Volume 13 Issue 2

101 N. Zeysing · P O Box 228 · Alma, MO 64001 · 660.674.2222 ·


When you go shopping, include God. He loves to lead you to the source and give favor. On June 25 Alex Bennett, Elaine Wittmeyer, Mikiah Hulme and John Gross went shopping in Kansas City to gather gifts and needs for the Kansas City Christian Fellowship July 10 mission trip to Uganda. Eyes open and the list before them, there appeared the first blessing of the day —96 pairs of reading glasses for adults for $1.00 each at Everything’s a Dollar. They came in a display case (good for packing for the trip) and went all the way to 3.5 strength. The list had grown that morning when they called Abba House for some information. There was a need for backpacks for every child as they kept losing their school supplies going back and forth to school. Seven were picked up for $1.00 each at Everything’s a Dollar and then on to Red Backpacks for Racks. Favor and 33 backpacks were found at school. Red Racks along with three suitcases for packing the gifts. A 25% special discount was given and it all came in under $61. Boys boxer shorts were purchased at Wal-Mart. One of the main gifts this team wanted to take were dance shoes for the children at Abba House. Some of the girls going had teaching dance on their agenda—God directed. Windy Farr had contacted the owner of the Dance Mikiah Hulme and Windy Farr, dancers, Shoppe in North Kansas City to share their misdisplaying the gift of dance shoes at Abba House. sion and ask if she had any shoes to sell at a reduced price or to donate. Upon Alex, John, and Mikiah’s arrival, the owner, Susan, told them she had a “few” pairs of shoes for them. Then she showed them a big box full of all types of dance shoes (20 to 25 pair). She was told this would be a great start. Then, right as they were about to ask her about how much they would cost, she ran to the front of the store and grabbed more. The thoughts began rolling in, “How much is this going to cost us?” But, then she put them all in two big boxes and gave all 40 pairs of them to the team for free! God had provided and the excitement among the team members was ecstatic! The team members headed for another Wal-Mart and got great prices on dresses for the girls. They shared the miracles of the day with the cashier Girls show off their new dresses. and he loved what they were doing and shared some miracles he had heard of. That evening Alex and Vicki Bennett found watches for all the boys at Wal-Mart. How amazing the day was! All knew that the Lord would provide and He did.

Everyone going on the field with House of Friends this summer is soaring on the wings of God’s love and goodness and the children at Abba House have been so blessed. It is next to impossible to tell it all, so we’re going to let some of the team do the talking. Join the KCCF team as they impart from their heart the things they encounter and the goodness of God.

Jane Hulme, team member (and House of Friends board member) writes, “So many special memories of this trip. Getting to meet Dorcus and David (sponsored children) was an amazing experience. I loved their smiles and giggles. It was a joy to see their playfulness and orneriness. It added a dimension of “reality” to giving to their support that makes it even more of a blessing to give. I also met the newest Abba House child, Joyce. I held her and hugged her and have cried for her. It was a significant experience to meet her in the context of the rest of the children because I was able to witness first-hand the effect that love and care has on these children. Joyce was still deeply sad when we met her.

My heart ached for her! Yet, as I watched the other children in various stages of life, I was probably most surprised by the joy and contentment the majority of them seem to possess. Though their situations are far less than ideal, they are loved and they know they are loved—first and foremost by their Heavenly Father, and also by those He has entrusted with their care. This touched me deeply and made me even more convinced of God’s desire to care for orphans and widows.”

“We first heard of Alice’s plight last summer, says Vicki Bennett, team leader, (co-pastor of KCCF. R.N., and House of Friends board member). Her parents had died, and she was in the custody of her aunts, as the tradition goes. The aunts were going to marry her off as a teenage bride and receive a dowry payment. She was only 15 years old but looked older than this at the time. She ran away from the aunts and went to Abba House, the only safe place she could think of. Her desire was to continue her education, not to get married. After some deliberation over the dilemma, John Gross told Alice she could stay under one condition—she had to believe (cont. on page 3)

