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Thursday, September 19, 2013 dailytarheel.com Volume 121, Issue 75
Tradition in transition
Watauga
resolution
questioned
By Sarah Brown
Assistant State & National Editor
Stefan Weathers didn’t always
have a historically black college or
university on his radar.
Weathers, a Charlotte native
and the student body presi-
dent at North Carolina Central
University, knew he wanted to
attend a small university, and his
mother had graduated from an
HBCU — but he wanted to keep
his options open.
But Weathers found his niche
at NCCU, which, at the time,
was the top public HBCU in the
country.
“I felt that it was destined,” he
said.
North Carolina has 11 four-year
public and private HBCUs — the
most in the country — but fewer
HBCU students in the state are
able to afford four-plus years of col-
lege, in part due to the latest flurry
of state funding cuts to the UNC
system and decreased financial aid.
Some students don’t complete
their degrees and drop out, while
other prospective students can’t
even start.
“I know people my same age
who couldn’t return to their uni-
versity ... because of that finan-
cial burden they had to incur,”
Weathers said.
Johnny Taylor, president of
the Thurgood Marshall College
Fund, a group that represents the
country’s 47 public HBCUs, said
North Carolina has to commit to
educating an increasingly diverse
workforce.
“More than ever, it’s important
that the state invest in the institu-
tions that have a mission to edu-
cate people of color,” Taylor said.
“We are really at a crisis in the
HBCU community.”
‘rough spots’
N.C. Sen. Gladys Robinson,
D-Guilford, a former UNC-
system Board of Governors mem-
ber, said HBCUs have had trouble
recruiting faculty and resources
at the same rate as other public
universities.
“They started at a disadvantage
in terms of funding from the time
they became a part of the UNC
system,” Robinson said.
UNC-system President Tom
Ross said at a news conference
last week that a persistently trou-
blesome economy continues to
make less funding and financial
aid available for all students —
but HBCUs have seen the steepest
resulting enrollment declines.
Also affecting HBCUs are
changes in student admission and
progression standards at system
campuses, a move mandated by
the Board of Governors in 2011.
“This is a transition time,” Ross
said. “Any time you go through
the kind of economy we have for
the last five years, you’re going to
see some rough spots.”
Jon Young, provost and vice
chancellor for academic affairs at
Fayetteville State University, said
this year, the school had to freeze
all faculty travel and postpone
hiring of tenure-track faculty.
Only one HBCU in the state,
North Carolina Agricultural &
Technical State University, saw an
increase in enrollment funding
for the 2013-14 academic year —
and budget cuts hit all five of the
state’s public HBCUs and UNC-
Pembroke, a minority institution
created to serve Lumbee Indians.
And students are noticing.
Priscilla Azaglo, student
body president at Elizabeth City
State University, said the drop
in enrollment at her school has
sparked conversations and con-
cerns across campus.
ECSU enrolled about 2,400
students this fall — down from
about 3,000 only three years ago.
The drop contributed to the uni-
versity losing nearly 10 percent of
its state funding in 2013-14.
“Students have noticed that the
student body isn’t as big as it used
to be,” Azaglo said. “It’s been a
tough year.”
Alex Sampson, an NCCU junior
and editor-in-chief of the school's
student newspaper, Campus Echo,
said she’s heard many NCCU
dth/taylor sweet
Stefan Weathers is the student body president at North Carolina Central University. N.C. Central and other HBCUs face enrollment troubles.
HBCUs battle declining enrollment, look to move forward
By Andrew Craig
Staff Writer
Voters in Watauga County are question-
ing which Eggers brother is responsible for
a resolution that moved Appalachian State
University polling places.
An article published in Sunday’s edition
of The Winston-Salem Journal has con-
firmed the suspicions of many Watauga
county leaders that county attorney Stacy
“Four” Eggers IV has been influencing
decisions made by the Watauga County
Board of Elections through his brother
Luke Eggers, chairman of the board.
The controversial Aug. 12 resolution
closed all ASU on-campus early voting
polling sites for the municipal elections
and moved them to remote locations with
little parking and limited access.
Both Luke and Four Eggers did not
respond to multiple requests for comment.
A representative at the Eggers Law Firm
said the brothers are not commenting.
Kathleen Campbell, the sole Democratic
member of the three-person Watauga
County Board of Elections, said the con-
troversy started Aug. 9 when Luke Eggers
was appointed as chairman of the board.
Campbell said Luke Eggers called for a
board meeting without giving the required
48-hour public notice and presented the
resolution, demanding that it be put to
an immediate vote before board members
had the opportunity to read it.
“Luke’s a substitute teacher, and there
were a lot of legal-sounding language
in it,” she said. “He just didn’t have the
know-how to write that, and it wasn’t until
(Winston-Salem Journal reporter) Bert
Gutierrez looked at the metadata and dis-
covered the digital fingerprint that we had
proof he didn’t.”
For Gerry Cohen, special legal counsel to
the N.C. General Assembly, the issue is not
that Four Eggers was writing resolutions
for the board, but that he was exclusively
doing it for one member of the board.
“As county attorney, it’s part of Four’s
job to write things for groups like the
Board of Elections,” Cohen said. “It’s the
fact that he had refused to help Kathleen
Campbell that presents a problem and
raises some ethical issues.”
Campbell said she asked Four Eggers to
help write some of her resolutions, but he
wouldn’t.
Four Eggers was originally nominated
to the county board but was told by the
Report shows outside
influence on elections board.
THE LOAMLANDS
This week Dive introduces us to The Loamlands, a
folk rock band out of Durham. The band will drop
its debut EP Tuesday on Trekky Records, a label
that band member Will Hackney founded. Page 4
Inside
This day in history
SEPTEMBER 19, 1893
New Zealand becomes the frst country
in the world to grant women the right
to vote in national elections. The United
States followed suit in 1920 and Great
Britain in 1928.
Unemployment cuts strain nonprofits
By Eric Garcia
Senior Writer
This summer, unemployed
North Carolinians lost nearly $200
in weekly state unemployment ben-
efits, on top of seeing their federal
emergency benefits completely
disappear.
They’re now turning to state
nonprofits — some of which are
struggling to handle the surge.
In an effort to pay back federal
unemployment insurance debt,
North Carolina cut state unemploy-
ment insurance compensation from
$535 per week to $350 per week,
which went into effect July 1.
Federal law prohibited states
receiving emergency unemploy-
ment compensation — benefits
after 26 weeks of unemployment —
from cutting unemployment insur-
ance. As a result, the federal gov-
ernment dropped North Carolina
from the program.
This affected 170,000 unem-
ployed North Carolinians and lost
the state $780 million in federal
funds.
“North Carolina said to heck
with that, we’re doing it anyway, so
the federal government was forced
to cut emergency benefits as well,”
said Rob Schofield, policy director
for the left-leaning advocacy orga-
nization N.C. Policy Watch.
But state nonprofits have been
bracing for the effects of the cuts,
said David Heinen, director of pub-
lic policy and advocacy for the N.C.
Center for Nonprofits.
“Nonprofits were preparing,
knowing after July 1 that more
people were going to be coming for
more services,” Heinen said.
Kristin Lavergne, community
services director for the Inter-
Faith Council, an organization
that assists low-income people in
Chapel Hill and Carrboro, said
the council has a process to help
people who are beginning to lose
benefits.
“In that sense, we felt we already
had that process set up,” Lavergne
said.
She also said that while there has
not been a flood of people in need
of the council’s services, a larger
variety of people is using them —
including more professional work-
ers.
“We saw someone working at
(UNC) and had been laid off, and
he was getting ready to run out (of
benefits), and he was worried about
what would happen,” she said.
Ben Money, president and CEO
of the North Carolina Community
Health Center Association, said
more people are using community
health centers as more people lose
benefits.
“The number of uninsured contin-
ues to rise by folks not having access
to extended unemployment benefits,”
Money said. “It puts people in a
lower financial category so they are
available for more discounts.”
Brian Toomey, CEO of Piedmont
Health, said the cuts have made it
more difficult to administer care
efficiently.
“We get more and more calls by
people in our Carrboro location —
we have not been able to see people
as quickly,” he said.
Toomey also said he thinks peo-
ple might be willing to seek better
Unemployment benefits
$350
Weekly unemployment benefits
170,000
North Carolinians affected by cuts
$780 million
Federal money lost by the state
health options when the Affordable
Care Act comes into effect January
2014.
“They might feel able to see us
sooner because they have some cov-
erage,” he said.
Money said he hopes that in the
short session in May, the N.C. General
Assembly will rethink the cuts.
“We hope the General Assembly
will reconsider the decisions they
made in the last session and look
at some of the human cost that has
been inflicted on people suffering
from a lagging economy,” he said.
state@dailytarheel.com
more people are seeking
help from service groups
following benefit cuts.
Campus Y
to give out
$10,000
By Mia Madduri
Staff Writer
In a time of heavy cuts to UNC’s
budget, many student groups have
seen their budgets trimmed as well.
However, clubs aiming to promote
social justice could get financial help
from the Campus Y’s YFund, which
received a $10,000 grant last spring
that campus groups can benefit from.
The YFund is a source of seed
money for innovative social jus-
tice initiatives on campus that is
run by students in the Campus Y
Development Committee. While in
prior years YFund money was avail-
able only to organizations operating
out of the Campus Y, money from the
$10,000 grant will be made available
to any campus social justice group.
“We’re there with them through-
out the steps of the project,” said
Madhu Vulimiri, co-director of the
YFund’s Development Committee.
“It’s cool to see the project go from
an idea to fleshed out and detailed.”
Established two years ago, the
YFund typically ran on $6,000 avail-
able exclusively to Campus Y com-
mittees. Last March, UNC’s Parents
the Carolina parents
Council grant will fund
UnC social justice groups.
see yfUnD, Page 7
see WAtAUGA, Page 7
see HbCUs, Page 7
today
Global Projects Showcase:
Those wishing to travel next
summer or fund their global
projects can come to this
showcase that features students’
research, experiences and
travel stories from a variety of
felds and destinations. Learn
more about what the Center for
Global Initiatives has funded in
the past. Lunch will be provided.
Time: Noon - 1 p.m.
Location: FedEx Global Educa-
tion Center
Dean’s Speaker Series: CEO
and President of the Tennes-
see Valley Authority: William D.
Johnson, president and CEO of
the Tennessee Valley Authority,
will deliver a lecture at this free
business school event. Register
at alumniconnections.com.
Time: 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Location: Koury Auditorium
Diaspora Festival of Black and
Independent Film: Join the
Stone Center for Black Culture
and History as it shows a double
feature of flms that depict
beauty as it relates to race.
Time: 7 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Location: Stone Center
Friday
Ackland Art Museum Scholars’
Breakfast: Area scholars and
students with an interest in the
themes explored in The Sahmat
Collective are invited to enjoy a
private viewing with cofee and
pastries.
Time: 8 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Location: Ackland Art Museum
Public Service Fair: Learn about
NOTED. Glen James, a homeless man
living in Boston, was rewarded with
$70,000 by an online donation campaign
after he had turned in a backpack filled
with some $40,000 full of cash and trav-
eler’s checks to the police.
