enjoyed spending time with her family,
especially preparing holidays meals. She was a competitive crib-
bage player and avid lover of crosswords puzzles. In earlier years,
she enjoyed traveling and visited several destinations in Canada
and Europe. She was a life-time member of the St. Cecilia/St.
Sylvester Catholic Church. She is survived by her son, Dennis
Fournier; son Norman Fournier and wife, Maggie; daughter Lea
Fournier; daughter Michelle Leever and husband, Jeff; three
grandchildren; as well as many cousins. She was predeceased by
her five brothers, Bernard, Paul, Gerald, Marcel and John, and her
sister Claire.
ROCK, PHYLLIS J., 74, of North Barre Manor,
passed away September 5, at Dartmouth Hitchcock
Medical Center. Born on Nov. 26, 1938, in
Northampton, Mass., she was the daughter of the late
Millard L. and Dorothy (Thompson) Cleveland.
Phyllis attended schools in Northampton, Mass., and
was a graduate of the Amherst Catholic High School.
She was married to Norman F. Rock II. They made their home in
the central Vermont area for many years. Mr. Rock passed away in
2001. Phyllis enjoyed playing cards, bingo, and spending precious
time with her family and grandchildren. She is survived by one
daughter, Chris Evans and husband, Anthony of Westmore; two
sons, Norman F. Rock, III of Barre, and Guy Rock of Orange, and
two special grandchildren. She is also survived by one sister, Ruth
Dexter of Belchertown, Mass. Besides her husband, she was pre-
deceased by two sisters, Sandy Smith and Linda Demato, and one
brother, Buddy Cleveland.
THOMPSON, HARRY AUGUST, 98, longtime
resident of Cabot, passed away peacefully on
September 3, in the presence of family at Woodridge
Nursing Home in Berlin. Harry was born in Ekalaka,
Mont., on Aug. 24, 1915, the son of Frank Thompson
and Margaret Rose McCarty. Harry is predeceased
by his siblings, Frank "Crow," Herbert "Bert,"
Edwin "Dude," and Elizabeth "Lib." Harry is survived by his chil-
dren Hunter, Rose, Lucas and Matthew, his six grandchildren, as
well as longtime friends and caring companions Stephen Gregg
and Cathleen Besch. Harry was a tried-and-true Vermonter, col-
lecting cows, houses, antiques, "junk" and friends, near and far in
Vermont and beyond. He was renowned for his kindness and abil-
ity to find anything a person might need among his treasures, from
a kitchen sink to a gold locket and sometimes even a little baby
Chihuahua to warm a lonely heart. Harry's door was always open
for a cup of instant coffee, homemade jam and, if you were lucky,
a piece of fresh pie with lots of sugar and a perfect crust. A memo-
rial celebration potluck will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013,
from 12 noon to 6pm at Cabot Town Hall/The Willey Building on
Main Street in Cabot. All are welcome. Please bring a dish to share
as well as loving memories and any photos you would like to
share.
BAKER, CLARENCE W. "BILL" JR., 61, passed
away September 8 at Copley Hospital in Morrisville. He was born
July 9, 1952, in Montpelier, the son of Clarence W. Baker Sr. and
Alma Reynolds Baker. He served for over six years in the Vermont
National Guard. He was employed for several years by S.D.
Ireland. Bill enjoyed hunting, fishing and camping, and was a fan
of the Yankees, Celtics and followed NASCAR and his favorite
driver, Kyle Busch. He is survived by his wife, Donna Philip
Baker; children Jordan and Carol Baker, Tim Baker, and William
and Jodi Baker; six grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; sis-
ters Mary Covey, Donna and Lee Delphia, and Penny and
Mohammed Mousawi; as well as aunts and uncles Peggy, Dorothy,
Ruth, Eugene and Miles; and many nieces, nephews, cousins and
friends. He was predeceased by his parents and brothers and sister
Kenneth, Brenda, John and Alson Baker.
DUBOIS, ROELOF A. "RUIE," 92, died
September 10 at the Mayo Healthcare facility in
Northfield, where he had been residing for the past
eight months. He was born in Highland, N.Y., Feb.
17, 1921, the youngest of three sons to Andries and
Grace (Feeter) DuBois. He was a 1938 graduate of
Highland High School. At age 17, he started running heavy equip-
ment, bulldozers, etc., in Minneola, Long Island, N.Y., and later at
Norfolk (Va.) Naval Air Station. It was in Norfolk where he met
Virginia Jarvis, and they were married July 4, 1942, in South
Mills, N.C. They were married for 52 years when Virginia passed
away of cancer on Aug. 30, 1994. In November 1942, Ruie joined
the Army 841st Aviation Engineers, 5th Air Force, as a heavy
equipment operator, trained in Florida for 10 months building
practice airstrips, and was then shipped out to Sydney and
Brisbane, Australia, and then on to the World War II invasion in
the Southwest Pacific in Cape Gloucester, New Britain; Hollandia,
New Guinea; Moratai Island; and the Philippine Islands. The 841st
EAB built airstrips for P-38 fighters and B-24 bombers, working
sometimes 24 hours around the clock to get air protection. He
achieved the ranks of corporal, sergeant and tec third grade, serv-
ing until January 1946. He was awarded the Asiatic-Pacific
Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Philippines Liberation
Ribbon, American Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory
Medal. In May 1946, Ruie and Virginia moved to Northfield to
join his older brother, Bill DuBois, in starting an excavation busi-
ness named DuBois Construction. The two brothers worked tire-
lessly over the years to grow the business from a single Caterpillar
traxcavator, digging cellar holes in the central Vermont area, to a
respected midsize organization completing projects throughout the
state. After Bill's passing in l981, Ruie became the sole owner
until his retirement in 1986, when the company was purchased by
his son, Don DuBois, and nephew Phil Scott. Ruie has resided in
Northfield for 67 years, most of them in their home on Stony
Brook Road, where he and his wife, Virginia, raised two children,
Andrea (DuBois) Scarborough and Donald DuBois. For many
years Ruie and Virginia wintered in their Lakeland, Fla., home to
escape the harsh winters of Vermont and to be near his brother,
Bob. Many trips were made in their motor home, when still able
to, back and forth each year to Florida, and on camping caravan
trips with local friends, including a trip to Prince Edward Island.
Ruie flourished when he could be around heavy equipment from
his early years of running bulldozers and running the family busi-
ness, to visiting job sites in his retirement years. He loved cars and
was ever so proud of each one he owned. His main hobby was
polishing and waxing his everyday vehicles and his antique cars,
the '56 and '57 T-Birds and a Model A Roadster. He was one of the
early members of the Vermont Automobile Enthusiasts antique
auto club and entered his cars for competition and participated in
local parades. He loved car racing and was instrumental in starting
the Dog River Speedway in Northfield, around 1948. In the 1960s,
he was again instrumental in the building of Thunder Road race-
track in Barre. Ruie was also an accomplished musician of many
instruments. He especially loved playing the violin and his electric
organs. His memberships included the Sorrell-Maynard American
Legion Post 63, the DeWitt-Clinton Lodge 15 F. & A.M., a life
member of the Scottish Rite Masonic Bodies, and Mount Sinai
Shriners No. 3. Survivors include his daughter, Andrea
Scarborough, and fiancé Lloyd Smith, of Berlin; a son, Donald
DuBois, and wife Lee, of Northfield; a granddaughter, Sarah
DuBois, of Barre; a grandson, Michael DuBois, and fiancée
Christina Filian, of Montpelier; a nephew, William DuBois, of
Chillicothe, Ill.; and Curtis Olds and wife Jan, of Norfolk, Va.
Besides his wife, Virginia, he was predeceased by his two broth-
ers, William DuBois and Robert DuBois; and a special friend/
companion, Beverly Ritzer.
LAVIGNE, DANIEL E. "UNCLE DAN," of
Moretown, died peacefully at his Cobb Hill home on
September 8. He was surrounded by three genera-
tions of family members. Dan was born in Montpelier
on Aug. 7, 1936, the son of Arthur and Emma
(Duquette) Lavigne. He was educated at St. Michael's
in Montpelier. In his early years, Dan worked on the
family farms in Middlesex and Lowell, and later in his life he was
employed by Pizzagalli Construction Co. After his retirement, Dan
was frequently found traversing Cobb Hill in his utility vehicle
helping out friends. Dan was a wonderful, caring man who will be
greatly missed by his family and friends. Survivors include his
sister and brother-in-law, Rolande and Conception Conti, of
Moretown; sister-in-law Marie Lavigne, of Magnolia, N.J.; and
numerous generations of nieces and nephews located throughout
the country. Dan was predeceased by his parents; brothers Frank
and Dennis; and sisters Delores Lavigne and Jackie Sweetser.
MANNING, THOMAS J., 71, of
Montpelier, died September 9, at Berlin Health and
Rehabilitation Center. He was born July 10, 1942,
the son of the late Percy W. and Mildred F. (Devino)
Manning. He attended St. Michael's School. He
served in the Vermont Army National Guard in the
1960s. Tommy worked as a custodian for the Montpelier school
system, as well as a crossing guard at the corners of Main and
School streets. He also worked at the former Miss Montpelier
Diner and Brooks Esso Service Station on lower State Street. He
also mowed lawns for several families in the area. He was a mem-
ber of many local clubs including the American Legion, Aurora
Lodge 22 F & AM, Mount Sinai Temple 3, Crown Jewels, Ianis
Club, and was a life member of the Canadian Club. Tommy was
an avid bowler and was a longtime participant of several bowling
leagues in the area. He was also a dedicated fan of the Vermont
Mountaineers baseball team. Survivors include his brothers Arthur
Manning and wife, Arlene, of Montpelier, Francis Manning and
Hester, of Middlesex, Raymond Manning and wife, Tina, of
Northfield; sisters Mary Kelley, of Northfield, Anne Rogers and
husband, David, of Marshfield, Elaine Isham and husband, Ross,
of Moretown, and Teresa Brooks, of Meriden, Conn.; sister-in-law
Yvonne Manning; longtime friends Donald and Tippy Ruggles;
and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his brother
William "Mickey" Manning on Nov. 6, 2012, and brothers-in-law
Raymond Kelley and Myron Brooks.
MURRAY, EDWIN S., 78, a resident of the Hopewell
Junction, N.Y. area for almost 40 years, died August 22 at Vassar
Brothers Medical Center. Born in Northfield on Aug. 16, 1935, he
was the son of the late Sheldon K. and Maidene Murray. Edwin
proudly served our country in the United States Air Force and
graduated from Vermont Technical College in Randolph. He was
employed with IBM for over 30 years, and enjoyed retired life at
home with his wife and family. On Aug. 24, 1963, he married his
wife, Lucinda, at St. James United Methodist Church in Stoneham,
Mass. Edwin is also survived by his children, Dian Murray, Jeff
Murray (Callie), Christine Foote (Michael) and Scott Murray
(Becky); six grandchildren; siblings Elsie Zufall, Eleanor Denko
(Donald), Pauline Washburn, Sandra Ferno (Richard) and Steven
Murray (Roberta); and many nieces and nephews. Edwin was
predeceased by his brother-in-law, John Zufall.
RENFREW, SGT. 1ST CLASS
ALEXANDER, a member of the Vermont Army
National Guard, 56, of Bethel, died September 7, at
his home surrounded by his loving family. Born on
Dec. 27, 1956 in Barre, he was the son of William
and Beatrice (Hutchinson) Renfrew. He attended
Orange Center School and graduated from Spaulding High School
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September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 13
in Barre in 1974. On Dec. 14, 1991, he married Brenda Conlin in
Wells. Following their marriage, they made their home in Bethel.
For over 30 years, he had worked for Vermont Castings in
Randolph. Additionally, he had been a member of the Vermont
Army National Guard, where he served proudly for over 20 years.
He enjoyed motorcycles, his truck and especially helping others.
Survivors include his wife, Brenda Renfrew; two daughters,
Jennifer Kelley and Chrissy Kelley; one grandson; three sisters,
Wilma Renfrew and her companion, Thomas Follansbee, Margaret
Collins and Hazel Norton; three brothers, Alan Renfrew, Walter
Renfrew and Robert Renfrew. Besides his parents, his grand-
daughter, Sabrina Miller, and a brother, William Renfrew, prede-
ceased him. His graveside service will be held on Wednesday,
Sept. 18, 2013, at 2pm in the Wilson Cemetery in Websterville.
SANFORD, MURIEL ADAMS, 90, of Orono, Maine, died
September 5. She was born Jan. 31, 1923, in Lewiston, Maine, the
daughter of James G. and Mildred (Willis) Adams. Muriel was
brought up in Auburn, Maine, and Topsham, Maine. She was an
honor presenter in the Brunswick High School class of 1940.
Muriel attended Farmington Normal School and received her
Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Maine in 1946
and her Master's in Library Science from Simmons College in
1955. She established two high school libraries, one in Houlton,
Maine, and one in Waltham, Mass., before working for the
Vermont Free Public Library Commission from 1954-1958, where
she provided books and services to the Montpelier region. In 1958,
she and her husband, Alpheus Sanford, whom she married on June
24, 1947, moved to Orono, Maine. Muriel was librarian at Husson
University until 1971, when she joined the Special Collections
Department at Fogler Library at the University of Maine. She
became head of the department in 1990 and was especially proud
of the addition of many collections of papers of historical signifi-
cance to the state of Maine, including family histories, records
from Maine businesses and organizations, papers from individual
artists, writers and government officials. The acquisition of the
William S. Cohen papers occurred during the last part of her
career there. Muriel was a member of the Maine Library
Association, Maine Archives and Museums, New England
Archivists, various University of Maine organizations and the
American Association of University Women. She felt very fortu-
nate to have a wonderful daughter, Nancy. In addition to her par-
ents, Muriel was predeceased by her husband of 49 years, Alpheus,
in 1996. Together they especially enjoyed their cottage on the
Maine coast in Harborside, and the summer visitors and family
get-togethers there. She is survived by her daughter, Nancy Ann
Sanford, of Waterville, Maine, and other family and friends.
SAYERS, KENNETH CARL, 75, of
Middlesex, died September 7, at Rowan Court
Health and Rehabilitation Center in Barre. Born Jan.
30, 1938, in Roxbury, he was the son of Elmer and
Christine (Williamson) Sayers and had attended
school in Northfield, and was a graduate of Northfield
High School. Enlisting in the U.S. Air Force in May 1958, he
served until July of 1962, when he was honorably discharged. He
then returned to Vermont and had resided in Middlesex since
1963. Kenneth worked in the granite industry for many years, as a
foreman for Cook, Watkins and Patch Granite Co. and later at
Anderson-Friberg and then Rock of Ages, where he later retired.
His memberships included the Vermont Association of Snow
Travelers and the Canadian Club in Barre. Playing horseshoes,
hunting, fishing and camping were special times for him. Survivors
include two sons, Brian Sayers and wife, Eileen, of Moretown,
and Randy Sayers, of Woodbury, and a daughter, Tammy Reaves,
and husband, Mark, of Graniteville. Also surviving are seven
grandchildren and five brothers and a sister. Twelve brothers and
sisters and his parents predeceased him.
TROKEY, MARIE E., 77, died September 8 at the
Woodridge Nursing Home in Berlin. Born April 1,
1936, she was the daughter of the late Henry Frank
Sr. and Mary (Hammercracker) Frank. She attended
schools in St. Louis. She worked as a nurses' aide at
a nursing home in St. Louis for many years. She
married Linneus Trokey in St. Louis. He died May
20, 1996. In 2011, she moved to Barre. She enjoyed
country-western music and paint-by-numbers. She also enjoyed
going to Project Independence. Survivors include two sons,
Lawrence Trokey, of Ladue, Mo., and Noel Trokey, of Morrisville,
as well as many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by two
brothers, Henry Frank Jr. and Jack Frank; and five sisters, Mildred
Frank, Dorothy Frank, Maryann Fox, Dolores Koeb and Charlotte
Doerr.
CRUICKSHANK, LAWRENCE DANIEL
"LONNY," 90, died September 10, at his home in
Northfield. He was born May 19, 1923, in Randolph, the son of
James and Ella (Fullam) Cruickshank. He married Joan Pollard on
Sept. 15, 1951. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War
as a paratrooper. He worked for D.W. Bailey Co. and later was an
accountant for Rock of Ages Corp. in Barre from 1951 to 1984.
He was a member of the Montpelier Elks and a life member of the
Northfield Country Club and the Northfield American Legion. He
was an avid hunter and fisherman and especially enjoyed golf,
achieving nine holes-in-one during his golfing career. Survivors
include his wife; five children, Lawrence Cruickshank and Sue
LeFebvre, both of Northfield, Cynthia Cruickshank, of Burlington,
Julie Dikon, of Virginia, and Jody Cruickshank, of Manchester,
N.H.; a sister, Mary Sentor, of Arizona; nine grandchildren; and
nine great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by three siblings,
Theron Cruickshank, Earl Cruickshank and Ladora Binns.
WROBEL, ROBERT HENRY, 85, died September
10, at Ledgeview Assisted Living in Cumberland,
Maine. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on Jan. 15, 1928, the son
of John and Grace (Migacz) Wrobel. He was a veteran of World
War II, having served in the United States Navy. He married
Josephine Tomasik on July 26, 1950, in Boston. They lived for
many, many years in Massachusetts, 20 years in Montpelier, eight
years in South Burlington, and Bob resided in Cumberland,
Maine, the past two years. Mrs. Wrobel predeceased him Oct. 5,
2010. Bob worked as a superintendent of maintenance and con-
struction for The Boston Globe, retiring after 35 years of service.
He was a member of St. John Vianney Catholic Church in South
Burlington. He enjoyed attending his grandson's sporting events.
Survivors include his son, John Wrobel, and his wife, Christine, of
Falmouth, Maine, and one grandson.
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History of the Vermont State House at Montpelier
By H. Brooke Paige
W
hen Vermont was in its infancy, its elected leaders met in
various locations throughout the republic, as Vermont
had no capital city or town. Vermont entered the Union
in 1791 and the legislature continued its nomadic ways, meeting
in a different location each year. For thirty-five years Vermont’s
government operated without a seat of power or a state house
within which to meet. During this period the legislature met forty-
seven times including: eight meetings in Bennington, one in
Burlington, one in Castleton, one in Charlestown, New Hampshire
- then part of Vermont, one in Danville, three in Manchester, two
in Middlebury, two in Newbury, one in Norwich, seven in Rutland
(where a special build-
ing was built for the
meetings), one in
Vergennes, four in
Westminster and four-
teen in Windsor which
claims the title of “first
capital of Vermont.”
In 1805, the legisla-
ture selected Montpelier
as “the permanent seat
of the legislature for
holding all their ses-
sions” upon two condi-
tions: first, that
Montpelier should give
the land for a state
house building - build
said building by the
first of September, 1808
and second, that if a
future Legislature
should cease to hold its
sessions in Montpelier, the State would repay Montpelier the value
of the property.
Citizens of Montpelier and nearby towns raised $6,138.88 by
the sale of subscriptions ranging in value from $5 to $100. The
amount raised exceeded the amount needed to construct the first
State House. Land was given by Thomas Davis, the son of Colonel
Jacob Davis - Montpelier’s first permanent settler. The first State
House was designed by Deacon Sylvanus Baldwin and was con-
structed under his supervision. It was a simple three story wooden
structure with a cupola that housed an “excellent bell.”
By 1831, the state government had grown beyond the capacity
of the simple wooden structure in which it was housed. In 1832,
the Legislature appropriated the sum of fifteen thousand dollars
toward the construction of a new State House with the understand-
ing that the Town of Montpelier would raise an equal amount
through the issuance of a bond. A building committee was appoint-
ed with Lieutenant Governor Lebbeus Egerton named as superin-
tendent. The committee visited recently completed capitol build-
ings in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire to
observe firsthand various architectural features that might be
incorporated into the design of Vermont’s new State House. The
committee selected the design of Ammi B. Young, a Burlington
architect, to design their new State House.
Young’s design consisted of a central building with a wing on
each side; the entire building measured one hundred and sixty five
feet in length. The central building was one hundred feet deep and
the wings each were fifty feet deep. The central building was sur-
mounted by a copper-sheathed dome rising one hundred feet
above from the main floor. In front of the central building was a
portico, modeled after the Doric design of the Temple of Theseus
(480 B.C.), with six fluted pillars each measuring six feet in diam-
eter. When completed in 1838, the State House accommodated
state offices and committee rooms on the first floor; the legislative
chambers, the office of the Governor and the State Library were
located on the second floor.
On the evening of January 6, 1857 a horrific fire destroyed the
interior of the State House and its dome. Through the heroic
efforts of Montpelier citizens, most of the books of the library, the
portrait of George Washington, a “goodly” portion of the papers in
the office of the Secretary of State and a few pieces of furniture
were saved. It was a devastating loss for the State; only the thick
granite walls and the Doric portico remained.
A special session of the Legislature was held on February 18,
1857. The Senate met at the Washington County Court House
while the House of Representatives held their meeting at a local
church. An attempt to remove the capital from Montpelier failed
and the Legislature appropriated forty thousand dollars provided
that the citizens of Montpelier should raise a sum equal toward the
total cost of “rebuilding and improving the State House.” Thomas
Silloway of Boston, an architect who had worked with Ammi
Young, assessed the ruined State House and drafted plans for
reconstruction. Thomas Powers of Woodstock was selected as
Superintendent of construction for the project. By August of 1858,
it became obvious that State House construction would not be
completed that year and the granite walls would not be protected
from the harmful effects of the coming winter weather. The citi-
zens of Montpelier, without solicitation, provide an additional ten
thousand dollars for the construction of a temporary protective
cover to insure that the granite walls would not be harmed.
When the Legislature of 1858 refused to appropriate additional
funds required to com-
plete the building, the
citizens of Montpelier
raised the fifty-three
thousand dollars
required to fully fund
the enterprise through a
special subscription.
With sufficient funds
now in-hand; the com-
missioners selected J.
R. Richards of Boston
as the architect to com-
plete the reconstruction.
The new State House
retained the Grecian
portico with the central
building and wings
completed in the
Renaissance-revival
style. A Renaissance-
inspired wooden dome
with a windowed drum
was designed which would rise over one hundred and thirty-six
feet above the floor of the portico. The dome was to be surmount-
ed by an allegorical statue of “Agriculture” designed and executed
by the Vermont sculptor, Larkin Goldsmith Mead. The fourteen
foot tall statue was carved in wood, since the wooden dome was
incapable of supporting the far greater weight of a stone sculp-
ture.
The new State House was completed in time for the Legislative
meeting in October of 1859. The State House was a remarkably
elegant structure, decorated throughout with ornamental wood-
work carved by Boston craftsmen, marble flooring (quarried in
Isle LaMotte) exhibiting deposited fossils, stately cast iron col-
umns with Ionic capitals, deeply sunk ceiling panels and ornate
fireproof iron staircases.
By the 1970’s, the appearance of the State House was but a faint
shadow of its original elegance. Years of benign neglect and a
poorly directed renovation in the late 1960’s had grievously
altered the appearance of the once “stately” structure.
A comprehensive architectural and historical study of the struc-
ture was completed in 1981 which recommended an extensive
renovation to restore the State House to its 1859 appearance.
Many in the Vermont Legislature failed to appreciate the historical
significance of their State House, and were hesitant to invest the
nearly four million dollars required to complete the project. A
group of concerned citizens organized a private enterprise, The
Friends of the State House, to undertake the ambitions effort to
restore Vermont’s “House of the People.”
The “Friends” informational and fund-raising campaign raised
awareness of the historical, architectural and artistic importance of
the State House as well as raising over one million dollars in “seed
money” toward the rehabilitation effort. In short order, the
Vermont Legislature was persuaded to commit state funds toward
the effort and a modest determined mission to restore the State
House to her 1859 elegance began. The restoration was completed
in 2000. After a nearly twenty year effort, the State House again
reflected the respect and pride of the Citizens of Vermont hold for
their state and its government.
Today, The Vermont State House stands as a great tribute to the
dedication and determination of the people of the State of Vermont
and especially the citizens of Montpelier, rebuilding and preserv-
ing for future generations Vermont’s own “Temple of
Democracy.”
H. Brooke Paige is a member of the Friends of the State House – This
article includes information found in Vermont’s State House by Mary
Greene Nye (1936) and Temples of Democracy by Henry-Russsell
Hitchcock and William Seale (1976). The linoleum-type print of The
Vermont State House – 1859 (2008) by Mary Simpson is used with her
permission. Copies of the print are available from the State House gift
shop.
page 14 The WORLD September 18, 2013
2 x 8.1112
BOTANICA FLORALS
“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD
c/o Happy Anniversary
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.
Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each week for a Gift Certificate from Botanica
Florals. No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
to anniversary date. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.
ANNIVERSARY
DATE_______________________# YEARS_____
NAMES__________________________________
ADDRESS________________________________
________________________________________
PHONE__________________________________
Botanica Florals and The WORLD would
like to help you wish a special couple
a Happy Anniversary. Just send their
name, address & wedding anniversary
date. Each week we publish the names
plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each
week for a Gift Certificate for a bouquet
of fresh flowers from Botanica Florals
in Montpelier. No obligation, nothing to
buy. Just send anniversary names two
(2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to
The WORLD, c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY,
403 U.S.Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641.
Please provide name, address & phone
number for prize notification.
Happy
Anniversary
10 St at e St reet
Mont pel i er
802-229-9885
www. bot ani caf l or al svt . com
f l ower s@bot ani caf l or al svt . com
Please Send Us Your September Anniversaries
& Be Automatically Registered
To Win A Gift Certificate from Botanica
LUCKY WINNING COUPLE FOR THIS WEEK:
On SEPTEMBER 21, JOHN & DIANE BISSON
of ORANGE Will Celebrate 39 Years of Marriage
SEPTEMBER 19
Rich & Laurie Bentley, 7 yrs, Barre
SEPTEMBER 20
Lizz & Greg Gove, 5 yrs, Danville
SEPTEMBER 21
Walter & Brenda King, 25 yrs,
Websterville
Kevin & Stephanie Croteau, 16
yrs, W.Berlin
Bernie & Gail Barclay, 50 yrs,
Barre
SEPTEMBER 22
Joyce & Paul Liberman, 61 yrs,
Barre
SEPTEMBER 23
Brad & Marcia Hudson, 18 yrs,
Plainfield
SEPTEMBER 24
Clifford & Karen Kenyon, 19 yrs,
Montpelier
Don’t forget...
9-28 Jessica McLeon, 24,
Hardwick
10-4 Bret Hodgdon, Jericho
10-5 Lisa Companion,
Waterbury
10-6 Steven Lefcourt, 29,
Burlington
10-10 Chris McLeon, 43, N.
Hyde Park
10-15 Gavin Hodgdon, 5,
Jericho
10-18 KAY
10-24 Joey’s Mommy
10-29 Eric Evans, 28,
Plymouth
11-7 Karen Evans, 59,
Plymouth
11-7 Jillian Hass, 23, E. Mplr.
11-12 Chloe Labbe-
Thibouthot, 24, Barre
11-15 Tyler Hass, 26, E.Mplr.
11-15 Bob Spaulding
11-15 Becky Hall, Greensboro
Bend
11-18 Stephen Wilson, 24,
Burlington
11-19 Henry Kasulka, 9, E.Mplr
11-22 Ruth Pearce, 65,
Chelsea
11-23 Jason Lowe, 24, Wby
11-28 Neil, 24
12-3 Peter Lefcourt, 39, Barre
12-3 DOT! 60, Calais
12-7 Armour Moodie, 59,
Stannard
12-8 Thelma Forkey, Waterbury
12-16 Lonny McLeon, 47,
Hardwick
12-25 Jenna Companion, 15,
Waterbury
12-31 Chelsea Phillips, 24,
Manassas, VA
1-4 Betsy Cody, 57, Barre
1-10 Curt McLeon, 46
1-14 Brandon McLeon, 22,
Hardwick
1-15 Peggy Zurla, 50, Mayaez,
Puerto Rico
1-15 Shawn Kasulka, E.Mplr
1-19 Kevn Sare, 32, Cabot
(no “I”)
1-31 Wayne Michaud, 66,
Bristol
2-1 Nancy Prescott, Barre
2-6 Bob Edwards, 71
2-8 Warren Lanigan
2-12 Joe Richardson ,
Moretown
2-13 Sandy Salvas, Barre
2-14 Laura Rappold, East
Montpelier
2-19 Kevin Lawson, 45, W.
Topsham
3-5 Rebecca Lefcourt, 34
3-16 Chubb Harrington, Barre
3-16 Roxie D. Gonet, 7,
Chelsea
3-17 Pat Wieja, Baltimore, MD
3-22 Nicholas Salvas, 21,
Barre
3-25 Zarek Michael Gonet, 6,
Charlestown, NH
4-1 Adam Lefcourt, 34
4-12 Daisy ,11
4-12 Meredith Page, 58,
Croyden, NH
4-20 Jessie Phillips, 22, E.
Mplr.
4-30 Lillian Kasulka, 4, E.
Montpelier
4-30 Darlene Callahan, 52,
Barre
5-4 Katie Hodgdon, 6,
Waterbury
5-6 Gary Villa, Washington
5-6 Jim Elliott, 47, Barre
5-13 Kristen Lee Evans, 26,
Mentor, OH
5-14 John, Chelsea
5-20 Bill Boyce, Chelsea
5-20 Mary Lefcourt, Burlington
5-22 Ruth Madigan P., Bethel
5-27 Candy McLeon
6-3 L’il Joey, Wby Ctr, 35
6-5 Rob Salvas, 52, Barre
6-6 Heather Holmes, 46,
Woodbury
7-7 Marti Elliott, Barre
7-9 Pierce Salvas, 29, Barre
7-11 Joslyn Richardson, 26,
Waterbury, VT
7-11 Marcus Hass, 25
7-12 Emily Rappold, Plainfield
7-16 Belle D. Gonet, 9,
Chelsea
7-18 Mike Jacques, So. Barre
7-24 Fran Houghton,
Lyndonville
7-28 Lew Perry, Lyndonville
8-2 Grace Hodgdon, 8, Jericho
8-2 Andy Fournier, Glover
8-8 Gary
8-8 Shirley Combs, Randolph
8-9 Bob Evans, 60, Clark, NJ
8-15 Dolly Fournier, Glover
8-16 CHARLOTTE EDWARDS,
BARRE TOWN
8-20 Rachel Salvas, 20, Barre
8-21 Chriiis
8/22 Tanya Bryan, 43, Barre
8-24 Terry Spaulding,
Lewiston, ME
8-26 Joshua McLeon, 24,
Hartford, CT
8-26 Darcy Hodgdon,
Waterbury
8-29 Connie Spaulding, Minot,
ME
9-5 Sally Fontaine, Walden
9-8 Arlo Benjamin Lefcourt, 4
9-15 Deborah Phillips
Don’t forget to
change this date
to the Thursday
after issue
date...
FROM
BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.
Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a
Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the names in this
space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE
from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send birthday names two
(2) weeks prior to birthdate, to The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin,
Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.
WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for
Sharon Hebert (Bakery Mgr.) or Beverlee Hutchins or Penny Millette
(Cake Decorators) by Thursday, September 19 to arrange for cake pick-up.
PRICE CHOPPER
“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin
Barre, VT 05641
Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will
publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week
for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,
VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.
BIRTHDATE______________________________
NAME___________________________________
AGE (this birthday)_________________________
ADDRESS________________________________
________________________________________
PHONE__________________________________
SEPTEMBER 14
Brett McNaulty, 24, Graniteville
SEPTEMBER 15
Kenneth L. Smith, 63, Barre
SEPTEMBER 18
Julia Fewer, 10, Barre
SEPTEMBER 19
Levi Beavin, 15, Montpelier
Jill Mattote, 42, Brookfield
Mark Peloquin, 42, Williamstown
SEPTEMBER 20
Rich Bentley, 44, Barre
SEPTEMBER 21
Andrusha Kwasmik, 25,
Williamstown
Rick Piro, Barre
Jayvian Poitras, 15, East Barre
SEPTEMBER 23
Teagan Garbacik, 20, South Barre
SEPTEMBER 24
Francis Holmes, 72, Montpelier
This Week’s Cake Winner:
September 19, FIONA ADAMS of WARREN will be 14 YEARS OLD!
Happy Birthday!
2 x 6.75
Waterbury-Stowe Rd. Waterbury, VT 244-1116
46 N. Main Street, Barre 802-479-0671
97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Road • 802-479-0671
Family Owned & Operated for 33 Years
Mike & Amanda Peyerl
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Fashion Know-How is written by
Alyson Lincoln McHugh, owner of
No. 9 Boutique in Montpelier
www.shopno9boutique.com
Fashion
Know-How
Ladies:
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with the Michelin Tire
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The Sewing Basket
“A Professional Sewing Service”
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BARRE 476-8389
325 N. Main St.
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Alterations & Tailoring for the Whole Family
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Kasper - Rutledge
Sara Kasper and Jeremiah Rutledge were united in marriage in
a private ceremony held at Caspian Lake in Greensboro on August
24, 2013. The bride is the daughter of Earl and Debbie Kasper of
Greensboro. The groom is the son of Betsy Rutledge and the late
Jerry Rutledge of North Fayston.
The bride graduated from Hilliard High School in Hilliard,
Ohio, and Florida State University in Tallahassee, Fla. She works
for Central Vermont Medical Center. The groom graduated from
Harwood Union High School in Duxbury, and is employed by
Waitsfield Telecom.
Mr. and Mrs. Rutledge reside in North Fayston.
Through October 26th,
Contemporary Dance and
Fitness Studio in Montpelier
will host a photographic retro-
spective of the studio’s 40-year
history. The show begins a year
of celebratory events that will
culminate with a May 18, 2014
Gala.
The studio invites CD&FS
alumni to be in touch, come
share memories and photos,
and join in the Gala festivities
to honor founder and owner
Lorraine Neale.
CD&FS is located at 18
Langdon Street in Montpelier.
The photo show can be viewed
M-F 3:30-8, Sat 9-2. For more
information, call (802) 229-
4676 or visit cdandfs.com.
40 Years of Dancing; A Photographic
Retrospective of Contemporary
Dance and Fitness Studio
Pictured in this photo from the 80s are CD&FS founder Lorraine Neal
(top right) and longtime faculty member Kathe McBride (bottom left).
■ ■ ■
Email Us!
sales@vt-world.com
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September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 15
Today, I...
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cleaned my carpets,
scrubbed and sealed
my stone floor,
and got that nasty stain out
of my couch.
I didn’t have to
lift a finger!
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Montpelier
Report: Affordability is
Largest Barrier to Health
Care Access in Vermont
Affordability remains the largest barrier to consumer access to
health care in Vermont, even for the insured, according to the 2013
Annual Report of the Vermont Health Care Ombudsman (HCO).
The HCO serves as a consumer advocate on state and federal
health care issues and operates a free, statewide hotline to advise
and assist all Vermont residents with health care and health insur-
ance issues, regardless of income, resources or insurance status.
The report provides an overview of the health care challenges
Vermonters called about during the State Fiscal Year (SFY) begin-
ning July 1, 2012 and ending June 30, 2013.
Access to Care and Affordability:
Requests for assistance accessing care accounted for more than
25% of 3,167 calls to the HCO from Vermonters across the state
in SFY 2013. Lack of affordability was cited as a problem by 527
callers - a 32% increase over SFY 2012.
“Individuals increasingly have told us that they cannot afford
the cost of medical care, their insurance premiums, or their plan’s
cost-sharing,” reported State Health Care Ombudsman Trinka
Kerr. “Many told us they were foregoing care because they could
not afford it, even though they had insurance.”
State Medicaid Programs:
After affordability, the most pressing issue was the need for
information about state Medicaid programs, which also relates to
affordability in most cases. The number of callers seeking infor-
mation about Department of Vermont Health Access (DVHA)
programs increased 82% over last year.
Some callers had insurance they couldn’t afford and wanted to
know if they qualified for state health plans, some needed health
care services and didn’t know about state programs for which they
were qualified, and some were having problems understanding the
programs’ rules or navigating the eligibility determination pro-
cess.
Mental Health Care:
Calls regarding problems accessing mental health treatment
increased 49% in 2013, compared with the previous year. The
most frequently cited issue was the lack of affordable treatment for
uninsured individuals, followed by difficulties finding psychia-
trists and therapists and denials of coverage by insurers.
More Than $200,000 in Savings to Vermonters
HCO advocates intervened on behalf of callers to get claims
paid, written off or otherwise covered in 153 cases; prevented 89
households from losing their insurance; and helped 178 house-
holds obtain insurance. Together, these actions saved Vermonters
more than $200,000.
The HCO also reviews insurance company requests for rate
increases that are submitted to the Green Mountain Care Board
and appears before the Board on behalf of consumers to recom-
mend lower rates when it feels that the requested rates are too
high.
In SFY 2013, the HCO represented the public before the Green
Mountain Care Board in 41 rate review proceedings, presenting
detailed memoranda to demonstrate why the rates should be lower
and, in some cases, appearing in hearings before the Board.
Created by the Vermont legislature in 1998 to provide advice
and advocacy for Vermonters with health care and health insur-
ance concerns, the Office of Health Care Ombudsman is not a
state agency. It is program within Vermont Legal Aid, a statewide
nonprofit law firm. There is no charge for HCO services.
For information on how to contact the Health Care Ombudsman’s
office for assistance and for a broad range of consumer guidance
regarding common health care access and insurance issues, visit
the HCO website at www.vtlawhelp.org/health.
Fish & Wildlife Dept Acquires Two New Land Parcels for Conservation
■ ■ ■
The Vermont Fish & Wildlife
Department recently closed on a pair
of properties that will increase the size
of the department’s conserved lands.
The Lewis Creek Streambank prop-
erty is a 323-acre area of conserved
land owned by the Department to pro-
tect streamside habitat and provide
access along the stream for hunting
and fishing. Recently, the Department
acquired an additional 65 acres that
has been added to this property in the
towns of Hinesburg and Monkton. The
65 acres are along Lewis Creek and
were sold at a discounted rate by Ray and Pat Mainer of Hinesburg
to the department.
“We’re pleased to be able to give something to the community
and the state, and to know that this sale will add a substantial
amount of conserved land available to the public,” said Mainer.
According to Jane Lazorchak, land acquisition coordinator for
the Fish & Wildlife Department, the Mainer parcel hosts habitat
for a large colony of federally endangered Indiana bats. In 2008,
department biologists trapped two Indiana bats on adjacent lands
and tracked the animals to a large dead elm tree on Lewis Creek
Road near the Mainer property.
“When we revisited this tree at dusk and watched the bats leav-
ing their maternity roost, we counted over 300 Indiana bats,” said
Lazorchak. “That makes this tree the largest known Indiana bat
maternity colony ever found in Vermont. With the spread of white
nose syndrome, it makes it even more important to protect roost-
ing and feeding habitat for these bats. The Department is grateful
for their thoughtful and generous donation.”
Calendar Brook Wildlife Management Area (WMA) near the
village of Sutton has also added 37
acres, bringing the total size of the
WMA to 450 acres. The additional
property is entirely composed of
mapped deer wintering habitat - a con-
servation priority for the Fish &
Wildlife Department. The property
was acquired through a donation from
Sarah Scharfenaker and Tom Koehne.
“My family has deep roots in Sutton
and this piece of land was our last con-
nection,” said Koehne. “We were
happy to donate it to the state so that
future generations can enjoy this land
as we have.”
“Tom [Koehne] and Sarah [Scharfenaker] demonstrate the gen-
erosity of Vermonters,” said Lazorchak. “This land can now be
managed for wildlife conservation and will remain open for the
public to enjoy.”
The Fish & Wildlife Department has 89 WMAs, the largest of
which encompass tens of thousands of acres. In all, the Department
owns more than 133,000 acres of conserved land throughout
Vermont. Streambank properties, which are usually smaller than
WMAs, are landholdings of the department that protect riparian
habitat along streams and rivers and provide access along streams
for hunting and fishing. They are distinct from the department’s
170 formal fishing access areas on ponds and rivers throughout
Vermont, which typically contain a small parking lot and a boat
ramp. More information about Department landholdings is avail-
able at www.vtfishandwildlife.com.
Along with the Lewis Creek Streambank, the department man-
ages the Lewis Creek Wildlife Management Area on the same
waterway, a few miles upstream.
For
Classified
Advertising
That Works
Call 479-2582
or
1-800-639-9753
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
The changing season brings
new experiences as well as
challenges for the ever-adven-
turous Aries. Your social life
expands, as do the opportuni-
ties at your workplace.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
That recent period of uncer-
tainty has passed. You can now
feel more confident about mak-
ing decisions, especially those
that relate to an important per-
sonal relationship.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Although you might be faced
with a number of tasks on your
to-do list, try to take time out to
enjoy the arts. Music, espe-
cially, can be soothing to the
sensitive soul of a Gemini.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
A disagreement with a col-
league or friend is best resolved
with open and frank discus-
sion. Trying to force the other
party to see things your way is
bound to backfire.
LEO (July 23 to August 22)
That Leonine pride might be
ruffled by a colleague’s chal-
lenge to one of your pet ideas.
But stop growling and listen.
You could learn something that
will work to your advantage.
VIRGO (August 23 to
September 22) Someone in
authority might decide to select
you as a candidate for a project
that carries more responsibili-
ties. Be prepared to show why
you’re the right choice for the
job.
LIBRA (September 23 to
October 22) That new work-
place problem should be dealt
with as soon as possible.
Leaving it unresolved for too
long could lead to an even
more unsettling and time-con-
suming situation.
SCORPIO (October 23 to
November 21) You might have
to do some fancy juggling to
keep both your work responsi-
bilities and personal obliga-
tions on track. But ultimately,
you’ll work it all out, as you
always do.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22
to December 21) You might
hear some upsetting things
about a situation in your life.
But don’t be swayed by talk.
Demand proof before making
any decisions on the matter.
CAPRICORN (December 22
to January 19) Don’t risk
depleting those precious energy
levels by taking on more tasks
than you can realistically han-
dle. Also, remember to ask for
help when you need it.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to
February 18) It might be diffi-
cult for the Aquarian who is
used to giving advice to take
counsel when offered. But it’s a
good idea to listen to what
trusted friends feel you should
know.
PISCES (February 19 to March
20) Things might be a little
unsettled as you move through
a period of reassessment. But
once you get your priorities
sorted out, you should be ready
to tackle an important deci-
sion.
BORN THIS WEEK: You’re
able to achieve a happy balance
in your productive life by never
feeling overwhelmed or under-
appreciated.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
page 16 The WORLD September 18, 2013
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$45 INTRODUCTORY RATE
WITT PLACE, MONTPELIER
DEEP TISSUE - TRIGGER POINT THERAPY
MYOFASCIAL RELEASE
SPECIALIZING IN NECK, SHOULDER & HIP PAIN
NATIONALLY CERTIFIED
www.homesharenow.org
802-479-8544
HOUSING
ACUPUNCTURE
Acupuncture &
Oriental Medicine
Joshua Singer, L.Ac.
Kerry Jenni, L.Ac.
At Montpelier Integrative Family Health
156 Main St. | 223-0954
www.integrativeaom.com
Thursdays 6-8 pm, beginning January 6
No Appointment Necessary
At Montpelier Integrative Family Health
With Kerry Jenni L.Ac. and Joshua Singer L.Ac.
156 Main St., Montpelier • 802.223.0954
Treatments will be provided in a group
setting and are based on the successful
experience of the National Acupuncture
Detoxification Association and the Lincoln
Recovery Center in NY.
This type of treatment is most effective for:
Stress • Headaches • Sleep Issues • P.T.S.D.
Addiction Management:
Smoking, Alcohol, Drugs, Sugar
Everyone is welcome!
For more information please visit www.integrativeaom.com
or call 802-223-0954
$10
Acupuncture
Sessions
Acupuncture &
Oriental Medicine
Joshua Singer, L.Ac.
Kerry Jenni, L.Ac.
At Montpelier Integrative Family Health
156 Main St. | 223-0954
www.integrativeaom.com
Thursdays 6-8 pm, beginning January 6
No Appointment Necessary
At Montpelier Integrative Family Health
With Kerry Jenni L.Ac. and Joshua Singer L.Ac.
156 Main St., Montpelier • 802.223.0954
Treatments will be provided in a group
setting and are based on the successful
experience of the National Acupuncture
Detoxification Association and the Lincoln
Recovery Center in NY.
This type of treatment is most effective for:
Stress • Headaches • Sleep Issues • P.T.S.D.
Addiction Management:
Smoking, Alcohol, Drugs, Sugar
Everyone is welcome!
For more information please visit www.integrativeaom.com
or call 802-223-0954
$10
Acupuncture
Sessions
Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine
Joshua Singer, L.Ac.
Kerri Jenni, L.Ac.
At Montpelier Integrative Family Health
156 Main Street ❘ 223-0954
www.integrativeaom.com
IAOM is a CIGNA provider. Check with your plan to see if it
covers acupuncture. Most Vermont state employee plans do.
CHIROPRACTIC
Gentle, effective family
chiropractic since 1983
James M. Lynch, D.C.
Shane J. Lynch, D.C.
Saturday appointments
now available
Lynch Family
Chiropractic, LLC
223-3811
214 Elm St., Montpelier
VISIT US ON
We Take Time To Get To
Know You And Your
Medications.
20 South Main Street, Barre
479-3381
M-F 8:30am-6pm • Sat. 8:30am-1pm
PHARMACY
Don’t have health insurance?
Need to see a doctor?
WE’RE HERE FOR YOU
if you live anywhere in Central Vermont
~ By Appointment Only~
553 North Main Street
Barre, VT 05641
802-479-1229
HEALTH CARE
the healing practices AT 28 EAST STAT E ST.
28 East State Street Montpelier, Vermont 05602