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House of Friends welcomes our new missionary family, Chad and Sarah Spencer and their children Josiah (12), Emma Joy (10) and Hope (7) of Kansas City. The Spencer family came under our umbrella, not only for the purpose of being a benefit to our mission, but also like missions who have orphaned and destitute children in their care. One part of their direction is to develop relationships between orphanages like our own and initiate collaborative efforts that will be helpful to all. Chad and Sarah have a testimony they have shared which reveals “it is God who is at work in you, both to will and to work for His good pleasure,” (Philippians 2:13 ) and that “He who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.” (Philippians 1:6) To come to know this family more intimately, they have allowed us to share their struggles and triumphs to bring God glory and to let you know, He will bring you through whatever struggles you are experiencing. Chad and Sarah, a couple whose marriage was based on Christian principles and God was the center, can attest to God never leaving or forsaking them as they found themselves in a place of despair 14 months into their marriage. Even with aspirations to go in full–time ministry and attending Grace Training Center, struggles in establishing a true heart-relationship with the Lord became very evident in Chad’s life which placed a great strain in their marriage to the point of “divorce” being a strong possibility. Chad had come to doubt his faith in God and gave up trying to believe. Sarah shared that she didn’t know the depth of his struggle and even had doubts about them being able to make it. It was a dark time that lasted nearly 12 years. During that time, they met with a counselor who took them under his wing and gave them tools. They came to a point they didn’t want a divorce as they still loved each other. The Lord gave Sarah powerful dreams that helped her hold on. It was a time of removing pride, etc. and developing Godly character. Chad wrote out four points to hold on to during this time. He created his own statement of faith—what do I believe. 1) There is a God. 2) God is good. 3) Life is worth living. 4) Everything was going to be okay. Chad tells he had to wake up and choose to fight for it. . Four years ago Chad recalls being in bed worrying about money and about a job. He could have done anything and made money. He could have quit school and go make money. He was tired of it all. It was at that moment God spoke very clearly to him, saying, “I want you to give your life for the poor and the orphan.” He also was given a vision of his whole life before him, along with the words, “You were built for this.” As a young man Chad thought his ministry was to preach. Sarah tells that “God’s training was different than anticipated and a little longer. When Chad told Sarah what God had said, she wasn’t real excited. She thought, “I don’t want to go overseas with Peace Corp.” But also working with the poor and orphans was a dormant dream of hers and she was concerned Chad was messing with her heart and he was crazy. It created a tension because there was a destiny in their hearts with no way to act it out. With all the tension and frustration, Chad consulted with 10 men he highly respected and told them the story and asked for help. As a result, he began pondering Jesus and opened up to believing Jesus is God. Chad and Sarah were not ready to have a conversation with the children as to what was going on. The counselor encouraged Chad to pray at the dinner table and he started liking how it felt. He also started to pray, “Thank You God that I am healthy