Sometimes the world just really doesn’t
suck, you know?
QUOTED. “He was a really nice guy.”
— Brett Mugglin, an Ohio State
University student, after he discovered a
random man was living in his basement.
While he did laud the squatter for his
kindness, Mugglin did acknowledge that
a random man having a key to his house
“could have been extremely dangerous.”
D
ude, I’m so drunk right now. Imagine if people were to get
inebriated just by eating food, most of us would be drunk
all of the time and probably not alive. That’s literally the
case for one Texas man who came into the emergency room
completely hammered and swore he didn’t have anything to drink, even
though he had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.37 percent.
Doctors put his word to the test by isolating him in a hospital room for
24 hours. Afterwards, they found he had a blood alcohol concentration
of 0.12 percent even though he hadn’t consumed alcohol. Apparently,
his stomach has a buildup of excess yeast, so whenever he eats carbohy-
drates, his body converts the sugars into alcohol. Cheers to that.
Build your own brew
From staf and wire reports
DAILY
DOSE
• Someone vandalized
property at 113 Basswood
Court at 8:15 a.m. Tuesday,
according to Chapel Hill
police reports.
The person wrote graffiti on
the street, pointed in the direc-
tion of a home. Damage was
estimated at $5, reports state.
• Someone received threat-
ening emails at 306 Hickory
Drive at 4:10 p.m. Tuesday,
according to Chapel Hill
police reports.
• Someone received threat-
ening phone calls at 128
Johnson St. between 7:09
p.m. and 7:23 p.m. Tuesday,
according to Chapel Hill police
reports.
• Someone committed
fraud at 131 Justice St. at 1:55
a.m. Wednesday, according to
Chapel Hill police reports.
The person acquired war-
ranty information for a scam,
reports state.
• Someone commit-
ted larceny at 107 Spring
Valley Road between 9
p.m. Sunday and 9:30
a.m. Monday, according to
Carrboro police reports.
The person stole two plas-
tic planters containing ferns
from the residence’s front
yard, reports state.
• Someone broke and
entered a vehicle at 8400
Sterling Bridge Road
between 6 p.m. Sunday and
8 a.m. Tuesday, according to
Carrboro police reports.
The person broke into a
Honda Odyssey minivan and
took a black Garmin NUVI
GPS unit, reports state.
• Someone shoplifted at
310 N. Greensboro St. at 5:52
p.m. Tuesday, according to
Carrboro police reports.
The person stole one
24-ounce can of Icehouse
beer from Carr Mill Mall,
reports state.
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com. Please include the date of
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will be published in the newspaper
on either the day or the day before
they take place.
CoMMUNity CaLENdar
opportunities to get involved
and lend a helping hand within
the community at both at UNC
and beyond.
Time: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Location: The Pit
Sculpture in the Garden
preview reception: Get an early
glimpse at the N.C. Botanical
Garden’s 2013 sculpture show at
its preview reception. Meet the
artists and enjoy light refresh-
ments. Tickets are $35.
Time: 5 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Location: N.C. Botanical Garden
PoLiCE LoG
News Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 2
street serenade
A
llan Roth (left) and Samuel Wayne (right)
entertain people walking on Franklin Street
Wednesday evening. Roth and Wayne played
in the entrance of Julian’s. Roth said they are “trying
to abolish capitalism” through their music.
dth/elise karsten
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AVAILABLE NOW
News Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 3
City brief
Pedestrian struck and killed near
University Mall Wednesday night
Lisa Renee Baldwin, 41, of Chapel Hill,
was struck and killed by oncoming traffic
at 8:24 p.m. Wednesday at the intersec-
tion of U.S. 15-501 and South Estes Drive
near University Mall, according to a
press release from the Chapel Hill Police
Department.
An investigation is ongoing, the press
release states.
— From staff and wire reports
inBRIEF
Women’s soccer drops two in a row
By Kevin Phinney
Staff Writer
For the second game in a row, the
scoreboard shouted a zero at the No.
5 North Carolina women’s soccer
team from high above the pitch.
This time, UNC matched up
against No. 3 Florida State, and
again the vaunted attack had been
held scoreless by an ACC foe.
Despite a constant flurry of shots
from North Carolina, FSU kept the
Tar Heels off the scoreboard and
held on for a 1-0 win.
“FSU put us under a lot of pres-
sure,” coach Anson Dorrance said.
“But we were the masters of our own
fate tonight. We should’ve had an
opportunity to put away at least two
or three (goals).”
FSU junior Jamia Fields scored
the lone goal of the game in the
82nd minute, as she dodged her
defender senior Megan Brigman
and beat sophomore goalie Bryane
Heaberlin in the far corner.
Dorrance’s Tar Heels haven’t lost
two games in a row since 2011 when
they lost three straight games. That
three-game skid also included a loss
to Florida State.
Despite a spirited attack in the
final seven minutes, UNC failed to
find the equalizer before the final
buzzer. The win for Florida State
was their fifth against UNC, the
second-most of any team in the
country.
During one of those late attacks
on goal, UNC freshman Emily
Bruder injured her shoulder in a
fall after being challenged by a FSU
defender. She left the game with
what a team spokesman called a
sore shoulder. She will likely be able
to play in Sunday’s game at Miami.
It was a tale of two halves for
UNC’s leading goal scorer senior
Crystal Dunn. Dunn didn’t take a
single shot in the first half, instead
spending more time trying to find
her teammates. In the second half
she tried to beat her defender more
in one-on-one soccer. But neither
strategy could break through.
“Their back line was pretty solid,”
Dunn said, “As soon as we were
looking to attack it seemed like
there were eight players back there
defending.”
Dorrance said that UNC was in a
better position to get Dunn the ball
in the second half due to the fatigue
of the Seminole defense.
Senior forward Kealia Ohai was a
different story. Ohai took nine shots
in the game, constantly attacking
the FSU defense to no avail.
“Out of nine shots I’ve got to fin-
ish one of them,” Ohai said. “So mov-
ing forward I need more composure
and better placement.”
But according to Dunn, UNC’s
failure to finish despite severely
By Morgan Swift
Staff Writer
The new Orange County Schools
superintendent will start her position on
Tuesday, Oct. 1 after leaving her job as
the current superintendent of McDowell
County Schools.
The county school
board announced Gerri
Martin as the new
superintendent in a
press release on Sept. 12.
“She was an excel-
lent candidate,” Donna
Coffey, president of the
Orange County School
Board, said.
Coffey said Martin
boasts many unique
credentials, setting her
application apart from
nearly 30 others, which
poured in from 11 states.
Lawrence Sanders, a member of the
school board, said those qualifications,
coupled with 27 years of experience, made
her the best fit for the position, despite the
large quantity of applicants.
The press release said Martin has held
an array of positions, such as high school
teacher, college professor, assistant princi-
pal and principal. She became the superin-
tendent in McDowell County in 2012.
“She started as a teacher and had that
experience in the classroom,” Sanders said.
He said her experience as a teacher was
especially important to the board members
when selecting a viable candidate. Being
bilingual also worked in her favor, due to
Orange County’s rising Latino population,
Sanders said.
“The key thing was to make sure we
heard from the community — those in the
school system and the taxpayers — to make
sure they had the opportunity to provide
their input in the process,” Sanders said.
When the former superintendent,
Patrick Rhodes, announced his plans
for retirement this year, Sanders said
the school district joined with the North
Carolina School Boards Association to seek
help in filling the position.
Members of the community, parents and
staff were asked to fill out a survey about
what they felt was important in their public
schools and what improvements could be
made, Coffey said. The survey gave com-
munity members a chance to weigh in on a
topic that highly affected them.
Coffey said she was optimistic about the
future of Orange County’s public schools
and their pursuit of academic achievement.
“I believe that she will carry us forward
in our educational excellence,” Coffey said.
city@dailytarheel.com
The Tar Heels lost two
games in a row for the
first time since 2011.
dth File/spencer herlong
Senior Kealia Ohai took nine shots against FSU, four of which were on goal.
outshooting its opponents in the last
two games isn’t a cause for concern.
“We’ve just got to take the posi-
tives away from these games,” Dunn
said. “We didn’t play terribly bad, we
just didn’t score.
“We just need to put the ball
away.”
sports@dailytarheel.com
County
hires new
schools
leader
Gerri Martin
was hired by the
orange county
school board as
superintendent for
the district.
Scholars reflect on Moral Monday movement
By Sarah Chaney
Staff Writer
Since Moral Monday dem-
onstrations began this summer,
more than 900 people have been
arrested at the Raleigh protests —
including some UNC professors.
Tonight students will have the
opportunity to hear from UNC and
Duke University professors about
their experiences with the Moral
Mondays protests against North
Carolina’s Republican-controlled
government this summer.
The event will be held at
5:30 p.m. in the FedEx Global
Education Center.
“All these major national news
outlets are talking about what our
state legislatures are doing, so
we thought we’d provide the first
major scholarly interpretation
of Moral Mondays,” said panelist
Nancy MacLean, a history and
public policy professor at Duke.
“Sometimes you can read about
these things in the paper, but it’s
hard to distinguish what’s really
there,” she said.
More than half of the panelists
are members of Scholars for North
Carolina’s Future, an organization
committed to fostering discussions
about the state’s political climate.
Other panelists were invited
because of their active participa-
tion in the heated protests.
Dr. Charles van der Horst of
the UNC School of Medicine said
he was arrested at Moral Monday
in May, charged with three misde-
meanors: the illegal gathering of
three or more people, the failure
to leave the building and singing
and waving placards.
He said he strongly opposed
the government’s decision not
to extend Medicaid under the
Affordable Care Act — a change
he said cut funding for AIDS drug
assistance programs.
“Many of the legislative chang-
es will kill my patients,” van der
Horst said. “That cuts off funding
for 1,800 people.”
UNC sociology professor
Kenneth Andrews, who attended
one Moral Monday event in the
spring, plans to focus on how the
events fall within the context of
social movements and protests.
“The main question that I look
at is how citizens’ groups and pro-
tests influence politics,” he said.
Panelist and Duke theology pro-
fessor Willie Jennings said the level
of civil disobedience this summer
was in many ways unprecedented.
“Moral Mondays is unique in the
number of people, the consistency,
the growth and the maintaining of
the energy,” Jennings said.
Bruce Orenstein, a coordinator
of the event at Duke’s Center for
Documentary Studies, said the goal
of tonight’s event is to promote a
deep discussion while increasing
awareness of the social movement.
“Over last spring and summer,
a lot of people were out of town,
but now they’re back and need to
be informed,” he said.
university@dailytarheel.com
‘scHolars speak ouT’
Time: 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Thursday
Location: Nelson Mandela
Auditorium in the FedEx Global
Education Center
TO BEER OR NOT TO BEER
dth/louise mann clement
“Tender Naplam” will be playing in Linda’s Downbar on Franklin Street tonight through Sunday.
Actors, director say Linda’s bar reflects play’s mood
By Rebecca Pollack
Staff Writer
Instead of performing at the usual Center
for Dramatic Art, LAB! Theatre’s next show,
“Tender Napalm,” will be held at Linda’s
Downbar on Franklin Street.