HOLISTIC HEALING
Edward Kentish
■acupuncture 229-4537
Pamela Kentish
■acupuncture 229-4537
Janet Pocorobba
■psycotherapy 249-4997
Hadar Sarit
■shiatsu therapy 279-7804
Robin Cornell
■happiness coaching 223-3427
Joann Dwyer
■massage therapy 371-9922
Maggie Fox
■psychotherapy 522-5855
Melissa Marks
■massage therapy 518-755-5688
Sari K. Wolf
■body/energy work 223-4715
To be the best, it takes more than just the training and expertise to diagnose and treat
patients. It takes heart. Providing quality healthcare in a community setting is what it’s
all about, and we take pride in making our patients and their families feel at ease. We’re
committed to providing the care, the service and the respect you deserve.
TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
Join CROP Hunger Walk to
Fight Hunger in Vermont
and Around the World
Hunger is a terrible thing.
Everyone knows how they
feel when it is 11am and
lunch is at least an hour
away. Being hungry is all
you can think about! Then
you get to sit down to eat and
you say, “I was starving.”
(But you know you really
weren’t “starving!”) Doesn’t
it hurt to think of people in this country, and in places all over the
world, feeling worse than that all the time, every day?
You can actually do something to help make this terrible situa-
tion better. And you’ll get exercise, fresh fall air and have a lot of
fun doing it. A CROP Hunger Walk is planned for October 20th
and you are invited to join in.
Folks, from a variety of Barre and Montpelier area churches and
faiths, are busy making plans for a 2.7 mile stroll through
Montpelier. Neighbors, friends and families are all invited to join
in the fun. There is no need to be a church member. You just need
to be a person who cares about others and is willing to help raise
money for a very worthy cause.
CROP Hunger Walk is a mission of Church World Service,
which is an inter-faith humanitarian organization whose goal is
“working with partners to eradicate hunger and poverty, and to
promote peace and justice around the world.” For more informa-
tion on what Church World Service is and does, you can visit
www.churchworldservice.org and for more information about
CROP Hunger Walks, visit www.cropwalk.org. The local walk
also has its own site at www.crophungerwalk.org/barrevt.
The folks at Church World Service are committed to helping
organize and support local CROP Hunger Walks, and 25% of the
money raised by the walkers stays in the local area and is used to
support agencies or ministries that are working to end hunger and
poverty in Central Vermont. Next year’s walk will be in Barre as
this is a regional event.
Bethany UCC Church on Main St. in Montpelier will be hosting
a Recruiters/Walkers Rally event at the church on Tuesday,
September 24th at 5pm. A light meal is planned and will be fol-
lowed by a presentation by Rev. Bert Marshall, Regional Director
of CWS. He will share best practices, answer questions, and gen-
erally help interested participants to start something new and
wonderful in Central Vermont. He will also discuss online giving,
which is known to be a major boost to the money walkers can
raise.
At the end of the meeting, recruiter’s packets, brochures, post-
ers, and whatever else people need to take back to their friends,
families and neighbors to get people excited and involved, will be
handed out.
Please contact Judi Joy at 802-279-3177 if you are planning to
attend or with any questions.
Organizers of Granite City
Grocery, the proposed commu-
nity-owned grocery store for
downtown Barre, are selling
owner shares to raise funds for
start-up and welcome any and
all community members inter-
ested in supporting the initiative
to consider becoming an owner.
Says GCG chairwoman Emily
Kaminsky, “After a year of
organizing, we’re excited to be
at this stage. After reaching our
goal of 600 pledged owners in
April, we started selling owner
shares in July. Since then, nearly
half of those who pledged are
now owners and dozens become
owners every week. Ultimately,
we’ll need more owners than
that to turn the dream of a com-
munity-owned downtown gro-
cery store into a reality. And,
we’re encouraging the commu-
nity to join us now so we can
take the next step: select and
secure a site.”
Granite City Grocery orga-
nizers explain that their vision is
for a Barre-style grocery store
that offers what its owners and
community members want and
need the most. Kaminsky says, “Some people hear the word co-op
and think this place won’t be for them. Nothing could be further
from the truth. A co-operative is a powerful business model that
gives consumer owners the power to control the direction of the
business. But, the co-op model doesn’t determine what’s on the
shelves or what it looks like. Owning a grocery store together as a
community affords us the chance to do it our way and not wait (…
and wait) for an outsider to come along and do it. We’ll decide
what goes on the shelves; fresh food plus the basics at reasonable
prices is our focus.”
As for the search for a location, the GCG Board utilized the
funds raised over the last year from a Food Co-op Initiative grant
plus matching funds from the community to fund a market study
on seven downtown locations all within a ½ mile of Depot Square.
Now, the job of the Board is to take that information from the
market study and, with the help of two new consultants (also paid
with the same funds), run each potential site through its paces to
determine design and financial feasibility. “When it comes to loca-
tion, we can’t skip these important steps and it takes time,” says
Granite City Grocery Invites the Community to “Own It”!
The Kaminsky Family, one of several hundred proud GCG owners.
Kaminsky. “We hope that enough people will join our ranks as
owners now even though we haven’t yet secured the site. In fact,
we can’t secure a site without enough owners. If we can get 600 to
800 owners paid in, we’ll be in a good position to secure a site…
sooner rather than later.”
The cost of a voting share in Granite City Grocery is $200 per
household (or per organization in the case of nonprofits, coopera-
tives, and sole proprietor businesses) with several payment plans
and methods to fit virtually anyone’s financial needs. Payment
plans of $10, $25, and $50 per month are available and GCG is
accepting payment by check, credit card, cash, or automatic
draft.
GCG organizers invite anyone interested in making this project
a reality to purchase a voting share today at www.granitecitygro-
cery.coop. Or, call 802/279-7518 to request owner share informa-
tion. Owner share information may also be picked up at GCG’s
table at the Barre Farmer’s Market table every Wednesday
between 3 and 6:30pm.
New Location
with Ample Free Parking!
Pamela Brady, L.Ac.
250 Main St., Ste. 206, Montpelier, VT
802-229-1800
Treating:
•Acute & Chronic Pain
•Asthma •Allergies
•Headaches
•Anxiety/Depression
•Stress •Hypertension
•Sport Injuries
•Insomnia
ACUPUNCTURE,
SOUND HEALING AND QIGONG
The Yankee Chef
TM
My name is James Bailey and I AM THE YANKEE CHEF! I have been cook-
ing since the age of 14 years, when my Dad opened his third restaurant in
Maine. I currently write food columns for several New England newspa-
pers, The Maine Edge (found online at themaineedge.com) and the Villager
Newspaper (found onlne at villagernewspaper.net). I have written several
cookbooks and I blog at theyankeechef.blogspot.com. Find me on Twitter
and check out my youtube videos. I am also a Yankee Food Historian and a
professional genealogist. Visit my website at www.theyankeechef.com
Corn on the Cob with Garlic-Herb Butter
The perfect combination of that garlic fla-
vor will compliment any protein dish you will
be enjoying with your corn on the cob.
6 ears fresh corn on the cob, cooked
1 stick of butter or mar-
garine
1 teaspoon minced garlic
in oil
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
pepper
Parsley
Allow butter to come to
room temperature. Mash
garlic with a a mortar and pestle or simply use
a sturdy fork so the garlic is mashed. It doesn’t
have to be lump-free however. . Beat butter
with a hand-held or table top mixer until light
and airy. Add the garlic,
cayenne pepper and what-
ever amount of dried or
freshly chopped parsley
you desire. Continue beat-
ing until well blended.
Cover and refrigerate until
needed to slather on your
hot corn on the cob.
Sweet and Salty Corn on the Cob
Give it some thought. The corn is sweet and
with the tiny little bit of honey mixed in with
the butter, it can only heighten the taste of the
corn. And about the bacon. It was just an item
that popped into my head and I sure am glad I
gave it a whirl.6 ears of fresh corn on the cob,
cooked
1 stick butter or margarine
3 tablespoons honey
1 strip bacon, cooked and crumbled*
Let butter come to room temperature. With
a hand-held or tabletop mixer, beat the butter
on high for about 2 minutes, or until it is light
and airy. Slowly beat in the honey until well
incorporated. Add the bacon and continue
beating until mixed well.Transfer to a bowl
and cover to refrigerate until needed.
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 17
GETTING BACK UP
In recent years, health professionals have been using a simple test
that reveals longevity potential. This test involves nothing more
than rising from a sitting position on the floor. The so-called “sit-
rise test” reflects the muscle strength, coordination, balance, and
flexibility needed to perform a variety of daily tasks. It is also tied to
the risk of falling, which is a major concern among seniors. Ideally,
a person should be able to rise up from a seated position on the floor,
without the use of his or her hands, knees, forearms, or sides of legs.
Of course, older individuals
are not able to pop up from a
cross-legged seated position
as well as a youngster, but
that’s the point.
P.S. Any exercise that
increases strength and
balance, such as yoga, Tai
Chi, or weight-bearing
exercise (walking), helps
reduce the likelihood of
falling and fracture risk.
The “sit-rise test” measures your fitness at
the most basic level, testing not only your
muscular strength but also flexibility, balance,
and motor coordination. All of these attributes
are essential for daily living, and for maintaining
your independence as you age. If you’re
being discharged from a hospital, short-stay
rehabilitation can help “bridge the gap” between
hospital and home-and give you the extra time
you need to get back on your feet again. At
ROWAN COURT HEALTH & REHAB CENTER,
we strive to make the later years of life some
of the very best years. For more information,
please call 476-4166. We are located at 378
Prospect St.
In affiliation with
Central Vermont
Medical Center
We are CIGNA providers,
please check with your
plan for
coverage information
Integrative Acupuncture
& Oriental Medicine
Kerry Jenni, L.Ac. and
Joshua Singer, L.Ac.
802-223-0954
156 Main Street, Montpelier
246 Granger Road, Berlin
www.integrativeaom.com
Acupuncture Helps Relieve Pain
~Back Pain ~Neck Pain ~Joint Pain
What Your
Anesthesiologist
Needs To Know
To reduce possible complications
during surgery, speak with your
anesthesiologist before your proce-
dure. Make sure to tell him of any
previous adverse or allergic reac-
tions to anesthesia, as well as any
other allergies to food or drugs. To
avoid harmful drug interactions,
inform him of all vitamin or herbal
supplements and prescription medi-
cations that you may be taking.
Often patients don't think over-the-
counter (oral or topical) medications
are important enough to mention.
This could be a potentially danger-
ous omission. Talk about any smok-
ing and/or alcohol consumption hab-
its also.
Weekly
Health Tip
20 South Main Street
Barre • 479-3381
M-F 8:30am-6pm, Sat. 8:30am-1pm
by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph.
for 9-18
What Your
Anesthesiologist
for 9-25
Exercise Prevents
Heart Attacks
for 10-2
Excess Weight
Ups Cancer Risk
for 10-9
Whole Grains
Benefit The Heart
Students Work Together to ‘Free My Ride’
of Secondhand Smoke
Community Partners Meet To Discuss Childhood Trauma
Surviving a Loved One’s Suicide
Survivors of a death by suicide play a central role in National
Suicide Prevention Week, which was held September 8 to
September 14 this year. Few advocates of prevention and aware-
ness are as passionate and dedicated as an individual who has been
through the tragedy of a loss to suicide.
According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,
more than 80% of people will lose someone to suicide in their
lifetime. The AFSP offers an accessible, comprehensive website,
www.afsp.org that provides an array of resources.
Those resources tackle head-on the omnipresent question of
“why” that many survivors struggle with, noting that more than
90% of people who take their own lives have an underlying mental
disorder at the time of their death, that is often unidentified. While
not usually the only factor in a suicide, AFSP notes that these
disorders can cause terrible suffering and can affect a person’s
ability to think clearly, make decisions and seek help.
The website also provides ready resources to assist those strug-
gling – normalizing all the myriad feelings a survivor may experi-
ence, emphasizing that a death by suicide should not be a source
of shame, and directing individuals to local help.
The Vermont Chapter of the AFSP is just such a resource, with
a mission of promoting the AFSP goals within Vermont and pro-
viding comfort to those who have lost a loved one to suicide
through monthly support group meetings.
Support groups are held throughout the state, with three running
currently and three more starting up soon. The current groups meet
monthly – in Burlington on the first Wednesday, in Wallingford on
the third Tuesday, and in St. Albans on the second Thursday. New
groups are beginning in Newport, Montpelier and southern
Vermont.
In addition to these groups and outreach to survivors, the
Vermont AFSP delivers innovative prevention programs, educates
the public about risk factors and warning signs, and raises funds
for suicide research and programs.
Linda Livendale, Chair of the Vermont Chapter, called attention
to AFSP’s signature prevention program, the Interactive Screening
Program, a web-based method for connecting people at risk for
suicide to a counselor.
Providing a brief online questionnaire to help the user identify
depression or other mental health problems, the ISP is anonymous
and customized for each participating site.
“We would like to get this screening program set up in the
Vermont colleges,” said Livendale. The ISP is designed to be used
in a variety of settings, including colleges and workplaces, and can
be adapted for outreach to at-risk groups in the population at
large.
Those who complete and submit the questionnaire receive a
personalized written response from a counselor, and are encour-
aged to exchange follow-up messages online with the counselor
without having to identify themselves. In cases where the coun-
selor is nearby, users whose responses suggest significant mental
health concerns are offered in-person meetings and treatment
referrals.
Livendale expanded on the offerings that AFSP can provide
throughout the state.
“The Vermont chapter also has the More than Sad: Teen
Depression program for high school students, which helps staff
and students to understand suicide risk factors and warning signs,
and support efforts in getting help,” said Livendale. Stigma around
mental health struggles often interfere with help-seeking.
“We have several videos for physicians, college students, and
medical students to help them recognize and reduce suicide risks,”
Livendale added. “We can provide the films to any interested
group. We can also provide a town hall meeting in any commu-
nity with AFSP’s researchers who are conducting studies to try to
understand and prevent suicides.”
Livendale encouraged community members to come out in sup-
port of the next Annual Out of the Darkness Community Walk,
held on Saturday, October 5, 2013, in Burlington. This event fol-
lows the first 2013 Vermont Walk held in Newport last week.
Every fall, family members, friends, and colleagues walk 3 to 5
miles together in hundreds of communities across the nation to
prevent suicide, raise awareness, and end the stigma that sur-
rounds depression and other mental disorders. The Out of the
Darkness Community Walks are AFSP’s signature fundraising
campaign, and walkers honor loved ones lost to suicide and raise
funds to support AFSP’s vital mission.
For more information, visit www.afsp.org, or call the toll free
number 1-888-333-AFSP (2377). The Vermont Chapter can be
reached at vermont@afsp.org, or 802-272-6564, for more infor-
mation on the Out of the Darkness Walk and the Vermont support
groups.
If you are feeling suicidal please immediately call VT 2-1-1 or
the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK
(8255). For training information on suicide risk factors, warning
signs, and prevention, please contact nicole@healthandlearning.
org or visit www.healthandlearning.org.
A group of approximately 40 experts in child-
hood development, adult well-being, and educa-
tion came together on September 11 at the Barre
Evangelical Free Church for a forum on child-
hood trauma to discuss its impact on community
wellness throughout central Vermont.
“We focused on what is working in central
Vermont communities that prevents childhood
trauma,” said Sasha Bianchi, director of the
Barre office of the Vermont Department of
Health. “We should make every effort to connect
children exposed to trauma with people who are
trained to intervene, provide help, prevention
and guidance.”
Research attributes as much as one-half to
two-thirds of serious drug use to childhood
trauma. There are also strong links between child
abuse and neglect and later chronic disease such
as heart disease and obesity.
Childhood trauma is all too common, Bianchi
said. According to data collected by the Vermont
Department of Health, 58 percent of adult
Vermonters report at least one childhood trau-
matic event. Fourteen percent reported four or
more types of childhood trauma. And the more
types of childhood trauma in a person’s back-
ground, the stronger the likelihood that he or she
will deal with chronic disease, including addic-
tion and depression.
Awareness of the scale of the problem as well
as its overall impact on health – both physical
and mental – is a glaring need.
“During the forum, we discussed ways to
engage the community in preventing trauma,
identifying the markers of trauma once it’s hap-
pened, and offering effective treatment for those
dealing with the aftermath,” Bianchi said.
Children suffering from adverse childhood
experiences such as physical or emotional abuse,
emotional neglect or witnessing violence, may
have difficulty concentrating, and be in trouble at
school. Teens may engage in risky behaviors
such as early and unprotected sex and drug use,
or simply eating too much as a means of finding
comfort. And adults may suffer from depression
and have a hard time keeping a job or performing
well at work. These adults also show a strong
tendency to develop chronic disease, such as
obesity, heart disease and diabetes.
“Research suggests that childhood trauma is
the root cause in far too many cases of the top
public health concerns today,” Bianchi said.
“Obesity, diabetes, depression, drug use – the
science making these links is strong. We need to
continue to come together and discuss what we
can do locally to prevent childhood trauma.”
n n n
n n n
Hannah Crowley, 11, knew she wanted to par-
ticipate in the Free My Ride campaign after get-
ting sick from exposure to secondhand smoke.
“I got pneumonia and I wanted to prevent
smoking in cars and keep other kids from getting
sick,” she said on her audition tape for a new
video the campaign released today. Crowley is a
sixth grader at Hunt Middle School. “Opening
the car window does not protect me from sec-
ondhand smoke, and being exposed can lead to
respiratory infections.”
One in three high school students reported that
they had been exposed to secondhand smoke
inside a car in the past week, according to the
2011 Vermont Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The
Free My Ride campaign was developed by the
Vermont Department of Health to provide stu-
dents, many of whom are driven to school each
day, with a unified forum to speak out against
secondhand smoke exposure.
The campaign is led by Vermont Kids Against
Tobacco (VKAT) and Our Voices Xposed (OVX)
coalitions, two groups that empower youth to get
actively involved in tobacco control. VKAT and
OVX have more than 400 members across the
state who work together with the Health
Department and community groups to educate
parents and other students about the health risks
associated with tobacco use.
Deerfield Valley Community Partnership is
one of the community coalitions that supports
the campaign, and has been collecting pledges
from Vermonters who believe that secondhand
smoke in cars needs to be stopped.
Mai Linh Vankirk, a freshman at Essex High
School, joined VKAT last year during middle
school, and said she learned about the Free My
Ride campaign from the school nurse, who sug-
gested she audition for the video.
“I am not exposed to smoke in a car, but I
know so many other students are, and I wanted
to do something about it,” Vankirk said. She said
filming the campaign video lasted nearly three
hours, but it was well worth her time. Her part of
the video includes a warning to parents that sec-
ondhand smoke can lead to ear infections.
Go to the Free My Ride Facebook page, which
has already received more than 300 “likes,” to
watch the video: www.freemyridevt.com. Follow
the campaign on Twitter: @FreeMyRideVT or
Facebook: /FreeMyRideVT.
For Classified
Advertising
That Works
Call 479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
The Health Center
We would like to welcome the
following people to our dental staff
Joshua Bratt, DMD
Attended Boston University
Katarzyna Dionne, DMD
Attended Tufts Univ., Boston, MA
Richard Cordero, DMD, MD
from Burlington. An Oral Surgeon who will provide
services on a part-time basis on select Tuesdays.
Please call 454-1047 for an appointment
157 Towne Avenue • Plainfield, Vt 05667
page 18 The WORLD September 18, 2013
Barre Congregational Church
Chicken Pie Supper
Country Craft Fair
Craft Fair, Bottle Drive, Silent Auction & Raffle
Fri. Sept. 27 3-8pm
Sat. Sept. 28 8am- 12pm
crafts, baked goods, take-home hot food, and lots more!
Fri. Sept. 27
5 & 6:30pm seatings
Adults, $11;
children under 10, $5;
Toddlers, free
for reservations call 476-6869
Canadian Club
Canadian Club
Route 14 • Barre, VT
Sunday,
October 13, 2013
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Lunch Available from 11:00 am-2:00 pm
CHICKEN PIE DINNER
Crafters Setup Starts at 8:00 AM
TABLES ARE STILL AVAILABLE
Please call Gloria Marceau 433-5589 for details
HARVEST CHICKEN DINNER
Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013 • 6:00 PM
Central VT Catholic School
79 Summer Street, Barre
Menu includes: Chicken & Biscuits, Mashed
Potatoes, Gravy, Vegetables, Coleslaw, Cranberry
Sauce, Homemade Pies & Cakes, Beverages
$11 adults • $5 children under 12
Reservations Required by October 1
Call 479-0667 or 476-9418
Sponsored by Catholic Daughters of the Americas
Court St. Monica #1181, Barre, Vermont
POTATOES POTATOES
Sunday,
Sept. 22
9AM to 5PM
ONE DAY ONLY!
P
I
C
K
Y
O
U
R
O
W
N
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND: ANA’S HOMEMADE FRENCH FRIES
Follow the signs from Route 14 South of Williamtown
Barb & Bob Chappelle
South Hill Road, Williamstown  433-5930
35¢/Lb. Behind the Digger
Bring Own Containers
50 Lb. Bags of #1’s $17.00
50 Lb. Bags of Chefs, Bakers
& unclassifieds also available
CHICKEN PIE
SUPPER
Saturday, Sept. 28
5:00 PM & 6:15PM
East Brookfield Community Church
Route 14
Adults $10.00 • Children (5-12) $5.00
Reservations call 276-3312
TAKE OUTS $11.00 • BAKE SALE
LIBERTY
ORCHARD
“Pick Your Own”
Apples
OPEN FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
West St., Brookfield
Short, Easy-To-Pick Trees
Mon.-Thurs. 1PM to 5PM
Fri.-Sun. 10AM to 5PM Dwayne & Ginny
Brees
802-276-3161
www.libertyorchardvt.com
MILLER FARM STAND
Sweet corn varieties
$5 per dozen,
$20 per bushel
Plus limited quantities
of cucumbers,
tomatoes & sunflowers
South Barre off Miller Rd.
2 blocks north of Hwy 63
802-793-5129




