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NANCY TRESER OSGOOD WANTS TO INSPIRE A LOVE OF LEARNING/PAGE 5
Friday, September 20, 2013 u One dollar

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After the FIRE
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COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Director of the Bernard Field Station Wallace Meyer surveys a portion of the burn area on Tuesday, less than a week after a fire scorched 17 acres at the field station. Scientists and students alike are motivated to study the effects of the fire on the field stationʼs ecosystem—including the possibility that long-dormant plant species may sprout once the rains begin.

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The strange and macabre Sweeney Todd opens at the Candlelight Pavilion
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Stay tuned...
We’ll announce the Best of the Best in next Friday’s edition! New principal jumps right in at San Antonio High/ PAGE 16

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 10

LETTERS/ PAGES 2 & 8 CALENDAR/ PAGE 20

With things heating up in Claremont, don’t miss the news. Visit our website: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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READERS’ COMMENTS
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
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ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Bernard Field Station Feeling the Golden State’s heat, That hot summer day.
—Joe Tonan Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

The Consortium’s bottom line
Dear Editor: I was stunned to read Friday’s COURIER reporting of the Consortium's decision to close the Claremont Golf Course. The only printable word I’ll use is shame! Here we have a corporation looking only at their bottom line and seemingly caring very little for the community they operate in. Consortium, you are operating as a 501(c)(3) and yet, it appears, do not have any charity or creativity in you to allow this tiny bit of green space and recreation and learning site to continue to exist. You have stated that since 2008, the use of the facilities has shrunk by 30 percent. Well, duh! Didn’t everything suffer from the recession back then? This course is a slice of heaven for young and old, with access for all, and should be saved. I hope that someone can step in that is not viewing everything as black and white and can see the other aspects of what it means to be a part of Claremont, where community and the people within make it a great place to live. A business is not really part of the community at large, if all they see is their bottom line. Nikki Coulas
Claremont

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
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Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
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Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Golden State Water puts communities in danger
Dear Editor: As a resident of Claremont, I have seen my fair share of southern California wildfires. However, I was shocked and angered to learn that Golden State Water

Back Page Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com

was to blame for starting the fire that put our community and homes in danger. Because of the actions of Golden State’s crew, we saw a reported 17 acres in Claremont go up in flames. Despite admitting that they were responsible for the fire, they will not be required to pay for the firefighters’ efforts, and the costs related to the water-dropping planes and, ironically, they won’t pay for the thousands of gallons of water used to put out the fire. Regardless of Golden State’s inattention to safety, I am so thankful for our firefighters who worked diligently to protect our homes and, more importantly, lives in Claremont. They were prepared and ready when we needed them most. Now we are seeing Golden State at the center of another community crisis—this time near LAX. While they didn’t start a fire this time, their employees were involved in setting-off a dangerous methane gas leak, requiring the evacuation of homes and businesses in the area for several days. Families were displaced and forced to stay in motels until safety officials announced that the area was no longer in danger. But this time they will pay. What is especially frustrating is that ultimately we, the water rate payers in Claremont, will be forced to pay for the damages that Golden State caused. The costs will not come out of Golden State’s profits, but will be included in next rate increase they will by lobbying for from the PUC in San Francisco. While Claremont continues to fight for local control of our water company, we need to be mindful that local control is much more than just having input on our

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Monday, September 23 Joint City Council/School Board Kirkendall Board Room. 6 p.m. School board candidate orientation Tuesday, September 24 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 25 Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m.

water rates. We need control over all aspects of our water system, including the safety precautions taken by water crews.
Dr. Anne K. Turner Claremont More READERSʼ COMMENTS/page 8

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 45

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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Disaster lets students study ecology after fire

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he Claremont Colleges’ Robert J. Bernard Field Station—an academic resource for the Claremont Colleges and local community for decades—burned last week, leaving behind 17 acres of charred remains and numerous concerns over the resulting impact on environmental research. However, amid disaster, Claremont College faculty and students have found opportunity.

Academics have inundated the local field station following last week’s blaze, eager to take advantage of the opportunity to study in Claremont’s new fire ecology. “The language people use when talking about fire tends to be words like disarray, damage and destruction, but what I’m arguing for is that this is in fact about creation, regeneration and growth,” said Char Miller, director of the Environmental Analysis Program at Pomona College. “Fire is a very creative force,” he continued. “It’s devastating to be sure, and thank God the LA County Fire Department knocked that blaze down so quickly, but now we have a wonderful educational opportunity. We have this living laboratory right in our backyard.” On September 11, professors, students and Claremont residents lined the south side of Foothill Boulevard, across from the field station as fire crews and 2 Super Scoopers worked to contain the flames, sparked by a Golden State Water work crew. While discussions ranged from alarm to awe over the first responders’ coordinated effort, once the fire was contained Mr. Miller and colleagues found themselves shifting their thoughts to what opportunities the fire presented, particularly in terms of studying the plant life. Much of the expanse of the Bernard Field Station’s 86 acres is comprised of coastal sage scrub, which has become increasingly scarce with the build-out of Los Angeles County. “What the students in Claremont and faculty members have the chance to do is not just tell us about what happens here [at the field station], but about the whole ecosystem across the world,” Mr. Miller said. “This is really an unparalleled opportunity.” Nancy Hamlett, volunteer coordinator at the Bernard Field Station, insists the designated Code II fire was not as devastating as most think. In agreement with Mr. Miller, she believes the burn-down might bring an abundance of new plant life. “The plants that live in that community are adapted to fire and, in fact, in order to maintain a healthy community you sort of need to have a fire every so often. Some plants need the fire in order to germinate,” Ms. Hamlett said. The process of burning plants in order to regenerate them, Ms. Hamlett pointed out, is called stump sprouting. Field station workers have been asking for years to

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Professor Fran Hanzawa gives a lecture to students in her insect ecology class before they set out to do research on Tuesday at the Bernard Field Station. This was the first time the students had been at the field station since last weekʼs fire.

have a controlled burn but have been unsuccessful in getting the necessary approval to do so, she noted.   “Over time, [plants and brush] get thicker and thicker and overgrown and some of the really neat annuals or smaller perennials can’t grow,” she explained. “After a fire, you are likely to see more of certain plants that aren’t seen very often.” Ms. Hamlett and other volunteers plan to keep a photo documentation of the regrowth, beginning with images taken from the same vantage points every month for a year. Diane Thomson, associate professor of environmental science at the Keck Science Center, has been researching the field station’s annual plants and their dormant seedlings with her students since 2005. Although the fire swept through several of these plots, burning away many of these plants (as marked by little orange flags), Ms. Thomson remains unfazed. An important part of her research, Ms. Thomson relates, has to do with how changes in the environment are affecting some of the annual plants native to this area. One important change is the habitation of non-native competitors, mostly grasses, brought to California in the late 1800s. In many areas of southern California, these non-native grasses have replaced a lot of the plant species that were once common. Another important area of study is the change in climate and its affect on these plants. “Fire is an important part of both those stories. The presence of non-native grasses has changed the frequency and intensity of fire in California. At the same time, it’s not totally clear how fire affects competition between those non-native grasses and native species, because the native plant com-

munities here are very fire-adapted,” Ms. Thomson said. She plans to explore the possibilities with her students. “In the case of my lab, we’re very interested to see what species come out of the seed bank in response to the fire,” she added. “Will this represent a ‘good’ year for [native plants], or not? A lot might depend on what kind of winter rainfall we get. We are lucky to have data collected over a number of years on the plant community in the area that burned. This gives us some good baseline data to compare with what happens next.” Several Claremont Colleges students are already looking into ways to incorporate the burned landscape into their research. Pomona College junior Madison Dipman, an employee of the field station, was on site Tuesday conducting research, picked up where she left off the day of the fire. Now, though, she has a slightly different focus. Ms. Dipman was on her way to the field station to set up insect traps when she received texts about the brushfire. She said she was freaked out at first, but her mindset soon changed. “It’s upsetting to lose so much landscape, but it provides an interesting opportunity,” she said. Ms. Dipman looks forward to seeing the effect the fire has on the insect and arthropod community. Beyond her own academic aspirations, Ms. Dipman says the blaze has caused a buzz among her classmates as well. “People are pretty interested in what [this fire ecology] can do to further their research,” she said. For now, however, they will have to hold off. The scorched section of the Bernard Field Station is currently off lim-

Photo courtesy of Pomona College Char Miller, director of the Environmental Analysis Program at Pomona College, penned a column exploring the possibilities for study to be found after the Bernard Field Station fire. To read Mr. Millerʼs projections, visit www.kcet.org/user/profile/cmiller.

its as Professor Wallace Meyer, director of the field station, resolves how to best divvy up the space to those interested in using it. That meeting will take place early next week, he confirmed. It’s uncertain when the terrain will be open to academics and what it may mean for the field station, but Mr. Meyer looks forward to the concert of academic research to come. “With the attention that the fire has brought, we are going to see a real collaboration of research that includes not just the plant life, but the entire ecosystem,” he said. “That’s what I am most looking forward to.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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Fire came dangerously close to Live Oak Canyon homes

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or the second time in a week, fire threatened Claremont, this time at its western border near Live Oak Canyon.

At 12:52 p.m. on Friday, September 13, Los Angeles County Fire received a call about a brush fire directly behind the LeRoy Haynes Center at 233 W. Base Line Rd. in La Verne, just a few hundred yards from Claremont’s western border. The fire quickly advanced from the flash point in Broken Canyon into adjacent Live Oak Canyon, threatening homes in the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County between La Verne and Claremont, according to Los Angeles County Fire Captain Roland Sprewell. LA County Fire, US Department of Forestry hotshots and air support from the LA City Fire Department knocked down the fire pretty quickly thanks to a coordinated effort. In all, about 130 firefighters were involved. About 200 people were evacuated from homes in and around the canyon, including the Briney Point neighborhood where several homes were threatened and at one time surrounded by flames. Among those evacuated were the staff and residents at the LeRoy Haynes Center and students at The Webb Schools.