and have a job. He prayed through a prayer book. The counselor asked Chad to add something about Jesus to his four-point statement of faith. He added, “Jesus was probably at least the greatest man that ever lived.” Chad acknowledged that God was working in him to believe Jesus again. In September of 2010 Chad had become comfortable with traditional Christian doctrine and believed the right things and what he was suppose to do. He was praying the right prayers and he said to Sarah, let’s go. Sarah knew he was not where he needed to be. On one particular day they dropped the children off at Bible club and went to International House of Prayer in Kansas City. Chad poured out his heart to God about their money problems, various other problems and the tension. He felt worse off and cried out, “What am I going to do?” God spoke clearly. “You deal with Me and we will deal with the rest.” It was a promise, a rebuke, and a comfort. He had to open up a part of his heart that he had been withholding. He knew that if he didn’t open up to Him, nothing would work. He must trust Him and he would move forward. They were there for two hours and Sarah recalls that Chad looked bored stiff, while one hour of that time God was revealing to Chad things in his past, as on a TV screen, and healing the memories from his childhood and revealing his future. He was showing Chad that His love had always been with him. At the end, Chad stood up, lifted his hands, worshipped and cried—which he had not done for years. Sarah couldn’t believe it. She recalls his arms were raised wide and he was weeping. It had been 12 long years and it was hard for her heart to grasp. The glorious light of Christ began to shine in his heart. It took one year to rebuild their marriage. They had always been friends but it was a rebuilding of trust. They began to trust each other and pray together. “The first time was really hard,” says Sarah. Thanks to God’s faithfulness, the children have no memory of family tension and strife during those 12 years. During the rebuilding, Sarah had to see some things before stepping out into their destiny. Chad said he started praying, “I will go anywhere but Africa.” He became interested in Africa when a friend was in Swaziland. Chad’s pastor told him he could not go to Swaziland. He left the pastor’s office confused and frustrated. Not long after, a friend gave him $1,000 saying this was for his trip to Africa. It confirmed God’s direction to go to Africa so they refocused on Uganda. (Chad went to Uganda with a friend, David Grimes, on a mission trip in October 2011, developed relationship with John Gross, founder of House of Friends, and visited Abba House.) Connections were soon made and plans set for the whole family to go to Uganda for six months..Their initial stay in Uganda would be with Connect Africa. Trevor Tychon and family would be returning to the U.S. for a short time and Chad and family would stay in their house while they were gone—a good place to adjust to the country. They would also oversee a staff of 15 and learn how to do the technologies i.e. building efficiency stoves, serve and help. Chad and Sarah’s heart is to help existing orphanages to do better and establish an organization that can help people caring for orphans emotionally, physically and spiritually. The Spencer’s four goals are to 1) educate themselves on orphanages by going to 15 to 20 of them, and learn what is working and what is not ; 2) build relationships with Connect Africa and others with resources from which to gain wisdom; 3) determine if God is saying to move there longer term and that they could handle it as a family; and 4) to work on projects while there—i.e. water Chad , Sarah & family developing filters, etc. relationships when at Abba House. Chad, Sarah and family have been to Abba House four times providing great help. They are on the road of their destiny in God.

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Alice (cont. from page 1)

for her own support, and she did. Our church was moved by Alice’s story. The Vacation Bible School of 2012 sent their missionary offerings to House of Friends for Alice’s support. She was then the recipient of memorial offerings from a compassionate church member who lost her husband. I met Alice last month on the mission trip to Uganda. She had a bad burn on her leg from a cooking accident. A lady on a motorcycle rode in to treat it and put a dressing on it. I was relieved, since I had no medical supplies with me. Two days later, my daughter, Alexandra, said, ‘Mom, you have to look at Alice’s leg. She is in pain. It’s swollen and she’s sick,’ We took the dressing off and underneath was a hot, swollen, and badly infected leg. We gave Alice some ibuprofen and lollypop to get her ready for the wound cleaning. She said the burn was two months and three weeks old. She had gotten it from a cooking kettle that tipped over from the open fire. We did a series The burn began healing wood of actions to debride the in the shape of a heart... wound with no medical supplies. The most effective was when John poured water over the burn like a fountain. Timothy (from Kansas on a two-month mission at Abba House), a young man of incredible resource, hopped on a boda boda motorcycle and rode into Entebbe to buy the last roll of gauze dressing on the store shelf before closing time. Over the next few days, we applied antibiotic ointment and dressings and prayed. The interesting thing is that the burn began healing in the shape of a heart. One thing John pointed out was that as we bound the physical wounds, God was using our love, care, and physical touch to heal the internal woundedness of the heart. He asked Alice if she felt loved. She said that she felt very loved. Alexandra often held Alice’s hand, and Alice leaned her head against her while we treated her leg. It was a simple act of caring, one you would do for anyone, once you made the decision to get involved. But it meant something more to Alice. She gave me, along with other team members, a letter. Here is a portion of it: Dear Mummy Vicki, I am Alice and greet you in the name of my Heavenly Father. Thank you, mummy, for showing me a mother’s love. Thank you for taking me as your child. Thank you for praying for me. Thank you for caring for me in all ways. Thank you for taking care of your family. Thank you for loving God and knowing God. I really love you Mummy. Continue doing or working for God. Continue praying for me and I am praying constantly for you all. Pray for me for better results in classes and that I may also continue with God’s love. Come back next year Mummy. We shall miss you so much. Love, Alice. It’s interesting that she never mentioned her leg condition but is very concerned about her education. Thank you to everyone who supports the Abba House chilJoseph, Vicki, and Alexandra dren and is willing to get inwith sponsored child Vanessa. volved. As Alice has stated, ‘may God reward the work of your hands.’ “