Plumley Armory, Norwich University, Northfield, VT
DROP: Friday, Sept. 27: Noon - 6 p.m.
SWAP: Saturday, Sept. 28: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
BE PREPARED!
• Please separate clothing from rags
and label bags: “women’s,” “men’s,”
“children’s” or “rags.”
• No boxes or hangers, please.
• Shoes, bags and coats are accepted!
The free clothing DROP ’N SWAP diverts
clothing, linens, and rags from the waste stream and
redistributes quality items through the community
thanks to the Salvation Army of Barre!
(Proceeds will help cover advertising expenses of the event!)
Call the Center for Civic Engagement at Norwich
University for more information at 802-485-2644
or email 4achange@norwich.edu
Norwich University Proudly Presents
This Year’s Annual Fall Clothing
DROP’N
SWAP
ONLY $1 ENTRANCE FEE ON SATURDAY
FOR ALL THE CLOTHES YOU WANT!
Wednesday, September 18
BARRE- Farmer’s Market. Fresh produce, plants, baked goods,
meats, eggs, crafts and much more. City Hall Park, 3-6:30pm.
Open Mike. With host John Lackard. Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St., no
cover, 9pm. Info. 476-7919.
Bobby Petrocelli. Presentation by the speaker/coach/author. Hosted
by SADD, all community members and families with middle & high
school age students are welcome. S.H.S. auditorium, FREE, 7pm.
BERLIN- Cub Scout Recruitment Night. A short presentation on
scouting, for families with boys age 7-10 (or grade 1 to 5). Don’t have
to be a BES student to attend. Berlin Elementary, 6:30pm. 479-2787.
MONTPELIER- Monarch Butterfly Tagging. We’ll catch, tag &
release some monarchs. Bring a net if you can. North Branch Nature
Center, $5 adults/$3 kids, drop by any time 3:30-5pm. 229-6206.
History and Struggle in Egypt. Pres. by Sandy Mohlman, who was
an exchange teacher in Egypt. Part of Osher series. Montpelier Senior
Activity Center, $5 for OLLI non-members, 1:30pm. Info. 223-1763.
George Lisi Poetry Reading. Naturalist, teacher and poet George
Lisi reads from and signs his book, Through the Gates of Trees.
Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 6:30pm. Info. 223-3338.
Your Breath... It Happens Roughly 18,000 Times a Day! Practice
simple breath explorations & more w/Amy LePage-Hansen of Emerge
Yoga. Hunger Mtn Coop, FREE, 6-7:30pm. Pre-reg. 223-8000 x202.
Vermont Health Connect Forum for Small Businesses. Continental
breakfast provided. Capitol Plaza, 7:30-11:30am. Follow links from
www.vtchamber.com to pre-register.
NORTHFIELD- Book Discussion: Five Great Short Stories by
Anton Chekhov. Part of Vermont Humanities Council’s “Masters of
the Short Story” series. Grown Public Library, 7pm. Info. 485-7423.
WARREN- Comic Book Writing. Workshop with Ericc Cram, for
kids in grades 2-6. Warren Public Library, FREE, 3:30-4:30pm. RSVP
to programs@warrenlibrary.com
WATERBURY- Poetry Swap & Discussion. Waterbury Library
hosts this event as part of VT Reads program. Copies of Poetry Alive
available at the library. Event at Bridgeside Books, 7pm. 244-7036.
Thursday, September 19
BARRE- So You Always Wanted to be an Archeologist But Life Got
in the Way. Brown bag lunch & informal conversation w/archeologists,
foll. by Open House. VT History Center, FREE, noon-4pm. 828-3050.
Cub Scout Recruitment Night. A short presentation on scouting, for
families with boys age 7-10 (or grade 1 to 5). Any local family may
attend. Barre Congregational Church, 6:30pm. 479-2787.
MARSHFIELD- “Writing and Reading” Film Series. Will Ferrell
plays an IRS agent who discovers he is a character in a novel. Jaquith
Public Library, 7pm. Info. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Robert Frost: This Verse Business. Emmy-winning
actor Gordon Clapp stars as the great American poet. Lost Nation
Theater, adults $25-$30, senior & youth discounts, 7pm. 229-0492.
Jacob Green. Blues/soul/folk. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 6-8pm.
Info. 229-9212.
MORRISVILLE- GED Testing. Social studies, science & reading at
3pm, take 1 or 2; writing at 5:30pm, math at 6pm, take only one.
Morrisville Learning Center, 52 Portland St. Pre-register 888-5531.
STOWE- Make Some Noise. Move Around. Performance by pianist
Robert Grundstein and dancers Reilly Faith, Madeline Dwyer, Carmen
Isabell & Sojourn Gudorf-Johnson. Helen Day Art Ctr, 6pm. 253-8358.
Friday, September 20
BARRE- Art Opening. Reception for “Rock Solid” and other new
exhibits. Studio Place Arts, 5:30-7:30pm. Info. 479-7069.
Newsboys “Restart Tour.” With guests For King & Country, Moriah
Peters, and Rapture Ruckus. Barre Auditorium, $20-$35, group dis-
counts, doors 6pm, show 7pm. Tix at 476-8188.
BRADFORD- Caught in the Acts. A selection of shorts and one-acts
by various authors. Old Church Theater, $10 adults/$5 students,
7:30pm. Info. 222-3322.
BROOKFIELD- Fall Festival. Chicken Pie Dinner, $8, 5:30pm;
contra dance with music by The Parsnips at 7pm. All at Vermont
Grange Center, 308 West St. Info. www.vtstategrange.org
CALAIS- Abby Jenne. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store,
FREE, 7-9:30pm.
CHELSEA- Chelsea Farmers Market. Veggie starts, baked goods,
meats, crafts and more. North Common, 3-6pm. Info. 685-9987.
continued on next page
Autumn
Outings
ORCHARD HOURS
Sat. & Sun. 10-5
Mon. & Fri. 3-5
Weather permitting
•Syrup
•Honey
Vermont Technical College
Randolph Center, Vermont
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NOW OPEN
McIntosh, Cortlands & Liberty
MARSHFIELD- Art and Author Night. The art of Helen Rabin will
be shown, followed by a reading of the work of Jules Rabin.
Refreshments served. Jaquith Public Library, 6pm.
MONTPELIER- Robert Frost: This Verse Business. Lost Nation
Theater, 8pm. See description 9/19.
Fall Migration Bird Walk. We’ll search for migrating warblers, vir-
eos & more. Beginners welcome, binocs available. No. Branch Nature
Center, $10 adults/free for kids & members, 7:30-9am. 229-6206.
Carrotopia. Jackie Smith & Erik Nielsen share their multi-media col-
laboration feat. photos of unusual carrots, w/ accompanying poetry and
music. Montpelier Senior Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St., 1pm. 223-2518.
Ducks Unlimited Central VT Chapter Dinner & Auction. Elks
Club, $65/$85 couple (both include 1 membership), cocktail hour/raf-
fles/games at 5pm, dinner 6:30pm. Tix 244-6292 or 229-4275.
CVCOA Appointments. Sarah Willhoit answers your questions about
health insurance & other senior
services. Montpelier Senior
Activity Center, 58 Barre St., 9am-
noon. Call 479-4400 for appoint-
ment.
STOWE- Art Opening.
Reception for new group exhibi-
tion, t/here. Studio Place Arts,
6pm. Info. 253-8358.
WATERBURY- Tunnel, Hole
and Burrow. Join Mr. K. to learn
how & why animals dig, and
experiment with some digging
tools. For ages 3 to 6. Waterbury
Public Library, 10am. Pre-reg.
244-7036.
WATERBURY CENTER- Take
Out Dinner. Meat or veggie lasa-
gna or mac & cheese, plus all the
fixin’s. Waterbury Centerr
Community Church, $9, pick up
4-6pm. RSVP 244-8089.
W I L L I A M S T O W N -
Williamstown Farmers Market
and Flea Market. Free market
space. At Pump & Pantry, North
Main St., 3pm-6pm. Info. 433-
1052.
Saturday,
September 21
ADAMANT- Community
Crostic Construction. Puzzle
creator Rick Winston will lead the
group in construction of a new
word puzzle to be published this
fall. Adamant Community Club,
7pm. 454-7103.
BARRE- Central VT Roller
Derby. Twin City Riot vs. GSRD
Legislashers. At the Barre BOR.
Info. www.twincityriot.com
Barre Tones Annual Concert.
Women’s a cappella barbershop
chorus presents a Disney-themed
concert. Barre Opera House,
$15/$10 seniors/$7 under age 18,
7pm. Info. 476-8188.
Chicken Pie Supper. Takeouts
also available (12:45pm &
5:45pm). Barre Universalist
Church, $10/$5 kids under 12,
seatings at noon, 5pm & 6:15pm.
RSVP 479-0114.
BRADFORD- Caught in the
Acts. Old Church Theater,
7:30pm. See description 9/20.
BROOKFIELD- Fall Festival.
Demos, crafts, games, more. Food
auction 2pm; Roast Beef Dinner
5:30pm; Middle River Gospel
6:30pm. All at Vermont Grange
Center, 308 West St. www.vtstate-
grange.org
CALAIS- Peg and Cheryl,
Naughty and Nice. At Whammy
Bar, Maple Corner Store, FREE,
7-9:30pm.
MARSHFIELD- Food & Craft
Sale. Baked and home-canned
goods, produce, and crafts.
Benefits construction of new
church. Christ Covenant Anglican
Catholic Church, Creamery St.,
9am-1pm.
MONTPELIER- Capital City
Farmers Market. Produce, meat,
cheeses, baked goods, more.
Natural fiber demos start 10am;
Summit School musicians per-
form. Corner of State & Elm
Streets, 9am-1pm.
Robert Frost: This Verse
Business. Lost Nation Theater,
8pm. See description 9/19.
Onion River 8K Trail Race.
Adult & kids races on the NBNC
trails. North Branch Nature Center,
$10 adults/$5 kids/$15 day of,
register 8am, races begin 9:30am.
Info. at events@onionriver.com
Irish Session. Bagitos Cafe, 28
Main St., 2-5pm. Info. 229-9212.
Kids Yoga Fest for International Peace Day. Led by Chrissy
Lefavour of Studio Zenith. Yoga for ages 0-6 at 10am; yoga for ages
7-14 at 11am. At Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Pre-reg. 223-4665.
Hot Neon Magic. Come dance the night away to your favorite ‘80s
jams. Positive Pie, 22 State St., $5, 10:30pm.
Colleges, Communes & Co-ops: 1970s Contributions to VT’s
Organic Food Movement. Vermont Historical Society’s annual meet-
ing and conference. VT History Museum, $25 members & stu-
dents/$30 non-members, 9am-4pm. Pre-register 479-8503.
John Lackard Blues Band. Sweet Melissa’s, Langdon St., no cover,
9pm.
Fall Foliage Family Hike & Picnic. Hosted by Good Beginnings,
includes free picnic lunch. Bring the whole family! Hubbard Park,
meet at frog pond near entrance, 11am. Must RSVP to 595-7953.
continued on next page
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 19
VENDER EXPO: 3pm
COOKING SHOW: 5pm
Regular tickets are available at Price
Chopper in Barre and Morrisville.
VIP and Regular tickets are available at
the Barre Opera House Box
Office…476-8188 or online at:
Barreoperahouse.org
FRANK & FROGGY ‘live’
broadcasts along with
great door prizes and tons
of fun!
Barre, Vermont
TASTEOFHOME.COM
Saturday, October 5th
Making & Restoring Fine Violins
Rentals • Service • Sales
Violin • Viola • Cello • Bass
BACK-TO-SCHOOL
SPECIAL
2 months Free Violin Rental
with first two months paid
Monthly Rentals: Violin $15, Cello $28
10 Hutchins Circle, Barre 476-7798
www.vermontviolinmaker.com
Gregoire’s VIOLIN SHOP
MISCELLANEOUS
HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS WANTED
for
Central Vermont Rotary
“Last Chance” Yard Sale
Saturday, Oct. 5
at The WORLD
Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Must be in good shape.
Call Gary at The
WORLD 479-2582
or bring to The
WORLD at 403 US
Rt. 302 (B-M Rd.),
Berlin
No large appliances or furniture
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Congratulations
to Uncommon
Market, Golden
Meadows
Country
Market, Maple
Corner, LBJ’s,
Kurrley Fuel
and CP Dudley
Stores for
making it easy to
live healthy! These
stores joined he
VT Department
of Health’s Small
Change, Big
Impact Campaign
and continue to
promote healthy
food choices.
page 20 The WORLD September 18, 2013
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KID’S RIMFIRE
FUN SHOOT
SUNDAY, SEPT. 22 • 2-5PM
Rifles & Ammo Supplied
Range Safety Officers, Expert Shooters & Hunter Education
Instructors will be on hand to supervise the kids.
SPONSORED BY THE BARRE FISH & GAME CLUB • GUN CLUB ROAD, BARRE
ReUse Fair. Live music, outdoor sculpture, speakers, art & craft ven-
dors, more. Admission by donation of cash, used household or educa-
tional items, or clothing. Christ Episcopal Church, State St., 9am-3pm.
PLAINFIELD- Psychology and Counseling Program Visiting
Day. Learn about Goddards BA and MA programs. Goddard College,
9am-4pm. RSVP to admissions@goddard.edu or 800-906-8312.
RANDOLPH- Randolph Farmer’s Market. Veggies, plants, meat,
baked goods, crafts, music, more. Rte 66, 26 Central St., 9am-1pm.
RANDOLPH CENTER- Harvest Fair. Plants & producew, baked
goods, white elephant, raffles, BBQ chicken & hot dogs. First
Congregational Church, East Bethel Rd., 10am-2pm. Info. 728-4294.
ROCHESTER- Sandpaper Paintings: Talk by Randall Holton,
3:30pm; Why are We Drawn to Folk Art?: Panel discussion, 5pm.
BigTown Gallery, $15 incl wine/cheese btwn events. RSVP 767-9670.
WAITSFIELD- Waitsfield Farmers Market. Live music, foods, veg-
gies, plants, artisans, sweet treats, meats. Rte 100 on Mad River Green,
9am-1pm, rain or shine. Info. www.waitsfieldfarmersmarket.com
WATERBURY CTR- Community Breakfast. Pancakes, french
toast, eggs, sausages, hash browns, juice, coffee, much more. Grange
Hall, 317 Howard Ave., $8/$4 kids 4-12, 8-10:30am. Info. 244-1192.
WORCESTER- Pancake Breakfast. With eggs, sausage & more,
plus an art show by local artisans. Benefits church programs for those
in need. Worcester Church Annex, by donation, 8am-10:30am.
Sunday, September 22
BARRE- Kids Rimfire Fun Shoot. Range safety officers, expert
shooters & hunters, and hunter ed. instructors on hand to supervise.
Rifles & ammo supplied. Barre Fish & Game Club, FREE, 2pm-5pm.
BRADFORD- Caught in the Acts. Old Church Theater, 4pm. See
description 9/20.
MONTPELIER- Robert Frost: This Verse Business. Lost Nation
Theater, 2pm. See description 9/19.
Vermont Sings for Peace 6. Five Vermont choruses join forces to raise
money for an organization promoting peace in our world. Bethany
Church, donations accepted for Planting Hope, 4pm. Info. 540-1784.
PLAINFIELD- Hike with Green Mountain Club. Moderate, 4.5 mi.
family-friendly hike up Spruce Mountain to fire tower. hertzkj@gmail.
com for meeting time and place.
Medicinal Plant Walk. Led by clinical herbalist Rebecca Dalgin.
Focus on plants distributed throughout our area. Wild Heart Wellness,
on Goddard campus, sliding scale $4-$10, 1-2:30pm. 552-0727.
RANDOLPH- Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas. Scotland’s pre-
mier fiddle ambassador is joined by extraordinary young cellist Haas.
Chandler Music Hall, $25 adv/$30 day of, 7:30pm. Info. 728-6464.
STOWE- Stowe Farmers Market. Veggies, plants, baked goods,
meats, crafts, live music & more. Rte 108, next to Red Barn shops,
10:30am-3pm, rain or shine. Info. www.stowefarmersmarket.com
continued on next page
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 21
PLUS Call Us For ALL Your
CATERING NEEDS 249-7758
249-7758
At Tractor Supply on River St.
(B-M Rd.) Montpelier
Tues.-Sat. 4-8PM
Now Open
Take Your Dinner TO GO!