Residential burglaries reported in north Claremont
As Claremont residents hustled to work on Wednesday, burglars made a sweep of 3 local homes. A home in the 2100 block of Oxford Avenue was the first target, broken into around 10 a.m. while an elderly man was home. The victim described the burglar as a white or Hispanic male about 20-30 years old with brown hair. Another residence was broken into between 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. in the 2200 block of Indian Hill. A third home, located in the 100 block of Avila Way, was burglarized between 10 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. It is unknown if these burglaries are related. There is no suspect description for the Indian Hill or Avila Way incidents. Any information on these crimes should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at 399-5411.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff A hotshot crew works at building a containment line about 300 yards from a north La Verne neighborhood last Friday during a quick-moving fire on the western edge of Claremont. The fire was stopped at about 40 acres and there were no reports of damaged buildings or injuries.

Daniel Maydeck, president and CEO of the Leroy Haynes Center, said that the fire was spotted some time between 12:30 and 1 p.m. and staff immediately began the task of evacuating the center. Non-residents were sent home while residents and staff relocated to a local pizza parlor. They then went door to door to make sure no one was still at the center. Briney Point resident Glenn Stewart was shopping when he saw the smoke in the hills. After making his way back home, a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputy requested evacuation. Mr. Stewart had evacuated several times over the past 4 decades, but this was different. “This one was the scariest one so far,” he said. “It came from the west, and the wind was from the west, so at one point big flames and smoke were coming up over my home. I put my groceries down and turned on the sprinklers and left.”

The cause of the fire is still under investigation, according to Captain Sprewell. He said at this point it is considered suspicious in nature, but he would not speculate about whether it was intentionally started. By 3:30 p.m., firefighters had the blaze contained to 40 acres, but monitored the burn area and put out hot spots into the night. No structures were reported damaged and there were no reported injuries. Captain Sprewell cautions that southern California is heading into the traditional fire season that corresponds with the Santa Ana winds common in the fall. “The vegetation is very dry. It has been curing all summer and then, as we head into fall, the fire season really gets started,” he said. Residents should be particularly careful with fire this time of year.
—Steven Felschundneff steven@claremont-courier.com

Thursday, September 12 Residents in the 700 block of Occidental Drive received an unwelcome wake-up call on Thursday morning. Mary Perez, 34, of Ontario, took it upon herself to help the neighborhood rise and seize the day around 1:30 a.m. by repeated honking her car horn. While neighbors received an interrupted night’s sleep, Ms. Perez received jail time, as it turns out she was intoxicated and unable to care for herself, according to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek. She was arrested for being drunk and disorderly as well as for an outstanding warrant. **** For a college student moving into her dorm on Thursday, accepting a helping hand ended up turning into an unexpected personal hand-out. The student alleges she was approached by a couple of 20-year-old men in the 400 block of Tenth Street, who offered to help her carry a box of clothes to her room. She

POLICE BLOTTER

welcomed the help, only to discover the box and the boys were soon missing. Police have a detailed list of each item missing, but no suspects. Both young men are described as having a medium build and dark hair. One was about 5 feet 10 inches tall, the other was about 5 feet 8 inches, according to the victim. Any information should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at 3995411. **** Crooks made off with a treasure trove of loot after breaking into a home in the 1100 block of Cooke Avenue on Thursday night. An estimated $1000 in gold rings and $1200 cash was stolen. Police are following up on a potential lead. Friday, September 13 A resident in the 800 block of West Bonita Avenue received an unpleasant update to her car, parked outside her home on Friday afternoon. All 4 tires of

her Honda had been slashed with some choice words scribbled onto the car bed in black marker, according to Lt. Ciszek. More than $800 in damages is estimated. Investigation continues. Saturday, September 14 A local charitable organization was targeted in a Saturday afternoon burglary at the Claremont Packing House. Thieves entered the Claremont Forum through the store’s west doors, which face the entrance to the parking garage, and made off with $100 in coins and $30 in cash. There are no suspects. A second nonprofit was nabbed just 2 days after the Claremont Forum burglary. Burglars pried their way into the Claremont Community School of Music, located at 951 W. Foothill Blvd., on Monday, September 16. They made off with 5 electronic keyboards to the tune of $1600. **** Some thieves got creative in an attempt to steal money from an ATM machine at Bank of America, located at

1025 W. Foothill Blvd. The bandits tried to strike it rich by attempting to break into the ATM machine from above. However, their clever attempt at stealth and savings ended up sounding off the burglary alarm. The thieves took off empty-handed. Monday, September 16 Cops and helicopters came to the aid of a man found unconscious at College Park on Tuesday night. He was breathing, but unresponsive, according to Lt. Ciszek. Officers allege an alcohol overdose may have been the cause of the man’s unconsciousness. Since it was unknown if the man had sustained head injuries, he was transported to USC Medical Center via helicopter—a part of LA County protocol, according to Lt. Ciszek.
—Beth Hartnett news@ Claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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Treser Osgood has love of learning, collaboration

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chool board candidate Nancy Treser Osgood aims to enhance communication between the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education and stakeholders like district faculty and staff, parents and community members, nearby colleges and the local business community.
Ms. Treser Osgood will begin communicating her own message, in anticipation of the upcoming local and municipal election on November 5, at a campaign kickoff set for Sunday, September 22. The event, which runs from 4 to 5:30 p.m., will be held at 50-Fifty Asian Cuisine, 201 N. Indian Hill Blvd. in Claremont. Guests are invited to meet Ms. Treser Osgood, pick up a yard sign and sample some Asian fusion cuisine. Ms. Treser Osgood, who has been director of alumni relations at Pomona College since 1997, has been regularly attending school board meetings for the last 18 months in preparation for her candidacy. During that time, she has found the council chambers only tend to overflow during times of celebration and crisis. With a bit of outreach, Ms. Treser Osgood feels it’s possible to drum up more community interest in the day-to-day doings of CUSD. One way to do this, she suggests, would be to move school board meetings around, holding them at various school sites as opposed to keeping them stationed at the District Office on San Jose Avenue. Perhaps the times could be varied, too, capturing attendees who are generally at home eating dinner when the board gathers. For instance, a school board meeting held earlier in the day at Claremont High School might end up packed with CHS faculty and staff and with government students, who are required to attend a meeting of a local government body at some point in the year. Another way the school board could strengthen its relationship with the various schools would be for each board member to serve as a liaison with 2 or 3 schools in the district, according to Ms. Treser Osgood. If she were to serve as a liaison for Vista, for example, she might attend a PTA meeting, sit in on a staff meeting or take the principal out for coffee. “It’s a way to strengthen the lines of communication and emphasize that we’re all rowing in the same direction,” she said. Ms. Treser Osgood, who is delighted to have been endorsed by the Claremont Faculty Association, has an array of experience that qualifies her to help guide the local school district. With a master’s in religious education from the Claremont School of Theology, she served as director of education at the First Presbyterian Church of Pomona and at the California Heights United

Methodist Church in Long Beach, prior to coming to Pomona College as associate director of alumni relations in 1989. Ms. Treser Osgood has 2 sons—one attends Williams College and another is a senior at Claremont High School—and CUSD both attended ClareELECTION mont public schools since kindergarten. She has been an active volunteer at their schools, including service with the CHS soccer boosters, and is currently secretary of the Claremont Educational Foundation. In the realm of higher education, she is chair of the Southwest United States for CASE (Council for the Advancement and Support of Education) District VII. She is responsible for strategic planning, board leadership, financial management and overall administration of the district, which is comprised of 400 colleges in California and other southwestern states, along with a number of schools in Hawaii and Guam. Still, Ms. Treser Osgood has put in significant legwork to help prepare her for potential school board membership. She recently audited a class at Pomona College on politics and policy in education. She also just met with Sue Keith, Claremont’s representative on the Citrus College Board of Trustees, to find out more about the district’s relationship with its local community college. Ms. Treser Osgood was surprised to learn that Citrus welcomes more Claremont High School graduates than any other college, news that makes her determined the 2 schools should strengthen their partnership. She would love to see a meeting arranged between the boards of CUSD and Citrus that might help illuminate whether the district is properly preparing students for coursework at the community college. Ms. Treser Osgood would also like to see more collaboration between Claremont’s public schools and The Claremont Colleges. One aim might be to encourage more Claremont Colleges students to volunteer at Claremont schools and with programs like CLASP (Claremont After-School Programs), an endeavor that would provide college students with much-needed real-world experience, often just a short walk from their respective campuses. Along with seeing more Claremont College students and faculty lending their expertise to CUSD, Ms. Treser Osgood would like to see the local K-12 students benefit more from the material resources of The Colleges. Pomona College owns a permanent collection of more than 5,000 Native American artifacts, many acquired by collectors at the turn of the last century, which is now housed at Bridges Auditorium. It would be wonderful if Claremont students could take a field trip there, perhaps coinciding with their fourth grade Mission studies unit, Ms. Treser Osgood said, noting that in many cases the students are close enough to walk. Through her involvement in the Claremont Educational Foundation, Ms. Treser Osgood has come to value the partnership