Joy Goodrich, from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, joined the KCCF team on their 2013 mission trip. It was on this mission trip Joy recalls a shift that took place in her heart. Join me in hearing Joy’s story in her own words. “I returned three days ago from Uganda. I committed to going on this trip last January, before I knew any of the other team members (who are all from Kansas City) and when I really didn’t even know what I would be doing when I got there. I left the U.S. about two weeks ago after only visiting the team two other times. I am still amazed at how the Lord worked out every little detail. Out of every team that I have ever been on, this mission team was the most unified and cohesive of all, despite the fact that some odd little girl from Iowa that no one really knew snuck into it. While I had very few expectations about how the trip would go, I had so much confirmation about this trip that I knew God had great plans for our time there. And indeed, this was true. We saw wounds heal before our eyes, we wept as nearly 1,000 children prayed to accept Jesus into their hearts, and celebrated as we baptized many people in the water trough outside the church. It was the week of Ramadan, but that didn’t seem to deter the Lord from ransacking the enemy’s camp, as five Muslim children came to know the Lord, one young Muslim at the school gave his life to Christ and was baptized, and several Muslims from the village were saved as well. One of the most amazing miracles that I witnessed was the shift that took place in my heart as I stayed near Abba House, a home for children who have been abandoned by the world, but ardently loved by the Father. I wept many times as I stepped into visions and dreams that I had been given years before, realizing in a very tangible way the calling He has placed on my life. When I got on the plane to return to America, I had a sudden realization that I was not going back home, I was leaving my home. I am not sure when I will be given the opportunity to go ‘back home’ to Uganda, but my heart aches and longs for that homecoming.”

Above—Staying in an attitude of prayer throughout the mission trip, play time with the kids, Luisa Kidd helping with chapatti dough at Abba House.

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Sitting beneath the trees at the family picnic table, I watch as forty kids live their lives together. It looks like dozens of hearts and feet intersecting under the same Ugandan sky. With only two siblings myself, I imagine what it’s like to be surrounded by brothers and sisters day and night, some older, some younger. To never be alone, even when you want to. To wake up to the chattering birds outside plus many other voices in the adjoining bedrooms. This is Abba House Entebbe, and it is a place called home for forty Ugandan children, ages five to eighteen. On a recent Sunday in July, I watch, completely engrossed in the setting as the Abba family comes in and out of the home and enters the surrounding mission field. I’m watching this scene unfold after church; the kids have walked back from Tabernacle of Christ to change from their Sunday best. The girls were previously wearing “smartly” patterned pink dresses and singing in the choir. Here in Uganda, “smart” has a second meaning: attractive. Most of the boys are wearing dress slacks and button-up shirts. They’re trading those for shorts and t-shirts that they can cook in. Some of the cooking started last night in the dark – imagine peeling over 100 green bananas for the popular Ugandan dish of matooke. Meal preparation is timeconsuming here. It is done by hand and almost entirely on open fires. Today’s Sunday meal is an “all hands on deck” approach. Many of the young men are working on the chapatti bread, which is similar to a Mexican tortilla. Henry, the oldest boy, has taught his younger brothers how to mix perfectly mingled Everyone pitches in for meal prepara- dough, as well as how to tion. Here the children are plucking flatten it with a soda bottle chickens. rolling pin. He makes the process look easy and fun, and there’s a group of siblings ready to jump in and take a turn. The young ladies are finishing up the tomato slices. There are several large plates of the juicy red halves – fruit from the Abba House garden that provides a savory compliment to the beans, rice, and posho. Other siblings stack the plates, put lids on the ready dishes, and call everyone together. When you make it to the kitchen, you’ve made it home. This kitchen will feed about 55 people today, and no one’s likely to go hungry. We sit on benches and enjoy each other’s company. The kids tell us about what they learned at church, what Jesus was speaking to them during the prayer time. There is a content feeling to the afternoon and a great hope for what is to come in the children’s lives. As the breeze comes in from Lake Victoria, the younger kids finish their meals and resume their playtime. They chase each other across patches of dirt and grass, joining with their classmates from the boarding school. After filling up on oozing pineapple chunks, we head in that direction, too. There’s a game of netball just over the Abba House fence. William Mayengo, a fifteen-year old brother at Abba, plays with a group of younger children. He makes sure that everyone gets a chance to score. “Children’s evangelism is my passion,” he says. “I have always admired people who teach God’s word to kids. This is my dream for the future.” He passes the ball to a younger girl, and she tosses it up toward the net. Just past William’s game of netball is the soccer field of dirt and dreams. A dozen boys have already gathered here. They’re ready to start the late afternoon “football” game. I follow Abba