Student director Nathaniel Claridad, a
third-year graduate student, said this loca-
tion fits the style of the show. The play uses
the concept of found spaces, in which an
atypical performance space is used for a
show.
“We came up with the idea of Linda’s
Downbar because of the nature of the play —
it’s very gritty, raw,” Claridad said.
Actor Pat McHugh, a third-year graduate
student who plays the character Man, said
the play’s plot is complex.
“It’s about two people in a dysfunctional
relationship that are sort of coming to
terms with it in their own way, which is
kind of fantastical and brutal,” McHugh
said. “It hits many notes that are weird and
dark and sexy and twisted and funny and
otherworldly.”
For the director and actors, Linda’s mir-
rored the feel of the play.
“What’s especially disorienting is that the
lights are on the audience as much as they’re
on the actors,” McHugh said.
“We’re going to be able to see everybody in
the audience and hopefully not acknowledge
them.”
Claridad said he wanted to make this more
than just a play at a bar.
“I wanted to use the entire space,” he said.
“That’s why they’re everywhere. You never
know where they’re going to be — tables, bar,
the stage.”
Nicola Vann, a senior dramatic art major
who plays the character Woman, said the
cast was able to adjust to the unique loca-
tion.
“We pull a lot of ideas and inspiration from
the space around us,” Vann said. “I know that
LAB! is willing to take on risky pieces, and
we’re looking to do things in more unusual
spaces.”
McHugh also mentioned that the acoustics
were a problem because the sound doesn’t
carry from one side of the room to the other
as easily as it does in a theater, but the cast
found ways to make the space work.
“It’s a chance to see up close and personal
actors that are really throwing themselves
into a complex piece,” he said.
“It’s a unique experience, not something
you’re going to find anywhere around Chapel
Hill. So the fact that it’s free, why not show
up?”
Claridad said that immersive theater is
not being done in the area, but it is a trend in
New York City.
Vann was the one who originally sub-
mitted the play to LAB! Theatre to be per-
formed.
She saw it in Ireland and said it was a piece
she wanted to perform, so she asked Claridad
to direct it.
Vann also said she appreciates the show’s
uniqueness.
“It’s a hard show to explain,” she said.
“And you can’t really tell people what to
expect.”
Claridad said he was up for the challenge
the play presented to him.
“It looked difficult, so I said ‘yes,’” he said.
“They’re never sure where they are, whether
they’re in the real world or not.”
Vann then asked him if he knew anyone
who could play the other character in the
show, and Claridad suggested McHugh.
“I gave him the script because it seemed
“Tender napalM”
Time: Sept. 19, 21, 22, and 23 at 8 p.m.;
Sept. 20 at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.
Location: Linda’s Downbar, Franklin Street
Info: http://on.fb.me/18amRgB
Gerri Martin will start as
district superintendent oct. 1.
right up his alley,” Claridad said.
Vann said she knew this was the kind of
play LAB! would produce.
“Come see it and grab a drink while you’re
at it because the bar will be open,” Claridad
said.
arts@dailytarheel.com
WoMen’s soccer: florida sTaTe 1, unc 0
a panel will feature five
unc and duke professors
and a moderator.
diversions
Visit the Dive blog: dailytarheel.com/dive
dailytarheel.com
With Neighborhood Veins, Schooner delivers a heaping helping of psych rock that will leave listeners wanting another hit. Page 6
Robert De Niro’s lifetime of mob movies isn’t enough to help him keep The Family afloat. In a word: fuhgeddaboutit. Page 5
Loamlands, Durham’s newest folk rock outfit, is an earthy musical exploration between longtime Triangle music veterans. Page 5
Dive staff writer James Stramm talks to Durham duo Prypyat about its future plans and show tonight with Kishi Bashi.
MUSIC.
MOVIES.
FEATURE.
ONLINE.
TODAY IN DIVE
The lyrics here have almost nothing to
do with fall, but the real highlight of this
track is Doug Martsch’s gentle and breezy
guitar work. The way he makes that
electric guitar sound float evokes leaves,
fresh off the tree, slowly drifting in the
wind. When Martsch hits the whammy
bar during the song’s guitar coda, the
lilting tone that results is perfectly suited
for a climate of brisk, cool fall air. It also
doesn’t hurt that the heart-shattering lyr-
ics are a great prescription for any bouts
of autumn melancholy. — James Butler
Besides the obvious title and lyrics
like “I’ll be sad when the leaves fall /
and I’ll be sad when they grow back /
I think of you when the leaves change
/ and I remember what it is I lack,” the
song calls into question the nature
of the passage of time. For whatever
reason, the track’s ‘80s-esque sound
also contributes to a cool feeling of
autumn’s arrival. Fall can be a time for
self-reflection and new beginnings,
and this particular song manages to
encapsulate all these feelings of peace-
ful thought. — Tess Boyle
When listening to this song, it’s hard
not to immediately drop what you’re
doing and spend the day basking in
autumn’s perfect weather. With its crisp
vocals and wonderfully chilly lyrics,
this song embodies all the best things
about the season. Not to mention the
last minute is so pretty that it’ll warm
you up better than any fall-themed latte.
Half catchy, half indie-cool, this song is a
recommended listen for napping in the
quad. — Natalie Carney
In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great
Gatsby,” Jordan Baker tells Daisy
Buchanan, “Life starts all over again when
it gets crisp in the fall.” Tyler’s masterful
fingerpicking transports you to a differ-
ent place — essentially making you “start
over” in a new headspace and setting
you free from stress. “The World Set Free”
gently sighs like a breeze through dry
trees. Clocking in at just over 10 minutes
long, the track ambles along enough to
make it feel like a physical journey all its
own. — Allison Hussey
This powerful ballad puts into words
everyone’s dependency on the feeling
autumn creates when colorful leaves fall to
the ground and the “tender, cool breezes”
pass through and give relief after too hot
of a summer. Clare’s haunting voice, the
steady, low drum beat and the echoing
piano culminate to make the song light
during the verse and heavy during the cho-
rus. Despite all the stress the fall semester
brings, this song serves as a nice reminder
as to how calming this beautiful campus
can be. — Amanda Hayes
Wolves, woods and a woman: in the
title track from its 2010 album, Blitzen
Trapper tells a tale of personal growth
disguised in lyrics about a man whose
“flesh had turned to fur.”
The song’s steady rhythm hits like a
heartbeat — steady and thick — with
the strums of an acoustic guitar carrying
the melody.The nature noises of bugs,
birds and of course, wolf howls scattered
throughout the tune enhance an already
earthy vibe that’s perfect for incoming
crunchy weather. — Allison Hussey
This meandering jaunt recalls a mel-
low walk home from class amongst a
bevy of fallen leaves. Like the slight chill
that sets in come the end of September,
an airy organ gently shivers above vocal-
ist Ira Kaplan’s confessional melody.
Instead of mourning summer’s
end, this pleasant tune welcomes the
changing weather with a warm, tender
embrace. Through a series of heartwarm-
ing lyrics and cordial bass runs, Yo La
Tengo affectionately declares fall to be
the perfect season for cozying up with a
loved one. — Chris Powers
“You and I, riding high / In a landfill
building castles / We get around while
we’re alive.”This track is an adrenaline-
pumping song with an appreciation for the
present. With its fast-paced electric guitar
riffs to introduce the song, its catchy and
poppy chorus throughout and its low bass
to finish off, this song provides all the nec-
essary ingredients to dance and sing along
to. Its theme even reminds the listener of
the pointlessness of stressing for the past
and future, while simultaneously providing
the perfect remedy to survive this school
season. — Lily Escobar
No proper fall playlist is complete
without an emotive, introspective folk
song and this Okkervil River track fits
the bill perfectly. A heartbreaking tale of
unrequited love, the tune is embellished
by wandering horns and a softly-plucked
mandolin. With lyrics like “You love a
stone, because it’s dark, and it’s old/ And
if it could start being alive you’d stop liv-
ing alone,”“A Stone” is a somber reminder
that though the leaves are falling and the
temperature is dropping, some things
never seem to change. — Chris Powers
“And when I said that I love you honey
/ I knew that you would break my heart /
But why?” Leaves are changing, seasons
are changing and feelings are changing.
“Heartbreaker” pairs lo-fi with surf rock to
deliver a cool and mellowed-out groove.
It’s upbeat enough to dance to, yet somber
enough to sit and experience in solidar-
ity. Combined with their signature throaty
vocals and love-struck lyrics, “Heartbreaker”
feels like a tunnel into their heart. The
arrangements provide an eerie ballad to
bawl your eyes out at 3 a.m. — Lily Escobar
Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel
4
“Else”
Built to Spill
“Leaves Fall”
Mansions on the Moon
“Punch Drunk on Black Mold”
Absofacto
“Furr”
Blitzen Trapper
“Lost Weekend”
The So So Glos
“Heartbreaker”
Girls
“A Stone”
Okkervil River
“Our Way To Fall”
Yo La Tengo
“Whispering”
Alex Clare
“The World Set Free”
William Tyler
Diversions Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 5
Collaborative spirit marks Loamlands
By Chris Powers
Assistant Diversions Editor
The old adage, “Every
new beginning comes from
some other beginning’s end,”
carries a lot of weight in the
musical realm. Just ask Kym
Register and Will Hackney,
local stalwarts behind the
new Durham folk rock project
Loamlands.
Following the dissolu-
tion of their previous
band, the country-tinged
Midtown Dickens, Register
and Hackney collaborated
on a crop of songs that
would eventually become
Loamlands’ debut EP, Some
Kind Of Light. The EP is set
to be released Tuesday on
Trekky Records, a Chapel
Hill-based label that Hackney
co-founded.
“At sort of the end of
Midtown when we all were
going different directions, I
just remember calling Will up
and being like, ‘Hey, I really
still like playing music with
you, do you want to keep
doing that?’ And he was like,
‘Yeah, cool, see you in like a
month,’” Register said.
At the heart of the duo’s
pensive folk is an enduring
musical dialogue between
Register and Hackney, some-
thing Register attributes to
their prior experience per-
forming together.
“Being in a band for so
long together — we were
already in a band for four
years together — we sort of
know each other musically
especially,” Register said. “I
mean in every way, really. But
musically especially, and we
dth/ElizabEth MEndoza
Loamlands plays its release show tomorrow night at the Pinhook.
know how to interact and cre-
ate and are past the first date.”
Hackney said his and
Register’s time in Midtown
Dickens provided the duo
with a strong foundation for
Loamlands.
“We know how to be in a
band now,” Hackney said.
Some Kind Of Light, which
features Megafaun’s Brad
Cook and Lost in the Trees’
Kyle Keegan, was recorded
in the brief window of three
days with producer Scott
Solter. Hackney said the short
LoamLands Live
Time: 9 p.m. tomorrow
Location: The Pinhook, 117
W. Main St., Durham
Info: thepinhook.com, trek-
kyrecords.com
studio time strongly influ-
enced the music.