TRUCK
SAMBEL'S
Great Food To Go!
FULL MENU Just like our Legendary Restuarant COMPLETE DINNERS
on the way home! And don't forget
WE CATER at your location or one of ours Bob & Brenda Sambel
MAGIC HOUR - 4:30-5:30
LIMIT (2) PERSON PER AD
Baked Haddock w/seafood topping .............. $9.75
Fried Haddock ....................................... $9.75
Broiled Haddock .................................... $9.75
Chicken Fingers ..................................... $9.75
Fried Scallops ......................................$10.75
English Cut Prime Rib .............................$10.75
Your hosts Bob & Brenda Sambel
Choice of salad or coleslaw, fries, mashed or baked, plus roll
OPEN
FRI. & SAT.
FOR LUNCH W
I
T
H

T
H
I
S

A
D
249-7758
At Tractor Supply on River St.
(B-M Rd.) Montpelier
Tues.-Sat. 4-8PM
Now Open
Take Your Dinner TO GO!

TRUCK
SAMBEL'S
Great Food To Go!
FULL MENU Just like our Legendary Restuarant COMPLETE DINNERS
on the way home! And don't forget
WE CATER at your location or one of ours Bob & Brenda Sambel
MAGIC HOUR - 4:30-5:30
LIMIT (2) PERSON PER AD
Baked Haddock w/seafood topping .............. $9.75
Fried Haddock ....................................... $9.75
Broiled Haddock .................................... $9.75
Chicken Fingers ..................................... $9.75
Fried Scallops ......................................$10.75
English Cut Prime Rib .............................$10.75
Your hosts Bob & Brenda Sambel
Choice of salad or coleslaw, fries, mashed or baked, plus roll
OPEN
FRI. & SAT.
FOR LUNCH W
I
T
H

T
H
I
S

A
D
At Joe’s Pond Beside the Beach
(YES! We Now Have A Dock!)
Lots of Covered & Scenic Dining
Drive, Swim, Motorboat,
Sailboat, Cycle, Whatever, To:
Best Hospital
Central Vermont Medical Center Partner Pharmacies:
Kinney Pharmacies - Barre, Waterbury, Morrisville, and Waitsfeld,
Montpelier Pharmacy; Waterbury Pharmacy, Northfeld Pharmacy,
The Medicine Shoppe - Barre, Wal-Mart Pharmacy - Berlin,
Rite-Aid Pharmacies - Montpelier, Barre, Hardwick,
Community Health Pharmacy - Colchester
Healthy Community
Classes
Community Reiki Clinics
Reiki is a hands-on healing art performed by a
trained Reiki Practitioner. Using specifc hand
positions, the practitioner places their hands
on or above the body as the recipient relaxes
on a massage table. The recipient remains fully
clothed and awake during the session. Reiki is
used to promote relaxation, reduce stress and
balance energy, allowing the body to better use
its own self-healing ability. Clinic sessions are 20-
30 minutes in length. Call in advance to reserve
a time. Walk-ins are always welcome and are
seen on a frst come, frst served basis. For more
information contact Sylvia Gaboriault at 249-1218
or email at gaboriaults@myfairpoint.net
When: Saturday, September 21
10:00 am - Noon
Where: 141 Main Street (Suite One), Montpelier
Cost: $10
Chemo Brain – What is it?
Chemo Brain is an informal term used to explain
the cognitive changes that may accompany
cancer treatment. Its formal name, Cancer Related
Cognitive Change, is recognized as a real syndrome
that affects people in various ways. Co-presenters
Dr. Kim Dittus of Fletcher Allen Health Care and
the University of Vermont, and Dr. Patti O’Brien
of Fletcher Allen are involved with FAHC’s Steps
to Wellness Oncology Rehab program. Dr. Dittus
is the primary investigator in a research study on
cognitive changes in women undergoing therapy
for breast cancer. Call 225-5449 for information.
When: Monday, September 23, 6:30-7:30 pm
Where: CVMC Conference Room 1
Wellness Recovery Action Plan
The Wellness Recovery Action Plan, or WRAP, is
an evidence-based system that is used world-
wide by people who are dealing with mental
health and other kinds of health challenges, and
by people who want to attain the highest possible
level of wellness. Who should attend? Someone
struggling with mental health diffculties who may
also be dealing with physical health or substance
abuse problems. OR, caregivers or human service
providers who feel “burned out” or who wish to
aid others in their recovery. Learn more about the
program at the Information session or contact Lisa
Willette: (802) 225-5680, Lisa.Willette@cvmc.org
When: The Aldrich Library
6 Washington St, Barre
Where: Tuesday, September 24th,
5:30-6:30 pm
Monday, September 23
MONTPELIER- Music & Literacy for Infants. Part of workshop
series for new & expectant parents. Good Beginnings, 174 River St.,
FREE, 9:30-11:30am. Info./RSVP 595-7953 or gbcv91@gmail.com
Flu Clinic. CVHHH nurses will provide vaccinations and Medicare
may be billed. First come, first served. Montpelier Senior Activity
Center, $30 general public/$15 for anyone 50+ or high risk, 2-4pm.
Unstress for Success. Learn about food, herbs and energy medicine
for reducing stress. With Marie Frohlich, health coach. Hunger Mtn
Coop, $10 members/$12 non, 6-7:30pm. Pre-reg. 223-8000 x202.
Tuesday, September 24
BARRE- So You Always Wanted to be an Archeologist But Life Got
in the Way. Brown bag lunch & informal conversation w/archeologists,
foll. by Open House. VT History Center, FREE, noon-4pm. 828-3050.
BRADFORD- GED Testing. Social studies, science & reading at
11am, take 1 or 2; writing at 1:30pm, math at 2pm, take only one.
Bradford Learning Center, 24 Barton St. Pre-register 222-3282.
MONTPELIER- Some Like it Hot. Screening of the classic film
starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis & Jack Lemon. BYO snacks.
Montpelier Senior Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St., 6:30pm. Info. 223-2518.
Anima Borealis: Technicians of the Sacred. Firsthand account of a
shamanic seance. Bring your drum or rattle. Pres. by Ctr for
Circumpolar Studies. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 5:30-7pm. 223-3338.
continued on next page
Berg, Carmolli & Kent Insurance
83 Washington St., Barre
479-3366
Noyle W. Johnson Insurance
119 River St., Montpelier
223-7735
Sawyer & Richie Insurance
P.O. Box 195, Danville, VT
684-3924
www.nwjinsurance.com
THANK YOU FOR SAYING
I SAW IT IN

24-Hr Movie Line 229-0343 • BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT: www.fgbtheaters.com
~MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY ONLY~
CAPITOL MONTPELIER
229-0343
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FRI.-THURS., SEPT. 20-26
Audio Descriptive Available on certain movies....
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THE FAMILY --R--
THE BUTLER --PG-13--
WE'RE THE MILLERS --R--
PARAMOUNT
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FRI.-THURS., SEPT. 20-26
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RIDDICK --R--
page 22 The WORLD September 18, 2013
ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17
• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedule is subject to change without notice.
ORCA Media Channel 15
Public Access Weekly Program Schedule
Wednesday, September 18
6:00a For The Animals
7:00a Critical TV
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Northeast Fiddlers Meet
11:30a Songwriter’s Notebook
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Brown Bag Series
2:00p Sattuma Karelian Folk Band
3:30p Burlington Discover Jazz Festival:
Poncho Sanchez
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
7:00p Abundant Living
7:30p Northeast Fiddlers Meet
10:00p Brown Bag Series
11:00p For The Animals
Thursday, September 19
6:00a Burlington Discover Jazz Festival:
Poncho Sanchez
7:00a Brown Bag Series
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a The Opiate Effect
11:00a For The Animals
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p One Alcoholic To Another
2:00p Farmers Talk
2:30pThe Five
4:00p Vermont Countryside
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
7:00p Critical Mass
8:00pTalking About Movies
9:00p Alzheimers – Financial & Legal
Matters Part 1 & 2
10:30p Montpelier Chamber Orchestra
Friday, September 20
6:30a Northwoods Stewardship Center
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Slow Living Summit
10:30a Some Enchanted Evening
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00pTalking About Movies
1:30p Senior Moments
2:30p Spotlight on Vermont Issues
3:00p Brunch With Bernie LIVE
4:00p Messing Around with Charlie
Messing
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
7:00p Spotlight On Vermont Issues
8:00p Vermont Countryside
9:00p Farmers Talk
10:00p Sattuma Karelian Folk Band
Saturday, September 21
7:00a Jesus by John
7:30a Heavenly Sonshine
8:00a Senior Moments
9:00a Northeast Fiddlers Meet
11:30a Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:30p Montpelier Chamber Orchestra
2:00pThe Opiate Effect
4:00p Preservation Burlington
4:30p Roman Catholic Mass
5:00p Washington Baptist Church
6:00p Messing Around with Charlie sMessing
7:00p Slow Living Summit
8:30p Salaam Shalom
9:30p Burlington Discover Jazz Festival:
Poncho Sanchez
11:00p Gay USA
Sunday, September 22
7:00a Heavenly Sonshine
7:30a Jesus by John
8:00a Washington Baptist Church
9:00a Wings of Devotion
10:00a Hour of Refreshing
10:30a Roman Catholic Mass
11:00a Curious About Catholicism
11:30a Critical Mass TV
1:00p Northwoods Stewardship Center
2:30p Wings of Devotion
3:30p Hour of Refreshing
4:30p Vermont Countryside
5:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
6:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
7:00p Brown Bag Series
8:00p Some Enchanted Evening
9:30pTalking About Movies
10:00p One Alcoholic To Another
11:00p Farmers Talk
Monday, September 23
6:00a The Struggle
7:00a Talking About Movies
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Some Enchanted Evening
10:30a Montpelier Chamber Orchestra
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p We’re All InThis Together
1:30p Welcome To Reality – Reality And
The Futurists
2:30p NOFA Policy Update
3:30p Northwoods Stewardship Center
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00p Abundant Living
7:30p Senior Moments
8:30p Salaam Shalom
9:30p First Women’s Voices
11:30pThe Struggle
Tuesday, September 24
7:00a Vermont Countryside
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a One Alcoholic To Another
10:00a Farmers Talk
10:30a We’re All InThis Together
11:00a Salaam Shalom
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00pThe Struggle
1:30p Choices For Burial
3:00p Spotlight on Vermont Issues
3:30p Jack & The Beanstock
4:30p Abundant Living
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p Welcome To Reality – Reality And
The Futurists LIVE
7:00p Sudzin Country
7:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:30pTalking About Movies
9:00p Brown Bag Series
ORCA Media Channel 16
Education Access Weekly Program Schedule
Additional Educational Programming
Between Scheduled Shows
Wednesday, September 18
12:00p Sattuma Lecture
1:00p RoadTo Recovery
2:00pThe Artful Word
3:00p Educational Forum MA School of Law
4:00p VCFA August 11th Graduation
7:00p Montpelier School Board LIVE
Thursday, September 19
12:00p RoadTo Recovery
1:00p Master Story Tellers
2:00p Opus 26
4:00p Holistically Speaking
5:30pTBA
6:00p MovingToward Iridescence
7:00p CVTS issues Week
10:00p VT Floor Hockey
11:00pThe Joy of Reading
Friday, September 20
12:00pTransformative Technology
1:00p Rock & Roll Book Tour
2:30p Drawing With Mark
3:00p Danger Men Cooking
4:00p Authors at the Aldrich
5:00p Master Story Tellers
6:00p U32 School Board
9:00p Montpelier School Board
Saturday, September 21
12:00p CVTS Game of the Week
3:00p Opus 26
5:00p Harassment Prevention
7:00p Sattuma Lecture
8:00p Holistically Speaking
10:00p VCFA Songwriter’s Showcase
Sunday, September 22
12:00p U32 School Board
3:00p Montpelier School Board
6:00p Education – JoinThe Conversation
6:30p VCFA August 11th Graduation
8:30p VT State Board of Education
Monday, September 23
12:00p Institute for Life Long Learning
2:30p Educational Forum MA School of Law
3:30p VT Historical Society –
Uncommon Law
4:00p VT Community Preschool
Collaborative
5:30p VT State Board of Education
10:00p Harassment Prevention
Tuesday, September 24
12:00p Rock & Roll Book Tour
1:30p Education – JoinThe Conversation
2:30p VT Community Preschool
Collaborative
3:00p CVTS Game of the Week
5:00p Institute for Life Long Learning
7:30pThe Artful Word
8:30p VT Historical Society –
Uncommon Law
9:00p Danger Men Cooking
10:00p VCFA Songwriter’s Showcase
ORCA Media Channel 17
Government Access Weekly Program Schedule
Wed, Sept. 18
7:00a OnThe Road
7:30a Green Mountain Care Board
1:00p Conversation On Race Now
3:00p Green Mountain Care Board
6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE
Thu, Sept. 19
7:00a OnThe Road
7:30a Bethel Selectboard
10:30a Green Mountain Care Board
2:30p Montpelier Development Review Board
6:30p Montpelier Planning Commission
9:30p Green Mountain Care Board
11:30p Vermont Workers’ Center
Fri, Sept. 20
7:00a OnThe Road
7:30a Waterbury Selectboard
10:30a Berlin Selectboard
1:30p Central Vermont Regional Planning
Commission
3:30p Governor’s Press Conference
5:00p Montpelier Design Review Committe
8:00p Montpelier City Council
Sat, Sept. 21
7:00a OnThe Road
7:30a Vermont Workers’ Center
8:00a TBA
10:30a Randolph Selectboard
12:30p Waterbury Village Trustees
3:30p Berlin Selectboard
6:30p Bethel Selectboard
9:30p Green Mountain Care Board
Sun, Sept. 22
7:00a OnThe Road
7:30a Green Mountain Care Board
5:30p Waterbury Selectboard
8:30p Waterbury Municipal Complex Building
Committee
Mon, Sept. 23
7:00a OnThe Road
7:30a Way To Go Awards
8:00a Green Mountain Care Board
10:00a Randolph Selectboard
1:00p Waterbury Village Trustees
5:00p Montpelier Planning Commission LIVE
Tue, Sept. 24
7:00a OnThe Road
7:30a Green Mountain Care Board
1:00p Central Vermont Regional Planning
Commission
4:30p Governor’s Press Conference
5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee LIVE
7:00p Montpelier Development Review Board
Community Media(802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net
CVTV Channel 23 • BARRE, VT
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
Wednesday
6:30 AM Authors at the Aldrich
8 AM Vermont Architecture
12:30 PM Sports Talk
1 PM Syria Rally
2:30 PM City Room
4 PM City Room
4:30 PM Sports Talk
5 PM Doctors We Know
5:30 PM Authors at the Aldrich
6:30 PM Old Time Farm Fest
8:30 PM Sports Talk
9 PM Dragon Boat Races
10 PM History of Stenciling
11 PM Conservative
Environmentalism
11:30 PM Shelburne Museum
Thursday
2 AM Fright Night
6 AM Authors at the Aldrich
8 AM City Room
9 AM Arts Collage
11 AM Arts Collage
12 PM Sports Talk
12:30 PM Vermont
Architecture
2 PM City Room
3 PM Get in Shape
4 PM City Room
6:30 PM Make Books
7:30 PM Thru-Hike Panel
9:30 PM History of Stenciling
10:30 PM Messing Around
11 PM Fright Night
Friday
2 AM Fright Night
6:30 AM Special Olympics
7 AM Vermont Architecture
9 AM Arts Collage
9:30 AM City Room
10 AM City Room
12 PM Vt Race Care Driver -
Getty
12:30 PM Conservative
Environmentalism
1:29 PM History of Stenciling
2 PM Sports Talk
4 PM Conservative
Environmentalism
4:30 PM Make Books
7:30 PM City Room
8 PM Get in Shape
8:30 PM Vermont Architecture
9:30 PM History of Stenciling
10:30 PM Messing Around
11 PM Fright Night
Saturday
1 AM Sports Talk
2 AM Fright Night
6 AM New England Cooks
7 AM Vt Race Care Driver -
Getty
7:30 AM Sports Talk
8 AM Authors at the Aldrich
9 AM Syria Rally
10:30 AM Old Time Farm Fest
12:30 PM History of Stenciling
1:30 PM Sports Talk
2 PM Vermont Architecture
3:45 PM Vt Race Care Driver -
Getty
5:30 PM City Room
7 PM City Room
8 PM Sports Talk
9:30 PM History of Stenciling
10:30 PM Messing Around
11 PM Fright Night
Sunday
2 AM Sports Talk
6:30 AM Sports Talk
8 AM Thunder Road
12 PM Make Books
1:30 PM Doctors We Know
2 PM City Room
4:30 PM Conservative
Environmentalism
5:30 PM Vt Race Care Driver -
Getty
6 PM Sports Talk
6:30 PM Vermont Architecture
7:30 PM Sports Talk
8 PM Syria Rally
10 PM Fright Night
Monday
2 AM Fright Night
6:30 AM Arts Collage
7 AM Doctors We Know
7:30 AM Messing Around
8 AM Sports Talk
8:30 AM Authors at the Aldrich
10 AM Royalton_WiFi_launch
10:30 AM City Room
11 AM Thunder Road
1 PM Conservative
Environmentalism
2 PM Make Books
3 PM Sports Talk
3:30 PM Shelburne Museum
4 PM City Room
5 PM Thunder Road
7 PM City Room
7:30 PM Old Time Farm Fest
9:30 PM History of Stenciling
10:30 PM Messing Around
11 PM Fright Night
Tuesday
7 AM Dragon Boat Races
8 AM Sports Talk
10 AM Emerald Ash Borers
10:30 AM Shelburne Museum
11 AM Vermont Architecture
12 PM City Room
12:30 PM Arts Collage
2 PM Make Books
3 PM Authors at the Aldrich
4 PM Old Time Farm Fest
6:30 PM Thunder Road
8:30 PM City Room
9 PM Arts Collage
11 PM Shelburne Museum
11:30 PM Sander’s Town
Meeting
CVTV CHANNEL 7
CHARTER
COMMUNICATIONS
OF BARRE
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
Wednesday 9/18
Barre City Council 9a,12p,3p
Williamstown Select 7p,10p

Thursday 9/19
Williamstown Select 6a, 9a, 12p
Spaulding High School 3p,7p,10p

Friday 9/20
Spaulding High School 6a,9a,12p
Barre Town Select 3p,7p,10p

Saturday 9/21
Barre Town Select 6a, 9a, 12p
4 PM Washington Baptist Church
5 PM Faith Community Church
6 PM Barre Congregational Church
8 PM St. Monica’s Mass
9 PM Gospel Music
10 PM Calvary Life

Sunday 9/22
1 AM Faith Community Church
2 AM Barre Congregational Church
4 AM St. Monica’s Mass
5 AM Washington Baptist Church
6:30 AM Calvary Life
8 AM Gospel Music
9 AM Washington Baptist Church
10 AM Faith Community Church
11 AM Barre Congregational Church
1 PM St. Monica’s Mass
3:30 PM Calvary Life
5 PM Gospel Music
6 PM Washington Baptist Church
7 PM Faith Community Church
8 PM Barre Congregational Church
10 PM St. Monica’s Mass
11 PM Calvary Life

Monday 9/23
Barre Town School 6a,9a,12p
Barre Supervisory Union 3, 7, 10p

Tuesday 9/24
Barre Supervisory Union 6a,9a,12p
Statehouse Programming
Barre City Council “Live” 7pm
Wednesday
5:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
7 AM The Painted Word
10 AM Vermont Youth Orchestra
12 PM Poetry Slam
12:30 PM Granite History
2:30 PM Burlington Authors
4 PM Instant Coffee House
4:30 PM The Painted Word
6 PM CVTSport_010313
7:30 PM For the Animals
8 PM Vermont Worker’s Center
9 PM Ask the Experts
11:30 PM Montpelier Now

Thursday
2 AM Fright Night
6 AM CVTSport_010313
8 AM For the Animals
8:30 AM Road to Recovery
9:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
11 AM For the Animals
11:30 AM Messing Around
12 PM Granite History
1:30 PM CVSWMD
2 PM Road to Recovery
2:30 PM Vermont Movie Update
3 PM Burlington Authors
4 PM Dartmouth Medical
5:30 PM The Painted Word
6:30 PM Montpelier Now
7 PM Vermont Worker’s Center
8 PM Wind Power Discussion
9:30 PM New England Cooks
CROP Hunger Walk Recruiters/Walkers Rally. Light meal and
presentation about the October 20th walk for hunger. Bethany Church,
5pm. Info./RSVP 279-3177.
National Voter Registration Day Open House. Staff will be avail-
able to answer questions and register eligible voters. All are welcome.
Secretary of State’s Office, 128 Main St., 2pm-7pm. 828-2363.
Wednesday, September 25
BARRE- Open Mike. With host John Lackard. Gusto’s, 28 Prospect
St., no cover, 9pm. Info. 476-7919.
Farmer’s Market. Fresh produce, plants, baked goods, meats, eggs,
crafts and much more. City Hall Park, 3-6:30pm.
BERLIN- The Tragic Death of Mary Jane Neill. Maudean Neill of
Berlin Historical Society discusses the 1932 dynamite shack explosion
and its consequences. Berlin Town Hall, 7pm.
EAST CALAIS- Late Summer Wild Plant Walk. Greet and identify
the wildflowers and fruits of late summer. Wisdom of the Herbs
School, sliding scale $10-$0, 5-6:30pm. Pre-register 456-8122.
MIDDLESEX- Middlesex Historical Society Meeting. Middlesex
Town Hall, intersection of Rte 2 & Church St., 7pm. Info. 272-8074.
MONTPELIER- Monarch Butterfly Tagging. We’ll catch, tag &
release some monarchs. Bring a net if you can. North Branch Nature
Center, $5 adults/$3 kids, drop by any time 3:30-5pm. 229-6206.
VT’s New Health Initiative: Healthcare for All? Pres. by Georgia
Maheras of Green Mtn Care Board, part of Osher series. Montpelier
Senior Activity Ctr, $5 for OLLI non-members, 1:30pm. 223-1763.
Eye of the Storm. Film screening and discussion led by Richard
Bidnick. Part of “Books to Film” series. Kellogg-Hubbard Library,
Hayes Room, 7pm. Info. 223-3338.
What are You Thinking? Meditation practice followed by brief pre-
sentation, contemplation and discussion. led by Madge Rossinoff.
Montpelier Shambhala Center, 64 Main St., 3rd floor, 6-7:15pm.
PLAINFIELD- Jack Mayer Presents “Life in a Jar.” The story of
how some high school students discovered a lost heroine of World War
II. Goddard College, FREE, 7-9pm. Info. www.goddard.edu
RANDOLPH- Book Discussion: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott
Fitzgerald. Discussion led by
Gina Logan, a Vermont
Humanities Council event.
Kimball Public Library, FREE,
7pm. Info. 728-5073.
STOWE- The Pirates of
Penzance. Stowe Theatre Guild
presents the much-loved musical
by Gilbert and Sullivan. Town
Hall Theatre, $20/$10, 8pm. Info.
253-3961.
VT Health Connect Program
Navigator Open Office Hours.
Get answers to your questions
about the new health care
exchange. Stowe Public Safety
Facility, 350 So. Main St., FREE,
10am-1pm.
Thursday,
September 26
BARRE- So You Always Wanted
to be an Archeologist But Life
Got in the Way. Brown bag lunch
& informal conversation w/arche-
ologists, foll. by Open House. VT
History Center, FREE, noon-4pm.
828-3050.
Garden Leader Workshop. For
community and school garden
leaders, hosted by VT Community
Garden Network. Highgate
Apartments, $30 sliding scale,
4-8pm. Register at www.vcgn.org
or 861-4769.
HARDWICK- Branding 101.
Part of “Building Your Food
Brand” workshop series. Center
for an Agricultural Economy,
140 Junction Rd., $10 ($35 for
all 4), 6-7pm. Pre-register 472-
5362.
continued on next page
802.229.0492
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MIDDLESEX- Dave Langevin. Pianist performs for Bacon Thursday.
Nutty Steph’s, 6pm.
MONTPELIER- Green Mtn Care Board Public Meeting. Incl.
discussion of rate review, budgets, more. Dept. of Financial Regulation,
89 Main St., 3rd fl., 1-4pm. http://gmcboard.vermont.gov/
Beginner Naturalist Mini-Course. First session of 4-part series
taught by Larry Clarfeld. North Branch Nature Center, $165 mem-
bers/$180 non, 6-7:30pm. Pre-register. 229-6206.
Reading and Book Signing with Julia Lynam. The former National
Park Ranger shares her book, Treasures on Your Doorstep. Kellogg-
Hubbard Library, 6:30pm. Info. 223-3338.
Grand Opening of “The Nest.” See the new open space and parent
resource center. Free chair massages, snacks & beverages, free raffle
tickets, more. Good Beginnings, 174 River St., 9am-1pm. 595-7953.
ST. JOHNSBURY- An Evening Without... Celebrate the First
Amendment during Banned Books. Vermont writers will read from
works that have been challenged, censored, or banned. Catamount
Arts Cabaret, 115 Eastern Ave., by donation, 7pm. www.acluvt.org
STOWE- The Pirates of Penzance. Town Hall Theatre, 8pm. See
description 9/25.
WATERBURY- VT Health Connect Program Navigator Open
Office Hours. Get answers to your questions about the new health care
exchange. Waterbury Cong. Church, 8 Main St., FREE, 10am-1pm.
Friday, September 27
BARRE- Chicken Pie Supper: $11/$5 kids under 10/toddlers eat
free, seatings 5pm & 6:30pm. Country Fair, Silent Auction &
Raffle: 3-8pm. Both at Barre Congregational Church.
Freedom & Unity: The Vermont Movie. Gala reception & screening
of 1st of 6-part collaborative documentary about Vermont’s history &
culture. Barre Opera House, $15, 6-10pm. TheVermontMovie.com
BRADFORD- Caught in the Acts. Old Church Theater, 7:30pm. See
description 9/20.
CALAIS- Big Hat No Cattle. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store,
FREE, 7-9:30pm.
CHELSEA- Chelsea Farmers Market. Veggie starts, baked goods,
meats, crafts and more. North Common, 3-6pm. Info. 685-9987.
MARSHFIELD- Annual Harvest Supper. Meatloaf, veggies, pie
and more. Christ Covenant Church, Creamery St., $12/$6 ages 12 &
under, seatings 5:15 & 6:45pm. RSVP 426-3744, walk-ins welcome.
MONTPELIER- Fall Migration Bird Walk. Beginners welcome,
binoculars available. North Branch Nature Center, $10 adults/free for
kids & members, 7:30-9am. Info. 229-6206.
Peace & Pardon in the Parlor. This trio perform songs from the Civil
War to early 1900s, in period costume. Audiences invited to sing
along! Montpelier Senior Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St., 1pm. 223-2518.
Kina Zoré. One of the hottest Afro-pop bands in Boston. Positive Pie,
22 State St., cover, 10:30pm.
Navigating the New Health Care Exchange. Get help from Peter
Sterling, Executive Director of VT Campaign for Health Care
Security. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10am-2pm. Info. 223-3338.
STOWE- The Pirates of Penzance. Town Hall Theatre, 8pm. See
description 9/25.
WILLIAMSTOWN- Williamstown Farmers Market and Flea
Market. Free market space. At Pump & Pantry, North Main St., 3pm-
6pm. Info. 433-1052.
Saturday, September 28
BARRE- Country Fair, Silent Auction & Raffle. Crafts, baked
goods, books, much more. Barre Congregational Church, 8am-noon.
1st Annual Poetry Faire. Family fun w/story-telling, crafts, poetry
garden trail, open mike, free cider & donut-holes, more. MetroWay
Community Garden, behind Barre Opera House, FREE, 10am-2pm.
Freedom & Unity: The Vermont Movie. Screening of part 2. Barre
Historical Society, $8, 10:30am. See description 9/27.
Chicken Sh#! Bingo. 1 chicken, 49 squares, first plop wins! With
music, comedians & more. Barre Sculpture Studios parking lot, 15
Blackwell St., $5/ticket for adults, $2 for ages 14 & under, 3-6pm.
BRADFORD- Caught in the Acts. Old Church Theater, 7:30pm. See
description 9/20.
EAST BROOKFIELD- Chicken Pie Supper. Also bake sale and
takeouts ($11) available. East Brookfield Community Church, Rte 14,
$10/$5 kids 5-12, seatings 5pm & 6:15pm. RSVP 276-3312.
EAST ORANGE- Annual Fall Supper. Red flannel hash, beans,
slaw, pie and more. Benefits church restoration fund. East Orange
Church, $10/$6 kids 6-12, 5-7pm. Info. 439-5897 or 439-5103.
FAYSTON- Hike with Green Mountain Club. Difficult 5.2 mi. hike
via Hedgehog Brook Trail and Long Trail. Bring lunch, water, rain
gear. Call George or Cynthia, 229-9787 for meeting time and place.
MARSHFIELD- Chicken BBQ & Silent Auction. W/live music by
Cold Country Bluegrass. Benefits rhythm of the rein therapeutic rid-
ing center. Water Tower Farm, Rte 2, $10/$5, 5-7pm. Info 426-3781.
MONTPELIER- Capital City Farmers Market. Produce, meats,
cheeses, plants, baked goods, more. Corner of State & Elm Streets,
9am-1pm.
Irish Session. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 2-5pm. Info. 229-9212.
Prehistoric Pottery w/Charlie Paquin. Learn the techniques used by
Native Americans in VT many years ago. For ages 7-10 w/adult.
Kellogg-Hubbard Library, FREE, 1pm. Must pre-register, 223-4665.
Chicken Pie Supper. Trinity United Methodist Church, 137 Main St.,
$10 adults/$5 kids 10 & under, seatings at 5pm & 6:30pm. Call 476-
6403 for reservations or take-outs.
Bad Dog. Rock. Positive Pie, 22 State St., 10:30pm.
Tanya Lee Stone: Truth and Fiction in Non-Fiction. The YA author
will speak with educators, parents & the public about how writing a
compelling story while sticking to the facts. Bear Pond Books, 11am.
Freedom & Unity: The Vermont Movie. Screening of part 3. Savoy
Theater, $8, 3:30pm. See description 9/27.
RANDOLPH- Randolph Farmer’s Market. Veggies, plants, meat,
baked goods, crafts, music, more. Rte 66, 26 Central St., 9am-1pm.
Vermont Symphony Orchestra. A stop on the annual Made in
Vermont tour. Chandler Music Hall, $27 adults/$23 seniors/$14 VT
State College faculty & staff/$10 students, 7:30pm. Info. 728-6464.
ROCHESTER- Uncover Unwritten Stories at Bingo Schoolhouse.
Join Rochester Historical Soc. & archeologists to dig for clues. Rte
100, next to 2nd bridge on Bingo Rd., FREE, 10am-3pm. 747-6719.
STOWE- The Pirates of Penzance. Town Hall Theatre, 8pm. See
description 9/25.
WAITSFIELD- Waitsfield Farmers Market. Live music, foods, veg-
gies, plants, artisans, sweet treats, meats. Rte 100 on Mad River Green,
9am-1pm, rain or shine. Info. www.waitsfieldfarmersmarket.com
WEST FAIRLEE- Annual Harvest Supper. All you can eat buffet
feat. ribs, hash, beans, chicken pie, more. West Fairlee Congregational
Church, $13/$7 kids 5-12, seatings 4:30pm & 6pm. RSVP 685-3141.
Sunday, September 29
BRADFORD- Caught in the Acts. Old Church Theater, 4pm. See
description 9/20.
MONTPELIER- Freedom & Unity: The Vermont Movie. Screening
of part 4. Savoy Theater, $8, 3:30pm. See description 9/27.
RANDOLPH- Myra Flynn & Gregory Douglass CD Release Party.
Singer-songwriters w/VT ties celebrate release of their respective CDs.
Chandler Music Hall, $20 adv/$25 day of, 7:30pm. Info. 728-6464.
STOWE- Stowe Farmers Market. Veggies, plants, baked goods,
meats, crafts, live music & more. Rte 108, next to Red Barn shops,
10:30am-3pm, rain or shine. Info. www.stowefarmersmarket.com
Barre Masonic Temple - Square & Compass Club
2 Academy Street, Barre • 479-9179
Every Saturday Night - Children Welcomed
Doors Open 1:30PM Early Birds 5:45PM
Sales Start 4:00PM Reg. Games 7:00PM
Kitchen 5PM Tables/Tear-opens
Saturday
Night
FLASHBALLS
PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT
$1,300
#1
$
300
#2
$
50
53#'s or less
Winner Take All????
Special
Game 11:
Extra $25
50#'s or less
page 24 The WORLD September 18, 2013
Fall classes run 11 Thursdays
starting Sept. 26; $245
Pacem Learning Community
29 College Street, Montpelier
Beginning French A – for first-timers
and re-starters only. 6-7:30 p.m.
Beginning French B – beyond bonjour & je m’appelle...
4:15-5:45 p.m.
French Out Loud – intermediate grammar &
conversation. 6-7:30 p.m.
Details, contact info & easy sign-up at
http://www.aflcr.org/classes.shtml
ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE
of the LAKE CHAMPLAIN REGION
802-881-8826
French Classes for Adults
Because your fun-loving alter ego speaks French!