Ms. Treser Osgood salutes the current school board for achievements like helping CUSD navigate the financial crisis and inking a 3-year contract with Superintendent Jim Elsasser, paving the way for greater district stability. Still, she feels the board would benefit from her emphasis on communication and collaboration, particularly as the district prepares to come into several million dollars from the sale of surplus property such as the old district office and the soon-to-be-relocated service center. The process of spending that money, she said, should begin with the district revisiting its list of priorities. Once the district has communicated must-do expenditures such as the mitigation of safety issues, Ms. Treser Osgood said staff, students and residents should be given the opportunity to weigh in on the COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff improvements they would like to see Nancy Treser Osgood, candidate for made in Claremont schools. CUSD Board of Education. As the election nears, Ms. Treser Osbetween members of the local business good said she would welcome the chance community and CUSD. It is a union she to have more of a part in something she treasures: education. would like to see further enhanced. “I love to see the light go on in someThe Claremont Educational Foundation has more than 35 business partners one’s mind—that moment when the mathat donate to the organization’s mission terial comes alive and a spark and of providing art, music and technology at passionate energy ignites a student’s Claremont schools as well as running the learning power,” she said. For information on Ms. Treser Ogood SLICE summer enrichment program. A few businesses also give to CUSD by par- and her campaign, visit her website, ticipating in the eGood program, through www.osgoodforclaremontschools.com. —Sarah Torribio which a percentage of proceeds are dostorribio@claremont-courier.com nated to the district. Along with finding more businesses to “Get on the Bus” to help the schools fi- Profiles on school board candidates nancially, Ms. Treser Osgood feels it Steven Llanusa and Joseph Salas ran in would be beneficial if a variety of local previous editions of the COURIER. Probusinesses were encouraged to organize files on the remaining 2 CUSD school internships and other learning opportuni- board candidates, David Nemer and Paul Steffen, will appear in upcoming editions ties for Claremont students. of the COURIER.

CANDIDATES’ CORNER
To have an event listed, email Kathryn Dunn, editor, at editor@claremont-courier.com.

Saturday, September 21 Dave Nemer for School Board invites all community members to a great campaign kickoff party hosted by Jan and Lauren Roselle, 1145 Hillsdale, from 2 to 4 p.m. Come to enjoy appetizers, beverages and conversation about Claremont schools. Sunday, September 22 Campaign kickoff reception for Nancy Treser Osgood for school board at 50-fifty Restaurant, 201 N. Indian Hill Blvd., from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Meet Nancy and her supporters, pick up a yard sign and enjoy some delicious Asian fusion cuisine. Coffee meet-and-greet with Joe Salas hosted by Carolee and Jack Monroe, 1015 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Mr. Salas will hear your thoughts, questions and concerns regarding the Claremont schools.

Steven Llanusa Re-Election Student Advisory Committee, including Hannah Bivans, Sasha Houy and Shannon O’Toole, invite all students, parents and community members to a “Roundtable Discussion and Round Table Pizza” at 6 p.m. Come share ideas about issues of interest to students while enjoying complimentary pizza and soft drinks. Call 625-8558 for information. Eat with us at 408 Auto Center Dr., which is south of Vista del Valle Elementary School. Tuesday, September 24 Llanusa re-election meet-and-greet hosted by Russel and Nicki Heskin, “Cookies and Candidate,” at 6:30 p.m. at 1689 Barnard Rd. Come hear ideas and ask questions about how the district addresses the goal of the whole child. Find out what Mr. Llanusa has planned for another term. For details, call 6258558. Join us at this event, which is west of Condit Elementary School.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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Big things from a small town
by John Pixley

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ohn Wise. I wondered. Could it be that this guy, an environmental biologist for the state of Maine being interviewed during a segment about water purity on the PBS NewsHour earlier this year, was the same John Wise who was a student and assisted me while I spent a quarter and the summer term at UCLA in 1984?
Was this the same John Wise who also accompanied me on a trip to Vienna after I graduated from UC Riverside the following year? He had come from the East Coast, and he did return back east after graduating from UCLA Also, he was majoring in the sciences when I met him and went on to earn higher degrees in the field. And he did look familiar. More or less. But, after all, it has been nearly 30 years since I last saw him. I had not heard from John for a number of years, but I did have an old e-mail address, and I was able to find out pretty quickly that, yes, he was the same John Wise that I had seen on television. Wow! But perhaps I shouldn’t have been that surprised. These days, I am not so surprised at who shows up on the PBS NewsHour and other current affairs programs. No, I don’t see many old friends being interviewed on the tube, but I do see more and more professors from the Claremont Colleges. It’s not that I don’t exclaim, “Oh, look, it’s someone from Claremont!” I do. But it’s now not unusual to see a black studies professor at Pomona College talking about race relations in America or an anthropology professor at Pomona College being queried on, say, how AIDS is viewed in rural societies. There was Philip Clayton, then the dean of Lincoln University when it opened last year at the School of Theology, talking about the new venture to bring together ministerial students from different faith communities. TV isn’t the only place where I see Claremont professors popping up. Last week, there was an Op-Ed

observer
piece in the Los Angeles Times on Vladimir Putin by Ilai Saltzman, a visiting assistant professor of government at Claremont McKenna College. Then there’s Jack Pitney, the political science professor at CMC, who must be on speed-dial at the Los Angeles Times. Whenever there’s a big political move, especially in Republican circles, the former Republican official who has been teaching for some years at CMC is quoted, giving a line or 2 of analysis, in the paper. Who knew that this go-to guy for political commentary would be in Claremont? Who knew that this small, quiet town, called “a retirement community” by a graduating Pomona College student a couple years ago, was a hotbed of experts who are on call, in demand, if not renowned? Yes, the Claremont Colleges have been prestigious for a long time. The 5 under-graduate colleges in Claremont have consistently ranked high among American institutes of higher education. This year was no exception, with Pomona College coming in fourth place, CMC in ninth place, Harvey Mudd College 16th, Scripps College 25th and Pitzer College 35th among national liberal arts colleges in US News & World Report’s closely-watched rankings out this month. There is more and more of an argument that such rankings are not only irrelevant and meaningless but even harmful. Indeed, seeing the professors and the work done at The Colleges in the news is what, to me, makes The Colleges relevant and meaningful. It is a more real, more tangible and true measure, among others, of their prestige. Not that all the exposure that the colleges have had in the media has been something in which to take pride. In an example of the harmful effects of college

rankings, a former admissions official at CMC confessed last year to exaggerating statistics about admitted students. (It turned out that the manipulation didn’t make much difference.) There was also, several years ago, the bizarre case of the CMC professor who staged the vandalism done to her car. There was plenty to be proud of, though, a few weeks ago when a documentary by Pomona College’s Professor Betty Bernhard had its US premier. I have admired Ms. Bernhard’s work as a director in the theater department at Pomona College for many years, but I didn’t know that she is a documentary film maker, and it was a treat to see this side of her. Called Out! Loud!, the 48-minute film follows a group of young lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Pune, India, as they devise and put on a play called “He, She, It” (“Toh/Ti/Te”) about their lives. Through scenes from the production and interviews with the participants, the film explores what it is like to be an LGBT person in India, where Penal Code 377, a legacy of the British, makes homosexual activity a crime punishable by up to 10 years in prison even as homosexuality, bi-sexuality and transgenderism are clearly evident and legitimized in ancient and sacred Indian stories. In the same way as the Indian stage production, the film is eye-opening and brave. Ms. Bernhard, who has made documentaries and directed plays in India since 1990, reveals this world in a frank, non-judgmental— some may say provocative or controversial—way, as when one young man spoke of his father burning his lips with a cigarette when he spoke in a feminine way and another said he discovered that he liked having sex with men after being forced to do so. With this film, Ms. Bernhard opens our eyes to another world, a world that has been literally hidden. That its showing a few weeks ago at the School of Theology’s Mudd Theater was more or less the first public event of the school year was most appropriate. It was a great kick-off to another year, a reminder of what a tremendous, widely respected presence The Colleges have become in quiet, small Claremont.
DEMYSTIFYING SUSTAINABILITY/page 9

I wouldn’t hang it in my house. But that’s just me.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

7

Mystery solved: Clearing up confusion over Connie & Dicks
[Editor’s note: Ask and you shall receive. In classic Claremont fashion, the request for details on Connie & Dicks Service Center was answered. Dick Bixel’s son, Claremont resident Jim Bixel, provided a copy of an undated COURIER article and, along with Connie’s great-granddaughter, a sixthgrader at Sumner Elementary, provided the details we were looking for. A huge thanks to them for sharing. —KD]

From Dick Bixel’s son
Dear Editor: This message is in response to Lee McDonald’s letter to the editor regarding the recent COURIER article about Connie & Dicks. I am Dick Bixel’s son Jim, and I can clarify facts about the business prior to the purchase by the Browns. I’ve included a copy of a Claremont COURIER article featuring the history of Dick Bixel and Connie Nelson’s business partnership.
Jim Bixel Claremont

From a fifth-generation Claremonter

COURIER archive photo/Trish Branley Connie Nelson and Dick Bixel check out the 1969 Volkswagon formerly owned by the late COURIER publisher Martin Weinberger in this undated COURIER photo. Connie & Dicks provided automobile service to the publisherʼs powder blue VW for decades. Jim Bixel, Dickʼs son, noted in an email that “Dad kept that thing running for years.”

This undated COURIER article, published in part and provided by Dickʼs son Jim Bixel, clears up the missing links of Connie & Dicks Service Center.