“I think that energy gave
real life to the recordings
because the takes are kind
of desperate in a good way,”
Hackney said.
Martin Anderson, who
co-founded Trekky Records
with Hackney, attributed
the band’s vitality to the live
recording of the EP.
“The most gripping thing
about the recording to me
is that it feels like a session,”
Anderson said. “Everything
was recorded live and there is
a real electric feel — you can
feel it in the room.”
Bound by a reverential
Southern spirit, Register said
Some Kind of Light repre-
sents the most concentrated
release to arise from her and
Hackney’s collaboration.
“I love how I played music
in the past and who I played
music with in the past, but at
this point we’re sort of hon-
ing in a lot more,” Register
said.
“I don’t see it getting any
less fun to play this kind of
music. It’s so energetic and so
kinetic.”
diversions@dailytarheel.com
Insidious: Chapter 2
Still on a high from the
successes of “The Conjuring”
and “Insidious,” direc-
tor James Wan released
“Insidious: Chapter 2”, a
sequel that couldn’t quite
match up with its predeces-
sor. Despite the effective cast
that adds a creep factor, the
film is sluggish and loaded
with cliche scare tactics.
The plot picks up with
the Lambert family together
again after son Dalton was
rescued from a demon in the
first movie. But Josh (Patrick
Wilson), the father, isn’t him-
self, and it is soon discovered
that a spirit has taken over his
body. Typical scare attempts
follow, including a piano play-
ing by itself, a toy turning on
MOVIESHORTS
and slamming doors.
After exhausting the go-to
scares, the story actually starts
to develop. Finally, the audi-
ence gets some insight into
the paranormal realm and the
spirits causing the chaos with
the help of the deceased psy-
chic from the first movie, Elise.
The “Insidious” sequel’s
strength is its “Criminal
Minds”-like dive into the
backstory and psyche of
Parker Crane, a mass mur-
derer and possessor of Josh’s
body. Though intriguing, the
journey into Crane’s psyche is
too brief and undeveloped to
add much substance.
Specs and Tucker, Elise’s
colleagues, add the much-
needed action and comic
relief. Though the action is
regrettably limited, the two
men’s comedy keeps viewers’
attention during their scenes.
At the film’s conclusion,
Wan clearly indicates that the
story isn’t over yet and there
will be a third “Insidious,”
which will hopefully follow
more closely in the footsteps
of the original.
Overall, “Insidious:
Chapter 2” has some interest-
ing plot developments and a
couple of scary moments, but
it is not nightmare-inducing
and hardly encourages view-
ers to stay tuned for act three.
— Amanda Hayes
The Family
When it comes to mob-
sters, it’s all about family.
Mob families specialize in
violence, epic showdowns and
big hair with big secrets.
They don’t do normal,
which is the main problem
with Luc Besson’s action-
comedy “The Family.” Mob
families are anything but nor-
mal, so why try to make them
something they’re not?
The film follows mobster
Giovanni Manzoni (Robert De
Niro, of course) and his family
as they relocate to live a “nor-
mal” life under the Witness
Protection Program after he
snitched on his fellow kingpins.
The family itself, known as
the Blakes, includes his tough
wife Maggie (Michelle Pfeiffer)
and his teenage children,
daughter Belle (Dianna Agron)
and son Warren (John D’Leo).
Despite a strong family
dynamic, the plot is dead
on arrival. The focus on the
Manzonis’ attempts at being
a typical family — like deal-
ing with faulty plumbing — is
boring.
Surprisingly, it’s De Niro
who leads the boring brigade.
Giovanni is such a parody of
De Niro’s finer mob charac-
ters that you wonder when
he is going to break into Vito
Corleone or Jimmy Conway.
The action doesn’t pick up
until the last 30 minutes dive
into total guns-blazing enter-
tainment. But this shift is so
abrupt that you wonder if it’s
the same film. Despite the
inconsistent tone, the energy
of the Manzoni supporting
cast is the only thing keeping
“The Family” bearable.
— Avery Thompson
Poor
FAir
gooD
ExcELLEnT
cLASSic
STARS
Allison Hussey, Editor
chris Powers, Assistant Editor
diversions@dailytarheel.com
Avery Thompson, staff writer
rachel Holt, Design & graphics
Editor
cover Design: cece Pascual
and Mary Burke
DIVESTAFF
SUNDAY, SEPT. 22 • DEERHUNTER SUNDAY, SEPT. 22 • DEERHUNTER
MONDAY MONDAY
SEPT. 23 SEPT. 23
RICHARD RICHARD
THOMPSON THOMPSON
FRIDAY, SEPT. 20 FRIDAY, SEPT. 20
GRAM PARSONS GRAM PARSONS
TRIBUTE TRIBUTE
MONDAY, SEPT. 23 MONDAY, SEPT. 23
WASHED OUT WASHED OUT
TUESDAY, OCT. 1 • SURFER BLOOD TUESDAY, OCT. 1 • SURFER BLOOD
919-967-9053
300 E. Main Street • Carrboro
**Advance ticket sales at SchoolKids Records (Raleigh), CD Alley (CH). Buy tickets on-line www.etix .com | For phone orders CALL 919-967-9053
The BEST live music ~ 18 & over admitted
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER (CONT)
Serving CAROLINA BREWERY Beers on Tap!
WE ARE ALSO PRESENTING...
www.catscradle.com
18 WE: AUSTRA w/DIANA**($14)
19 TH: KISHI BASHI **($12/$14) w/My Darling
Fury and Prypyat
20 FR: GRAM PARSONS Tribute**($10)
21 SA: WHO’S BAD -- the Ultimate Michael
Jackson Tribute Band!**($17/$20) w/
Animal Envoys
22 SU: DEERHUNTER **($18/$20) w/Crystal
Stilts
23 MO: WASHED OUT **($15/$18) w/ Haerts
TU 24: MUDHONEY w/ Cheap Time**($18/$21)
27 FR: STRFKR **($15/$18) w/Chrome Sparks
28 SA: WALK THE MOON w/ Magic Man**($20)
29 SU: 1 PM-8 PM: CARRBORO MUSIC
FESTIVAL (FREE show!)
29 SU: BILL CALLAHAN**($15/$17) w/New Bums
30 MO: SAVES THE DAY w/ Into It. Over It. and
Hostage Calm**($16/$20)
OCTOBER ‘13:
1 TU: SURFER BLOOD **($14/$16) w/ Team
Spirit and Andy Boay
4 FR: GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV **($15) w/
Patrick Park
5 SA: BLACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB **
($22/$25) w/Restavrant
SU 6: UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA w/
Jackson Scott**($12/$14)
7 MO: WAVVES w/King Tuff and Jacuzzi Boys**
($17/$20)
8 TU: JUNIP **($15) w/Barbarossa
11 FR: ZOSO -- The Ultimate Led Zeppelin
Experience**($12/$15)
12 SA: JASON BOLAND & THE STRAGGLERS w/
Jason Eady**($15/$18)
14 MO: ELECTRIC SIX w/ My Jerusalem**($12/$14)
WE 16: AARON CARTER **($14/$16; VIP Tickets
also available) w/Brie Goldsobel
17 TH: WATSKY / WAX ...”Hug A Hater Tour” *
*($15/$17)
18 FR: FINCH ( playing “What It Is To Burn” in
its entirety) w/ Dance Gavin Dance**
($20/$23)
20 SU: SOJA w/Aer**($20/$25)
22 TU: OF MONTREAL w/ Surface To Air
Missive**($17)
25 FR: FATHER JOHN MISTY W/ KATE
BERLANT **($18/$20)
26 SA: THE ENGLISH BEAT **($17/$20)
28 MO: MAN MAN **($15) w/ Xenia Rubinos
29 TU: MIKE STUD** ($12/$14) “The Relief Tour”
30 WE: BUILT TO SPILL w/ Genders and Slam
Dunk**($20/$23)
31 TH: MONDO ZOMBIE BOOGALOO :
SCOTS, LOS STRAITJACKETS, and THE
FLESHTONES**($18/$20)
NOVEMBER ‘13:
1 FR: PHANTOGRAM **($16/$18)
2 SA: BIG D AND THE KIDS TABLE w/Red
City Radio, Survay Says!**($14/$16)
3 SU: DAVID BROMBERG BAND **($24/
$27) w/Holland Bros. ( 7 PM SHOW)
6 WE: COCOROSIE **($18/$20)
7 TH: LEFTOVER SALMON **($22/$25)
9 SA: MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA w/ The
Front Bottoms**($17/$20)
12 TU: KATE NASH **($15/$18) w/ La Sera
13 WE: TORI KELLY **($12/$14; on sale 9/20)
15 FR: STEEP CANYON RANGERS / MIPSO**
($15/$17)
17 SU: FLATBUSH ZOMBIES
w/ Bodega Bamz**($13/$15)
19 TU: JOHNNY MARR **($22/$25) w/Alamar
20 WE: MATT WERTZ **($14/$16) w/Elenowen
21 TH: MIKE DOUGHTY used to be in SOUL
COUGHING ( Performing all Soul Coughing
material) **($20)
22 FR: CARBON LEAF w/ Mel Washington**
($15/$18)
29 FR: POST-TURKEY DAY JAM ($10)
30 SA: NORTH CAROLINA MUSIC LOVE
ARMY album release show
13 FR: THE INFAMOUS STRINGDUSTERS w/
Paper Bird**($16)
18 WE: GREG BROWN**($28/$30)
SHOWS @ LOCAL 506 ( Chapel Hill):
Sept. 21: TWIN FORKS **($12.50/$15) w/
Matrimony and Steph Stewart
Oct. 9: QUASI **($12/$15) w/ Jeffrey Lewis
Oct. 20: THE MOONDOGGIES w/Rose
WIndows and Mercators**($10)
Oct 26: TIM BARRY w/ Des Ark**($10)
Oct. 29: The World is a Beautiful Place and I
am no Longer Afraid to Die **($8/$10)
Dec 16: MAX BEMIS w/Matt Pryor, Sherri
Dupree-Bemis, Perma, Merriment**
($13/$16; on sale 9/19)
SHOWS AT MOTORCO (Durham):
Oct. 30: CULTS **($15/$18) w/SACCO and
Mood Rings
Nov. 2: KING KHAN & THE SHRINES w/ Hell
Shovel and Black Zinfandel **($14/$16)
Jan 25, 2014: AMY RAY record release
show($15)
DURHAM PERFORMING ARTS CENTER:
Sa Oct. 26: NEKO CASE **
KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE (CARY):
Fr Sept 20: ALABAMA SHAKES w/
Dexateens and Majestico**
THE HAW RIVER BALLROOM:
Sept. 26: BLITZEN TRAPPER w/Phox**($16/$18)
Sept. 27: LANGHORNE SLIM & THE LAW *
*($16/$18) w/Jonny Fritz
Oct. 9: AIMEE MANN w/ Ted Leo (solo)**$25
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER
SHOWS AT THE RITZ (Raleigh):
Nov. 10: THE HEAD AND THE HEART w/
Thao..., Quiet Life**($22/$25)
Nov. 19: JANELLE MONAE **($22/$25)
SHOW AT Fletcher Theatre (Raleigh):
Sept. 23: RICHARD THOMPSON **
SHOWS AT KINGS (RALEIGH):
Oct 12: THE HELIO SEQUENCE/
MENOMENA**($15)
Oct. 24: HALF JAPANESE w/LUD and
Polyorchard**($12)
CAROLINA THEATRE (DURHAM):
Nov 6: COLIN MELOY w/ Eleanor Friedberger
SHOWS AT MEMORIAL HALL, UNC-CH:
Nov 6: METRIC **($25/$28)
Nov. 14: TRAMPLED BY TURTLES **($22)
Co-presented by CUAB/ STUDENT TICKETS $10
Cat’s Cradle
BACK ROOM:
10/12: ELEANOR
FRIEDBERGER
10/17: LUCIUS w/Alpenglow
10/21: CROCODILES
11/2: BIRDSMELL ( Ben Bridwell
of Band of Horses )
11/15: BASIA BULAT **
($10/$12)
TUESDAY,
NOV. 19
JANELLE
MONAE
SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 SATURDAY, SEPT. 21
TWIN FORKS TWIN FORKS
SAT, OCT. 26 SAT, OCT. 26
NEKO CASE NEKO CASE
SUNDAY, NOV. 10 SUNDAY, NOV. 10
THE HEAD & THE HEART THE HEAD & THE HEART
Diversions Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 6
Loamlands
Some Kind of Light
Folk rock
Listening to Loamlands’
singer Kym Register is like
playing trivia. I hear hints of
voices I’ve come to know very
well and want to place whom
I'm thinking of.