French Classes for Adults

Because your
fun-loving
alter ego
speaks French!
Fall classes run 11Thursdays starting Sept. 26; $245
Pacem Learning Community, 29 College Street, Montpelier
Beginning French A – for first-timers and re-starters only. 6-7:30 p.m.
Beginning French B – beyond bonjour & je m’appelle... 4:15-5:45 p.m.
French Out Loud – intermediate grammar & conversation. 6-7:30 p.m.
Details, contact info & easy sign-up at http://www.aflcr.org/classes.shtml


ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE of the LAKE CHAMPLAIN REGION
302 Dupont Building, 123 Ethan Allen Avenue, Colchester VT 05446




French Classes for Adults

Because your
fun-loving
alter ego
speaks French!
Fall classes run 11Thursdays starting Sept. 26; $245
Pacem Learning Community, 29 College Street, Montpelier
Beginning French A – for first-timers and re-starters only. 6-7:30 p.m.
Beginning French B – beyond bonjour & je m’appelle... 4:15-5:45 p.m.
French Out Loud – intermediate grammar & conversation. 6-7:30 p.m.
Details, contact info & easy sign-up at http://www.aflcr.org/classes.shtml


ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE of the LAKE CHAMPLAIN REGION

302 Dupont Building, 123 Ethan Allen Avenue, Colchester VT 05446



Fall Driver Ed Course
September 30 - November 18
Contact: 1-802-775-9218
info@allstatevt.com • www.allstatevt.com
Classes to be held in
Central Vermont area
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not responsible for
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Power Ball • Megabucks • Vermont Instant Lottery • NOBODY BEATS THE BARON!
411 North Main St., Barre
479-9227 • 476-4962 • Fax 479-9348
Specials Good Thru 9/30/2013
We Sell Hunting & Fishing Licenses
Checks By Courtesy Card Only!
ATM
ON PREMISES
LP Gas Grill
Cylinder
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Advance notice appreciated
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13
99
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can
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1
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14
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SUPER SAVINGS Most liquor stores
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77 Convenient
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This ad paid for
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Not responsible for
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TANQUERAY
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BERLIN
622-0250
Open 5am M-S,
6am Sun.
BARRE
479-0629
Open
24 hours
MONTPELIER
223-0928
Open 5am M-S,
6am Sun.
Now on DVD
Reincarnation
★★1/2
W
ho is the most influential American
of the past 20 years? Possibly Snoop
Dogg.
Twenty years ago, kids were listening to
very different music: Metallica, Def Leppard,
Van Halen. Seriously, I owned a Van Halen CD.
Looking back, I have no idea why.
Rap existed, but it was a niche genre. That
is until Dr. Dre’s “The Chronic,” introducing
Snoop Dogg, became a massive mainstream
hit.
Suddenly it wasn’t just thuggish young men
and Urban Studies professors who were lis-
tening to rap. Every fifteen-year-old girl who
watched MTV was singing “Bow wow wow
yippee yo yippee yay.”
Young Americans were hooked on rap. But
the genre wasn’t going to last if all of the rap-
pers killed each other. And that’s exactly what
was happening.
After his friend and label mate Tupac Shakur
was shot to death in 1996, Snoop Dogg had a
revelation: rapping about murder was selling
records, but it was destructive and dangerous.
With Snoop at the lead, the genre evolved
from gangsta rap to hip-hop. The topics of his
songs were no longer about blowing people
away; they were more about blowing smoke.
That brings me to the second big influence
Snoop Dogg has had on our society: the nor-
malization of marijuana.
Twenty years ago, most Americans agreed
that people who smoke pot are druggies who
should rightly be arrested. Today, marijuana is
legal in two states and semi-legal in others - in-
cluding Snoop’s home state of California.
A majority of Americans under 40 are com-
fortable with decriminalization and Snoop
Dogg is partially responsible.
In Snoop, we see a healthy, successful, pro-
ductive member of society. And we know that
he has been high for a majority of his waking
life. And then we think: Snoop’s a good guy, so
why he is still technically a federal criminal?
He certainly smokes his share of ganja in
“Reincarnation,” a documentary that takes
place - naturally - in Jamaica. It’s called “Rein-
carnation” because Snoop is there on a spiritual
journey of discovery and change.
First, he announces that he now wants to be
called Snoop Lion (news that must have come
as a shock to the proud canines of the world).
Second, he wants to become a practicing Ras-
tafarian. Third, Snoop decided to record a pro-
fanity-free reggae record.
The reggae songs aren’t especially good.
That isn’t that surprising. The man is a super-
star because he is super cool, not because he
is super talented. Anyone who lists Snoop as
one of their top five hip-hop artists either just
stepped out of a time machine from 1993 or
only knows five rappers.
“Reincarnation” isn’t a great documentary.
Like most of Snoop’s music, the movie is low
on substance. But I enjoyed it, anyway, because
it is about one of the coolest, most likable, and
most influential men of our time. Go, Snoop!
ART EXHIBITS
BARRE- 13th Annual Stone Show: Rock Solid. Stone sculptures
and assemblages by area artisans. Studio Place Arts, main gallery,
through 11/2.
-- Works by Meri Stiles. Studio Place Arts, 2nd floor gallery,
through 11/2.
-- The Bumble Bee Series. By Gabriel Tempesta. Studio Place
Arts, 3rd floor gallery, through 11/2.
-- Susan Bull Riley. Paintings. Studio Place Arts, 3rd floor gal-
lery, through 11/2.
BERLIN- Regeneration. Prints and drawings by Carol
MacDonald. Central VT Medical Center lobby gallery, through
10/25.
HARDWICK- GRACE Community Workshop Exhibition.
Old Firehouse Gallery Annex, through 9/30.
MIDDLESEX- Pastel Exhibit. Feat. works by Marcia Hill, Cindy
Griffith and Anne Unangst. Red Hen Cafe, September and
October.
MONTPELIER- Carrotopia. Jackie Smith & Erik Nielsen col-
laborated on these photos of unusual carrots, w/accompanying
poetry & music. Montpelier Senior Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St.,
thru 10/31.
-- 40 Years of Dancing. A photographic retrospective of
Contemporary Dance and Fitness Studio. Contemporary Dance
and Fitness Studio, 18 Langdon St., through 10/26.
-- Cinema of Surveillance. Semi-abstract post-cubist drawings
by Alexis Savino. Green Bean Gallery at Capitol Grounds, thru
10/5.
-- Annie Tiberio Cameron. Fine art photos, paired with poems by
Robert Frost. Lost Nation Theater lobby gallery, through 9/22.
-- Found in the Forest. Nature-inspired scrolls and sculpture by
Emiko Sawaragi Gilbert. VT Supreme Court, through October.
-- Sculpture Exhibit. Featuring works by Thea Alvin, Ria Blaas,
Rob Hitzig, Steve Proctor, Brian-Jon Swift & James Irving
Westermann.Vermont Arts Council Sculpture Garden, ongoing.
NORTHFIELD- Round. Featuring objects of circular shape.
Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University, through
12/20.
PLAINFIELD- Landscape into Abstraction. Photo exhibit by
Richard Ambelang. Pratt Gallery, Goddard College, through 10/31.
ROCHESTER- Folk Vision. Group exhibit of folk art from New
England and beyond. BigTown Gallery, through 9/28.
PLAINFIELD- Within Reach. Oil paintings by Marshfield artist
Tracey Hambleton. Blinking Light Gallery, through 10/27.
Top 10 DVD, Blu-ray Rentals
1. Olympus Has Fallen (R)
Gerald Butler
2. 42 (PG-13) Chadwick
Boseman
3. Mud (PG-13) Matthew
McConaughey
4. The Big Wedding (R) Robert
DeNiro
5. Admission (PG-13) Tina Fey
6. GI Joe: Retaliation (PG-13)
Dwayne Johnson
7. Scary Movie V (PG-13)
Simon Rex
8. Identity Thief (R) Jason
Bateman
9. Bullet to the Head (R)
Sylvester Stallone
10. Killing Season (R) Robert
De Niro
Top 10 DVD, Blu-ray Sales
1. Epic (PG) FOX
2. Olympus Has Fallen (R)
Sony
3. Oblivion (PG-13) Universal
4. NCIS: The Tenth Season
(TV) Paramount
5. Boardwalk Empire: The
Complete Third Season (TV)
HBO
6. Scary Movie V (PG-13)
Anchor Bay
7. Killing Season (R)
Millennium Films
8. GI Joe: Retaliation (PG-13)
Paramount
9. The Big Wedding (R)
Lionsgate
8. Duck Dynasty: Season 3
(TV) Disney
Source: Rentrak Corp.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
page 26 The WORLD September 18, 2013
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
$28/Month Auto Insurance-
Instant Quote-Any Credit
Type Accepted-Get the
Best Rates In Your Area.
Call 877-985-7003 Now
ASSISTANT MANAGER -
Retail; Lenny’s Shoe & Ap-
parel in Barre is seeking a
qualifed candidate to fll the
role of Assistant Manager.
Start a rewarding career with
our fun, fast-paced, fam-
ily owned business. Qualifed
candidates can learn more
about this position and ap-
ply online at lennyshoe.com
ASE Master
Automotive Technician
Very Busy Independent Shop
-Minimum 8 years full time
experience as automotive technician
-Experience working on European
Imports a must
-Pay is based on ASE certifications,
experience and skill
-Sign on bonus based upon
experience
-Paid training & ASE testing
-Standard mechanics tools
-Valid driver’s license
-Reliable transportation
-Strong work ethic
email: Amy@autocraftsmen.com
is seeking
part-time
Tax Preparers
Will train qualifed candidates.
Classes starting in October.
For more information contact
Penny @ 479-9100 or
penny.farrell@hrblock.com

WORK AT HOME AND
EARN BIG BUCKS!
Earn up to $1,000 a week
at your leisure in your own
home? The probability of gain-
ing big profts from this and
many similar at home jobs is
slim. Promoters of these jobs
usually require a fee to teach
you useless, and unproft-
able trades, or to provide you
with futile information. TIP:
If a work-at-home program
is legitimate, your sponsor
should tell you, for free and
in writing, what is involved. If
you question a program’s le-
gitimacy, call the ATTORNEY
GENERAL’S CONSUMER
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM at
1-800-649-2424.
CHILDCARE
BARRE CITY daycare. All
ages welcome.
Call Doug or Jen. 802-476-
3565.
BARRE TOWN, registered
family home daycare has Two
full-time openings for Infant-
Two years old. Lots of love and
attention to help your little one
learn and grow. Music and ac-
tivities. Large, fenced-in back-
yard. Healthy meals/snacks.
Interview, 802-477-2647.
DAYCARE has open-
ings. CPR, registered, all
meals provided. Reason-
able rates. 802-479-2106.
SOUTH BARRE. Full- or
part-time, all meals includ-
ed, Barre Town Bus route,
nice play yard, low rates.
Ages 2+. 802-479-8904
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-
LION$? Watch out for business
opportunities that make outra-
geous claims about potential
earnings. Don’t get fooled into
get rich quick scams. There
are legitimate business op-
portunities, but be cautious of
any business that can’t refect
in writing the typical earnings
of previous employees. TIP:
Investigate earning potential
claims of businesses by re-
questing written information
from them before you send any
money, or by calling the AT-
TORNEY’S GENERAL CON-
SUMER ASSISTANCE PRO-
GRAM, at 1-800-649-2424.
COMPUTERS/
ELECTRONICS
*REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* 4-Room All-Digital
Satellite system installed
FREE!! Programming start-
ing at $19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade new
callers, 1-866-939-8199
LOWER THAT CABLE BILL!!
Get Satellite TV today! FREE
System, installation and HD/
DVR upgrade. Program-
ming starting at $19.99.
Call NOW 800-725-1865
CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
FROM HOME. 6-8 weeks AC-
CREDITED. Get a diploma.
Get a job. 1-800-264-8330
www.diplomafromhome.com
LOTUS YOGA: a practice of
wholeness: Calm mind/strong
body. Offering yoga classes for
all levels in downtown Barre.
At 65 Elm St. Contact Regina
at 802-371-9648 or www.
trailweaver.com/lotusyoga.
SPANISH IN WATERBURY
CENTER - Our seventh year.
Adult Spanish classes begin-
ning September 16-19 for 10
weeks: all levels. Lessons for
travel, private instruction, tu-
toring/AP, children. Learn from
a native speaker. For details:
www.spanishwaterburycenter.
com or call 585-1025 or email
spanishparavos@gmail.com
PERSONALS
Meet singles right now! No
paid operators, just real peo-
ple like you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange messages
and connect live. Try it free.
Call now 1-888-909-9905
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING adoption? Talk with caring
adoption expert. Choose from
families nationwide. LIVING
EXPENSES PAID. CAll 24/7,
Abby’s One True Gift Adop-
tion, 866-413-6296. Florida
Agency#100021542 Void in
Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING Adoption? You choose
from families nationwide.
LIVING EXPENSES PAID.
Abby’s One True Gift Adop-
tions. 866-413-6292, 24/7
Void/Illinois/New Mexico
WANTED Gay Man 60ish
to practice violin with and
play Bach duets. Serious
musician. 802-229-0678
FREE ITEMS
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.
$100-$300 PAID for Your Com-
plete Junk Cars and Trucks,
FREE metal pickup Plainfeld.
839-6812 (Cell); 454-0165.
WHITE LONG Hair MALE
10yrs old, fxed, indoor/
outdoor(stays in when its cold),
litter boxed trained. Called
269-6492 leave message.
HEALTH
CARE
LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE/
Lose 20 pounds in one week?
This is almost impossible!
Weight loss ads must refect
the typical experiences of the
diet users. Beware of pro-
grams that claim you can lose
weight effortlessly. TIP: Clues
to fraudulent ads include
words like: “breakthrough,”
“effortless,” and “new discov-
ery.” When you see words like
these be skeptical. Before you
invest your time and money
call the ATTORNEY GEN-
ERAL’S CONSUMER ASSIS-
TANCE PROGRAM, at 1-800-
649-2424.
WANT A CURE-ALL?
Health fraud is a business
that sells false hope. Beware
of unsubstantiated claims for
health products and services.
There are no “Quick Cures”
- no matter what the ad is
claiming. TIP: DO NOT rely
on promises of a “money back
guarantee!” Watch out for key
words such as “exclusive se-
cret,” “amazing results,” or
“scientifc breakthrough.” For
more information on health re-
lated products or services, call
the ATTORNEY GENERAL’S
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM at 1-800-649-
2424, or consult a health care
provider.
WANTED
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
COIN COLLECTOR will
Pay Cash for Pre-1965
Coins and Coin Collec-
tions. Call Joe 802-498-3692
Opportunity of a lifetime:
unique USDA-certifed grass-
fed NOP organic livestock
farm, see detail at www.lew-
isfamilyfarm.com/recruitment
WANTED: PISTOLS, Ri-
fes, Shotguns. Top Prices
paid. 802-492-3339 days.
802-492-3032 nights.
WANTS TO purchase miner-
als and other oil and gas inter-
ests. Send details to: PO Box
13557, Denver, CO 80201
WILL HAUL away for free:
Scrap metal, old appliances,
car parts, etc. Furnaces,
boilers and demolitions for
a fee. No job too big or too
small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES/
RESTORATION
FREE PARKING in Rear of
Store. LastTimeAroundAn-
tiques.com Facebook us 114
No Main St Barre 802-476-8830
NEED STUFF! Buying Most
Anything 50 Years Old or Old-
er; Furniture, Signs and Wood
Items. Oak, maple, walnut,
mahogany chest of drawers
starting at $89.00. Oak & Pine
Farm Tables, round oak tables,
sets of chairs, stands starting
at $29. Early Vt Cupboards,
trunks. Single horse drawn
buggy $385. Brass Cash reg-
ister (1900’s) $395. Pine pull
out drawer bin, great for re-
cycling or wood pallets. Book
cases. 3 Bicycles(1960’s).
JOHNSON ANTIQUES, 4
Summer Street, East Barre.
Behind Vermont Flannel. 8:30-
3:30, most days; Saturday
till noon. Closed Sunday and
Tuesday. Cell, 802-249-2525.
WORLD CLASSIFIED
DEADLINE MONDAY 10AM (Display Ads Thursday at 5:00 PM)
802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com • www.vt-world.com
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
continued
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
continued
CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
continued
HEALTH CARE
continued
continued on page 27
Automotive Technician
Very Busy Independent Shop
-Minimum 6 years full time experience as automotive
technician
-Experience working on Imports a must
-Pay is based on ASE certifcations, experience and
skill
-Sign on bonus based upon experience
-Paid training & ASE testing
-Standard mechanics tools
-Valid driver’s license
-Reliable transportation
-Strong work ethic
-Good sense of humor!
Call 522-5990
Search Re-Opened
Family Community Support Program Seeks Applicants
Family Development Housing Counselor
We are recruiting for a temporary Family Development Housing Counselor who will
provide or arrange for emergency and support services to individuals in crisis, and
participate in community development, advocacy and community organization. The
Family Development Housing Counselor is a part-time, temporary position, 24-32
hours a week in Randolph working with families experiencing economic diffculties.
The position also includes advocacy, mediation, assessment, planning, creative
confrontation, and connections to resources. B.A. required, plus 4 years’ experience
providing housing counseling or similar work.
Submit your resume and letter of interest postmarked no later than
September 23rd to:
Central Vermont Community Action Council, Inc.
Human Resources
20 Gable Place
Barre, VT 05641
Or e-mail to: cvcachr@cvcac.org
CVCAC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer. Applications
from women, individuals with disabilities, veterans, and people from
diverse cultural backgrounds are encouraged.
INTERESTED
IN CDL?
Classes
ongoing in Barre
Information:
476-4679
249-2886
Visit Our Website:
www.cdlschoolinvt.com
EXPERIENCED
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
WANTED
This is not an entry level
position. Experienced
mechanic must have own tools, drivers
license and injection license.
We offer competitive pay and benefits.
Plus $1,000 Sign-Up Bonus!!
POULIN AUTO SALES
& SErvIcE
Route 302 • East Barre Road • Barre
www.poulinautosales.com
802-476-8159 Ask for Ron
STATE MAIL CLERK II
Department of Buildings and General Services
We are looking for a team player to work in our postal
operations center located in Middlesex. You will process
and sort incoming and inter-departmental mail and deliver
to various State locations. Operate postal meters, barcode,
sorter and other related machinery; work with automated
systems, and transport heavy boxes. Requires good
customer service skills, postal operations experience and
a current, valid motor vehicle driver’s license. Ability to
drive a box truck or van and transport heavy parcels and
mail bags required. Job Opening # 613523. Application
deadline: 9/27/13. To apply you must use the online
job application at http://humanresources.vermont.gov/
careers
For questions related to your application, please contact
the Department of Human Resources, Recruitment
Services at (800) 640-1657 (voice) or (800) 253-0191
(TTY/Relay Service). The State of Vermont is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.
Administrative Assistant B
TemporAry
Department of Buildings
& General Services
We are looking for an independent self-starter to
handle administrative functions for our Property
Services division, for approximately three or four
months. This position will function as part of the
team and requires good organizational and customer
service skills. Will work on various administrative/
clerical functions including: lease tracking, property
document filing, tenant problem responses (phone/
email), and general property correspondence
relating to property services. Proficiency with MS
Office Suite is expected. Prefer knowledge and
experience in service contracting, real estate
transactions, space leasing and overall property
management concepts and practices. Position
located in Montpelier.
Interested candidates should send their resume to
Jaime Roy at jaime.roy@state.vt.us.
The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer
FOUND DOG
WILLIAMSTOWN
Blue Tick, Tri-Color
Call 461-5283
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 27
TWO THRIFTY SISTERS
ANTIQUES, Now Open 124
North Main St Barre. Come
Check Us Out! 802-622-8000
MISCELLANEOUS
!!OLD GUITARS wanted!! Gib-
son, Fender, Martin, Gretsch,
1930-1980. Top Dollar Paid!!
Toll Free: 1-866-433-8277.
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
$28/Month Auto Insurance-
Instant Quote-Any Credit
Type Accepted-Get the
Best Rates In Your Area.
Call 800-317-3873 Now
AVIATION MAINTENANCE
TRAINING Financial Aid if
qualifed. Job Placement
Assistance. Call National
Aviation Academy today!.
FAA Approved. CLASSES
STARTING SOON! 1-800-
292-3228 or NAA.edu.
B&L AUTO Salvage & Metal
Recycling. Pay cash for salvage
or unwanted vehicles. Pick up
scrap metal. 802-249-5220
BASEBALL- FOOTBALL-
HOCKEY-RACE Car
Cards For Sale Also Na-
scar Models. 802-476-2058
Cut your STUDENT LOAN
payments in HALF or more
Even if Late or in Default.
Get Relief FAST Much
LOWER payments. Call Stu-
dent Hotline 888-224-9359
DIRECTV, Internet, & Phone
From $69.99/mo+ Free 3
Months: HBO Starz SHOW-
TIME CINEMAX + FREE GE-
NIE 4 Room Upgrade + NFL
SUNDAY TICKET! Limited
offer. Call Now 888-248-5961
DISH TV Retailer, SAVE!
Starting $19.99/month (for 12
months). Free premium mov-
ie channels. Free equipment,
installation and activation.
Call, Compare Local Deals!
1-800-309-1452
HARDWOOD CAMP-
FIRE WOOD, Meshbags
$6.00/ea. Free delivery
to Seniors. 802-279-2595
H U R R I C A N E
SCOOTER:(Fairs, camping,
Park Safari, leaf peeping,
Flea Markets) Color-Hunter
Green, basket, New Batter-
ies, tote bar, pair aluminum
telescoping ramps, 400lb
capacity, Used little, $3500
New, $1800. 802-479-1830
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES/
RESTORATION
continued
Green Mountain Transit Agency
Now accepting applications for Seasonal Drivers in Stowe and
Sugarbush
GMTA is looking for part-time bus drivers with excellent customer
service skills, great driving record and a positive team attitude
to join our team of seasonal drivers. Seasonal Drivers provide
transportation for the Stowe and Sugarbush ski resorts.
A Commercial Driver License (CDL) with passenger and air
brake endorsements, clean driving record, and the ability to
pass a background checks are also required. GMTA is willing to
train the right candidates for their CDL.
Several positions are available mid-December through early
April, up to 40hrs/week. Weekend availability is required.
Hourly rate: $15.85 and free seasonal ski passes are available
based on eligibility.
To apply for this position, please download an application
from gmtaride.org. Submit the application, along with a cover
letter and resume; in one of the following ways (no phone calls
please):
• viaemailtojobs@cctaride.org,
• viafaxto(802)864-5564,or
• viamailto:GMTA,
15 Industrial Parkway,
Burlington, VT, 05401
Attn: Human Resources
GMTA is an equal opportunity employer
and is committed to creating a diverse
workforce.
Drivers
Wanted
Green Mountain Transit Agency (GMTA) is now
hiring full- and part-time Volunteer Drivers for the
Washington County area. Drivers are compensated
with a generous mileage reimbursement.
Please call 223-7287 for more
information.
gmtaride.org
Full Time PCA/LNA Position Available
on the Night Shift (11 pm to 7 am) for
80 hours per biweekly pay period.
If you enjoy working in a warm and caring
environment where staff are valued
in the same way as our residents and families,
then join this exceptional team today!
Contact: Chelsea Driscoll, RN Manager
610 Water Street
Northfeld, VT 05663
802-485-3168 Fax 802-485-4815
cdriscoll@mayohc.org www.mayohc.org
EOE
STAFF DEVELOPMENT RN
Full-Time Position Available
I invite you to apply to:
Christine Scott, Administrator
71 Richardson Street
Northfeld, VT 05663
802-485-3161 Fax 802-485-6307
cscott@mayohc.org www.mayohc.org
EOE
Orange North Supervisory Union
Substitute Teachers
& School Staff Needed
Seeking qualifed substitute teachers and school
staff for Orange Center School, Washington
Village School,
Williamstown Elementary School, and
Williamstown Middle High School.
Pay rate is $75.00 per day.
Candidates must have a minimum high school
diploma. Experience with children/students
with two years college
or equivalent preferred.
Call Robin at 433-5818 or visit us at
www.onsu.org for an application packet. E.O.E.
Spaulding High School Seeks a
Library Technology Assistant
This position is responsible for technology and AV equipment
in the library and high school.
Job Requirements:
Responsible for using and maintaining school hardware and
software. Also responsible for setting up and training on
equipment such as ebooks, ipads, video recorders and players
as well as auditorium AV equipment. And will maintain
records, schedules and work to assist and monitor students.
In addition, the successful candidate will assist in general
circulation and clerical library duties.
Qualifcations:
Associates degree or 48 college credits
Relevant experience
Please submit a letter of interest, resume, transcript
& 3 letters of reference to:
Genevieve Knight, Librarian
Spaulding High School
155 Ayers Street
Barre, VT 05641
EOE
Only qualified applicants will receive a response. Valid driver’s license, excellent driving record and access to a safe, reliable,
insured vehicle is required. Send letter of interest and resume to: WCMHS, Personnel, PO Box 647, Montpelier, VT 05601.
Contact: 802-229-1399 Fax 802-223-6423 personnel@wcmhs.org www.wcmhs.org E.O.E.
Family Support & Partnership Case Manager: Full time w/ benefits. The Case Manager will coordinate and facilitate ongoing
community based supports to parents, guardians and services to children and youth experiencing a severe emotional/behavioral
disturbance. Extensive collaboration with other agencies and supports serving children, youth and families needed. BA in Human
Services or related field required. Two years of human service delivery with children and families preferred.
Computer Support Person: Full time w/ benefits. This position will be responsible for maintenance, upgrading hardware and
software on PC’s in a Windows XP\7 and Server 2008 environment. Duties would include working with active directory, installation
of operating system and application software, reconfiguring systems, installing printers, database programming, web development,
training of staff, general computer repair as well as phone repair. Knowledge of Pc hardware, MS Office applications, Networking,
Windows operating systems, Databases and web development. Position may require occasional evening and weekend work hours.
Employment Services Specialist: 30+ hours w/ benefits. This position provides supported employment services to individuals with
developmental disabilities which meet the individual's employment goals and on-going support needs. Specializes in the training
management strategies such as vocational assessment, placement, training, support and continuous follow-along while serving the
employer and individual. HS diploma with 3-5 years of experience working with adults with developmental disabilities and job
development.
Outpatient Clinician: Full time w/ benefits. Mental Health clinician needed to provide clinical services to adults in a physician’s
office. This position is located in a central Vermont primary care office and employed through Washington County Mental Health
Services. A Master’s degree, license eligible, a collaborative approach, and at least one year experience providing psychotherapy
required. Experience and interest in behavioral psychology desired.
Outpatient Family Therapist Clinician: Family therapist needed to provide clinical services to families, individuals and couples
in a busy outpatient clinic. This part-time position is located in Berlin at Washington County Mental Health Services, CCPS. A
Master’s degree, license eligible, a collaborative approach, and at least one year experience providing psychotherapy with families
required for thisn30 hour per week, salaried position.
COMMUNITY-BASED CASE MANAGER: Full time w/ benefits. Looking for someone to act as mentor, role model, and support
for men, aged 18 and up, with psychiatric and co-occurring disorders. Caseload would include, but not be limited to; young men
who are newly diagnosed; those involved with the criminal justice system; and those who are older and have lived with severe and
persistent psychiatric disabilities throughout their lives. This is a fast passed outreach position that includes supportive counseling,
service coordination, skills teaching, and advocacy; and requires someone who is compassionate, creative, well organized, honest,
dependable, and strength based. Prefer person with Master’s Degree in related field and a minimum of one-year experience working
with men with mental illnesses. Will consider a person with a Bachelor’s degree in related field, who has relevant experience.
Ch.O.I.C.E. Academy Educational Instructor – Math: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking an educator to provide academic and skills
instruction to adolescents in an integrated mental health treatment/educational center. Will be responsible to design and implement
academic curriculum and instruction appropriate to the needs of each student in the classroom, implement social and behavioral
programming for each student and must be willing to learn de-escalation and passive restraint techniques. Teaching experience with
children with severe emotional and behavioral challenges or other mental health issues preferred. Master's degree or Bachelor's with
a teaching license in the appropriate area of instructional specialization. Will consider Bachelor's degree with extensive knowledge
(18 college credits) and experience in instructional specialization with teaching experience. Teachers meeting Vermont's Highly
Qualified standard preferred
Accounts Payable Clerk: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking individual to process expense sheets for WCMHS and process checks for
Professional Parents once a month. Process and track Agency Petty Cash accounts. Prepare and maintain monthly recur batches.
Assist with the daily processing of checks. Prepare for and participate in the annual Guardianship Trust audit. Maintains and
processes the annual W9 forms. HS Diploma or GED required. Associate’s Degree in Accounting desirable. One year of experience
in customer services, two years general office/administrative work or two years of experience with data entry and record keeping
helpful.
Behavior Interventionists/Educational Support Specialists for the following programs: Full time w/ benefits.
SBBI (School Based Behavior Interventionist): Multiple positions. Full time w/ benefits. Provide direct supervision to enrolled
child or youth within a school setting. Implement behavioral programming and provide counseling in social, recreational and daily
living skills in school and community settings. Bachelor's Degree in human services, education or psychology preferred. If degree
requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required. Experience providing direct instruction and
therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred.
ChOICE Behavior Intervention/Education Support Specialist: Provide direct supervision to youth (ages 12-18+) within an
integrated mental health treatment facility / educational center. Implement behavioral programming and milieu counseling in social,
emotional and recreation/leisure skills and activities of daily living in classroom, day treatment and community settings. Provide
individual and group supervision as needed.
DTL & Social Skills Interventionist - Preschool: Full time w/ benefits. This position works under the direction of the Program
Director, and with ongoing training from lead interventionists and program consultant(s), provides individualized support services
to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs attributed to Pervasive Developmental Disorder.
Provide direct supervision, behavioral support, social skills building and daily living skills. Must possess strong communication
skills both verbally and in writing.
ODIN House Supervised/Assisted Living Provider & Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. This position will provide
a level of supervision for severe emotional/behavioral challenged youth. To provide supervision in the assigned home during
selected day shifts as well as selected over night shifts. To be available during nighttime hours for supportive counseling and for
implementation of crisis plan as needed. To participate in the treatment process, and utilize that knowledge to intervene during
potentially high-risk situations. Extensive transportation to fulfill transition / treatment plan goals. Experience providing direct
instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
Evergreen House Supervised/Assisted Living Provider & Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. This position will
provide a level of supervision for severe emotional/behavioral challenged youth. To provide supervision in the assigned home during
selected day shifts as well as selected over night shifts. To be available during nighttime hours for supportive counseling and for
implementation of crisis plan as needed. To participate in the treatment process, and utilize that knowledge to intervene during
potentially high-risk situations. Extensive transportation to fulfill transition / treatment plan goals. Experience providing direct
instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
All Behavior Interventionist positions require: Bachelor's Degree in human services, education or psychology preferred. If
degree requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required. Experience providing direct
instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred. Ability to lift and carry 50 pounds and
execute physical restraints required.
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
continued on page 28
page 28 The WORLD September 18, 2013
JUNK AUTO
PICK-UP
YOU CALL
I’LL HAUL
802-279-2595
MEET singles now! No paid
operators, just people like you.
Browse greetings, exchange
messages, connect live, FREE
trial. Call 1-877-737-9447
NASCAR NEXTEL XL Cup
Series Coat, Red Sox 2004
Champion Coat, Both New-
Never Worn. 802-476-2058
NEW SOLAR panels, 230
Wattsx24 Volts. $1.80/
watt. Charlie Hall, W. Top-
sham, 802-439-5519.
ROTARY INTERNATIONAL-
Start with Rotary and good
things happen. Rotary, human-
ity in motion. Find information
or locate your local club at:
www.rotary.org. Brought to
you by your free commu-
nity paper and PaperChain.
TOP CASH PAID FOR OLD
GUITARS! 1920’s thru 1980’s.
Gibson, Martin, Fender,
Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild,
Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Praire
State, D’Angelico, Strom-
berg, and Gibson Mandolins/
Banjos. 1-800-401-0440.
V
I
D
E
O