Dear Editor: My name is Melia Bartosh, a fifthgeneration Claremont resident and the great-granddaughter of Connie from Connie & Dicks Service Center. In 1946, Conrad Nelson started as a gas attendant at a gas station on the northeast corner of Bonita and Yale in downtown Claremont. Around 1958, he moved across the street as the owner/operator of the Mobil station on the northwest corner of Bonita and Yale. In 1960, he was introduced to Dick Bixel, who he took in as a partner in the gas station. Connie and Dick needed more space, so they bought some property at 108 Olive St. to expand their mechanics business. Shortly after that, in 1963, they closed the Mobil gas station and took over the Shell station on the corner of Arrow Highway and Indian Hill. A few years later, they decided to concentrate solely on the garage on

Olive Street. In 1980, they expanded to the current location at 150 Olive St. After retirement in the 1990s, Connie and Dick sold the shop to current owners Scott and Cindy Brown. Dick Bixel passed away shortly after retirement and, being a Navy veteran, was buried in the Riverside National Cemetery. Conrad Nelson (Connie) is still happily living in La Verne, loves to travel with his wife Mary, and still has

his love for tinkering with cars. Our family would like to thank Mr. Lee McDonald for sharing his fond memories of Connie and Dick and the service they proudly provided the community with for more than 3 decades.
Melia Bartosh 10 years old Sixth grade student, Sumner Elementary School

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

8

Traveling with Jan Wheatcroft
Dear Editor: Being a retired old fellow, abiding in Claremont with limited resources and energy for travels, I want to compliment you for featuring Jan Wheatcroft’s travelogues, colorful memories and her richly-flavored escapades. I can sit in an air-conditioned abode and vicariously wander with her, not having to swat mosquitos and sniff rank scents while visiting ancient places. I’m grateful, too, for not having to suffer the pangs of those who still fly hither and yon via expensive, overloaded airlines and Homeland Insecurity procedures. Thank you and Jan Wheatcroft for this feature, and all of you who produce the Claremont COURIER. Those of us fortunate to read this local paper are much more in touch with this community because of your enterprise.
Chris Rubel Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS
Delaware, Wellesley, and Purdue. By choosing to run on the east side of the street cuts down the number of intersections I have to cross from seven to one, and keeps me completely out of the way of folks just heading for work, thereby minimizing the number of drivers I have to interact with. If my running is “deemed unnecessary by most parents,” I wonder what common sense and courtesy they are teaching the children they are transporting. I believe I exercise common sense and courtesy in timing my runs, and in choosing my routes. It is disappointing that Ms. Coble chose to make negative assumptions about both. My earlier letter was aimed at encouraging drivers to accord me the same common sense and courtesy for the 1-2 seconds it takes me to get across a parking lot opening, not to mention to obey the law. Pedestrians are legitimate components of traffic flow; pedestrians on sidewalks and in crosswalks should be able to proceed at least in safety, if not with confidence. If Ms. Coble has any remaining reservations about my common sense and courtesy, she is more than welcome to join me on a morning run. I would be happy to show her some of my routes, and we can discuss the factors that went into developing those routes.
Joan Fryxell Claremont

The memory of community
Dear Editor: I’m writing this on September 12, 2013 after spending most of yesterday, like many Americans, interlacing my normal weekday activities with my memories of 9/11. Prior to my family settling in Claremont in 2003, I was fortunate, yes fortunate, to have the experience of officially relocating from Los Angeles to Manhattan on September 10, 2001. While it was overwhelming to be so close to some of the tragic events as they occurred, I’m thankful that I was there to see the unbelievable ways that Americans of all shapes, colors and tax-brackets pulled together during that time of terror and tragedy. Placing aside, for a moment, the politics and feelings related to the sequence of events that followed the attacks (war, finger-pointing, polarization, etc.), it’s my hope that the words “Remember” and “Never Forget,” included in so many of the 9/11 tributes, can also be associated with the humanity that followed the events. While there’s no denying that those words, as they relate to 9/11, will forever bring images of burning towers, smoldering rubble and the need for unrelenting reasonable vigilance, they should also be balanced with the memory of “community.” Perhaps this is naïve of me to say not having lost someone during these events or the war(s) that followed, but it remains my hope. My images include witnessing the support and compassion offered to the ash-covered people making their way up the avenues, and the empathy and charity directed toward those grieving losses in the months and years that followed. Also included is a feeling of deep gratitude for the families and individuals that continue to place their lives in danger to defend our freedom. Again, regardless of your opinion as to the reasons why they are there, please “remember” and “never forget” that they are there…for us.
Ed Leavitt Claremont

Pedestrians near schools
Dear Editor: Vicki Coble responded to my earlier letter concerning pedestrian and vehicle traffic near the high school with several criticisms of (her assumptions of) my courtesy and common sense. The incident I described occurred at 7:25 a.m., exactly halfway between the starts of period 1 and period 2 at the high school. I time my runs to go by the high school during that lull, after the frantically-late period 1 traffic, and before the period 2 traffic becomes heavy. Ms. Coble questions whether I have children, which I do, the youngest of whom is a senior at the high school, so I am familiar with the bell schedules of local schools and have years of experience with “the hassles of dropping children off at school.” I do not “feel compelled” to run past schools, but it is difficult to map a route that avoids all of them. For example, I have abandoned running on the south side of Base Line (on the sidewalk) because the parents dropping off their children at Tutor Time are frankly dangerous. She proposes that it would be safer for me, “at the very least” to run on the other side of Oxford and so avoid the parking lot entrance. That route would require me to cross Oxford, Scripps, Fairmont, Hood,

The threatening of the ‘white folk’
Dear Editor: I woke up Monday morning to read that Nina Davuluri became the first Indian-American to capture the Miss America title. I saw her picture and thought, “Wow, she is beautiful.” Apparently, a flood of nasty tweets followed her victory from those who did not agree with the judges’ decision. They suggested among other things that Ms. Davuluri is an Arab with ties to Al Qaeda or that she works in a 7-11. Seriously. Todd Starnes, host of Fox News & Commentary, blamed the win on a “politically correct” panel of judges and stated that the runner-up, Miss Kansas,

was not chosen because she represented American values, according to a series of tweets. Mr. Starnes’ definition of American values appears to be that you have to be white and like guns. Ms. Davuluri was born in Syracuse, New York, which makes her an American. Period. Perhaps she is in favor of gun rights, perhaps she is against abortion and gay rights and believes that we should continue to use “Under God” on our money and speak only English. There are Americans that believe these views. There are Americans that believe the opposite. Who knows where Ms. Davuluri stands? But because she isn’t white, people like Mr. Starnes immediately judge her as being un-American. The fact that most people from India follow the Hindu faith and are not Arabic just points to the ignorance of these racists. America is a wonderful melting pot of nationalities, beliefs and political views. Diversity is one of the many things that makes our country exceptional (despite what Mr. Putin may say, but that is the subject for another time). The problem with right wing nut jobs like Mr. Starnes is that they cannot seem to wrap their heads around this fact. There certainly are conservative people in this country that embrace diversity. But to a racist like Mr. Starnes, if someone isn’t white and following exactly their narrow definitions of American values, then they are someone to be ridiculed and belittled. For the rest of us, I say congratulations to Ms. Davuluri. She wants to follow in her father’s footsteps and other family members to become a doctor. She has graduated from the University of Michigan, where she has won several honors including dean’s list and National Honors Society. She appears to me to fully embrace a love for this country while also honoring the culture and heritage of her ancestry. I, for one, am delighted that she will represent this great country of ours and show the rest of the world what it means to be a true American.
Pam Stevenson Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

9

Some don’t like it hot
by JP Scheetz

F

or so long, the term “global warming” has been just an abstract concept to me, bringing forth the image of a lone polar bear, floating aimlessly on a chunk of ice. This image has saddened me, yes, but it was a problem so far away that it quickly disappeared from my mind. Until now. Until I listened to a lecture given by Dr. Alex Hall, an associate professor in the Department of Atmosphere and Oceanic Sciences at UCLA. I now understand how global warming will affect not only me, but also the city of Claremont as a whole.

Demystifying
SUSTAINABILITY
In the “business as usual” model, Dr. Hall has determined that by mid-century, the average temperature in Los Angeles will increase 4 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit. This may not sound like a big deal, but it is. When Dr. Hall examined what the effects would be on inland cities, such as Claremont, he discovered a great increase in the number of days of extreme heat (with a temperature greater than 95 degrees). Currently, Claremont experiences, on average, about 20 such days. Dr. Hall predicted that by the end of this century, if we conduct “business as usual,” Claremont will experience approximately 100 days of extreme heat per year. 100 days! That’s more than June, July and August combined. Personally, I start whining after only one or 2 days of extreme heat. Three months of it would ensure I’d be positively friendless. I know, I won’t be around in 87 years to suffer this heat, but my grandchildren will. Is this the kind of world I want to leave them? Absolutely not. Claremont would cease to be the Claremont we know and love. It would be hotter than Palm Springs is now and would become a place from which people escape during the summer months, or if they choose to stay, hole themselves up in air conditioned houses. Imagine that electric bill.

Dr. Hall’s research has taken the immense topic of global warming and broken it down enough that he can explain what it will mean to Los Angeles and the surrounding cities. In his presentation, Dr. Hall presented 2 scenarios. The first he called “business as usual,” which predicts what the future will look like if the behavior of human beings on this planet does not change. The second scenario, called “mitigation,” imagines a future where the world comes together and makes the drastic changes that will successfully lessen carbon emissions.