With Loamlands’ debut EP,
Some Kind of Light, this sen-
sation is commonplace. On the
first track, “Another Reason,”
between the galloping acoustic
rhythm guitar, thumping per-
cussion and elongated swell-
ing vocals, I hear definite hints
of Rusted Root’s “Send Me on
My Way.” On the second song,
“Scottsboro”, Register’s voice
evokes a Dylan-esque wheeze.
Also on the album are flitting
glimpses of later Lou Reed
and Alanis Morissette, among
muddled others.
But it’s on the third track,
“Folk Hero,” that the band
breaks these comparative
chains and really starts to
shine. A moody, slow-jam
with plenty of reverb and a
well-recorded, clean electric
lead, the song is when one
first starts to get a feel for the
band’s own sound. It’s impres-
sive, but the lyrics espouse a
cliched, repetitive feel.
Overall, the record shows
promise for the young band
but doesn’t quite cast it
beyond the skilled bevy of
musicians in the Triangle. It’s
going to take more personal-
ized exploration of the band’s
own sound for Loamlands
to take deeper root in the
Triangle’s musical soil.
— Bo McMillan
Schooner
Neighborhood Veins
Rock
Durham-based rock group
Schooner is psychedelic, soul-
ful and downright dreamy.
With its newest release
Neighborhood Veins the group
plays its cool with a nearly
flawless delivery.
Lead single “It Won’t
Matter” is a folk-rock ballad
that bursts out of an eerie
whistle into an enjoyable com-
bination of fuzzy guitars and
multi-layered harmonies. This
song is an upbeat dance-wor-
thy track that focuses on lead
singer Reid Johnson’s pensive
and expressive lyrics.
“Floodlights and Ghosts,”
slows things down quite a bit
as a deliberate electric jam
focusing on romantic back
beats and enhancing horns.
The album’s fifth track “Still
in Love” is a captivating hit
that brings to life the ’50s era
doo-wop blues with minimal-
ist guitar, unhurried beats
and a Temptations-like men’s
choir. This tune shows the
band’s ability to drift across
genres while remaining faith-
ful to its overarching, down-
hearted tone.
The final song,
“Neighborhood Veins,” pulls
the album to a disorienting
close, forcing the listener to
question its purpose while still
smiling at the oddity.
This collection of mindful
songs proves that bands can
still succeed without tying
themselves down to a specific
sound.
— Olivia Farley
MUSICSHORTS
NOTICE TO ALL DTH CUSTOMERS
Deadlines are NOON one business day prior to
publication for classifed ads. We publish Mon-
day thru Friday when classes are in session. A
university holiday is a DTH holiday too (i.e. this
affects deadlines). We reserve the right to re-
ject, edit, or reclassify any ad. Acceptance of ad
copy or prepayment does not imply agreement
to publish an ad. You may stop your ad at any
time, but NO REFUNDS or credits for stopped
ads will be provided. No advertising for hous-
ing or employment, in accordance with federal
law, can state a preference based on sex, race,
creed, color, religion, national origin, handicap,
marital status.
Child Care Services
NANNY BOUTIQUE is a professional place-
ment agency seeking experienced caregivers.
Part-time and full-time. 2 years experience,
clean criminal background and motor vehicle.
www.nannyboutiquenc.com.
Child Care Wanted
BABYSITTER NEEDED: Looking for experienced
babysitters with references for multiple fami-
lies (Mom’s club babysitter list). Please email
dcmoms@outlook.com.
BABYSITTER WANTED: Seeking UNC student to
care for our 2 year-old son in Carrboro. Tues-
day, Wednesday, Thursday mornings or after-
noons for 3-4 hour shifts. Extra days if wanted.
$10-$12/hr. Lszpir@nc.rr.com. 919-537-8101.
SEEKING SITTER: Looking for someone to
watch my wonderful girls, ages 5 and 3, two
afternoons a week and some weekend nights
if desired. Help with snack, play, bath time.
Timing, days are a bit fexible. Own trans-
portation necessary. Highly competitive pay.
919-451-2890.
EXPERIENCED SITTER NEEDED Tu/Th 2:30-
6pm for 2 boys, ages 7 and 11, starting
immediately. Chapel Hill, close to UNC
campus. Supervise snack, homework
and play during free time. Sitter must
be ready to help with homework and
play with the boys, have own reliable
transportation, and be willing to drive to
local activities. Experience with this age,
excellent driving record and non-smoker
a must. We do have a cat. $10/hr. Email
sallyvtaylor@gmail.com and please pro-
vide references.
EXPERIENCED SITTER NEEDED: 20-30 hrs/wk
caring for 5 and 10 year-old boy and girl. Duties
include school pick up and activities weekdays
until 6pm, some evenings. Flexible daytime
hours for household organization. Excellent
pay for the right person. Clean driving record.
Cooking a plus. Send resume and references to
battlepark68@gmail.com.
For Rent
FAIR HOUSING
ALL REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, limitation, or dis-
crimination based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status, or national origin,
or an intention to make any such preference,
limitation, or discrimination.” This newspa-
per will not knowingly accept any advertising
which is in violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis in accordance with
the law. To complain of discrimination, call
the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development housing discrimination hotline:
1-800-669-9777.
BIKE FROM THIS 2BR/2BA HOUSE on
Branch Street (off of MLK Blvd). Lovely
hardwood foors, great room, 1 car ga-
rage and large. $1,295/mo. Fran Holland
Properties, fhollandprop@gmail.com or text
919-630-3229.
For Rent
COUNTRY SETTING OFF HWY 86, this lovely
2BR/3BA (with extra room with built in bunks)
is located in Hideaway Estates. A large shady
lot perfect for pets, enjoy the private deck.
Wonderful great room with freplace, lovely
kitchen, hardwood foors thru out, 2 car ga-
rage, mud room. $1,300/mo. Fran Holland
Properties: fhollandprop@gmail.com or call
919-630-3229.
SHARING A QUIET HOME. Grad student
preferred. On a little lake, a few miles
from campus. $600/mo. includes utilities.
919-210-4532, rross919@gmail.com.
SPACIOUS 3BR/2.5BA DUPLEX offers open
foor plan with hardwood foor and
freplace in great room, kitchen, large
master suite and bath, 2 car garage.
On busline, pets negotiable with fee.
$1,395/mo. Fran Holland Properties.
Email fhollandprop@gmail.com for pics
or text 919-630-3229.
3BR/1.5BA CARRBORO HOUSE on
North Greensboro Street. Large yard,
hardwood foors, carport, pets nego-
tiable with fee. $1,200/mo. Fran Holland
Properties: fhollandprop@gmail.com or text
919-630-3229.
1BR. 207-A CARR STREET. 4 blocks to Franklin
Street. Available now $600/mo. For more info,
Fran Holland Properties: fhollandprop@gmail.
com or text 919-630-3229.
NORTH CHATHAM. 3BR/1.5BA RANCH off
Manns Chapel Road, Large wooded lot with
carport, fenced in back yard. $985 mo. Fran
Holland Properties: fhollandprop@gmail.com
or text 919-630-3229.
FURNISHED OAKS 2BR/2.5BA condo close
to Friday Center. Bring suitcase and move
in. 3+ month term available. One check
$1,250/mo. all utilities and internet in-
cluded (no utilities, $975/mo). Fran Holland
Properties: fhollandprop@gmail.com, 919-
630-3229.
CONVENIENT TO UNC: 3BR/1.5BA ranch
in quiet Glen Lennox neighborhood. Large
yard, carport, hardwood foors, bus nearby.
East Chapel Hill High, Culbreth, Glenwood.
Rent reduced $1,290/mo.. Fran Holland
Properties, fhollandprop@gmail.com or call
919-630-3229.
ROOM WITH
WALK IN CLOSET
for rent in2BR townhouse style apartment
in Shadowood Apartments. Room also has
personal sink. Apartment includes freplace
and W/D. $470/mo. +utilities. Water in-
cluded in rent. Off the NS, T, A buslines. Call
404-861-5170 or email taylor.hartley116@
gmail.com.
2BR/1BA DUPLEX: Energy effcient, AC,
W/D connections, deck, storage. No smok-
ing, pets. $700/mo. 28 Woodbridge Drive.
919-382-8048.
2BR/2.5BA OAKS CONDO: Backs up to golf
course, Living room with freplace, dining
room, Walk, bike or bus to Meadowmont
and Friday Center. $910/mo. Fran Holland
Properties, fhollandprop@gmail.com or text
919-630-3229.
GREAT HOUSE near UNC on Culbreth Circle.
Freshly painted, modern appliances, park-
ing, campus bus across street. Good for
grad students. 3BR/1.5BA, quiet cul de sac.
$1,285/mo, lease to June. Available mid-
October. Milton: 919-969-1514.
Help Wanted
HIRING SERVERS
Tobacco Road Sports Cafe, located in East
54 shopping center (next to Aloft). We are
entering our busiest season. Apply today at
http://bit.ly/163qvuY.
THE DTH WANTS YOU
to work at the front desk. The Daily Tar Heel
has the following hours available for UNC stu-
dents. Mondays 8:30am-2:30pm and Thursdays
8:30am-12:30pm. Low stress environment 1
block from campus on Rosemary Street. An-
swer phones, enter classifed ads, entertain the
staff, offer service with a smile no matter the
situation. $7.25/hr. Must be able to both multi-
task and entertain yourself. Prefer undergrads.
Email experience and available hours to clas-
sifeds@unc.edu. Act NOW, will hire quickly.