C
O
N
VERSIO
N

T
O

D
V
D
Convert
VHS, SVHS,
VHS-C, 8mm, High HP
or Digital to DVD Disc
Cost $0.05 per foot
Plus Tax/Shipping
Contact Mac at
802-244-1697 or
macsports@myfairpoint.net
WE CAN remove bankrupt-
cies, judgments, liens, and
bad loans from your credit file
forever! The Federal Trade
Commission says companies
that promise to scrub your
credit report of accurate nega-
tive information for a fee are
lying. Under FEDERAL law,
accurate negative information
can be reported for up to seven
years, and some bankruptcies
for up to 10 years. Learn about
managing credit and debt
at ftc.gov/credit. A message
from The World and the FTC.
HOME
APPLIANCES
GAS STOVE W/heater sell-
ing B.O. also, Bradford-
white gas H2O Heater B.O.
Call days 802-476-0955
RANGE HOOD good qual-
ity, black, almost new $75.
Sump Pump never used
$50. Double stainless steel
sink $15. 802-454-7814
continued on page 29
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
19 VALLEY VIEW Circle,
Barre Town, 9/20&21, 9AM-
3PM. Pickup Truck Ramps
& Chrome Bed Rails,
Jointer, Curio Cabinet,
Household Goods, Skates,
Kids Clothes, Lots More.
BARRE KIWANIS, Part 2. Fri-
day, 9/20; Saturday, 9/21, 9-3, 6
Grandview Drive, Barre Town.
BARRE TOWN 341 CAMP ST.
HUGE Multi-family Garage
Sale. household goods, small
furniture, clothes, vintage
cotton, yarn, fishing equip-
ment, tools, decorative items,
jewelry. Fri Sept 20 8:30-
5:30, Sat Sept 21 9:00-1:00.
BARRE: 102 PROSPECT
STREET. Friday & Saturday
9/20 & 9/21, 11-2. Books, tools,
file cabinet, roller & ice skates,
work boots and coveralls, mini
greenhouse, furniture, much
more. Look for parking signs.
GARAGE SALE 9/21&22,
8-4PM. Barre 407 Sierra
Lavin Rd. Lots of fancy glass,
snow shoes, x-country skies
& boots, furniture, Misc items.
MISCELLANEOUS
HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS WANTED
for
Central Vermont Rotary
“Last Chance”
Yard Sale
Saturday, Oct. 5
at The WORLD
Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Must be in good shape.
Call Gary at The WORLD
479-2582
or bring to The WORLD
at 403 US Rt. 302 (B-M Rd.),
Berlin
No large appliances or furniture
MIDDLESEX COUNTRY
Store, Middlesex Village
Rte 2 and 100b. Lots of
stuff, tools, toys, greet-
ing cards, furniture, and
more. Saturday only 8-4pm.
MULTI-FAMILY Garage Sale
— set of 6 painter-signed Old
Hitchcock chairs, butterwork
table in old blue, banks, old
candlestick phone with ringer
box, more antiques, large old
movie posters, Old Handwerk
doll; household items, and
more! September 20 and
21st, 8:00AM-4:00PM, 11
Cobble Hill Meadows, Barre.
MULTI-FAMILY Sale, 9/20&21,
9-3, Cardinal Circle Barre
Town, Books, clothing, house-
hold, kitchen, cookware items.
N.Montpelier VT RT 14, Sun-
day 9/22 9am-dark. Last Sale
of the Summer; Lots of $1 items
including jewelry, Beautiful ta-
ble w/2 chairs, Jewelry bags,
Too many items to List.any
question call 802-279-4728.
SEPT 20-21, 9-4, WARK ST,
Barre Town; Hunting, Fish-
ing, Many Household items.
Mansfield Canoe, Tubbs
Snowshoes, deer stand,
mounts, antlers, ammo, Ice
tent, heater, tipups, jigs, Rods,
lures, goose, duck decoys
and more. Rain date 9-27-28.
TRASH and TREASURE
BARN SALE, Friday-Sept
20-Saturday Sept 21, 9am-
3pm. Rt 14 six miles south of
Williamstown in East Brook-
field, Taylor Hill Rd. Go-Go
Scooter, Claw foot bath tub,
cast iron radiators, brush hog,
Puzzles, household items,
furniture, dryer, Maytag ringer
washer, lamps, etc. Barn is full
WATERBURY FLEA MARKET.
Vermont’s Largest flea mar-
ket. Open every Saturday and
Sunday from May to October.
Only $20 a day for vendors.
Call Brien Erwin at 882-1919 or
email: vberg33@hotmail.com
YARD SALES • GARAGE SALES • TAG SALES • RUMMAGE SALES
403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274
479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916
Use your VISA/MC/DISCOVER
and call 479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
3
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The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error please
notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be responsible
for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.
CLIP AND MAIL THIS HANDY FORM TODAY
CHECK HEADING:
■ Animals-Farm ......................500
■ Animals-Pet .........................430
■ Antiques/Restorations .........144
■ Baby/Children Items ............140
■ Bicycles ...............................220
■ Boating/Fishing ...................210
■ Building Materials ................300
■ Business Items ....................080
■ Business Opportunities .......060
■ Camping ..............................205
■ Childcare Service ................030
■ Christmas Trees ..................370
■ Class & Workshops .............103
■ Clothing & Accessories .......130
■ Computers/Electronics ........100
■ Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410
■ Free Ads ..............................108
■ Furniture ..............................180
■ Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145
■ Health ..................................113
■ Home Appliances ................160
■ Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305
■ Insurance/Investments ........090
■ Job Opportunities ................020
■ Lost and Found ...................110
■ Miscellaneous .....................150
■ Musical ................................200
■ Personals ............................105
■ Professional Services .........540
■ Rideshare ............................125
■ Snow Removal Equip. .........355
■ Snowmobiles/Access. .........360
■ Sporting Equipment ............250
■ Storage................................235
■ Support Groups ..................107
■ Tools ....................................330
■ Wanted ................................120
■ Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350
■ Work Wanted .......................040
AUTOMOTIVE
■ Campers/Motor Homes .......845
■ Cars & Accessories ............875
■ Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850
■ Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870
■Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873
■ Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855
REAL ESTATE
■ Apts./House for Rent ...........630
■ Camps for Sale ...................650
■ Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605
■ Condominiums ....................680
■ Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685
■ Homes .................................690
■ Land for Sale .......................670
■ Mobile Homes .....................600
■ Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645
■ Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610
PHONE NUMBER ___________________________________________________________________________
LAST NAME _______________________________________________________________________________
FIRST NAME ______________________________________________________________________________
ADDRESS _________________________________________________________________________________
CITY _______________________________________________ STATE ____________ ZIP _______________
START DATE: ___________ NUMBER OF ISSUES: __________
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Instructions:
Step 1: Go to www.vt-world.com
Step 2: Single click on “Classified” tab
Step 3: Single click on “Place a Classified Ad”
Step 4: Select “Internet only” or “Internet and
Print” for a fee.
Step 5: Follow the on-screen instructions online.
403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641
479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916
www.vt-world.com • sales@vt-world.com
Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 29
FURNITURE
10” PREMIUM MEMORY
Foam Queen Mattress with
cover—smoke-free, pet-free,
stain-free—great condition.
Asking $350 802-479-1781
BUFFET; 2 Drawer, 2 Cupboard
Buffet. $200. 802-622-0027
CHILD BDRM SET Twin
bed w/hb; corner desk,
bookcase and drawers.
$400.00 802-622-0027
MUSICAL
GUITARS 3 for sale $75-
$150 802-793-4781
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
CLARINET/FLUTE/ VIOLIN/
TRUMPET/ Trombone/ Ampli-
fier/ Fender Guitar, $69 each.
Cello/Upright bass/ Saxo-
phone/French horn/Drums,
$185 ea. Tuba/Baritone horn/
Hammond Organ, others 4
sale. 1-516-377-7907.
TFN-BNE
NORTH BRANCH Instru-
ments, LLC. Fretted Instru-
ment Repair. Buy and Sell
used Fretted Instruments.
Michael Ricciarelli 802-229-
0952, 802-272-1875 www.
northbranchinstruments.com
PIANO TUNING & REPAIR
DAVID GAILLARD
802-472-3205
SPINET PIANO. Very good
condition, moving, $400. 802-
479-3262, 828-712-2655.
CAMPING
2001 ROCKWOOD FREE-
DOM POP-UP CAMPER.
Sleeps 8, stove-fridge-new
awning. Call 802-479-2764
HARDWOOD CAMP-
FIRE WOOD, Meshbags
$6.00/ea. Free delivery
to Seniors. 802-279-2595
SEASONAL RV LOTS
FOR 2014
Complete hookups plus
cable, TV & WIFI if desired.
5min. walk to Crystal Lake. 3
golf courses nearby. Belview
Campground. 802-525-3242.
BICYCLES
SCHWANN recumbent excer-
cise bike $95.
Cannon recumbent road bike
BENT II $200. 802-522-6889.
STORAGE
8’X20’ STORAGE UNITS
for rent. Airport Rd, Ber-
lin. 802-223-6252
8’x20’, 8’x40’ OCEAN
FREIGHT containers (new/
used) for sale. 802-223-6252.
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
Royalton, VT
1-877-204-3054 • (802) 763-7876
FOR LEASE OR SALE...
STORAGE
CONTAINERS
DELIVERED TO YOUR SITE
PLENTY OF STORAGE TRAILERS
& CONTAINERS AVAILABLE
Call For Prices
1-877-204-3054
Exit 3
off I-89
LEA
SING








































































































STBRABE
IXITS
5x5 10x15
Pay for 6 Months,
Get 1 Month FREE!
Don`s Affordable
Self Storage
East Montpelier
223-7171
WINTER STORAGE for
Cars, Boats, Bikes, RV’s
Call 802-485-7500 for
Rates and Reservations.
YOU Store It!
Lock It!
And YOU
Keep The Key!
CaII 229-2222
Barre Montpelier Area
Mini Storage Warehouse
SPORTING
EQUIPMENT
2012 CRICKET 1 mile,
#197564265 $2,995 Dark Blue
Autoxtreme 866-859-8284
Great X-cross ski condition-
ing NordicTrak $50. New
Basketball & Pump $10. Gulf
Clubs, bags & accessories
make an offer. 802-229-1549
HUNTING/GUNS/
ARCHERY
NEW AND used guns,
muzzleloaders, accesso-
ries. Snowsville Store, E.
Braintree, 802-728-5252.
WANTED: PISTOLS, Ri-
fles, Shotguns. Top Prices
paid. 802-492-3339 days.
802-492-3032 nights.
TOOLS/
MACHINERY
CRAFTMAN WELD-
ING Gauges, $75. 802-
479-3262/ 828-712-2655
TooI Warehouse OutIet, Inc.
Rt. 302 · Barre-MontpeIier
CentraI Vermont's Best
SeIection Of QuaIity TooIs
Discount Prices!
802-479-3363 800-462-7656
TOOLS REPAIRED
Air, electric, hydraulic. Tool
Warehouse Outlet, Barre-
Montpelier Rd., 802-479-
3363, 1-800-462-7656.
WOOD/HEATING
EQUIP.
ALTERNATE HEATING sys-
tems model E140 wood
fired boiler, stainless steel,
down draft gasification de-
sign, 140,00 BTU, 90% ef-
ficiency, no creosote, hot
water coil and smoke hood.
$7,850 obo. 802-223-5923.
ANTHRACITE COAL
5 Sizes in stock
Bulk & 50lb bags
BLACK ROCK COAL
www.blackrockcoal.com
1-800-639-3197
802-223-4385
AVALON WOOD STOVE for
sale $550. Good condition,
with stove pipe. 802-485-5441
CHOP-CHOP FIREWOOD
Service. Comfort food for your
furnace. Green firewood. $210/
cord. (2) cord deliveries pre-
ferred. 802-472-WOOD(9663).
DRY FIREWOOD DELIV-
ERED 18” or 16” wood,
stacked 8-12 months. Mixed
hardwoods, $275/cord de-
livered within 25 miles of
Washington, VT 685-4626.
DRY FIREWOOD. Cut 24”,
stacked 2-3 years, $200 per
cord, you haul. 802-223-5923.
FIREWOOD For SALE, Qual-
ity Hardwood: Green $225,
Seasoned $260 cord. Call
802-371-8250(days)/ 802-
454-1259 (evenings).
FIREWOOD SPLIT & DELIV-
ERED $200/CORD, Fresh
Cut Only. Kirk Thompson
802-456-7421 evenings.
FIREWOOD SPLIT + De-
livered, Green $200/cord,
Seasoned Ash $210/cord,
Paul Poulin 802-883-5563
FIREWOOD
$195/cord
Split & Delivered/Green
802-498-4078
FIREWOOD, GREEN and
Seasoned call 802-454-
1062 Leave message.
FIREWOOD, Split/deliv-
ered, Seasoned $250.
Green $230/cord 802-
479- 0372/ 802- 839- 0429
FIREWOOD: CUT, Split, de-
livered $210 within 10 miles of
Duxbury, more than 10 miles,
price negotiable. 802-244-8580
HARDWOOD KINDLING,
Meshbags $6.00/ea. Free de-
livery to Seniors. 802-279-2595
METALBESTOS INSULATED
Chimney pipes. Everyday low
price. Plainfield Hardware &
General Store, Rt2 East Mont-
pelier Rd, Plainfield. 802-454-
1000 Open 7 Days a Week
PELLETIER’S
PELLETS
Buy VT First!
Made In VT
#1 Best Softwood Pellets
.22 Ash Content
Buy Now - Beat The Rush!
$270 per ton $5.75 per bag
Call For Delivery
802-249-7857 or 479-1308
We Accept:
QUADRAFIRE CAST Iron
Brick Lined Glass front, up to
16” wood, $400. 802-433-5875
VIGILANT II STOVE, Cozy
50,000 BTU’s heats estimated
2,000 square feet, Includes
Coal outside bin plus 12 bags,
Used one Season, Sell or
trade $1400. 802-479-1830
VOGALZANG DURAN-
GO High efficiency wood
stove, fan, takes 22” wood,
$350. Wonderwood, takes
22” wood, fan, used one
year $350. 802-496-3984
Wood
Pellets
at
CliffDodge.com
Cliff Dodge
(802)793-4222
FARM/GARDEN/
LAWN
BARRE TOWN, hay $4
per bale, mulch hay $3.50
per bale. 802-479-9683.
CEDAR BROOK FARM; Ce-
dar Fence Posts, Brush Hog-
ging, Pasture Renovation,
Rototilling, Planting, Wildlife
Food Plots. 802-274-2955
email-ajpalmiero@gmail.com
FOR SALE: One JERSEY
Bull Calf, One Ashire Heifer
calf, weigh 300 to 400 pounds
approx each price $300.00
each or both for $500.00.
Dont want to keep over win-
ter. Northfield 802-485-7757
TIRED OF BARK MULCH?
COLORED STONE ROCKS!
www.landscapestonesofver-
mont.com at Black Rock Coal,
East Montpelier, VT. 802-223-
4385, 1-800-639-3197.
STORAGE
continued
TOOLS/
MACHINERY
continued
WOOD/ HEATING
EQUIP.
continued
FARM/GARDEN/
LAWN
continued
continued on page 30
FAX US!
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display Ad Is
Even Easier!
Our Fax Number Is
(802)479-7916
Please Include Contact
Person & Payment Info
VISA, MasterCard & Discover
McLEODS
SPRING & CHASSIS
“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”
32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971
Snowplows
SALES &
SERVICE
For Superior Snowplowing Performance
We Repair All
Snowplow Makes
& Models
WINKY
~4 Year Old Neutered Male
Domestic Short Hair
I am a very handsome man that deserves a life of
luxury. I would love to sun myself in a big comfy
chair, do you have one I can claim as my own?
I came to CVHS after living in an overcrowded
home of other felines. I would love to live in a
home that is like a library; quiet but still lively.
I can go home to live with other feline
companions, older children and timid dogs.
Am I your
purrfect match?
1589 VT Rte 14S • East Montpelier
802-476-3811
www.cvhumane.com Tues.-Fri. 1PM-5PM, Sat. 10AM-4PM
$ $ cash for guns $ $ cash f
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g
u
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s

$

$

c
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g u n s $ $ c a s h f o r g u n s $ $ c a s h f o
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guns
carrara’s gun shop
WE BUY GUNS! New, Used, Old or Broken
802-492-3339 Days
802-779-7217 Cell
if you have firearms for sale, we are serious buyers!
We are strong buyers for nice
Winchesters, Savages, Brownings, Colts & fine shotguns
~We Have Buyers In Your Area~
We Buy
Guns
We Buy
Guns
POWER EQUIPMENT
476-7712
81 S. Main St., Barre
M-F 8-5 • SAT. 8:30-Noon
15 Models in Stock
OCCASIONAL USE SAW
MS 170 C Stihl MiniBoss
TM
$
179
.95
MIDRANGE SAW
MS 290 Stihl Farm Boss
®
Rugged Farm
Use
PROFESSIONAL SAW
MS 362 Stihl Magnum
TM
$
689
.95
Tough High
Performance
START AT
Ideal for
Home Use
START AT
START AT
$
389
.95
Appalachian Supply, Inc.
4581 Memorial Drive
St. Johnsbury, VT
(802) 748-4513
970 Meadow Street, Littleton, NH
(602) 444-6336
D
U
M
P TRAILE
R
S
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★



TRAILER
SALES
www.luckystrailers.com
402 VT Rt. 107 (Exit 3, I-89) So. Royalton, VT 05068
1-800-877-5854
28 Jasper Mine Rd (Exit 17, I-89) Colchester, VT 05446
1-877-201-9993
TRAILER SALES
ONE STOP
TRAILER CENTER
•Registration
•Inspection
•Brake
Controllers
•Wiring
•Hitches
•Parts
•Service
EQUIPMENT
TRAILER
Leash Laws Are Sometimes Vague
DEAR PAW’S CORNER: I’m
writing in reference to your
recent column about training a
“cool city pooch.” You’re for-
getting that many cities have
laws about tying up your dog to
lampposts. Unless that “cool
pooch’s” owner wants to pay a
fine, he’d better forget about
doing that. -- S.Y., via e-mail
DEAR S.Y.: That’s a good point: Pet owners should check city
ordinances ahead of time before taking their pets out on a
stroll. Are pets completely not allowed inside businesses by
city law, rather than at the business owner’s discretion? Can
you tie their leash to a lamppost, bike stand or outdoor table?
Can a dog be unaccompanied or off leash at any time?
As a counterpoint, many cities’ leash laws are sometimes a
bit vague on this point. Almost all require that owners keep
their dogs under control at all times, and on a leash everywhere
except in designated off-leash areas. Municipal buildings and
schools are usually off-limits to non-service dogs, period.
Some cities, and an increasing number of businesses, are
making more allowances for dogs. For example, some grocery
stores and a few department stores in my area, like Home
Depot, allow small dogs inside as long as they stay on a leash
beside their owner and are well-behaved. However, it is up to
the pet owner to learn what the rules are in the businesses he or
she wants to frequent.
The most important point, beyond what’s written in leash
laws or by businesses, is that pet owners be good citizens, and
make sure their dog is safe and under their control when out
and about.
Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com.
Did you know mosquitos can transmit heartworm larvae to
dogs, but fleas don’t? Find out more in my new book,
“Fighting Fleas,” available now.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
FOUND
DOG
WILLIAMSTOWN
Blue Tick, Tri-Color
Call
461-5283
page 30 The WORLD September 18, 2013
ANIMALS/PETS
BOSTON TERRIERS & PUGS;
shot and dewormed, and pa-
per training, 802-476-5904.
BROOKSIDE KEN-
NELS. Boarding dogs.
Heated runs. Located Or-
ange Center, 479-0466.
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802~22ß~0114
/QN\+MZ\QNQKI\M[)^IQTIJTM

DON’T WANT TO
KENNEL YOUR DOG(S)?
Have your child friendly com-
panion animal stay with us in
the comfort of our home. Call
Your Pet Nannies, Sophie
802-229-0378 or Shona 802-
229-4176, references avail-
able.
WANTED; MALE, BROWN
TABBY, MAINE COON
KITTEN, MUST PURR,
Ask for Donna 249-4142
WHITE LONG Hair MALE
10yrs old, fxed, indoor/
outdoor(stays in when its cold),
litter boxed trained. Called
269-6492 leave message.
ANIMALS/FARM
HORSE TRAILER - 2 Horse
Slant, Full Tack/Dressing, Very
Good Condition, Just Inspect-
ed. $3900. 802-479-2404
Kidder’s Smokehouse. Cus-
tom smoke & cure. We do corn-
beef. Orange. 802-498-4550.
LEATHER WESTERN Sad-
dle, double cinch, soft seat
cantle. $400 802-563-2735
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
ACE PAINTING
& STAINING SERVICES LLC
Covering all interior/exterior
and pressure washing needs.
802-461-7828.
BEAUDIN’S PLUMBING/
HEATING. New construc-
tion. Remodel jobs. Re-
pairs, service. Furnace/
boiler replacements. Furnace
cleanings. Odor eliminat-
ing service. Fully licensed/
insured. Leo, 802-476-3237.
BRUSH HOGGING, large
and small lots. Home-
stead Landscape, Rhett
Savoie, 802-272-7130.
CARPENTRY; ADDITIONS/
Renovations, kitchens,
cabinets, and siding, tile
work. Clay wall plastering.
Rob after 6p.m., 456-1340.
CARPET AND
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING
Residential & Commercial
223-6490
“Our Reputation Is Clean!”