With these numbers staring me right in the face, I can no longer view global warming as the plight of the polar bear. I now see how it will affect my children and grandchildren. “Business as usual” shouldn’t even be listed as an option. This leads me to the other scenario mentioned by Dr. Hall called “mitigation.” If the world can come together and make the changes necessary to lower carbon emissions, there may be hope. We can’t stop global warming. Too much harm has already been done. But we can potentially lessen future damage. And isn’t that the ethical thing to do? Fortunately, Claremont is ahead of the game. We have our own Sustainable City Plan. The nonprofit group, Sustainable Claremont, has created the Community Home Energy Retrofit Project (CHERP), which is helping homeowners reduce their energy consumption. We even have our own urban forest to take up carbon and keep us cool! But that’s only the beginning. There’s still a lot of work to be done. So, now we need you. It’s not enough that we bring our cloth bags to Trader Joe’s and Sprouts. We need to be actively involved if we want to change the future. To read more about the future of Los Angeles, visit http://c-change.la. Then vow to be part of the solution. Demystifying Sustainability is a project of Sustainable Claremont (sustainableclaremont.org), email address is info@sustainableclaremont.org, or follow them on Facebook at facebook.com/sustainableclaremont and on Twitter #GreenClaremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

10

Robert Borrelli Professor, mathematician, wine aficionado
Robert Borrelli, a longtime Claremont resident, died on September 11, 2013. He was 81 years old. Mr. Borrelli was born on March 4, 1932 in Clarksburg, West Virginia to Giuseppe Salvatore “Joe” Borrelli and Giovannina “Jenny” Rossi, an immigrant family from southern Italy. In 1947, Joe bought a prune ranch in Gilroy, California but soon realized that he wasn’t cut out for farm life. Within a year, he traded the ranch for a house and an adjacent apartment building on Julian Street in San Jose, making half of the ground floor into a grocery store, while Jenny looked after their 6 children and kept the household running.   Young Robert showed an early aptitude for learning, earning himself the nickname “Professor” when he was still in elementary school. He grew up not far from where he would eventually attend college: San Jose State, Stanford University and UC Berkeley. What made his academic success so surprising is that, at that time, children from poor Italian families were all expected to work and contribute to the family coffers. All of his friends were planning on attending college, and he wanted to go too. Instead of broaching the subject directly, he asked his adored older brother James to ask his mother to ask his father, fully expecting to be turned down. When the answer came back “Yes,” he was elated. So as not to incur the wrath of his father, Mr. Borrelli snuck off to classes and returned in time to do his evening chores before dinner. Only later did he learn that James never did ask for permission, as the answer most certainly would have been “No!” Instead, James secretly funded his younger brother’s undergraduate education himself by doing odd jobs. In the fall of 1951, Mr. Borrelli transferred from San Jose State to Stanford, with his room and board costs again covered by James. His college years coincided with the Korean War. Since he was registered for the draft, he had to apply for a deferment in order to continue his studies. After receiving his bachelor’s degree in mathematics in 1953, he applied for another deferment, during which time he earned a master’s degree in mathematics, also from Stanford. In 1954, Mr. Borrelli joined the Army, serving in the Army Counter Intelligence Corp (CIC). Because he had studied the German language in college, he was assigned to a small intelligence unit near Offenbach, Ger-

OBITUARIES
Fellowship in Art, an endowment fund in the Stanford Art Department in honor of his older brother James. Mr. Borrelli also relished any opportunity to travel. His sabbatical leaves included residencies at MIT, the University of Bonn, the ESIEE school of engineering and electronics in Paris and Rensselaer Polytechnic University. In 1998, he was invited to visit the University of South Australia (UniSA), advising the school on how to start a program similar to the HMC Mathematics Clinic. In 1998, Mr. Borrelli was awarded the Henry T. Mudd prize for exemplary service to Harvey Mudd College and its mission. He retired the following year after 35 years as an HMC faculty member, but continued to work on numerous pet projects, including the formation of the Claremont Center for Mathematical Sciences (CCMS). CCMS was established in 2007 to promote collaborative research and creative teaching among the institutions of the Claremont Colleges Consortium: HMC, Claremont McKenna, Pomona, Pitzer, Scripps and the Claremont Graduate University. Although Mr. Borrelli’s career kept him busy, he also found time over the years to pursue various interests. He was a serious wine connoisseur, who enjoyed collecting wines and served as founding director of the Claremont chapter of Les Amis du Vin. “Our Dad was many things to many people,” his family shared. “To his beloved wife Ursula, now departed, he was ‘husband’ or ‘Luigi.’ To his children, he was ‘Dad’ or ‘Daddy.’ To his 11 grandchildren and 5 greatgrandchildren, he was ‘Nonno.’ To his students, he was ‘Professor.’ To some, he was ‘Uncle Bob’ or ‘compadre.’ “No matter what you called him, there was something about Robert that drew people in. He had a smile that was freely given. His eyes would twinkle when he spoke of favored topics: mathematics, Harvey Mudd College and its many clinic programs, his students’ accomplishments and, of course, wine!” Mr. Borrelli is survived by his children, Monica Hess, Christina Franks, Stephen Borrelli and Margaret Murphy, and by his sister, Mary Stabile of San Jose, California. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the American Heart Association by visiting https://donate.americanheart.org and selecting “Make a Memorial Gift.”

many. It was here that he met Ursula Lebeda, a student at the University of Frankfurt who was teaching German to the GIs through the University of Maryland Overseas Program. After 6 months of dating, Mr. Borrelli married Ursula on July 7, 1956 in her mother’s hometown, Bad Wildungen. Nine months later, their first child, Monica, was born. Upon discharge from the Army, Mr. Borrelli entered the PhD program in mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley and the family moved back to the United States. During his graduate years, their children, Christina, Stephen and Margaret, were born. Mr. Borrelli finished his graduate studies in 1963 and found a job working for a defense contractor. After just one year, he realized that crunching numbers for the government held no challenge and embarked on a teaching career instead. He accepted an assistant professorship at Harvey Mudd College (HMC) for half of his previous salary, moving his family to Claremont until he and Mrs. Borrelli moved to Upland in 1987. Mr. Borrelli enjoyed teaching immensely, and was proud of his many accomplishments at HMC. During his time at the college, he served for 11 years as math department chair and 22 years as director of the Mathematics Clinic, a program that he helped found in order to address the needs of industry-bound HMC math graduates. In the early 1970s, Mr. Borrelli set up 2 endowment funds in memory of his 2 deceased brothers: the Giovanni Borrelli Fellowship at HMC in honor of his younger brother John, and the James William Borrelli

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

11

‘Sharing’ takes on new meaning in changing economy

L

istening to business news lately, it would appear the American economy is on a roll. Corporate profits are up, the stock markets have had a great year and it even seems as though consumers are spending again. But many Americans are still not reaping the benefits of this recent growth and unemployment remains stubbornly high.
Frustrated with the perceived lack of opportunity, and also looking for a different way to get things done, many people are turning to an emerging peerto-peer network, euphemistically called “the sharing economy” or collaborative consumption. It works like this: People who own homes, cars, tools, bicycles and other assets rent them directly to users via a host of new websites and apps that facilitate the transaction for a fee. The phenomenon began in 2008 with the launch of Airbedandbreakfast.com, which sought to rent airbeds in San Francisco apartments to people visiting the area. The idea grew, with the assistance of significant investment capital, and now the renamed Airbnb offers accommodations from a single room to an entire castle in 192 countries with over 300,000 listings in 33,000 cities, according to the firm’s website. Today there are dozens of start-ups that use a similar concept to rent users’ assets or time. Popular sites include: Lyft for ride sharing; TaskRabbit for small jobs around the house; RelayRides to rent personal vehicles; and SnapGoods to rent or lend household goods. It may be tempting to dismiss these businesses as just another type of Internet-based retailing. However, just as eBay revolutionized the collectibles

market 18 years ago by providing a platform for sellers to connect directly with buyers, the sharing economy is similarly upsetting current business models by eliminating retailers. An article in Forbes Magazine published in January estimated that revenue flowing through the sharing economy will surpass $3.5 billion this year and will have a growth rate of 25 percent. At that pace, “peer-to-peer sharing is moving from an income boost in a stagnant economy into a disruptive economic force,” according to the magazine. As the sharing economy grows, it’s still concentrated in large metropolitan areas, even passing by the suburbs of these big cities. For instance, there are only 5 listings on Airbnb in Claremont, one of which appears to be spam. Car sharing website RelayRides lists 3 vehicles in Claremont and shows a total of only 5 rental transactions. But the effects are beginning to be felt. Recent Claremont expatriate Jess Block Nerren uses the task-sharing site Fancy Hands to help with her business, Felton Media Services. “Over the past month it gave me back 5 hours of billable time. It’s hard to calculate just how valuable that is,” said Ms. Block Nerren. The site charges a $25 flat fee for the first 5 tasks and then $5 for each additional job. They will do just about anything that can be done remotely. She had them coordinate a conference call, research airport lounge availability in Seattle and book her son’s birthday party. “It’s so cool that they’ll do anything,” she said. Claremont businesswoman Becky Kachlik has recently started using Airbnb to find tenants for her vacation rental in South Lake Tahoe. She largely manages the property herself, however, she has used Tripadvisor and Flipkey as marketing tools. Ms. Kachlik says that the process Airbnb uses to review potential renters is a little more thorough

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont businesswoman Becky Kachlik uses the peer-to-peer website Airbnb to find tenants for her vacation rental in South Lake Tahoe. She finds that the site provides a more personal connection with potential renters.

than that of other sites and that she gets a better feel for the person. As a result, she feels more comfortable with the renters that come through Airbnb. She says, “it’s a lot more personal—you can see the person’s likes and dislikes.” If Claremont seems off the grid in terms of the sharing economy, that doesn’t mean people here are not taking advantage of these sites when looking for travel deals.

C

laremont resident Jason Cruz travels frequently teaching the Filipino martial arts discipline the Kali method. He has used Airbnb to find nice and affordable accommodations in England, Ireland and France. “It’s awesome to connect with people from other places, plus it costs less and you get treated very well,” he said.
Of course, huge problems remain. There’s the creepy factor some have described at the prospect of having a stranger in one’s house or the potential liability if someone is killed by one’s car with a RelayRides driver at the wheel. Every new peer-to-peer business clearly addresses the safety and security issues, and RelayRides has a $1 million insurance policy, yet it remains largely unknown who is deemed liable if tragedy occurs and the damages exceed a company’s insurance coverage. In May, the New York State Department of Financial Services issued a public warning about RelayRides and other car-sharing programs. “Beware that you will likely be responsible for damages and injuries stemming from accidents during the rental period, and in violation of your auto insurance policy.”

