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The Chrysalids

:
Socratic Circles
Throughout  this  unit,  you  will  be  encouraged  to  pull  out  themes  and  ideas  from  The   Chrysalids  and  the  other  texts  we  address  and  connect  those  ideas  to  real-­‐world  issues.  Over   the  course  of  the  novel  study,  you  should  select  a  complex  issue  that  interests  you  and  begin   researching  the  writing  and  thinking  that  has  been  done  on  the  topic.  By  the  end  of  the  unit,   you  should  have  two  pieces  (news  articles,  videos,  documentary  clips,  blog  entries,  etc.)  that   relate  to,  complicate,  or  expand  upon  the  big  ideas  we’ve  discussed  throughout. Once  we  have  completed  studying  the  novel,  we’ll  begin  Socratic  Circles.  Each  day  we’ll  have   an  inner  circle  and  an  outer  circle;  the  individuals  in  the  inner  circle  will  each  take  a  turn  as   the  facilitator.  The  facilitator  leads  the  group  discussion  pertaining  to  the  research  he  or  she   has  brought  to  class.  It  is  the  inner  circle’s  job  to  read  the  research  completed  by  the  other   members  of  the  inner  circle;  each  member  should  also  come  to  class  with  ideas,  questions,   and/or  important  passages.  In  short,  you  should  be  prepared  to  delve  into  a  complex   discussion. When  preparing  to  act  as  facilitator,  ensure  that  your  inner  circle  has  access  to  your  research     and  prepare  a  list  of  open-­‐ended  questions  that  will  provoke  discussion.  Remember:  the   purpose  of  a  Socratic  Circle  is  not  to  come  to  an  answer,  but  to  explore  complex  ideas.  An   excellent  way  to  approach  this  goal  would  be  to  include  research  pieces  with  opposing   views. While  the  inner  circle  discusses  an  issue,  the  outer  circle  will  keep  track  of  who  is  speaking   and  the  points  that  the  inner  circle  is  making.  When  discussion  winds  down,  the  outer  circle   members  will  ask  a  question  of  the  inner  circle,  meant  to  clarify,  deepen,  or  expand. One  goal  of  Socratic  Circles  is  to  understand  the  ideas  and  thoughts  of  others  through   asking  questions  and  listening  to  answers.  This  means  that  participants  must  practice  how   to  agree  and  disagree.  Participants  must  be  able  to  disagree  without  being  disagreeable.  In   order  to  do  so,  the  participants  can  use  the  following  suggested  ways  of  responding  as  a   way  of  framing  their  thoughts  before  they  speak.  Speaking  and  responding  in  a  calm,   collaborative  manner  is  essential  to  good  discussion  and  dialogue.   1) I  agree  with__________  because,  but  I  want  to  add  another  reason  why  I  think  _________   is  true.  (Give  another  reason.)   2) I  disagree  with  __________  because  .  .  .   3) I'm  not  sure  why  ___________  said  .  .  .  Can  you  reword  your  comments  to  help  me   understand?   4) I  understand  your  point,  __________,  but  I  want  to  add/disagree/give  another  side  .  .  . 5) This  is  what  I  think  you  are  saying.  .  .  Is  that  correct?