CLEANING SERVICES: Home
or Offce, One time or sched-
uled, Carpets, Clean-out, Site
Clean-ups, Real Estate Clean-
ing, Windows. 802-279-0150
DmFURNACE
MAN
·Oil Furnace Tune-Ups
·Cleanings ·Repairs
·Installations
Fully Licensed & Insured
Reasonable Rates
Call Daryl
802-249-2814

FOUR SQUARE CON-
TRACTING. Quality Car-
pentry, Painting, General
Repair. Ed, 802-229-5414.
HANDYMAN SERVICES:
Repairs.Carpentry.Flooring.
Painting. Electrical/Plumb-
ing, Pressure Washing. De-
bris Removal 802-279-0150
HANDYMAN will cut your
grass, Take care of fowers,
anything outside or inside
the house or garage, Rea-
sonable and Good work, Call
802-479-0610 Scott Plante
LAWN MOWING & WEED
Wacking
Free estimate. Bob Morin 802-
522-9753/802-476-8404.
LOU’S APPLIANCE Repair,
36 Central Street, Randolph.
Service throughout central
Vermont. In Barre, Montpe-
lier area all week. 802-728-
4636; 802-477-2802(cell).
lousappliance@comcast.net
MINI EXCAVATOR. Skid
Stir Work.DriveWay re-
pair, Resurfacing, ditching,
Drainage Work, and More.
Harley Rack and Grap-
ple Bucket. 802-485-3870
PROFESSIONAL CLEAN-
ING for Commercial &
Residential. Call 371-8083
QUALITY PAINTING, Stu-
art Morton, Interior/Exte-
rior, Repairs, Many Excel-
lent Local References.
802-229-0681 corsica@sover.net
TENDER LOVING HOME-
CARE, LLC Reliability You
Can Trust, Toni Barrows Vice
President 802-595-0518 fax
802-461-4135 tenderloving-
homecar el l c@gmai l . com
TREE and YARD SER-
VICE, BRUSHHOGGING,
and more. Fully insured,
free estimates. Jamie Benja-
min at jamiesyardandtree@
aol.com or 802-272-0217.
TREE SERVICE; Full Tree
Service, Stump grind-
ing, 35+ years experi-
ence, call Randy 802-479-
3403/249-7164 fully insured.
WILL HAUL away for free:
Scrap metal, old appliances,
car parts, etc. Furnaces,
boilers and demolitions for
a fee. No job too big or too
small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
continued
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
continued
BONANNO MASONRY
P.O. BOX 303, MONTPELIER, VT 05601
793-3190 CELL
Fully Insured
STONE BRICK BLOCK
Snowplowing
Available This winter
Fireplace, Stove & Chimney Maintenance
David Loughran
Barre, VT
•Chimney Building •Repairs •Liners •Caps
•Cleaning •Metalbestos
Also Foundation &
Brick Wall Repair (802) 479-3559
Quality In
Concrete
Concrete business since 1972.
Repairs • New foors and walls • Decorative concrete
Crane work • Consulting • ICF foundations
114 Three Mile Bridge Rd., Middlesex, VT
(802) 229-0480 gendronconcrete.com
Gendron
Building
Are You Ready for your
PELLET BOILER
to Heat Your Whole Home?
SAvE 40-50% On YOuR HEATIng BILL!
802-426-HEAT(4328)
Pellergy
Certifed
Installer
Call Us
Now For
Cleaning
Your
Heating
Systems!
Garage Doors and Openers
Sales & Service
Offering prompt, professional service and
repair on all residential makes and models
Kevin Rice, Owner Cell: (802) 839-6318
Kevin’s Doors
OPENERS
Come Home To A
Clean House!
Wouldn’t it be wonderful to come home to
a clean house, without lifting a fnger?
Now, you can!
Break free from the doldrums of housework
with a professional cleaning service.
I’ll leave your home looking, smelling
and feeling freshly cleaned
for a very affordable price.
Don’t hesitate~call Beth today
802-272-5550
Montpelier & East Montpelier Area
Reliable • Dependable • Reasonable Rates
ROOF REPAIRS & SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL & FLAT ROOF EXPERTS
Can’t afford a new roof yet?
NOW ACCEPTING MASTERCARD & VISA
SHINGLES • RUBBER • SLATE • METAL
Emergency Repairs 24/7 (Expert Leak Finders)
Al Smith, LLC
FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED
Call 233-1116 • alsmithroofng.com
TRUE COLORS
141 River Street, Montpelier
802-223-1616
"We now repair blinds!"
E-mail us!
Classified
& Display
ADS
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display Ad
Is Even Easier!
Our E-mail address is
sales@vt-world.com
Please include contact person
& payment info
( Only)
479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
Let Us Know...
if you are not getting
your
each week!
If you are in the greater
Barre-Montpelier-Northfield Area
Call 479-2582
Other Areas Can Call Toll Free
1-800-639-9753
DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL
TOMORROW WHAT
YOU CAN SELL
TODAY!
479-2582
Or Toll Free
1-800-639-9753
Central Vermont’s Newspaper
CLASSIFIEDS
403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641
FOUND DOG
WILLIAMSTOWN
Blue Tick, Tri-Color
Call 461-5283
ERVICE DIRECTOR
S Y
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 31
Bob Richardson, Owner
Tel: 802 472-8877
Cell: 802 249-8448
*Trees, Shrubs,
Evergreens
*Patios, Walls,
Walkways, Decking
*General
Maintenance,
Planting
*Designing
& Consulting!
Bob’s Creative Landscaping
Specializing
in
Concrete
Pavers
BOB’s masOnry
anD asPHaLT sHInGLE rOOFInG
Chimneys,
Steps,
Fireplaces, etc.
45 Years Experience
802-454-1134
BUILDING GARAGES
FROM FLOOR TO ROOF
Starting At
$
8,900
24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel
rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.
Garages to your specifications, any size.
House Framing & Addition Work
Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray
For All Your Home Improvement Needs
Spring Projects?
George Carrier
formerly of Poulin Aluminum Products
802-479-9633 802-272-8775
•Siding •Doors •Windows •Blown-in Insulation
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
Over 20 Years Experience ~ Fully Insured
GreG’s
PaintinG & staininG
Metal Roof Painting
Call 802-479-2733
gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified
• Handpaint or Spray
• Metal Roof Painting
• Interior/Exterior
• Guarantee
• Free Estimates
• Reasonable Low Rates
• Neat, Quality Work
• References • Insured
Daniels Metal Fabrication, Inc.
Over 35 Years Experience
Custom Sheet Metal Fabrication
•Furnace Plenums
•Heat Shields
•Roof Flashing
•Ductwork: pipes & elbows in stock
•Grille Faces & Registers in stock
456 East Montpelier Road, Montpelier
802-223-2801 802-223-3789
ALL FAMOUS NAME
FLOORING & CARPETING
EXPERT INSTALLATION
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
CARPET - VINYL - TILE
HARDWOOD FLOORS
AREA RUGS
ROLLS & ROLLS - IN STOCK
Mohawk Carpet
plus Mohawk Laminate® Mohawk Wood®
DELAIR’S
VT TOLL FREE 1-800-244-7179 delairscarpetbarn.com
“Our Prices Will Simply Floor You!”
See Our
Offer the
Coupon Section
NOW AT
2 CONVENIENT
LOCATIONS
RT. 2 , EAST MONTPELIER
802-223-7171
30 MOuNTAINVIEW PLAzA
Munson Ave. Morrisville
802-851-8250
Randy Eastman
CARPENTRY
"25 Years Experience"
522-5889
You Save Money Because There Is No Overhead
Free Estimates • References
3TILL (AVE
$IAL 5P
'ET (IGH3PEED 4ODAY
Offer expires 5/2l/l3. Pestrictions apply. Call for details.
0ROMOTIONAL PRICES START AT
lor 12 rorl|s
W/ 21-ro Açreererl.
$BMM UPEBZ UP mOE PVU NPSF
Mark Alberghini
Green Mountain Satellite
Waterbury, VT
802-244-5400
www.greenmountainsatellite.getdish.com • gmsat@myfairpoint.net
•Lawn care, installation & repair:
Lawn mowing, reseeding, fertilizing & more...
•Property & Home Maintenance:
Tree & shrub trimming/removal; mulching;
brush clearing/removal
•Spring & Fall clean-up; pressure washing
•House maintenance & more...
•Construction or Renovation:
Patios; retaining walls; stone hardscapes;
raised fower beds; fencing; drainage work
•Driveway Resurfacing
•Skid steer/Mini Excavator work & more...
•Brush grapple bucket
•Mulching
Insured/Free Quotes
Justin

(802) 883-5090 or (802) 595-5105 D
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W
I
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•Custom Made On Site
And Installed
• FREE Estimates,
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• Installation & Material
GUARANTEED
•30+ Years Experience
Compare Quality & Workmanship
MARIO VERDON 802-476-3331 or 1-800-463-7311
337 VT Route 110, Orange, VT 05641
“gutters, gutters”
Go With The Best!
Tom Moore
T&T Repeats
116 Main St., Montpelier
802-224-1360
•Light Moving
•House Clean-Out
•Landfill Runs
•Garage Clean-Out
•Reasonable Rates
Local Business
Long Distance Runs
Deliveries for
Local Businesses
TRUCK FOR HIRE!
Tiny’s Trash
SERVICES / HAULING
Bag Drop & Recycling @
Brookside Country Store
339 East Montpelier Road
(Vt. Rt. 14)
SAT. 7:00AM-1:00PM
SUN. 7:00AM-2:00PM
Also available for
Cleanouts/Debris Removal
Call Tiny @
802-522-5089
Top To BoTTom Chimney ServiCeS
Richard Dickinson
(802) 479-1811
Chimney Building, Repairs, Caps
Stainless Steel Liners and Cleaning
Free Estimates/Insured
Mobile Home
Sales, Parts & Services
GoVillageHomes.com
HSinglewide & Doublewide
HNew & Pre-Owned
HEnergy Effcient / Custom Layouts
HFinancing & Site Work
HTransport / Total Move & Set Up
802-229-1592 • 1083 U.S. Route 2, Berlin, VT
HParts & Fixtures
HRoofng, Skirting & Stairs
HRe-Leveling & Anchoring
HFurnace & A/C Systems
HAwnings, Doors & Windows
5” Residential & 6” Commercial Free Estimates / Fully Insured
Custom Gutters
Available in colors to match
Made from the heaviest weight
aluminum .032 gauge
We offer a 20-Year warranty on
materials and 5-Year workmanship
guarantee
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800-499-6326 • 802-334-6326
Visit Our Website: www.willeysgutters.com
SPOTLIGHT
ON SERVICE
These local businesses are here
to take good care of you.
OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE!
802-563-2015
or Cell: 802-272-7738
ROOFING
& Painting
Booking Now!
Residential & Commercial
NOW ACCEPTING
* We Return All Phone Calls *
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CERTIFIED
Fully Insured
page 32 The WORLD September 18, 2013
EQUAL HOUSI NG
OPPORTUNITY
PUBLISHERҋS NOTICE
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising in this news-
paper is subject to the fair housing act
which makes it illegal to advertise “any
preference, limitation or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or national ori-
gin, or an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination.”
Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing
and Public Accomodations Act prohibits
advertising that indicates any prefer-
ence, limitation or discrimination based
on age, marital status, sexual orienta-
tion or receipt of public assistance.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our read-
ers are hereby informed that all dwell-
ings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis.
To file a complaint of discrimination, call
the Vermont Human Rights Commisson
toll-free at 1-800-416-2010 (voice
& TTY) or call HUD toll free at
1-800-669-9777 (voice) or
1-800-927-9275 (TTY).
MOBILE HOMES/
RENT/SALE
1988 14X70, 3bdrm, 2bath,
mobile Home, W&D/Stove/
Frig, In Park, S.Barre, $21,000
also would rent $800/mo.
802-487-4718 After 7pm.
COMMERCIAL
RENTALS/SALES
COMMERCIAL LOCATION RT
14 East Montpelier. First Building
past Bragg Farm - 1000 to 3000
sq/ft. Bob 802-229-4366 nights.
EQUAL HOUSI NG
OPPORTUNITY
We have commercial space
available for lease and sale
and businesses for sale
throughout the
Central Vermont area.
For more information, please
call John at BCK Real Estate.
John Biondolillo
BCK Real Estate
(802) 479-3366, ext. 301
John@BCKrealestate.com

WILLIAMSTOWN: COM-
MERCIAL/store front, previ-
ous Vermont municipal offce,
option of adding garage door.
See our ad on Craig’s list un-
der offce/commercial post-
ing ID4058313681. 1400 sq.ft.
$850/mth. Call 802-793-9682
WANTED TO RENT/
SHARE/BUY
BARRE TOWN Room Mate
Wanted: to share home,
Furnished with cable ac-
cess in room. Non-smok-
ing, No pets 802-479-2951
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
home on Rt. 100, So. Dux-
bury. $450/mo. 802-244-8666.
APARTMENTS
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
BARRE 2BDR 2nd foor, heat
included, no pets or smoking.
$845. Lease deposit refer-
ence required. 802-476-7106.
BARRE 3 BEDROOM newly
Remodeled, heat included,
No pets, Non-smoking, Credit
Check, $1,000 monthly plus
deposit. Call 802-476-6234
BARRE ANDREWS Court,
one bedroom, $700, 802-229-
5702 sal.b@myfairpoint.net
BARRE Apartment 3 ROOM.
Quiet location, includes heat &
electricity. No pets, non-smok-
ing, deposit. 802-476-4662.
BARRE CITY 1 Bedroom,
$625, available immedi-
ately, Heat included. 802-
3 5 5 - 0 6 0 5 / 8 0 2 - 7 9 3 - 7 3 7 1
BARRE CITY 3 Bedroom Du-
plex washer/dryer hook-up, pri-
vate driveway, nice fenced in
yard. Nonsmoking. $900/month
plus security deposit. Credit
Check. Call 802-793-8332
BARRE CITY, 1 Bedroom,
ground foor. Private entrance,
2 porches, Non-smoking, No
PETS, Snow/Rubbish Removal,
References and deposit required,
$725. Available October 1st. For
application call 802-272-8529
BARRE Clean and bright 1bdrm,
Includes heat and hot water, off-
street parking, No pets, $775
plus deposit. 802-476-0533.
BARRE EFFICIENCY APT, heat,
lights, Included. No pets, Non-
smoking, $475.00 plus deposit.
Credit Check. Call 802-476-6234
BARRE ONE BEDROOM
3RD Floor, $675/mo. No pets/
Non-Smoking. 802-476-7106
BARRE ONE BEDROOM Apt,
ground foor, coin-op washer/
dryer on premises, No pets,
credit references required,
$625/mo. 802-476-2092
CALAIS. COUNTRY apartment.
Lovely 3Bdrms, Dish washer,
open beams, huge yard, organic
garden space, non-smoking, no
pets. Surrounded by 200 acres.
$1150/mo. 802-454-7198.
DOWNTOWN BARRE, 2
Bedroom, 1st Floor, non-
smoking, heated, trash re-
moval, references, deposit,
$950/mo. 802-479-0686
MONTPELIER/BERLIN; MUR-
RAY HILL, FREEDOM DRIVE,
INDEPENDENCE GREEN,
CONDO’S FOR RENT. 802-
229-5702 sal.b@myfairpoint.net
NORTHFIELD, 4 BEDROOM,
2 bath house. No smoking. 1st
month, last month, security,
references and credit applica-
tion required. $1300 month,
plus utilities. 802-485-7304.
NORTHFIELD, 4 BEDROOM,
2 bath house, Non-smoking,
1st month, last month, security,
references and credit applica-
tions required. $1300 month,
plus utilities. 802-485-7304
ORANGE 3 BEDROOM Farm
House, 1 1/2 baths, porch,
large yard, utilities not included.
Would consider rent with option,
2+aces, frst/last/security. $850/
mo. After 6pm 802-476-7170
RENT W/OPTION to BUY,
Owner Financing w/Down
payment. 2001 3 Bed Mo-
bile HOme 24,500, Must have
good credit 802-479-2187
RULE OF THUMB......
Describe your property,
not the “appropriate” buyer or
renter, not the landlord,
not the neighbors.
Just describe the property and
you’ll almost always obey the
law.
WEBSTERVILLE, LARGE, 1
Bedroom Apt, $850/month, Heat,
Hot water, Snow Removal includ-
ed. References and Security de-
posit required. Preferably Non-
Smoking, Call 802-476-9611
or 522-5389 Available Oct 1st.
WILLIAMSTOWN, 1BDRM,
1st foor, heated, non-smok-
ing, no dogs. $575 plus
deposit. 802-433-5832.
VACATION RENTALS/
SALES
WARM WEATHER is Year
Round in Aruba. The water is
safe, and dining is fantastic.
Walk out to the beach. 3-Bed-
room weeks available. Sleeps
8. $3500. email: carolaction@
aol.com for more information.
CAMPS FOR SALE
PEACHAM POND 100 Foot
Lake Frontage, 3br Camp,
Furnished $375,000. sva-
s c e n s i o n @y a h o o . c o m
LAND FOR SALE
(3) BUILDING LOTS all per-
mits in place. Route 14 North
East Montpelier 802-839-0227
40 ACRES $155/MONTH $499
down. Immediate fnancing. No
qualifcations. NW Nevada near
Reno. Call Earl 1-949-632-7066.
www.CheapRuralProperty.com
BCK offers expert advice on
maximizing your land investment.
Farms, estates, Maple Sugar
Orchards, and woodlands.
Call to arrange a consultation
whether you`re Buying or Selling.
Dave Jamieson - BCK Real Estate
(802) 479-3366, ext. 305
Cell: (802) 522-6702
DavidJ@BCKrealestate.com
www.VermontLandCompany.com
EQUAL HOUSI NG
OPPORTUNITY
BERLIN 36 Mostly WOODED
Undeveloped Acres on East
Road, U32 School district,
$90,000.00 802-223-2227
has lots in
ORANGE
Ready to build on.
Call 229-2721

MARSHFIELD RT 232 1/
Acre, Drilled Well, Septic in
place. Beautiful Views, Power
at Road, 50X24 Garage w/
High ceiling in 1/2, Power
Door Opener. 239-495-1153
MONTPELIER: (TWO car ga-
rage) 2.48 Acres of land with
power $59,900 802-223-7782
WEST FAIRLY MOBILE HOME
LOT. 3/4 Acre, $16,500.00.
Owner/Broker 802-866-5961
HOMES
$28/Month Auto Insurance-
Instant Quote-Any Credit
Type Accepted- Get the
Best Rates In Your Area.
Call 877-958-6972 Now
CHELSEA, Modern Country Liv-
ing. 2000+ sqft, 4 bedrooms, 3 full
baths, country kitchen w/ stain-
less appliances, wood foors,
bedrooms carpeted, 2 porches,
dual heating system, 44.9 acres.
Contact Paul 802-498-8255
COZY PLAINFIELD village
home circa 1870. 4 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, forced hot air, wood
heat, 1500 sq.ft.
Separate apartment pays mort-
gage. $149,000 FSBO. 802-
456-8711.
GREENSBORO BEND, OLDER
2 STORY HOUSE, 3 bedrooms
upstairs, kitchen living room,
dining room and bedroom on
frst foor, full bath, some ap-
pliances, 2 acres +/-, asking
$109,500. 802-533-2315/802-
535-7867 leave message.
LARGE 2 APARTMENT house,
N. Montpelier priced to sell.
Storage space, garage, back
yard. Old but income posi-
tive. Needs work, but a lot of
house for $78,000. No owner
fnancing. 802-454-8635. Do
not leave message(broken).
WILLIAMSTOWN LAND/
HOME Package 14X76, 4 bed
2 bath, $67,900 802-229-2721
WORRIED ABOUT
FORECLOSURE?
Having trouble paying your mort-
gage? The Federal Trade Com-
mission says don’t pay any fees
in advance to people who prom-
ise to protect your home from
foreclosure. Report them to the
FTC, the nation’s consumer pro-
tection agency. For more infor-
mation, call 1-877-FTC-HELP or
click on ftc.gov. A message from
The World and the FTC.
Wednesday, September 18, 2013 ★ DEADLINES: •Display Ads Fri. 3:00PM •Word Ads Mon. 10:00AM
WE GET RESULTS! • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com
real estate
Wed., July 10, 2013 • DEADLINES: •Display Ads Fri. 3 PM •Word Ads Mon. 10AM
WE GET RESULTS! • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com
real estate
WE GET RESULTS! • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com
real estate
APARTMENTS
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
continued
LAND FOR SALE
continued
COMMERCIAL
RENTALS/SALES
continued
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
For Real Estate
Advertising
That Works
Call
1-800-639-9753
Classified
Deadline
Is Monday
Before
10:00AM
LAST DOWN
LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT
Granite Hills 9/13/13 4.750% 4.913% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 522-5000 3.750% 4.027% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Merchants Bank 9/13/13 5.650% 5.671% 30 yr fixed 0 20%
1-800-322-5222 4.850% 4.878% 15 yr fixed 0 20%
New England Federal 9/13/13 4.625% 4.646% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 866-805-6267 3.625% 3.661% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Northfield Savings 9/13/13 4.625% 4.666% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Bank (NSB) 3.625% 3.695% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
802-485-5871
VT State Employees 9/13/13 4.625 4.655% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union (VSECU) 3.625% 3.676% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
1-800-371-5162 X5345
Rates can change without notice.
***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as
5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not
included in the APR calculations.
Updated Weekly
Home Mortgage Rates
Granite Hills CU 4.750% 4.913% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
3.750% 4.027% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Merchants 5.650% 5.671% 30 yr fixed 0 20%
4.850% 4.878% 15 yr fixed 0 20%

NE Fed CU 4.625% 4.646% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
3.625% 3.661% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Northfield Savings 4.625% 4.666% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
3.625% 3.695% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

VSECU 4.625% 4.655% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
3.625% 3.676% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
WE ARE MOVING!
ALL MODEL HOMES MUST GO!
I91, Exit 23, Behind the Colonnade Inn, Lyndonville, VT
(800) 321-8688 www.beanshomes.com
Providing outstanding customer service and quality
singlewide & doublewide manufactured homes since 1974!
Trade in’s always welcome!
“Delivering what we promise”
We are moving to our new sales
location this winter &
we don’t want to move these homes!
Huge Savings!
No reasonable offer refused!
Stop in today!
Providing Quality,
Energy Efficient
Single & Doublewide
Manufactured Homes
& Superior Customer
Care since 1974!
SAVE BIG
ON OUR
PRE-OWNED
HOMES!
$ $
$ $
Open 7 Days a Week - Come Visit Us!
Bean’s Homes
Junction of Routes 5 & 114
Lyndonville, VT
(800) 321-8688 www.beanshomes.com
3 BEDROOM APTS.
AVAILABLE!
The Laurel Street Apartments
Barre, VT
**LABOR DAY SPECIAL! First month FREE for
leases signed during the month of September!**
Beautiful newly renovated apartments available on
Laurel St. in Barre, VT. $800 (second floor) - $850
(third floor) rent includes heat, hot water, trash removal,
private decks, onsite laundry and 24 hour emergency
maintenance services. Minimum monthly household
income to qualify (does not apply to Section 8 recipients):
$2,000/mo.
For more information or to apply, contact
Central Vermont Community Land Trust
802-476-4493 ext. 200, or download the
application at www.cvclt.org
Maximum Annual Household Income To Qualify
3 people:
$32,050
4 people:
$35,600
5 people:
$38,450
6 people:
$41,300
7 people:
$44,150
MIKE’S
PRE-OWNED
HOMES
1995 Champion
14x70, 3-bed 1-ba
$8000.
1990 Zimmer 2-bed,
nice home, $19,000.
1997 14x70, 2-bed,
Skyline, $24,500.
2000 14x70 2-bed,
Castle, front kitchen,
$28,500.
2000 Redman 16x80,
4-bed, 2-bath, $29,900.
12x60 2-bed, Holiday
Cottage, $6000.
More Inventory
Coming!
Call For Prices
802-272-9476
P: 802-479-1154
C: 802-224-6151
Wanda French
Mortgage Loan Officer
Wanda.French@guaranteedrate.com
guaranteedrate.com/wandafrench
NMLS ID: 101185
164 So. Main St., Barre, VT 05641
License # 6502
NMLS ID 3113
Licensing Information: http://www.guaranteedrate.com/licensing
Weston’s Mobile Home Park
We now have many favorable lots available for your
mobile home in this well maintained park close to the
Interstate and Montpelier.
Lot rent of $320.00 month includes water, septic, and
trash removal. Call for details.