The agency went a step further, issuing a cease and desist order to the company. In response, RelayRides ceased operations in the state. Another obstacle for the peer-to-peer rental of real property is the presence of local zoning laws that regulate how homeowners use their properties. According to Brian Desatnick, director of community development for the city of Claremont, it is legal for a homeowner to rent a room in their home on a monthly basis, but not on a nightly basis. Chapter 16 of the municipal code section about the rental of rooms in single-family homes states that rooms shall not have kitchens and not be rented for periods shorter that 30 days. He also noted that the city probably would not crack down on the practice unless there was a complaint. It remains to be seen whether this will be a revolution of the economic model or simply another way for a handful of clever individuals to get rich via the Internet. Still, in 2011 Time Magazine included the sharing economy on its list of “10 Ideas That Will Change the World.” Time noted that the 20th century was all about accumulating stuff, but that the next generation seemed more inclined to share. “There’s a green element here, of course: sharing and renting more stuff means producing and wasting less stuff, which is good for the planet and even better for one’s self-image,” according to the magazine. In the meantime, this new economic venue will undoubtedly change how we look at the things we own and the goods and services we need.
—Steven Felschundneff steven@claremont-courier.com

Claremont resident Jason Cruz travels frequently teaching the Filipino martial arts discipline the Kali method. He has used Airbnb to find nice and affordable accommodations in England, Ireland and France.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

12

CERT safety and preparedness class will begin soon
It’s not too late to sign up for the fall Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training class, which takes place at the Hughes Center, 1700 Danbury Rd. This year, CERT training will be condensed to accommodate people’s busy schedules. Instead of encompassing 7 weeks, the upcoming course will start on Monday, September 23 and conclude on Saturday, October 5. Classes will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. on Mondays, September 23 and 30, Wednesdays, September 25 and October 2, and Saturdays, September 28 and October 5. CERT is part of a nationwide program to train individuals to safeguard their family and community in case of disaster. Claremont has its own team made up of roughly 125 volunteers who assist when emergencies occur so the city and community are better prepared to meet large-scale disasters. Completion of this course is a prerequisite to joining the city’s CERT program; however, residents are encouraged to attend this training even if they are not in-

OUR TOWN
terested in being part of the CERT program. To register, contact Debbie Trevino, Claremont Police Department, at 399-5420.

Local progressive groups to join in pipeline protest Memorial screening of John The Pomona Valley Chapter of Progressive Christians Uniting, joined by the Claremont Democrats, the Harrelson documentary
Claremont chapter of MoveOn.org and the Pomona Valley Interfaith Sustainability Council, will participate in a nation-wide protest against the Keystone XL Pipeline this Saturday, September 21. The local demonstrators will gather at the intersection of Indian Hill Boulevard and Foothill Boulevard from 4 to 5:30 p.m. The Keystone XL pipeline is slated to move tar sands oil from Alberta to Port Arthur, Texas. Opponents say this is the dirtiest source of energy extracted so far, producing many times the carbon dioxide emissions of coal.

The Claremont protest is a part of over 100 demonstrations across the nation organized under 350.org, the organization founded by Bill McKibben. When James Hansen, the top NASA climate scientist was in Claremont as a part of the lecture series, Agenda for a Prophetic Faith, sponsored by several regional churches, he said that if all the oil from these tar sands is burned, “It’s game over for the planet.”

You are invited to join friends and family for a memorial screening of Dead Man Rockin’ on Thursday, September 26 at 7 p.m. Created by Roger Tessier and Michael Monteleone, the 80-minute documentary chronicles the life of Claremont music legend John Harrelson. The film will be shown in the Mudd Theater at the campus of the Claremont School of Theology, 1325 N. College Ave. in Claremont. There is no charge to attend.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
accounting Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA 140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E Claremont, CA 91711

For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761.
architect attorney MIKE F. OʼBRIEN
Attorney at Law

architect/contractor
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD

WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street Claremont, CA 91711

100 West Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

212 Yale Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 447-6802
www.christiansenaccounting.com
www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa

(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic restorations, and custom home building

(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com

(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Se habla español

Specialize in small business accounting and tax planning since 1962.

Building a better Claremont since 1985

attorney PAUL L. BRISSON
Attorney at Law 112 Harvard Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

attorney
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

13

CHS, El Roble bands to showcase talent with community concert
The public is invited to “Take Note!” and watch the Claremont High School Marching Band perform its full competition program at a free concert on Saturday, September 28 at the CHS athletic field from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Claremont High School Instrumental Music Boosters, the show will also feature the CHS Orchestra and the CHS Jazz Band, plus the El Roble Intermediate School band and orchestra, all performing under the lights on the athletic field. Band instructor Melanie Gonzalez, known to her students as “Mrs. G,” is excited to highlight these talented musicians who have been rehearsing during summer camps and now into the school year. “We are so fortunate in Claremont to have a community that enjoys public music through the Concerts in the Park,” she said. “Now that that series is over, we are ready to showcase our student performers for friends, family, neighbors and the general public.” The Claremont High School Marching Band will perform their entire 3-part program for the upcoming marching band field competitions to be held throughout southern California during the coming October and November. The evening will feature snacks and refreshments, an opportunity drawings and the chance to sponsor “Shout Out” messages over the loudspeakers to performers or guests. Various school booster club and spirit organizations will have booths promoting CHS spirit wear and other fundraising opportunities. CHS Instrumental Music Boosters will also be accepting donations for their annual “Take Note!” campaign to raise money to support the music program. The gates open at 6 p.m. and the music starts at 6:45 p.m. For more information, contact CHS Instrumental Music Boosters president Debra Mendelsohn at 6415758 or visit www.wolfpackmusic.org.

OUR TOWN
Celebration will salute Walterʼs anniversary, raise funds for local nonprofits
The community is invited to celebrate 40 years of Walter’s ownership by Nangy and Fahima Ghafarshad at a fundraiser this Sunday, September 22 from 4 to 7 p.m. Held at Walter’s Restaurant, 310 Yale Ave., the event will feature international cuisine, live music, a no-host bar and a silent auction of works by local artists. All proceeds will benefit Claremont Heritage and the Claremont Community Foundation. “This is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate a Village institution while honoring some of the amazing contributors to Claremont’s art and culture scene,” according to event organizers. Tickets, which are $35 in advance or $40 at the door, may be purchased at the Claremont Community Foundation, 205 Yale Ave. (398-1060); at Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty, 500 W. Foothill Blvd (624-1617); or at Heirloom, 175 N. Indian Hill Blvd. (621-7939). They are also available online at www.claremontheritage.org.

Douglas H. Moore
Douglas Houston Moore, a longtime resident of Claremont, died Tuesday, September 17, 2013 in the Health Center at Mt. San Antonio Gardens. He was 93. A gathering of Mr. Moore’s friends will meet to commemorate his life today, Friday, September 20, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Mt. San Antonio Gardens Health Center. In lieu of flowers, donations in Douglas Moore’s name may be made to the Nature Conservancy or to the Mt. San Antonio Homeship Fund, which supports residents in need of financial assistance. Center, Copeland Donahue Black Box Theater and Digital Media Center, McCarthy Aquatics Center and the Hall of Life and Research Lab at the Alf Museum of Paleontology. More than $6 million alone has been devoted to enhancing the arts at Webb. The donors’ generosity have also allowed for more than 200 renovated dormitory rooms and common spaces and new and renovated faculty housing. In addition to the completion of a number of capital projects, more than $10 million was gifted to current operations. The endowment for areas like financial aid and teacher development grew from some $17 million at the start of the campaign to over $30 million. Estate gifts totaled over $13 million. On Saturday, September 21, The Webb Schools will celebrate its success with the grand opening and dedication of the Susan A. Nelson Performing Arts Center at 5 p.m., followed by an alumni and friends reception and dinner. Registration through The Webb Schools website, www.web.org, is required but there is no cost for the event.

Webb Schools celebrates $50.4 million theater campaign
The Webb Schools, a boarding and day secondary school located in Claremont, announced the successful completion of the Fulfilling Our Promise campaign. More than 3,600 alumni, parents and supporters of The Webb Schools contributed $50.4 million to the campaign, exceeding its original goal of $40 million. Launched in October 2008, the campaign has made possible the new Susan A. Nelson Performing Arts

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

14

From doctor to docent: Claremonter loves the LA Fair

T

he crowds, whirling rides and colorful attractions of the LA County Fair, now in its 90th year, are certainly a lot to take in, but Claremont resident Dr. Donald Huber finds himself at home amid the commotion. It’s the excitement and fanfare that have drawn the local doctor to volunteer at the fairgrounds for over a decade.