House brothers, Enock and Andrew, to the field. They are both in grade P7 at New Life Primary School. Most of the boys playing are barefoot, but this doesn’t stop them from chasing the ball with fearless ambition. I make my way over to a nearby tree and sit beneath it to watch the game. It isn’t long until one of the boys’ classmates joins me. His name is Joseph, and he’s been in the same class as Andrew for the past two years. While we watch the plays, I ask Joseph about his aspirations, his friends, and his time at church. He begins to open up, telling me about Andrew. “Andrew is my best friend. He has always been there for me, helping to take care of me.” Looking out at his friend, I ask him what he likes about Alexandra Bennett with Andrew and Joseph Andrew. His eyes look toward the field. “A lot of times I haven’t had the required items for school. My mother could barely afford the school fees for my three siblings and me. But Andrew has always shared things with me, like when I need soap for clothes washing or a pencil for class.” I ask Joseph about his family. He tells me that he was a Muslim while attending the Christian school with Andrew for two years. He came to New Life because he wanted to play soccer. He went to church every Sunday but was still clinging to his father’s religion of Islam. He didn’t want to disappoint his father by converting, even though his father left his mother and refused to help with his school fees or return his phone calls. “For two years Andrew has been a true friend to me and has shown me who God is. He has been more like a brother. I know he wanted me to get saved.” Crossing over toward the West, the African sun makes its slow descent above the field. I think about Joseph’s words and his friendship with Andrew. He was converted just two days ago. “The mission team was at the church that night,” he says, “and the school security guard was getting baptized. Andrew brought me to the missionaries. I was ready to accept the Lord.” He smiles, and there is a deep pleasure in his countenance. “After being baptized I was given a new name. Everyone used to call me by my Muslim name, Ashiraf, but now I am Joseph.” We watch the players chase after the ball, bounding ahead to gain position. A few players shoot for the goal, and one player’s shot goes into the net. The boys congratulate him, and then they are right back at it for the next play. With the onset of darkness, Joseph and I stand up. It’s time to walk back to Abba House. He takes me up the dirt path, and the soccer players follow suit, leaving the field for their evening chores and meal. Andrew comes alongside us and says something to Joseph in Luganda. They smile at each other, and Joseph looks toward Abba. “I hope that I’m successful someday, and as soon as I have some money, you know what I’m going to spend it on first?” Curious, I ask him what he plans to spend his money on. “The very first thing will be a children’s home, like Abba. Every child deserves a place to live and a family to love them, and I want to do this.” Joseph, Andrew, and I nod in agreement. We part ways with Joseph, heading up to the house to begin prepping for dinner. There is cabbage to chop, beans to stir, and even homework assignments to finish before Monday. I think about Joseph’s destiny and how his brother loved him to Christ. Andrew doesn’t say much about the experience. He will meet up with his friend in class tomorrow. His quiet demeanor seems to convey thankfulness, though. The story is a part of his Abba House journey – a place where lives converge, hopes and challenges arise, and family members endeavor to serve each other with love. This is a place called home, and it’s here that young people like Andrew meet with the Lord and go into His fields of harvest. —Story by Alexandra Bennett

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Elaine Wittmeyer made memories with her sponsored children, Joan, Solome, and Jackson. She writes, “It was an awesome experience being able to actually spend time with the children. I look forward to going back. Talking to Elaine recently, she expressed she didn’t realize how badly she was going to miss them. Luisa Kidd spending time with her sponsored child and enjoying time with the other children as well. Luisa says she would have loved to bring her family with her.