Ellery and Jennifer
Packard
Weston’s Mobile
Home Park
229-5741ext. 103
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 33
2
4

Y
E
A
R
S
E
X
P
E
R
IE
N
C
E
OUR
24th
YEAR!
MEMBER
BETTER
BUSINESS
BUREAU
SENIOR CItIzEN
DISCOUNt
5% OFF
your total order
Do you dream of owning your own home?
Are you tired of paying rent?
Do you want to know what you can afford?
We know just how to help you!
Come - See if homeownership is right for you and find out if you can own the
home of your dreams.
Free - 1 hr. Orientation/ Registration session , come see how we can help you.
Learn - Sign up and attend the 8-hour Realizing the American Dream
Workshop, you will gain knowledge in the step-by-step processes of buying and
owning a home. Workshops are held once per month on a Saturday and there is
an $80 per household fee.
Graduate - Receive a certification of completion for this workshop, your
lender will be very impressed!
To reserve your seat, stop by , call 476-4493 x 211, or register online
www.cvclt.org. Our offices are located at 107 N. Main St., Barre
Central Vermont Community Land Trust’s
NeighborWorks® HomeOwnership Center is offering
Homebuyer Education Workshop.
Does Your Home Need Repair? We Can Help!
Repairs include:
Energy efficient improvements
Heating systems, including
Alternative fuel heating sources

Make Your Home Safe and Accessible
Access Modifications include:

Grab bars
Barrier-free showers

If eligible* we can assist with an affordable loan or grant to address
health & safety concerns, correct code violations or make access modifications
for an elderly or disabled household.
————————————————————————-
*Homeowners in Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties who meet income eligibility
requirements may qualify, please call for these guidelines. For example, a four person
household in Washington County must have an annual income of $54k or less.
————————————————————————
Call today: 802-476-4493 ext:211 or visit our website: www.cvclt.org
or stop by our office
Central Vermont Community Land Trust NeighborWorks® Homeownership Center
107 N. Main Street, Barre, Vermont 05641
Supported by a $375,000 VCDP grant from the
Agency of Commerce &
Community Development
Wells and Septic systems
Plumbing and Wiring
Roof and Foundation repairs
Permanent or temporary wheelchair ramps
Flooring repair/replacement
Please call: Laura Perry - Real Estate Agent
802-431-0160 email: laura@annswanson.com
www.annswanson.com REALTOR
®
UNIQUE AND
CHARACTERFUL
COUNTRY HOME
with Brook and
Outbuildings.
Fantastic Potential!
19 Acres
$199,000
NORTHFIELD

www.C21Jack.com
(802)793-7043
98 South Main Street
Waterbury
Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated
REALTOR
®
Joanie K. Sabins
802-793-7043
OPEN HOUSE
MORETOWN - Come take a look at this beautiful custom Contemporary
on 1.9 private acres w/ scenic river & MT views. Quality crafted w/new
unique windows, hardwood &ceramic tile flooring w/ radiant fl. heat.
Kitchen w/ maple cabinetry, black granite counter tops, wrap around
deck & in- ground heated pool w/ new liner & pump. Master bdrm w/
walk in closet & master bath w/ Jacuzzi. 2nd bath w/ stunning double
steam shower w/ 27 jets. Attached 2 car garage. Separate 2 story
oversized 2 car heated garage w/ finished second floor. Included is a
1991 (3) bdrm 1 bath M/H rents for $750 a month. $379,000.
Directions: From Middlesex Village turn onto RT 100B, go over bridge,
turn left onto River Road. Drive 1.7 miles to property on right.
Look for sign.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 • 10AM to 1PM
57 Brook Street
Barre City
$105,000
4 BR/2BA
Beeman Real Estate, LLC
www.beemanrealestate.com
29 Sunset Dr., Morrisville, Vt 05661
office (802) 888-7510
info@beemanrealestate.com
REALTOR
®
New Paint and floor covering are some of the upgrades in this Barre City home.
Handicap accessible. Neat, clean and well cared for, this home offers close access
to the revitalized downtown.
OPEN HOUSE
SAT., SEPT. 21 • 11AM-1PM
You deserve this spacious 4-BR, 3-ba country log-sided home
with oversized heated garage and gazebo! Open layout with ash,
maple, oak and birch flooring. Upgraded hickory kitchen with Viking
professional appliances. Miele-brand laundry. First floor master BR
has walk-in closet and private luxury bath (both a whirlpool tub and
walk-in tile shower. Air conditioned. Whole house generator. Security
camera system. There’s even a beauty and nail salon! Secluded
setting on 10 acres is just off I-89 for easy access to the ski slopes.
$469,500.
Directions: Exit 5 off I-89. Turn towards Williamstown off ramp. 2nd
left onto Aminicki Trail. Drive to the end and follow signs.
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, Sept. 21 • 10AM to 1PM
320 Amanicki Trail, Williamstown
92.8 acres with extensively renovated home! Known locally as “The
Gulf House”, this 1925 vintage Williamstown residence has 3 large
bedrooms, new upgraded kitchen with stainless steel appliances and
granite counter-tops, new wiring & insulation, modern baths, security
system and a whole house Kohler generator! Primarily exposed
hard and softwood flooring on both living levels. Wide open living
space with double living room, family room, formal dining room and
office space. Heated workshop. Mostly wooded hillside acreage has
trails, waterfalls (2nd branch of the White River) and is enrolled in
the Current use program for property tax savings. Great exposure
and easy access, too, if you have plans for a commercial venture.
Exceptionally well priced at $295,000.
www.C21Jack.com
147 State St., Montpelier 223-6302
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated
REALTOR
®
Lori Pinard
Ext. 326
In addition to harvesting many tree fruits, and even some small
fruits, fall is the time for some other crucial activities to keep your
fruit plants healthy and productive the coming year.
Whatever the fruit plant, fall is not the time to prune, unless you
must or for the 3Ds—to remove diseased, damaged, or dead branches.
Pruning in early fall may stimulate growth that won’t harden before
winter. By pruning later in fall, the wounds won’t heal so diseases can
enter and get established. If pruning is needed, mark your calendar for
next late winter to early spring. Then is the time to fertilize too, not in
the fall.
As with pruning and many other gardening practices, patience in
covering strawberries is best (but often hard for gardeners). Wait until
late fall to cover them, about the time hard frosts start to freeze the
soil—perhaps late November. Covered earlier, the strawberries often
don’t harden properly for winter. You can purchase straw, one bale
covering about 100 square feet about 3 to 6-inches deep. Make sure
not to use hay, as it often contains weed seeds.
Alternatives for fall mulch on strawberries are pine needles, but
these may make the soil too acid over time; salt hay if you live near
the seacoast; or shredded leaves, such as running over them with the
lawn mower. Whole leaves tend to pack down and become dense,
smothering plants.
If you’re growing fall (also called two-crop or everbearing) rasp-
berries, such as ‘Fall Gold’ or ‘Heritage,’ you’ll hopefully be picking
some this month. If you prune such fall raspberries to the ground after
harvest, you won’t get an early crop next year but should get a larger
fall crop.
The other one-crop raspberry cultivars, as well as blackberries,
won’t fruit on the same wood again, so you can cut these “canes” that
have fruited back this fall. Again, have patience, as cutting back these
canes in late fall will let more nutrition from the stems go back into
the roots for the coming year. Since pests can overwinter in these
older canes and may be present, don’t compost them but either burn
(if allowed in your area) or take to your local recycle center.
Perhaps one of the key practices to reduce future pests on fruit
trees, if you do nothing else, is to remove the “drops” or fallen fruit.
Make sure to pick all fruit too, as it will eventually fall, or may attract
deer browsing on fruit and stems. If you have grapes, pick any fruit
and rake up fallen fruit. Rake up fallen leaves too. Many types of pests
and diseases overwinter in fallen fruit and leaves, so removing them
(burying, or to a local recycle center) greatly reduces these potential
problems without having to use many or any chemical sprays.
Fall is a great time to get back on top of weed control if you haven’t
been able to keep up. I love weeding this time of year as it is cooler,
and the weeds don’t regrow. If you have grassy areas around fruit
trees or between rows of small fruit bushes, mow them so the grass
will go into winter short (3 inches high, or so, is fine). This reduces
habitats for both pests and critters such as field mice and voles. In
particular, trim or keep grass (and mulch) away from trunks that the
latter love to chew on during winter.
You can mulch around trunks of trees with wood chips, bark or
similar, just don’t mulch up against the trunks. A couple inches deep
is fine, particularly if you use a weed fabric underneath. If you have
time for this in the fall, it will be one less activity to worry with during
the busy spring season.
If you planted new fruit trees this year, you may wish to wrap the
lower trunks with a tree wrap material, or tree guard, available online
or from full-service garden stores.
They help protect the tender bark
from possible chewing by ani-
mals when the snow gets deep, as
well as protecting from winter
sun injury (“sunscald”). Such
injury happens on the south side
of trees with rapid temperature
fluctuations from sunshine on
cold winter days.
For older trees you can just use
cylinder of wire mesh, such as
hardware cloth, around lower
trunks to prevent mouse damage.
Try to avoid using poison baits
for mouse control, as non-target
species (such as pets) can get into
these.
If you have deer in your area,
you may need to protect shrubs
and trees with some sort of repel-
lent or fencing. If just a few deer,
and plenty of alternative food,
and a mild winter, repellent
sprays, fragrant soap in cloth bags
(don’t hang directly on plants, as
the dissolving soap attracts rodent
feeding), or similar solutions may
be sufficient. Otherwise, some
sort of fencing may be needed. If
individual trees, a simple cage of
5-foot deer fence around plants
may work. Larger plantings may
need taller fencing, or other ver-
sions such as electric fencing.
Before this past growing sea-
son becomes a foggy and distant
memory, evaluate your plantings
and how they performed, and
make notes for the coming year.
Did you have pests or problems
you need to watch for next year,
Fall Fruit Gardening Tips
Dr. Leonard Perry, Extension Professor
University of Vermont
and be ready for handling? Did some plants not perform well or pro-
duce, so perhaps need a change in culture, or maybe another partner
for cross pollination? Did you have enough fruits, or do you have
space and time for a few more? You can find more details on all
aspects of growing fruits in The Fruit Gardener’s Bible, by Lewis Hill
and Leonard Perry.

www.C21Jack.com
(802)244-4500
98 So. Main St., Waterbury
REALTOR
®
Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated
Ch a r mi n g
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outskirts of
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village. 2
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claw foot tub. Bamboo floors in the living room and
front sitting porch. Moretown, $99,000.
New To Market
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802-522-9216
Where the
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D u x b u r y ,
a n d
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town lines
meet, there
stands a
lovely 2
bed,1 bath
g a m b r e l
with original
wood floors and a sweet modern kitchen. Priced
below town assessment, this is great starter home.
$109,000.
Filomena
802-498-5407
page 34 The WORLD September 18, 2013
For Sale By Owner
1991 Skyline
Claridge 303
70x14, 3-BR,
2 baths, 2 large
sheds, porch and
ramp, large shaded
lot in Sandy Pines
Mobile Home Park
in East Montpelier.
$22,000 o.b.o.
Call 802-477-3676
or
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deck to enjoy expansive backyard and
views. Lovely pond. Easy, gracious
living awaits!
Montpelier, $439,000
Dir: Take Main Street up and out
of Montpelier. Take right on Towne
Hill Road to right on Grandview
Terrace. House on right. See sign.
#75 Grandview Terrace
Colonial with killer views in this
private hill top home. 4 bedrooms,
4-1/2 baths, gleaming hardwood
floors throughout, open floor plan on
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East Montpelier, $440,000
Dir: From Gallison Hill Road, take
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the road. #190 Wheeler Road
3336 Airport Road
Ste #3 - Berlin
Barre, VT 05641
802-223-6300
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
www.vtclassicproperties.com
Janel Johnson
498-3013
Sue Aldrich
839-0213
Carolyn Herz
793-6103
Ranch home with walkout lower
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cul de sac. Open and airy living and
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Attached 2 car garage and private
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Montpelier, $299,000
Dir: Take Main Street to right turn
onto Towne Hill Road. Hackamore
is right hand turn right after the
England Farm. House on right. See
sign. #105 Hackamore Road
• When preparing outdoor furniture for win-
ter storage, it’s important to give it a good
cleaning. If you have a truck, why not load
it up and take it to the local self-serve car
wash? The specialized brushes make it easy to clean right there in
the back of the vehicle, and a pressure rinse gets soap and dirt
from all the nooks and crannies. -- JoAnn
NOW HERE’S A TIP
By JoAnn Derson
Storing a Window
Air Conditioner
Q: This is our first year renting an apart-
ment. I’m from the South, where air condi-
tioning is used almost year-round. But my
mother recommended that we put away our
window air conditioner for the winter to
save on bills. Do you have any tips for doing this? -- Janice in
Mystic, Conn.
A: Storing the air conditioner is one of the less-celebrated fall
rituals in the Northeast. Sometime in between leaf-peeping, apple-
picking, autumn fairs and trick-or-treating, people must face up to
the fact that they need to come home and drag the A/C unit out of
the window. Here’s how to make it less painful.
--Recruit a friend or three. Even a small 5,000 BTU unit should be
tandem lifted. And if you’re hoisting a larger unit, you’ll need two
lifters and a puller to make sure the unit is safely lifted into the
apartment. (I’ll spare you the heart-stopping tale of the time I tried
to do this by myself and was discovered by my boyfriend strug-
gling to stop the unit from flipping out of the window to the car
roof three stories below.)
--Prepare a storage box ahead of time. If you don’t have the origi-
nal unit’s box, get a sturdy box that will fit the dimensions of the
unit, with a little room to store its expander panels.
--Turn off the unit a few days ahead of time. This allows for the
condensed water in the unit to evaporate.
--At the same time, remove and clean the air filter. Use a vacuum
to get rid of dirt and debris. Soak a really dirty filter in warm water
and dish soap, rinse and dry completely, and put back into the
unit.
--Clear a space to set down the unit after you’ve lifted it inside,
and line the space with old towels. Place the air conditioner
upright on the towels in case water from condensation is still in the
unit.
--Remove the expander panels and brackets from both sides of the
unit. Put the screws into a small plastic bag and tape to the side of
the air conditioner.
--Wipe down the exterior of the unit with a soft cloth to remove
dust and dirt.
--With your friends, tandem lift the unit into the prepared storage
box. Place the panels and brackets into the box and pad the sides
with dry towels or bubble wrap.
--Tandem lift the unit to a storage area that’s protected from the
weather.
--Buy your friends dinner, and be available to help lift their air
conditioner out.
HOME TIP: Clean a window unit’s air filter every two weeks dur-
ing the cooling season to keep the air conditioner working effi-
ciently.
Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisisahammer.com. My
new e-book, “101 Best Home Tips,” is available to download on
Amazon Kindle! Pick it up it today for just 99 cents.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
• “While at a backyard barbecue now that the weather has turned
nice out (down in the South, anyway), I learned this trick from a
neighbor. Put hot dogs in the slow cooker. Don’t add water or
anything. They taste really good without taking up space on the
grill.” -- J.V. in Alabama
• To keep algae from growing in your backyard birdbath, add a
few copper pennies. Or you can get a small piece of copper pipe
from the home-improvement store. It keeps the algae from getting
out of control.
• When you need an extra garbage bag, like during a party or while
doing lawn chores, try this cool
trick: Use a large pop-up laun-
dry bin, and line it with a lawn-
and-leaf garbage bag. Use chip
clips to secure it at the top if you
need to.
• “We keep a regular-size galva-
nized steel trash can with lid out
on our deck for the kids’ toys.
It’s big enough to hold every-
thing, convenient enough to
drag around the yard to clean
up, and the lid protects the toys
from the weather and bugs!” --
W.K. in Illinois
• “I had a plastic storage bin that
cracked, and I was about to
throw it out when my son
stopped me. He cut holes in
either side and used it to cover
the outdoor pipes that stick up
out of the ground. Now they
will be protected from cold tem-
peratures, and from the weed
eater through the rest of fall. My
boy!” --T.R. in South Carolina
Send your tips to Now Here’s a
Tip, c/o King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or
e-mail JoAnn at heresatip@
yahoo.com.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
By Samantha Mazzotta
September 18, 2013 The WORLD page 35
HREALTORS
eney
81 Main Street, Montpelier
229-0345
135 Washington Street, Barre
476-6500
HeneyRealtors.com
Soaring mountain views, 33 acres including multiple outbuildings, and
a wonderfully maintained three bedroom, two bath home. Features
include a bright an open maple kitchen and dining area, two bedrooms
on the main floor and a spacious master suite and separate den/siting area
upstairs. This private Berlin home is ideally located just a few miles to
downtown Montpelier. Price just reduced for a fall sale. $337,500. Call
Tim to schedule your appointment.
Location, Location, Location!
ANN
CUMMINGS
272-0944
CAROL ELLISON
249-7435
CHARLIE CLARK
229-0345
MICHELLE
MORAN GOSSELIN
249-9002
MAURICE (MOE)
FORTIER
249-7628
STEPHEN
BOUSQUET
793-9951
TIM HENEY
229-0345
FRED
VAN BUSKIRK
505-8035
BRENDAN
COYNE
245-4369
With an eye to fine craftsmanship and attention to details, this Barre
Town property is currently set up as a two unit with an owner’s unit
that just shines! An open concept for easy living with updated flooring
and a generous use of tongue and grove wood throughout. A private
patio and deck overlooks the tranquil brook. The heated oversized multi-
car garage and the heated workshop may be just the right location for
your business or vintage car hobby. $239,900. Contact Steve to see the
possibilities this home has for you!
Endless Possibilities
This great duplex offers three bedrooms in each unit, separate entrance,
wonderful porches, superb parking, and each unit even has garaging!
Maintenance free vinyl siding, a newer roof and lots of updates makes
this a great owner occupied or investment opportunity. All this on plus
a nice corner lot in Barre. $139,900. Let Michelle show you the way to
homeownership the old fashion way!
Spacious Two Family
Walk to downtown Montpelier from this recently updated three
bedroom cape. It was the large kitchen and large double sink bathroom
that sold this house to the current owners. Add to that new flooring in the
dining room, kitchen, entry and two bedrooms, new boiler, replacement
windows and chimney lining and you have yourself a conveniently
located well maintained home! $169,900. Call Brendan for further
details on this affordable home.
Nicely Maintained & Updated
With an easy drive to Hardwick, Barre or Montpelier, this home enjoys
a private setting on a pleasant knoll. Easy living on one level offering
a nice kitchen with an island, cathedral ceiling and breakfast area that
opens to a big covered porch, and a big central great room has a stone
hearth and woodstove. Three bedrooms including a master bedroom
with a walk-in closet and its own full bath with a soaking tub and
separate shower. The oversized two car garage has a woodstove and full
second floor with plenty of space for storage. Just listed at $124,900.
Conveniently Situated
Last Week’s Vermont Weather…
A general weather pattern featuring large troughs of lower
pressure followed by ridges of higher pressure gave the region
somewhat extreme temperature levels. The big roller coaster trend
of ups and downs landed back on Tuesday the 10th with cooler
weather, moderating upward to very warm and humid weather
peaking last Wednesday the 11thwith 95 degrees reported at
Randolph. The warmth was also accompanied by showers and
strong to severe thunderstorms with yet more wind damage.
Green Mountain Power reported as many as 36,000 people
without power after a series of storms moved through. A
whopping total of 2.85” fell in Cabot ending Friday morning.
A cold front brought colder temperatures and drier weather into
the region Saturday afternoon. After a clear and colder night,
there was spotty frost in parts of the Northeast Kingdom last
Sunday morning with 33 degrees reported at Gallup Mills.
Another cold front with even colder air set the stage Monday
filtering in the coldest air yet for this Autumn with frosty freezing
conditions Tuesday morning.
Vermont Weather Extreme Stats
from the last week…
Highest temperature: 95 degrees in Randolph Wednesday the
11th
Lowest temperature: 33 degrees Gallup Mills Sunday the 15th
Heaviest rainfall: 2.85 Cabot ending Friday morning the 13th
Global Temperature Facts
For Last Week
Last week’s hottest temperature on planet earth was 116
degrees F Abu Hamed (Sudan)
Last week’s cold spot was minus 86 degrees at Vostock
(Antarctica)
Maximum 24 hour Global Precipitation
14.53 inches (flooding ) Geser (Indonesia)
Atmospheric CO2…
For the week ending Sept. 14th Atmospheric CO2 was
“seasonally” down to 392.06 parts per million. One year ago the
reading was 390.86 parts per million for a one year change up
1.20 parts per million which is unsustainable for a stable climate.
Stable climate conditions are at or below 350 parts per million.
Warming Climate Detrimental to Fish,
Maine, New Hampshire Economy is
affected…
Freshwater fish are dying in New Hampshire and Maine due to
extreme weather events coupled with rising water temperatures
from climate change, creating environmental and economic
hazards, fishing experts say. Freshwater fish are endangered
nationwide due to factors arising from global warming, according
to a report released Wednesday by the National Wildlife Federation.
Maine and New Hampshire experts also weighed in on the report
Wednesday. According to the report, 37 percent of freshwater
animals, from fish to crayfish to mussels, are considered at risk.
This is due to a variety of factors, all climate related, including
nutrient pollution, sedimentation and habitat degradation, the
report stated.
He said 97 percent of the nation’s remaining brook trout live in
Maine, “and we’ve done a very poor job of protecting and
managing them.” As lake water becomes warmer, “if they don’t
have a spring to sit in or they can’t escape to a brook or stream,
they’re dead. You may not see them, but they are dead.” Eric Orff,
a New Hampshire-based wildlife biologist with the National
Wildlife Federation, said there are measures that can be taken,
particularly in rivers and streams to help at-risk fish. He pointed
to the Winnicut River as an example. The state, for instance, took
out a dam that was pooling warm waters, and the Great Bay
chapter of Trout Unlimited applied for a state grant to replace a
narrow culvert that was impeding the flow of brook trout on the
river.
“The fact is, fishing is a central tradition and an economic
foundation in Maine and New Hampshire,” he said. “It’s too
important to let it slip away.”
Fall Equinox and the end of Astronomical
Summer…
The Autumnal Equinox occurs on September 22nd Sunday this
year at 4:44 PM. This is the start of Fall and the end of summer
when day light and dark are roughly equal. This time of year also
signals more cloudiness helping to create the vivid Fall foliage as
well a colder air masses occasionally visiting the area becoming
more frequent and our temperature scheme more changeable.
It is the time get the wood pile stacked and readied as the
weather gets cooler and gardens put to bed. The typical end of the
growing season nears as is the case recently for some locations.
Thoughts turn to winter snow tires and prepping for colder
weather and eventual snows, but not before our local trees
become vibrant and fantastically gorgeous and visitors from all
over the planet arrive to take in the beauty. It is the time of year
for “cautionary driving” as well with leaf peepers.
Currently, there was about 20% leaf turn noted with more in the
Northeast Kingdom and less further south and in the valleys.
Overall we are looking close to on schedule if not just a slight bit
late depending on south or north facing slopes.
Tropics – Active but without any immediate
threats for our region…
We should not let our guard down for the formation of tropical
weather and what might suddenly work up the eastern U.S. Coast.
Humberto has dropped out and Ingrid the second hurricane so far
this season had moved inland earlier this week. A bit of a breather
for short period of time but there could more tropical systems
spinning up between the Cape Verde Islands and Florida.
Weather Trends Ahead…Some Excellent
Weather…
Make sure you have your sun glasses! Gorgeous high pressure
– albeit starting out very cold, will control the work week weather
through Friday complete with a temperature trend moderating
upward. A series of chilly night followed by bright sunny days
will make forget weather extremes and foul flooding weather that
seems to be so intensive in some part of the country for a while.
Temperatures will be cool with a high Wednesday around 65.
Approaching 70 Thursday and 70 to 75 possibly even warmer in
some areas for the Pick of the Week with near darn perfect
weather on Friday.
Weekend – Not so nice unfortunately. Our next frontal
boundary will arrive Saturday mixed with some of the same
moisture that has swamped parts of Colorado and newly flooded
Mexico with Ingrid’s moisture train. Thus rainfall could become
rather heavy with showers and some potential for thunderstorms
Saturday. Because we have progressive weather pattern – moving
along and getting stuck – Sunday might turn out to see some
decent sunshine by the afternoon with another stretch for drier
weather returning on Monday into early next week.
Check
out
Weathering Heights
on Facebook
Sea ice extent appears to have reached this year’s minimum
up from last year’s record setting low ice extent as measured
by various satellites. The Se Ice extent is an important mea-
surement where in the arctic warming has occurred at 2 to 3
times faster over the last 15 years melting portions of polar
ice cap. The ramifications of this melt off has been linked to
extreme weather caused by a slower meandering jet stream
pattern which can become stuck and produce extreme flood-
ing rains or its opposite drought like heat.
page 36 The WORLD September 18, 2013

Barre 802-479-3366 • Montpelier 802-229-4242 • Rochester 802-767-9900
Northfield 802-485-7400 • Stowe 802-253-8484 • Morrisville 802-888-0088 • St. Johnsbury 802-748-9543
www.BCKrealestate.com www.BCKrealestate.com www.BCKrealestate.com
BUY OF THE WEEK
Search Every Listing
in Vermont at:
www.BCKrealestate.com
Wolcott - $250,000 Montpelier - $214,900 East Montpelier - $257,000
Barre - $220,000
REALTOR
®
Barre - $160,000
Situated on 4.7 acres minutes from Lake Elmore.
Privacy, pond, perennial gardens, and a small barn.
Two story home, spacious living room with wood stove,
and large deck overlooking the pond and gardens.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4176610
Wonderfully maintained home on a double lot. The
inside of the home has been maintained by the owner
and is in move-in condition. 3 bedrooms with a dining
room and a large living room upstairs.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4221716
Beautiful home on over 2.5 acres. 5 bedrooms, 2
family/living rooms, hardwood floors, walk out lower
level, and 2 baths. Surrounded by protected land,
VAST trails, and gorgeous perennial gardens.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4177813
One previous owner. Great attention to detail
throughout. Handicap ramp in garage for access and
open floor concept from kitchen to living room. Large
carpeted family room and extra storage areas.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4230883
Well-maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with
amazing views. Freshly painted with newer roof and
newer windows. 2 car detached garage. In-ground
pool and two decks. Finished walkout basement.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4313441
Nestled against a state and town forest at the base of
the Worcester Mountain Range. A huge free standing
barn with it’s own office and storage area. Land would
be perfect for horses. 5 miles to I-89.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4251304
Middlesex - $1,600,000
Wolcott - $230,000
Very private! 42+ acres of privacy and seclusion. Newer
contemporary home offers vaulted ceilings, open floor
plan, exposed beams, and room for expansion.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4250224
Roxbury - $58,900
Seasonal camp with 7 rooms,
including two bedrooms and a loft
area, situated on 4.21 +/- acres. Ideal
summer retreat or a deer camp.
Quiet location bordered by State
land.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4295674
For Dave the transition from specialty construction projects to real estate sales
has been exciting and rewarding, as he simply enjoys helping people. Whether
it’s looking at a façade repair on a high rise building or helping a frst time home
buyer, Dave gets satisfaction by helping others achieve their goals through sharing
his knowledge and experience. As a seventh generation Vermonter who raises
Christmas trees and does low impact logging for a hobby, Dave also helps buyers
get past apprehension when selecting a special piece of land.
Featured Agent
DAVE JAMIESON
86 North Main St., Barre
(802) 479-3366
DavidJ@BCKrealestate.com
----- Original Message -----
From: James Nichols
To: Kay Roberts
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 4:08 PM
Subject: Washington World (Next Week’s Ad)
Buy of the Week
Roxbury - $60,000 (4295674)
Seasonal camp with 7 rooms, including two bedrooms and
a loft area, situated on 4.21 +/- acres. Ideal summer retreat
or a deer camp. Quiet location bordered by State land.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4295674
Wolcott - $230,000 (4250224)
Very private! 42+ acres of privacy and seclusion. Newer
contemporary home offers vaulted ceilings, open floor
plan, exposed beams, and room for expansion.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4250224
Wolcott - $250,000 (4176610)
Situated on 4.7 acres minutes from Lake Elmore. Privacy,
pond, perennial gardens, and a small barn. Two story
home, spacious living room with wood stove, and large
deck overlooking the pond and gardens.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4176610
Montpelier - $214,900 (4221716)
Wonderfully maintained home on a double lot. The inside
of the home has been maintained by the owner and is in
move-in condition. 3 bedrooms with a dining room and a
large living room upstairs.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4221716
East Montpelier - $257,000 (4177813)
Beautiful home on over 2.5 acres. 5 bedrooms, 2 family/
living rooms, hardwood floors, walk out lower level, and
2 baths. Surrounded by protected land, VAST trails, and
gorgeous perennial gardens.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4221716
Barre - $220,000 (4313441)
Well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with amazing
views. Freshly painted with newer roof and newer windows.
2 car detached garage. In-ground pool and two decks. Full
finished walkout basement.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4313441
Barre - $160,000 (4230883)
One previous owner. Great attention to detail throughout.
Handicap ramp in garage for access and open floor concept
from kitchen to living room. Large carpeted family room
and extra storage areas.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4230883
Middlesex - $1,600,000 (4251304)
Nestled against a state and town forest at the base of
theWorcester Mountain Range. A huge free standing barn
with it’s own office and storage area. Land would be perfect
for horses. 5 miles to I-89.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4251304
--
Thanks,

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