When not practicing medicine, which he has done for the past 50 years—40 in the City of Trees—Mr. Huber enjoys spending his time volunteering, whether with the YMCA, Casa Colina or the Claremont Colleges. But one of his favorite ways of giving back is through the time and money he has spent among the frenzied festivities at the Fairplex. “It’s about the people more than anything else,” Dr. Huber said. “I love the community.” His beloved post as a fair volunteer began like many of his volunteer endeavors, through an opportunity provided to him by a patient. In early 2000, he was asked to join several of his patients as a board member of the Fairplex’s Millard Sheets Center for the Arts. As an art collector, Mr. Huber was happy to take up the task, surrounding himself with works of art while, as a docent, helping other fairgoers appreciate the masterpieces. “What I like the most is what [curator] Tony Sheets has done with the space,” Mr. Huber explained. “He has put so much time and thought into each artist and project he has selected. They all tell a story.” When not helping out as a board member or a docent, he has also contributed as an art donor himself. One of his pieces, a mammoth tusk engraved with miniature horses, was featured at the museum’s “Hoofprints: The Horse in Art, Legend and Action” exhibition in 2008. He has also played ringleader to the hundreds of school kids that funnel through the fairgrounds each year courtesy of The Learning Centers at the Fairplex. It’s a full day for students and leaders, beginning at 8:30 a.m. and including trips through a number of the fair’s exhibitions, but the kids are a breath of fresh air for Dr. Huber. “They are the high point for me,” he said. “They get so excited over the stuff that they see, especially the dinosaur show.” Though by now Dr. Huber is well-acquainted with the fair’s many offerings, he admits the fairgrounds still hold a bit of magic for him as well. When not volunteering at The Learning Center or Millard Sheets, he can be found spending his time at the evening concerts, taking his annual fair trip with his grandkids or adding to his art collection, bargaining with the different fair vendors.

COURIER photo/Ryan Gann Claremont resident Don Huber listens to the tour being given by Jim Cogin on Friday at the Millard Sheets Center for the Arts at the Pomona Fairgrounds. Dr. Huber began docent training for the Millard Sheets Complex last week, but has been involved with the arts center since 2000.

As his students glean new information from the educational displays, Dr. Huber is also learning from the fair’s many exhibitions. He has quite the garden at his Webb Canyon home from flexing his green thumb over the years with the help of the LA County Fair’s garden show. Through another hobby picked up at the county fair, Dr. Huber also has an impressive pack of chickens, ducks, emus and alpacas to rival the fair’s barnyard showing. Dr. Huber and his animal friends have come away from the Fairplex with numerous first-prize blue ribbons in tow. But a doctor through and through, the avid dogooder is always happy to put his expertise to use

whenever the need arises. That sometimes means helping out in a pinch when a jockey is hurt at the horse races or tending to other injuries at the Fairplex. In recent days, Dr. Huber’s time at the fair has also been spent with eyes focused on his hometown, helping the Claremont committee prepare for Claremont Day at the Fair, taking place this year on Thursday, September 26. Festivities will begin with a 3:30 p.m. community reception at Mr. Huber’s favorite, The Millard Sheets Center for the Arts, followed by the Claremont parade through the fairgrounds at 5 p.m.
FAIR VOLUNTEER continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

15

Ellen Taylor honored with Caroline Beatty Award by League of Women Voters
The League of Women Voters, at its 75th Anniversary Fall Opening Meeting last Sunday, presented its Caroline Beatty Award for Distinguished Service to Ellen Taylor, action chair of the Claremont league, for her many years of dedicated work both locally and statewide. Ms. Taylor has a long history of service with the Claremont community and local league, first assuming the role of president in 1992. To date, she has served 3 terms as president of the local board as well as taking positions on the state LWV board. She has notably been a part of numerous local studies, including topics such as affordable housing, health needs of Claremont Unified School District students and local finances. Ms. Taylor has also contributed locally by serving on the Claremont City Council, as mayor and as a board member of the Claremont Museum of Art.

Community invited to say hello to former Superintendent Keeler
Friends and colleagues of former Claremont Unified School District Superintendent Douglas Keeler and his wife Susan are invited to an open house on Monday, September 30 between 3:30 and 7 p.m. at the El Ranchero Restaurant, 984 W. Foothill Blvd. in Claremont. The Keelers will be in Claremont on a cross-country visit. Superintendent Keeler served in the Claremont schools for 13 years from 1990-2003 and during that period became acquainted with not only those in the schools, but many members of the community as well. Following his retirement, he and Ms. Keeler made their home in Williamsburg, Virginia until recently when they relocated to Naples, Florida. The event will include Mexican treats compliments of El Ranchero owner Jose Haro and a cash bar. Additional information is available by contacting Devon Freitas at 399-9909.

City of Claremont given kudos for financial reporting, transparency
The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) has awarded the city of Claremont the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for its comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR). The certificate is the highest form of recognition in governmental accounting and financial reporting. The CAFR has been judged by an impartial panel to meet the high standards of the program, including a constructive “spirit of full disclosure” to clearly communicate its financial story and motivate potential users and user groups to read the CAFR. The GFOA is a nonprofit professional association serving approximately 17,500 government finance professionals.
Dr. Huber emulates the pose of a statue while assisting docent Jim Cogin with a student tour of the Millard Sheets Center for the Arts on Friday at the Pomona Fairplex. Dr. Huber shadowed Mr. Cogin while training to become a docent at the Millard Sheets center including the tour by the sixth grade class from Harrison Elementary in Pomona.

OUR TOWN

Photo by Tressa Kentner, LWV Ellen Taylor is thrilled as she is presented with the Caroline Beatty Award for Distinguished Service at last Saturdayʼs annual meeting of the League of Women Voters, Claremont area. FAIR VOLUNTEER continued from the previous page

and a salute to the community heroes at 5:30 p.m. Look for the good doctor atop one of the community floats, another highlight of his festival experience. Dr. Huber has lived and worked all over the country, from Honolulu to Anchorage to San Francisco and New York, but he is quite content with his patients here in Claremont, and with a little bit of extra time to indulge in volunteer work and some fair time fun. “There’s nothing quite like it.” Join Dr. Huber and other Claremonters on Claremont Day at the Fair with a special discount for locals. Admission for Claremont residents on Claremont Day will be reduced to $5 when you enter “Claremont” at lacountyfair.com/onlinetickets. For more information, visit www.lacountyfair.com.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

16

New principal arrives with fresh ideas, ready to face challenges at San Antonio High School

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ean Delgado, the new principal of San Antonio High School, believes that simple changes can be revolutionary.
His first move at the helm of Claremont’s continuation school has been to create an Associated Student Body (ASB) organization. He has hired Ashley DiGiulio to serve as activities director as well as to teach science. Though starting from scratch, they are enthusiastic about getting San Antonio’s ASB off the ground. “Activities make school fun,” Mr. Delgado said. “If you make school fun, kids are more likely to go to school and participate.” The students have been responsive, with a contingent already expressing interest in forming a fashion club. The administrator feels that participation in such associations offers kids an opportunity to pursue extracurricular interests, to foster leadership, to “learn how to fail” and to master important skills like fundraising. Students transfer to San Antonio because they are at risk of not graduating. Given that Mr. Delgado’s first job out of college was with Boys Republic in Chino Hills, a school for troubled teenagers requiring highly structured supervision, he is used to dealing with kids in need of intervention. The administrator, however, who previously served as assistant principal at Nogales, Chino Hills and Don Lugo high schools, doesn’t see the students at San Antonio as being much different from other teens. “I’ve taught students in placement and students going to Yale and Stanford, and I’ve found out that kids all have the same kind of needs,” he said. “They all want to feel accepted and they all have levels of responsibility.” While students at San Antonio High School (SAHS) often have a number of credits to make up in order to receive their diplomas, Mr. Delgado said what is most needed is often an infusion of confidence. “I talked to one kid and they said, ‘I’m dumb in math. I’m dumb in school. I’m going to end up like my family, who are all dropouts,’” he related. “What I say is, ‘You haven’t really tasted success, but it’ll happen here. With a little effort, it’ll happen for you.’” There’s a lot of talent at SAHS, Mr. Delgado said, noting that one student has a black belt, another gets paid $15 an hour as a server at the Candlelight Pavilion and another sings and plays guitar. Sometimes, he said, students get so fixated on their challenges, “they fail to see that the talents they have will carry them through.” Mr. Delgado, who studied political science at Berkeley and earned his master’s at UCLA, believes his own talent

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Sean Delgado took over as principal of San Antonio High School at the beginning of the fall semester. Mr. Delgadoʼs main goal for the continuation high school is to provide a rigorous and relevant educational experience.

lies in “out-of-the-box” thinking. includes wife Sarah, has a 4-yearOne innovative idea he would old son and a 2-year-old daughter, like to implement at the school, said schools like San Antonio High which has about 110 students, is the School face a stigma. concept of breaking down the stu“People see continuation schools dent body into smaller academies. as a stepchild, a place where you This is something he did at Chino can banish students,” he said. “No Hills and Don Lugo high schools, one wants to send their [kid] there where he helped to found acadeunless it’s the only way they can mies in the areas of health sciences, graduate. And it’s hard for those performing arts and engineering perceptions to die. and design. “I’ve always felt that it was a He feels specialized learning personal challenge to make communities give students a sense Following lunch, Mr. Delgado returns to his office to doubters believe,” he continued. of belonging and of excelling in a attend to administrative duties last week at the high “This may sound insane, but I certain area. They can also offer school. would hope that one day San Antokids a taste of the future, because a nio would be a destination school. well-designed academy combines core students in the school’s woodshop will If people would say, ‘I wouldn’t mind, in classes with exposure to career training create descriptive signs that turn the gar- fact I’d even prefer, sending my student den into a sort of outdoor museum. and opportunities. there,’ I’d say to myself, ‘You did your One thing that SAHS is lacking, ac- job.’” “It lends relevance and rigor to what cording to Mr. Delgado, a self-described we do,” he said. Right now, his job is made easier by Mr. Delgado is also excited to build on technology buff, is adequate technologi- the fact that CUSD administrators and some of the programs already in place at cal resources. He would like to see every staffers have thrown their full support SAHS, like the Food Justice Program. student on campus provided with an behind him as he embarks on his first Overseen by Scripps food politics pro- electronic device such as an iPad and is year at San Antonio High School. Anfessor Nancy Neiman Auerbach with the ready to seek donations, grants and part- other helpful factor is the cozy nature of help of Claremont Unified School Dis- nerships to make this vision a reality. The the SAHS campus. trict garden coordinator Dessa d’Aquila, timing, he said, is perfect for such an en“With the smaller size, you feel less the program features some 4,000 square deavor. barriers between you and the students’ “There is so much more philanthropy lives. You get to impact students more difeet of garden. going on nowadays—you see people do- rectly,” Mr. Delgado said. “I’m super exHe and his staff are planning to use nating through sites like Kickstarter and cited to get to know the kids better and this resource in a truly interdisciplinary DonorsChoose,” he said. “People want better every day. They are getting to know way. For instance, science classes will to be a part of something. I want to cap- me better and going from being skeptical head into the garden to see biology at italize on that and tap into people’s giv- of the new guy to making fun of me.” work, English classes studying internaing spirits.” —Sarah Torribio tional poetry will use the fruits of the garMr. Delgado—whose young family storribio@claremont-courier.com den to prepare international foods and