HR ASSISTANT: Town of Carrboro Human
Resources Dept. Part-time, temporary (sea-
sonal 10-15 hrs/wk). Performs a variety of HR
and clerical duties. Requires graduate from
high school supplemented by clerical, offce
experience, excellent oral and written skills.
Experience with MS Offce Suite required. Flex-
ible hours. Pay rate: $10-$12/hr. Open until
flled. For an application visit our website at
www.townofcarrboro.org.. EOE.
CARE PROVIDER: Care providers needed for
26 year-old woman with disability. Job de-
scription: Care provider must have at least 3
years experience working with individuals with
autism and basic skills using a computer for
making visual support materials. First aid and
CPR training will need to be completed prior
to beginning employment, as well as North
Carolina’s requirements in alternatives to re-
straint. This individual has service hours that
include personal care, home and community
skill building, and supported employment. Ex-
perience working with positive behavior sup-
port, and behavior plans is desirable. Email
bigchief2@bellsouth.net. 919-933-1264.
VALET DRIVERS needed for upscale restau-
rants, hotels and events. Great for students.
Flexible hours, lunch shifts available. $8-
$13/hr. Including tips. For more information
call 919-796-5782. Apply online:
www.royalparkinginc.com.
HIRING NOW: CATERING server and bar-
tender positions for all home UNC football
and basketball games. Catering experience
NOT necessary. Only responsible, reliable can-
didates need apply. Please email resume to
rockytopunc1@gmail.com if interested. Perfect
job for students!
THE CHAPEL HILL-CARRBORO YMCA is looking
for afterschool counselors. Counselors actively
participate in sports, homework, crafts and
other activities each afternoon with students
grades K-8. Hours are generally 2-6pm, Mon-
day thru Friday. Applications can be found on
our website, www.chcymca.org, or you can ap-
ply at the Chapel Hill Branch at 980 MLK Blvd.
Send applications to nchan@chcymca.org or
turn in at the Y.
TENNIS COACH NEEDED Looking for
experienced tennis coach for chil-
dren’s private and group lesson. Please
email dcmoms@outlook.com.
SOCIAL MEDIA: Growing real estate
company is looking for a part-time so-
cial media and blogging expert to take
their current social media presence to
the next level with the express interest
of generating business. I am looking
for someone with strong knowledge of
the area and the platforms and how
they should be used with creativity and
energy. A knowledge of real estate is a
plus but not necessary. 919-697-5014.
AFTERSCHOOL PICK UP wanted for 2 boys
from Carolina Friends School at 3:15pm daily
to north Chapel Hill, Fearrington area. Need
own transportation and a good driving record.
$10-$15 /hr. Please email aquapg@gmail.com
if interested.
CAMPUS REP FOR THEPREMISE.COM: Hand
out free tshirts promoting new site fea-
turing a weekly video contest. 1-2 hours
on each Friday. starting 9-27. $20/day.
Laugh@ThePremise.com.
BARTENDERS, BARBACK, SECURITY staff
needed, no experience required. Apply in
person at Players Tuesday between 9-11pm,
Thursday 8-10pm. 159 1/2 East Franklin Street.
Internships
EVENT PLANNING INTERNSHIP: Extraordinary
Ventures, a non-proft event center is offering
a non-paying internship of 10 hrs/wk. Great
experience working with event director. Email
Cyndi@evnc.org.
Lost & Found
FOUND: A/X ARMANI EXCHANGE glasses. Tell
me where I found them. 919-903-5854.
Roommates
THE WAREHOUSE APARTMENTS: Great bed-
room available immediately to sublease. Con-
venient to UNC; wonderful female roommates.
$780/mo. September rent paid. 919-815-1791.
ROOMMATE WANTED by female UNC sopho-
more. Mill Creek townhouse. 2BR/2BA, full
kitchen, W/D, carpeting, half mile to campus.
Rent share: $620/mo. includes water, parking.
336-339-2551.
SHORT TERM RENTAL with private bath.
Ground foor of private home. Near major
bus park and ride and Chapel Hill tennis club.
Seeking a visiting professor or working profes-
sional. 919-225-7687.
Sublets
GLEN LENNOX 1BR APARTMENT for sublet
through May. $725/mo. +utilities (water,
electricity, gas). Hardwood foors, central
heating and AC. Near bus stop on G route.
919-260-7740.
PRECALCULUS TUTOR NEEDED for high school
junior. Near UNC. Experience required. Send
your info smithj@sog.unc.edu Please include
tutoring, teatching experience.
TUTORS NEEDED IMMEDIATELY: Great pay.
Transportation is required. Math and science
skills required. Only hiring a few, please email
treasuretutorial@nc.rr.com or call 919-661-
1728 today.
TUTOR WANTED to help our 11th grade daugh-
ter with homework, particularly pre-calculus
and chemistry. Flexible hours. $20/hr. in our
home, 2.5 miles from campus. Please respond
to tisburypond@gmail.com.
Volunteering
SCHOOL READING PARTNERS! Help begin-
ning readers practice reading skills, 1-2 hrs/wk,
Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools. Training 9/25 or
9/26, 5:30-9pm or 10/2, 9am-12:30pm. Email
srp@chccs.k12.nc.us or call 919-967-8211 ext.
28336.
BE AN ESL VOLUNTEERS! Help school age ESL
students from various countries, Chapel Hill-
Carrboro Schools. Training 9/24 or 10/2, 5:30-
9pm. Email gmccay@chccs.k12.nc.us or call
919-967-8211 ext. 28339.
COACH WRITE VOLUNTEERS! Conference one
on one with students to improve writing skills.
Training 9/17, 6-9pm or 9/26, 9:30-12:30pm.
Email sphillips@chccs.k12.nc.us or call
919-967-8211 ext. 28369.
Announcements Help Wanted Help Wanted Help Wanted For Rent


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(c) 2013 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 6 -- Gather strength from
love. Accept a challenge. Take care when
changing your routine. The reins get
passed down. Conditions turn in your
favor, culminating in an expansive phase.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7 -- An older person changes
the plan. Accept invitations. The Full
Moon presents a turning point in your
work habits and priorities. Finish up old
projects. Love grows stronger by obeying
the rules.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7 -- Follow your plan. Your
Full Moon (Aries) turning point involves
balancing home and career. Confer with
allies. Get philosophical. Abundance
comes due to your own thrift. Get sexy
later.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is an 8 -- Invest in your business
with discipline. The Full Moon reveals a
turning point in your basic understanding
of the subject of your study. Push beyond
your old limits. Be respectful. Learn by
playing.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7 -- Travel, study and research
flow easily. Your phase favors stable
choices, regarding love, relationships and
education. Healthier ingredients may cost
more. Love is the bottom line.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is an 8 -- Check regulations, and
then do the work yourself and save.
Assess your position carefully. Get the
family to help. Share the rewards.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 9 -- Spell out the rules, while you
keep upgrading your skills. Today’s work
brings love home. An argument or contro-
versy propels a hero to your rescue. Your
discipline is admired. Romance beckons.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7 -- Learn from a distant older
woman. A turning point develops regard-
ing a relationship role. ulfill your promises.
Extend your influence through persever-
ance. Complete home decorating project.
Discover treasures.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 6 -- Your tastes change. You
might discover you like cutting costs. Listen
to messages. Important associates come to
an agreement. Encourage others to shine.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7 -- You have the resources.
Rediscover what you’ve got. Set long-
range goals. Your instincts lead you to a
new level of power and confidence. Stick
to your plan. Pay back a favor.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 9 -- Your partner helps balance
all the factors. Creative collaboration blos-
soms. Stick to the standard set. Get great
news from an old friend. New doors open.
Dig deeper into a favorite subject.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 9 -- Keep yourself to between
the lines. Develop a new good habit.
Provide what’s needed. Avoid provoking
jealousies or hurt feelings. Duty calls. For
the next few days, bring in the money.
HOROSCOPES
To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.
If September 19th is Your Birthday...
Favorable aspects launch your year for an explosion of
disciplined creativity, a revolution of lasting value. Build
partnerships. Blend work and play into a profitable net-
work. Research and make important financial, physical
and spiritual changes. Love is the common thread.
BR = Bedroom • BA = Bath • mo = month • hr = hour • wk = week • W/D = washer/dryer • OBO = or best offer • AC = air conditioning • w/ = with • LR = living room

Deadlines
Line Ads: Noon, one business day prior to publication
Display Classifed Ads: 3pm, two business
days prior to publication
Line Classifed Ad Rates
Private Party (Non-Proft)
25 Words ....... $18.00/week
Extra words .. 25¢/word/day
Commercial (For-Proft)
25 Words ....... $40.00/week
Extra words ...25¢/word/day
EXTRAS: Box: $1/day • Bold: $3/day
To Place a Line Classified Ad Log onto
www.dailytarheel.com/classifieds or Call 919-962-0252
DTH offce is open Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:00pm
New Contemporary Worship Service
Mount Carmel Baptist Church
2016 Mt Carmel Church Rd.,
Chapel Hill, NC 27517
919-933-8565
www.mcbc 1803 .org
Coffee and snacks served at 8:45am
Contemporary Worship service 9:00am
5:15pm
9am, 11am & Student Mass at 7pm
Reli
g
ious
Directory
Place a Classified: www.dailytarheel.com/classifieds or Call 919-962-0252
Tutoring Needed
Help Wanted
Rooms for Rent
NeuroCog Trials, a rapidly growing company in Durham with close ties to Duke University Medical Cent er is seeking:
Full-time bi-lingual data monitors fluent in both English and Russian or Italian; Part-time bi-lingu al data monitors fluent
in both English and Dutch; Serbian or Brazilian-Portuguese. Data Monitors will assist in, review an d learn rater
certification on neurocognitive test batteries for multi-site pharmaceutical company trials and pro vide forward and back
translations of communications between NeuroCog Trials and clinical sites. Travel to US or internat ional meetings is
required. Requirements: BA in psychology, neurosciences or related field. Fluency in English and any of the languages
above with the ability to speak, read and write in both languages. A language validation test will be performed. Ability
to travel as needed. We request that all applicants submit resume and cover letter to: mailto:hr@ne urocogtrials.com
Data Monitors: Bilingual in Dutch, Italian,
Brazilian-Portuguese, Russian or Serbian HELP WANTED:
Want to build your resume & gain valuable experience?
Weekend hours are available working with children and
adults with developmental disabilities, helping them
achieve their personal goals. Gain valuable experience
for psychology, sociology, nursing majors, and other
related fields. Various shifts available. $10.10/hr.
APPLY ONLINE by visiting us at:
www.rsi-nc.org
Residential Services, Inc.
415573
MERCIA RESIDENTIAL
PROPERTIES
is now showing 1BR-6BR
properties for 2014-15 school
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or call at (919) 933-8143.
Get a Jump Start on Housing for Next Year!
Find the perfect place to live by distance
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QUESTIONS
About Classifieds?
Call 962-0252
RECYCLE ME PLEASE!
State Board of Elections that
his job as county attorney
posed a conflict of interest,
Cohen said.