Sermon on the Mount, studied the verses and then taught it at Kansas City Christian Fellowship, also known as The Barn. The mission members also practiced giving their personal testimonies. The focus gave unity and purpose to the team along with preparation. Something interesting was going on outside the church during the women’s conference. Frequently there were several men standing by the open brick windows and walls. They would listen to the music and the teachings. There was a bathtub on the property that the men on the team filled and did water baptisms during the services. The men would gather up the new Christian believers and baptize them. At the same time of all this, the dance team of Windy Farr, Angie Ginenthal and Mikiah Hulme was giving dance lessons. They were teaching the children and young people how to worship and praise through dance. There was so much happening on several fronts. —Vicki Bennett

Carriers of His Blessing…
The Kansas City team sent before them blessings and added blessing upon blessing for the children and people of Uganda throughout their mission trip. Team member, Elaine Wittmeyer, had on her heart to help the vision of older Ugandans, so she took 100 pair of reading glasses for those who were over 40 years of age who needed magnification to read. The availability of the glasses was advertised on the radio and there was an overwhelming response. One pair of reading glasses can change a person’s life when it comes to seeing the Bible! Little things in the kitchen count too—even potato peelers. Peeling potatoes for 42 children and 3 staff is a lot of potatoes. Here you see Florence, the cook, trying out the new potato peeler brought by the team. The girl’s home did not have doors on their rooms and the frames were deteriorating. The Kansas City team held a huge garage sale and the proceeds went toward painting the house, repairing the door frames and putting on new doors, and putting a veranda on the home.

Did the camera pick up heavenly lights shining down on Mikiah Hulme as she shared her dancing talent and love for Jesus with the students at a Uganda government run school in Entebbe? She knew before leaving the States that she would be teaching dance to children in Uganda and God would use it for His glory to draw the hearts of 1000 children to Himself. That He did. As she shared her talent and love for Jesus, and invited the children to receive the Lord Jesus in their hearts, nearly 1,000 children raised their hands with big smiles on their faces. Mom, Jane, who was present, was overwhelmed by what God did through her daughter and was filled with joy seeing her daughter walking in her gifting and calling.

First Women’s Conference…
The team ladies planned a Women’s Conference to be held at Tabernacle of Christ while on the mission trip to Uganda. It was significant in that it was the first women’s conference to be held at that church. The theme was The Sermon on the Mount from the book of Matthew. Jane Hulme, Vicki Bennett shares. Luisa Kidd, Joy Goodrich, Alex and Vicki Luisa Kidd shares Bennett all shared at the conference. Close to 100 ladies attended. Some of the highlights included getting to pray for the ladies during the services. Many friendships were built despite the language and cultural barriers. Probably one of the greatest blessings for the Uganda team was the preparation they put into this trip and conference. Each team member took a Beatitude or one of the teachings from the

Thank you for the home improvements KCCF Team!

A team traveled to Adilang the first of August. For lack of space, report of the mission trip will be coming to you in October. However, we did want to share that Ugandan missionaries, Jimmy and Katherine Bodo, will return to the village of Adilang for a follow-up mission October 19-29. Jimmy will teach classes on How to Study the Bible, and Katherine will train church members in Children's Evangelism. Please keep this mission in prayer as it is a unique opportunity for continued spiritual growth and outreach in the north. If you'd like to contribute financially, you can give online through the House of Friends website. Please write "Adilang training" in the comment box.