“There’s nothing wrong
with having a family heavily
involved in local politics,” he
said. “But it does look a little
strange when Four’s brother,
Luke, gets the position.”
Now, Campbell said she will
appeal to the State Board to
return polling sites to campus.
“It’s obvious that (the
Eggers are) trying to keep stu-
dents from voting,” Campbell
said. “I think we’re all just sur-
prised at how blatant it is.”
Dylan Russell, ASU stu-
dent body president, said
his administration’s current
goal is to help students stay
informed and vote.
“We just want to make sure
students’ voices are heard,”
Russell said.
state@dailytarheel.com
Council presented the Campus
Y with the grant.
In order to receive funding,
groups must fill out a written
application, make a pitch for
their project and create a way
to evaluate their progress.
The YFund gives the proj-
ect half the money to start
with, and the rest of the
money is dispersed when the
group has reached its goal.
Long-term projects that
deal with social justice in
any way — such as minor-
ity empowerment or gender
equality — are eligible for a
grant from the program.
A past project that has
benefited from this grant
is a tutoring program
called “Bringing Back
Fridays,” headed by UNC’s
Helping Youth by Providing
Enrichment.
Three years ago, budget cuts
shut down two of four fam-
ily resource centers operated
in Orange County by service
group Chapel Hill Training-
Outreach Project. The loss
of funds also ended tutoring
on Fridays for elementary
school students at the Dobbins
Hills and South Estes Family
Resource Centers.
HYPE has used the money
to bring back Friday tutor-
ing at the centers and took a
greater role in organizing “Fun
Fridays” after-school pro-
grams. The club leads science
experiments, arts and crafts or
activities dealing with nutri-
tion and healthy eating.
“Getting the YFund money
helped us get enrichment
materials and supplies in order
to make the ‘Fun Fridays’ more
educational and effective,” said
Nariman Heikal, co-chair-
woman of HYPE.
Another group that has
used the YFund to jump-start
its project is Students United
for Immigrant Equality. The
club hosted an Immigration
Awareness Week last spring
using money from the fund.
Maria Pia Rodriguez, co-
chairwoman of SUIE, said she
was grateful for the opportuni-
ties the YFund made possible
for her organization, and that
she was excited for the money
to be available to organiza-
tions outside the Y.
“The YFund wants to make
sure that they don’t reach
out to just one group, but to
everyone,” she said.
The YFund’s deadlines for
applications this semester are
Sept. 19, Oct. 17 and Nov. 7.
university@dailytarheel.com
From Page One Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 7
Moral Monday forum
A panel of UNC profes-
sors will discuss the agendas
of protestors in a forum
today. See pg. 3 for story.
N.C. House seat
Graig Meyer announces
plans to run for Foushee’s
vacated seat. Visit our View
from the Hill blog for story.
Quebe Sisters Band
The Texas fiddle band will
hold an evening of music at
the Wilson Library today. See
online for story.
Trayvon Martin lecture
UNC’s Black Student
Movement hosted a lecture
on the Trayvon Martin case.
See online for story.
games
Solution to
Wednesday’s puzzle
Complete the grid
so each row, column
and 3-by-3 box (in
bold borders) contains
every digit 1 to 9.
© 2013 The Mepham Group. All rights reserved.
Level: 1 2 3 4
(C)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All rights reserved. Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACross
1 One who’s always on
the go?
6 Pear that’s good for
poaching
10 Glass sheet
14 Superior to
15 Member of the
opposition
16 One on a pedestal
17 Pick-me-up
18 Governor’s pet projects?
20 Like one who forgot the
Dramamine
22 Exposed
23 Nutritionist’s
recommendation
25 Causes to quail
29 Utensil that gives you
ideas?
32 Take to task
34 Cock or bull
35 Blues-rocker Chris
36 Clothes
37 Alex Haley
classic
39 Abarth
automaker
40 Coffee hour
item
41 Talent
42 Precipitation
43 Bully’s secret
shame?
47 Day spa offering
48 First name in
fashion
49 Pundit’s piece
51 Olympic Airways
founder
56 Say “Come in, Orson!”
e.g.?
60 Empty room population?
61 Poetic lowland
62 Iroquoian people
63 Compass dirección
64 Rep on the street
65 “Law & Order” org.
66 Composer Bruckner
Down
1 Expos, since 2005
2 High wind
3 Pulitzer poet Van Duyn
4 Budget alternative
5 Ruled
6 Hoops score
7 London’s prov.
8 Shot in the dark
9 Fortresses
10 Find one’s voice
11 Stir
12 Eur. kingdom
13 Antlered bugler
19 Take out
21 “Charlie Wilson’s
War” org.
24 Recipient of two New
Testament epistles
26 Without a downside
27 Pet’s reward
28 Use the rink
29 After-dinner drink
30 Jekyll creator’s initials
31 Distillery vessel
32 Things
33 Chick of jazz
37 Winchester wielders
38 Frequently, in verse
39 Hardy’s “__ From the
Madding Crowd”
41 Freak out
42 Liturgical shout of
praise
44 Was revolting?
45 Brought to mind
46 Place for a wide-screen
TV
50 Fishing boat
52 In short order
53 Spreadsheet function
54 Liking quite a bit
55 Not hidden
56 Home shopping
channel
57 Nasser’s confed.
58 Cry for a picador
59 Fashionable jeans
feature
students complain about liv-
ing conditions in the dorms
and call for upgrades to the
103-year-old campus.
But a 5.5-percent overall
cut to the school’s budget has
left little extra money for con-
struction projects, she said.
“I think (the buildings’
condition) really impacts pro-
spective students’ idea of how
the campus is,” she said.
Looking long term
Though HBCUs are not the
only schools struggling with
financial woes, Taylor said
campuses need to implement
change for future prosperity —
and they need to act quickly.
“You simply can’t cut your
way to profitability,” Taylor
said. “It’s a one-trick pony,
but it’s not sustainable for the
long-term.”
Both private and public
HBCUs have to start tapping
HBCUs
from page 1
YFUND
from page 1
WATAUGA
from page 1
more diligently into their
alumni bases for funding,
which the schools have not
done historically, he said.
Taylor added that HBCUs
need to broaden their appeal
beyond the African-American
population, which he said
often makes up between
80 and 90 percent of each
school’s student body.
Ross said in the news
conference that system lead-
ers are emphasizing how the
schools can play bigger roles
in strengthening their region’s
economy and workforce
through particular areas of
academic expertise.
At last week’s Board of
Governors meeting, one board
member brought up possible
campus consolidation within
the UNC system, citing ECSU’s
current budget trauma. Ross
said consolidation is not a pri-
ority for the near future.
But ECSU is in need of rapid
internal reform, Taylor said.
“I think (system leaders)
should give the institution an
opportunity to turn around in
a finite and reasonable period
of time — longer than six
months,” he said.
“If they cannot figure
it out, then it’s only fair to
North Carolina that these
resources be redistributed.”
ApplY For THe YFUND
Time: Sept. 19, Oct. 17,
Nov. 7
Location: Apply online at
campus-y.unc.edu/
Info: http://bit.ly/157gFSF
HBCUs still valuable
Meanwhile, students
at North Carolina’s public
HBCUs are determined to
keep campus life thriving.
Azaglo said a greater num-
ber of student activities at
ECSU are helping to keep the
university vibrant, including
several spoken-word groups.
And Jalynn Jones, student
body president at Fayetteville
State, said the student body
is becoming more inclusive
by increasing outreach to the
LGBT community on campus.
There has been national
debate on whether minority
institutions are as necessary in
the 21st century — but Azaglo
said she strongly disagrees.
“It doesn’t matter if it’s a
minority school — it’s the
education that is the most
important part,” she said.
Taylor said HBCUs con-
tinue to produce most of the
African-American leaders,
professors and STEM profes-
sionals nationwide.
“If you take a school like
N.C. A&T, where 50 percent
of the country’s undergradu-
ate black engineers come to
one school, it would seriously
impact our workforce diver-
sity initiative if that school
didn’t exist,” he said.
N.C. A&T was just ranked
the top public HBCU in
the country by U.S. News &
World Report.
HBCUs only represent 3
percent of four-year universi-
ties — but produce about a
fifth of African-American col-
lege graduates.
Sampson said a major
impact of HBCUs is the confi-
dence it gives to some minority
students, like her, who felt out
of place in high school.
“Growing up, there weren’t
a lot of people that looked
like me, to put it bluntly,”
Sampson said.
“I see females here com-
fortable with their hair, their
curves, their clothes — and
that’s really made me confi-
dent as a black female.”
state@dailytarheel.com
“It doesn’t matter if it’s a minority school —
it’s the education that is the most important
part.”
priscilla Azaglo, student body president at elizabeth City State University
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Opinion Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 8
Established 1893, 120 years of editorial freedom
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FEATUrED OnlinE rEADEr cOmmEnT
Hazing headline sent
the wrong message
TO THE EDITOR:
I am again disappointed
by The Daily Tar Heel’s lack
of neutrality on the sensi-
tive issue of the death of
David Shannon.
Of all the headlines
The Daily Tar Heel could
have chosen for the article
published Sept. 18, the
staff chose to pick one that
anchors the article to lead
readers to believe that Chi
Phi hazed David to death.
Why not, “Police Chief
Horton provides update
on first-year’s death”? Or
“Cause of first-year’s death
still unclear”?
I believe that any male
in the Greek community, or
anyone that knew him, can
attest to David’s outstand-
ing character. I also believe
that those familiar with the
Chi Phi fraternity can attest
that it is a fraternity of men
who share David’s strong
sense of character, and that
he chose Chi Phi with good
reason.
The Shannon family and
the Greek community have
experienced enough pain.
How about ending public
accusations that the organi-
zation that welcomed David
the most his first semester
killed him? Until there is
definitive evidence of such
accusations, refrain from
publishing such misleading
headlines.
Instead, the Shannon
family and Chi Phi need
the support of the entire
Carolina family, affiliated
or not.
James Martin ’15
Computer science
Meatless Mondays
benefit everyone
TO THE EDITOR:
President Clinton, once
known for his love of fast
food, has been making
headlines for his recent
dietary change. He’s
swapped the Big Macs,
chicken nuggets and fried
shrimp for veggie burgers,
beans and fresh fruits and
vegetables.
After years of battling
heart problems — even
undergoing quadruple
bypass surgery — Clinton
took his doctor’s advice to
reduce his meat consump-
tion and increase his intake
of plant-based foods. He
reports that the results
have been tremendous:
losing 24 pounds, feeling
more energetic and seeing
a welcome drop in choles-
terol levels.
President Clinton isn’t
the only one turning over
a new leaf; from Usher
to Oprah Winfrey, Ellen
DeGeneres and Kristen
Bell, people everywhere are
eating less meat. Even Mike
Tyson, once known for bit-
ing off a human ear, is now
limiting his ear consump-
tion to those of the corn
variety.
The movement toward
more plant-based meals is
also taking root on college
campuses, with more than
200 universities, including
lETTErS TO
THE EDiTOr
“Temporary insanity, self-destructive tenden-
cies, alien abduction, “truth or dare” or simple
curiosity ... haven’t been ruled out either.”
ecleen, on hazing as a possible factor in David Shannon’s death
“North Carolina said, ‘to heck with that, we’re
doing it anyway,’ so the federal government
was forced to cut emergency benefits.”
Rob Schofield, on the state cutting unemployment benefits
EDiTOriAl cArTOOn By Matthew Leming, mleming@live.unc.edu
Call me
crazy,
but then
what?
S
o we as a society see
someone do something
crazy, right? Crazy here
meaning demonstrably irra-
tional — something we can’t
imagine ourselves doing, be it
climbing a water tower, whis-
pering madly to oneself about
gophers, wearing clashing
plaids or mass murder.
“Well, that’s insane,” we say
to ourselves. “Totally sense-
less.” We call it “crazy,” and
that’s descriptive. It describes
how alien the action is to us.
Then we look at the par-
ticular perpetrator of this
act, and as with the act, we
attempt to understand them
— not so much a conscious
thing, but more of an auto-
matic reaction where our
brain sees something new
and instinctively tries to wrap
itself around it like white
blood cells digesting a bacte-
rial infection.
Failing to understand this
person, we call him or her
crazy. This is also descriptive
— we’re noting that this par-
ticular person is in the habit
of doing things we find to be
eccentric, unnerving or horri-
fying in a conventional, logical
or moral sense.
Here’s where it gets tricky.
Having bracketed off the actor
and actions as “loony,” our
brain can simply stop trying
to understand them. And then
suddenly, “crazy” becomes
more than descriptive. Now it’s
an explanation.
Now the “crazy” of the per-
son is the reason and the ori-
gin of the “crazy” actions that
we’ve been failing to compre-
hend. What’d they do? Oh my
God, that’s insane. Why’d they
do it? Oh my God, it’s because
they’re insane — case closed,
that’s all there is to it.
This is misleading for a
number of reasons. Also dan-
gerous.
Up until now we’ve been
using the word only to diag-
nose people and actions in
terms of our particular view
of the world. But this “crazy”
can be easily conflated with
the “crazy” that implies a pro-
fessional medical diagnosis,
which brings with it a greater
sense of legitimacy.
But we might as well
confuse the anecdotal and
the medical crazies for now,
because they’re both a part of
the same big fallacy.
We’re assuming this irra-
tional person is a closed sys-
tem — a little line segment of
insanity unto itself that shares
absolutely no points with any
other ray, line or quadrilateral
of earthly existence or human-
ity.
We can’t even be parallel
to the crazy line, because that
would imply some sort of com-
mon trajectory, which is ridic-
ulous because they’re crazy and
I don’t know why.
And equipping ourselves
with fancy medical terminol-
ogy that attempts to do more
than describe the crazy only
perpetuates this problem. Oh,
they have a disease — chemi-
cals in their brain made them
do it.
But chemicals in our brain
are responsible for everything
we do. Every time I get angry
you could simply ignore any of
the possible causes of my anger
and blame the chemicals in my
brain — and you’d be right!
But you’d be missing some-
thing. And it’d probably just
make me angrier.
9/20: VIDEOGAME VIOLENCE
Columnist Memet Walker on
howit doesn’t desensitize us.
N
E
X
T
michael Dickson
Cries from the Peanut Gallery
Senior English and journalism
major from Raleigh.
Email: miked3592@gmail.com
SPEAK OUT
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letters to 250 words.
suBMissiOn
• Drop-off or mail to our office at 151 E. Rosemary Street, Chapel
Hill, N.C. 27514
• E-mail: opinion@dailytarheel.com
UNC, leading the charge
with “Meatless Monday”
campaigns in their dining
halls.
There has never been
a more exciting time to
expand our dining hori-
zons. Skipping meat one
day a week is not a sacrifice
but an adventure.
And this is reflected
in the choices students
are making. According
to a study conducted by
Technomic, more than 20
percent of college students
are reducing their meat
consumption, and for good
reasons.
One of those reasons is
concern for the nine billion
chickens, pigs and other
animals raised for food each
year, most of whom suffer
in factory farms.
For example, mother pigs
in the pork industry are
typically confined in tiny
crates barely larger than
their own bodies for virtual-
ly their entire lives. Unable
to even turn around, these
sensitive, intelligent ani-
mals — all of whom have
their own personalities and
preferences — experience
tremendous physical and
psychological pain.
Most egg-laying hens
suffer a similar fate, as
they’re crammed into tiny
cages, each bird granted
less space than the screen of
an iPad on which to live for
its entire life.
By choosing meat-free
options just one day a week,
we can all help prevent an
enormous amount of cru-
elty to animals.
Human health and the
health of the planet also
benefit. A report issued by
Environmental Working
Group put it simply:
“Producing all this meat
and dairy requires large
amounts of pesticides,
chemical fertilizer, fuel,
feed and water. It also gen-
erates greenhouse gases
and large amounts of toxic
manure and wastewater
that pollute groundwater,
rivers, streams and, ulti-
mately, the ocean.”
Increasing numbers of
family farmers are also
voicing their support for
Meatless Monday as a
means to achieve a more
sustainable, community-
based agricultural system
before it’s too late.
Our current rate of meat
consumption is simply
unsustainable. By reducing
the total number of animals
raised for food, we place
greater value on humane,
sustainable agriculture in
which animal welfare is a
priority.
Thankfully, eating meat-
less doesn’t mean “less”
at all. It means “more,” as
in more choices. It means
“better,” as in better liv-
ing — both for us and for
animals.
From chain restaurants
like Chipotle and Denny’s
serving up hearty vegetar-
ian fare, to Indian, Thai,
Chinese and Mexican
cuisine, which regularly
incorporate delicious meat-
free items, the options are
endless.
Bon appetit!
Kenny Torrella
Humane Society of the
United States
T
he $50,000 that
the Association
of Student
Governments voted last
Saturday to allot to UNC-
system schools to promote
voter education is a great
use of money, if used effi-
ciently.
In light of a recently
passed N.C. law poten-
tially hindering student
voting efforts, this bill is a
positive way to get more
students out to vote.
Educating student vot-
ers is important, especially
when young adults are new
to the voting game and
Capitalize on the cash
EDiTOriAl
new legislation attempts to
discourage voters.
With these laws, new
voters need a reliable
source of information.
If not used effectively,
however, this grant could
backfire and cause more
controversy in the already
budget-tight UNC system.
UNC should consider
using a portion of the
money not only for educa-
tion about changing voter
legislation, but also for
information about new
ballot issues and back-
ground on candidates in
upcoming elections.
One way to do this
could be funding a website
where students could get
the basics of what will be
on the upcoming ballot
and what it all means,
as well as interact online
with other student voters.
If students had a consis-
tent place to go to obtain
information on all ballot
issues before heading to
the polls, they would be
more adamant about get-
ting out to vote because
they would be voting on
issues they were educated
about, and therefore care
for more passionately.
As the next generation
of voting Americans, the
more educated college
students are about their
changing government and
laws and how new policies
can affect them, the more
likely it is that they will be
an active voting group for
years to come.
UNC should use new
funds allocated for
voting information.
W
hile all middle
and high schools
in Orange
County already utilize
armed student resource
officers, a newly enacted
policy making the position
permanent in elementary
schools is the right move.
Ever since the shoot-
ing at Sandy Hook drove
parents and school admin-
istrators to re-examine the
way elementary schools
are secured, Orange
County elementary
schools have seen armed
police officers become a
permanent fixture.
Stay safe, schools
EDiTOriAl
The school system
administrators should be
commended for having the
foresight to put parents’
worries at ease, and should
continue working toward
improving school safety.
Each of the seven
Orange County elementary
schools will now have more
protection in the form of
one armed officer at each
school to serve a role in
safety and education of the
students.
By only adding seven sal-
aried positions, the finan-
cial strain will not prove
too hefty nor will officers be
so numerous as to distract
from the ultimate purpose
of the school — learning.
Despite the fact that
these officers represent yet
another salary to be paid
during a time of massive
budget cuts in education
across the state, many par-
ents have expressed their
gratitude for the peace of
mind the officers bring.
Parents need to believe
that their children will be
taken care of in all aspects
of a school environment —
academically and socially
with safety in mind at all
times.
Orange County has
chosen specific measures
that might be considered
superfluous by some, but
as long as the faculty, par-
ents and students directly
affected feel more confi-
dent and secure with the
officer around, then they
are serving their purpose.
Officers in schools
provide a valuable
service.
A group of protestors
circled the state’s execu-
tive mansion
on Monday in
order to protest
the voting law
changes en-
acted by the state’s legisla-
ture. The only problem was
that no one was home. The
governor was in Charleston.
Suprisingly, this wasn’t the
stupidest thing to happen
there over the last year.
QuickHits
Apple released its newest
operating system for the
iPhone and iPad
yesterday, called
iOS7. It comes
with an entirely
new layout. This
has sent the internet ablaze
with complaints with Ken-
dall Marshall going as far as
calling it “feminine.”As bad
as it is, everybody can agree
it’s better than a Facebook
update.
Local restaurant Top This!
has recently applied to
appear on the
Food Network’s
popular show
“Diners, Drive-Ins
and Dives.”The
added attention is always
great for a local business
that’s just starting out. How-
ever, it means Chapel Hill
will have to put up with a
douchebag that still thinks
bleached hair is edgy.
lights are on, but ... Flavor Hill seventh heaven
The frst day of fall is com-
ing this Sunday, and you
know what that
means: leggings.
As awesome as
the fall leaves,
cool weather
and lack of back sweat is, it
also brings about a terrify-
ing realization for a quarter
of the undergraduate
population: this was our last
summer vacation. Welcome
to the working force.
the frst of the last
Former UNC running back
Giovani Bernard scored a
crucial touch-
down during the
Cincinnati Ben-
gals’ win over
the Pittsburgh
Steelers on Monday Night
Football. In related news,
coach Larry Fedora is cur-
rently researching the legal
precedent for laying recruit-
ing claim to all progeny of
former players.
gio the dude
In case anyone was still
wondering, the sirens that
went of on
campus Tuesday
were just a test.
Though these
sirens only go
of during tests and emer-
gencies, that is only a very
convenient coincidence for
the Department of Public
Safety, as nobody is sure as
to where the sound actually
comes from.
the call of the siren
editOr’s nOte: Columns, cartoons and letters do not necessarily
represent the opinions of The Daily Tar Heel or its staff. Editorials reflect
the opinions of The Daily Tar Heel editorial board, which is made up of
nine board members, the opinion co-editors and the editor.
EDITorIal BoarD mEmBErs
NIcolE comparaTo EDITOR, 962-4086 OR EDITOR@DAILYTARHEEL.COM
saNEm kaBaca OPINION CO-EDITOR, OPINION@DAILYTARHEEL.COM
zach gavEr OPINION CO-EDITOR
mIchaEl DIcksoN ASSISTANT OPINION EDITOR
AlexAnDrA WillCox
AliZA ConWAY
DYlAn CunninghAM
gAbriellA koStrZeWA
kAreeM rAMADAn
kern WilliAMS
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