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Timothy Ninemire from Kansas spent nearly two months at Abba House helping wherever he was needed. Timothy was asked to share his most meaningful moments on his mission. Below you will hear it in his own words. “When I was at Abba House I think the most impressive thing I witnessed from the people was the sincerity with which they worshiped and prayed. They had almost nothing, nothing but Christ, and boy did they show it. In a church that is only half-finished with rough-brick walls, I saw God move in peoples lives and I heard testimonies about soap for cleaning chairs! Something that is an everyday convenience here was With work clothes on an amazing luxury for them. I mean soap! The man was like a little and tools handy, child so excited that he could do his part to make the church chairs Timothy went for clean. It made me really reevaluate what I think is important. All the supplies. At right he things we have here that are just ‘Duh’ are an amazing blessing there. greets you from the I saw boys become men and men become like boys through the tomato patch. The love of Christ, One was Henry. Praying over Alice's leg and watching it fines are staked up heal was a moment of great amazement and faith for me! I mean how for best fruit bearing often do I get to see the power of God so clearly displayed! But Henry, he was freaking out! I talked to him the next day, He was almost in a daze when I brought it up, I think at that moment he really realized who God was and what He can do. I mean he knew it could happen and had heard of it—but seeing it in front of your eyes! He was absolutely stunned that day as we talked in my room. Christ’s love became real to him. I baptized him that night. After this the older boys of Abba House began bringing me their friends to talk to about Jesus. Pleasant?...sometimes. Unexpected? Definitely. After I had the privilege of showing a young Muslim man the truth of Christ, I began teaching the boys to be lights for Christ on their own without my influence. The most emotional moment of the entire trip for me was watching Henry and William lead another young man to Christ all on their own, without my help. They were fulfilling their calling to be lights to the world for Christ. It was like I had shown them the way and they took it and ran with it. My role as a teacher was ended; but my role in God's will is just getting started, I can't wait to see where God has me working next. Thank you everyone who was praying for me through my sickness. Blessing in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, Timothy


When a foundation is bad, the whole building suffers. As we shared in the past, the kitchen/dining hall became very costly and it was discovered the builders cut corners— the foundation was bad as well as the structure not sound. The walls could be swayed by pushing on them. The building has been torn down and a lot of the materials salvaged. The kitchen portion has been reconstructed and the roof is now being put on. Plans are to make the dining hall portion more like an open shelter house. Chad and Sarah Spencer brought two new cooking stove units for the kitchen on one of their visits to the home. The stoves are different than have been used by the cook previously, so she will be making adjustments to new equipment. She did learn that the units used less wood which will cut down on costs. The kitchen will soon be ready to use. We are very thankful to all who have contributed toward this project and that a way is being made to rebuild and make the structure more sound and a great blessing to the home.

The missionary quarters is progressing. One of the bedrooms is finished and Barbara Decker is living in it at this writing. You will see the window to her bedroom in the picture on the right. The bathroom that will have a stool and a small lavatory is in the process of being finished as well as a septic system installed. There will be a small kitchen, another bedroom and small sitting room yet to be finished. Construction is being finished as funds come in. Thank you to all who have been helping on this project. Bunk beds will be put in the extra bedroom to help accommodate mission teams when they come.

Coming in October Newsletter: Reports on Adilang and Ethiopia Teams; Rwanda, Kenya, and South Sudan Missions;
Water Filter and Farm Projects; and Zacharias Team

Extending a hand of friendship with a special gift.
__ Enclosed is $_______ Dominican Republic Outreach __ Enclosed is $_______ Lakota Sioux projects __ Enclosed is $_______ Abba House Entebbe, Uganda __ Enclosed is $_______ Abba House Katogwe, Uganda __ Enclosed is $_______ Kitchen/Dining Hall Project Uganda __ Enclosed is $_______ Missionary Quarters Project Uganda __ Enclosed is $_______ Farm Project Uganda __ Enclosed is $_______ for Greatest Need

__Please send me information about sponsoring a child.
Please complete and return this response device if you would like to join with us in any of the above mentioned ways. All donations are tax deductible. Please write checks payable to: House of Friends and send to P O Box 228, Alma, MO 64001. Thank you for caring!

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