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

17

OUR TOWN
Hughes Center to host bicycle safety course
As part of countywide efforts to promote bicycle safety, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the San Gabriel Valley Bicycle Coalition will offer a free bicycle safety education course on Saturday, September 21 from 2 to 5 p.m. The event will be held at the Hughes Center, located at 1700 Danbury Road in Claremont. The goal of the free course, which is open to participants 18 and older, is to teach cyclists to follow and obey the rules of the road to increase safety. The course—which includes a one-hour classroom setting, one-hour of parking lot practice and a one-hour bicycle ride—will be led by a certified instructor from the League of American Bicyclists. The Claremont course is limited to 12 people. Applicants must bring a functioning bike to participate. Participants will receive a free helmet, lights, bike maps and additional giveaways on a first-come, firstserved basis. Additional countywide bicycle safety training opportunities are available. For more information regarding citywide bicycle safety training opportunities, visit www.bikesgv.org. People interested in participating in the Claremont safety-training course (or any other Los Angeles County bicycle safety training) need to send their first and last name, email address, phone number and city and date requested to info@bikesgv.org.

Marie Fiske Snoksrud (Mandie Marie Fiske) and Bjønar Snoksrud were married in a civil ceremony at the Oslo Courthouse on November 22, 2012 in Oslo, Norway. A formal reception was held on a clear night at a rustic lodge in the hills above Oslo on April 27, 2013. The couple was pleased to welcome quite a few international guests and family members, in addition to friends and family from the Oslo region. They honeymooned at a resort in the Canary Islands. The bride is a 1993 Claremont High School graduate. She is the daughter of retired Claremont Unified School District employee Debi Coleman of Upland and former longtime Claremont resident Jerry Fiske, who now resides in Redlands. She is the sister of Brian Fiske, also a CHS graduate, who now resides in Oceanside. The bride wore a traditional Norwegian dress called a bunad from the South Trondelag region of Norway. She wore an ivory satin gown with a birdcage fascinator headpiece and carried a bouquet of white calla lilies for the reception. The groom, of Oslo, Norway, is the son of Odd Snoksrud of Enebakk, Norway and brother of Eirik The event, benefiting the Claremont Museum of Art, begins at 5 p.m. with a reception, silent auction and exhibition visit, followed by dinner with guest speaker Woody Dike. A few tickets are still available at $125. For more information, call Marilyn Ray at 941-4437.

Fiske-Snoksrud

Snoksrud of Oslo, Norway. The groom graduated with a master’s degree in computer science from the University of Oslo and works as a software engineer for Cisco Systems. The bride earned a bachelor’s degree in business from the University of La Verne and a master’s degree in International Education Policy and Planning from the University of Oslo in Oslo, Norway. She works as a business English teacher. The happy couple currently resides in Oslo, Norway. works have been performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestras, and in concerts and broadcasts throughout the United States and abroad.

Fall gala to honor local watercolor master Phil Dike
The Claremont Museum of Art will hold its fall gala, “A Wondrous Evening: Celebrating the Watercolor World of Phil Dike,” on Saturday, September 21 at Scripps College in conjunction with the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery’s exhibition, “Chasing Daylight: Philip Latimer Dike, 1927-1943.” Mr. Dike was a key member of the early California Watercolor Society and worked on many classic animated Disney films from 1935 to 1945. He came to Claremont in 1950 to join the art faculty of Scripps College and also taught at the Claremont Graduate School for several decades. Mr. Dike was an inspiration to many well-known artists and his work is included in numerous prestigious collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Pomona College concert features music by Copland, Kohn
Pomona College’s Department of Music presents keyboard artist Genevieve Feiwen Lee in concert on Saturday, September 21 at 8 p.m. in the Mabel Shaw Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St. Ms. Feiwin Lee’s program includes works for piano and harpsichord by François Couperin, Aaron Copland and Ludwig van Beethoven plus a world premiere of “Five Reactions,” a selection composed this year by Pomona College emeritus faculty member Karl Kohn. The concert is free and open to the public. A longtime member of the southern California music community, Mr. Kohn was born in Vienna in 1926 and was educated in New York and at Harvard. With his wife, Margaret, he has presented 2-piano concerts throughout this country and Europe. Mr. Kohn also served 2 decades on the board of directors of the Monday Evening Concerts in Los Angeles. His

Joint public meeting between city and school district set for Monday afternoon
A joint public meeting with the City of Claremont and the Claremont Unified School District board of education will be held on Monday, September 23 at 6 p.m. at the Kirkendall Center Board Room, 170 W. San Jose Ave. The agenda notes that an oral report will be given to address changes to the city’s Youth and Family Master Plan Update. Action and recommendation is that the city council and school board receive and file the report. A second item for discussion includes the acceptance and approval of the City and School District Joint Use Partnership. The gropus will “reconfirm the ideological commitment to sharing facilities for joint and community use; direct staff to continue to work and resolve outstanding considerations,” according to the agenda.

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

18

Chicken in Claremont coop tests positive for West Nile

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an Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control has put locals on heightened alert after the West Nile Virus was found in a chicken coop located in northeast Claremont late last week.
Vector Control keeps 10 coops throughout the San Gabriel Valley where chickens are tested every 10 days to 2 weeks for antibodies associated with the West Nile Virus. On Thursday, September 12, at the coop located north of the Claremont Colleges, one chicken tested positive for the mosquito-borne virus. The Claremont finding is just one of several cases of West Nile confirmed in chicken coops in the San Gabriel Valley within the past month. Other confirmed cases of the potentially harmful virus were found in Arcadia, Irwindale and Monterey Park. An estimated 74 human infections of West Nile have been reported in LA County this year alone, 12 of which were found in the San Gabriel Valley, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. While no human cases have been reported in the city of Claremont at this time, Vector officials remain concerned because not every case results in West Nile neuroinvasive disease. Only one in an estimated 150 infections result in severe illness, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Further, Kenn Fujioka, district manager for the San Gabriel Mosquito and Vector Control District, believes it possible that 1300 cases of West Nile have gone untested and unreported. “This level of under-reporting leaves residents with the mistaken impression that West Nile Virus is not a big problem so they do not take these warnings seriously,” Mr. Fujioka said in a statement. “Any patient or their family members would testify that getting sick from West Nile virus is not a trivial issue." Vector employees have increased inspections throughout the San Gabriel Valley, Mr. Fujioka notes, in hopes of monitoring standing water for infected

mosquitos. Locals are also asked to take the necessary precautions to prevent the virus spread, especially in the months of August and September when West Nile transmission is believed to be most prevalent. “West Nile is continuously present throughout the summer here in southern California; the mosquitos are more active, the virus multiplies more quickly when it is warm, ” Mr. Fujioka said. “We don’t have a big staff and we need the public to modify their behavior so that risk is reduced, from making sure screens are intact to maintaining swimming pools to making sure their gutters aren’t collecting standing water.” Small, forgotten pots or nooks in residents’ backyards are also a common source of standing water that often goes undetected. As Vector employees inspect well-established sources of standing water, residents are encouraged to do their part to not only prevent the

virus from spreading, but from contracting the virus themselves. Mr. Fujioka encourages San Gabriel Valley residents to avoid outdoor activity between the hours of dusk and dawn and to wear light-colored, tightly-weeved long sleeves and pants as well as repellent when outdoors during those hours. Candles or “zappers” should not be relied on to avoid mosquito bites. Residents who come across dead birds, especially crows, are asked to report the incident to the local Vector Control district, as birds are prone to contracting the West Nile Virus. For reports of dead birds, or requests for help in removing standing water, contact the San Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control at 626-814-9466 or www.sgvmoquito.org.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

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Friday, September 20 to Saturday, September 28

CALENDAR
Claremontʼs Wine Walk took place on Saturday, featuring wine tastings and food samplings at many Village establishments.

Galleries
A closing reception will be held for artist Fikriye Oz on Thursday.

Nightlife
Solid Ray Woods performs on September 22 at Hip Kitty.

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YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

September Friday

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FOOD TRUCK The Grilled Cheese Truck will be at Claremont Craft Ales after 4 p.m. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C, Claremont. FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Dine downtown, then stroll the Village to hear free live music performances from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s performers include the Seth Greenberg Combo (jazz) at the Public Plaza, One Way Ticket (rock) at the Claremont Chamber and the Mike Taylor Trio (rock/jazz) at city hall. ROUTE 66 PARTY presented by the Kiwanis Club of Claremont, featuring a classic car show and Route 66 memorabilia. Dine and dance to live music by The Ravelers and come ready to bid on items in the silent auction. There will also be a free drawing, an opportunity drawing for $20 and a casino night with prizes. This event benefits Save Our Schools and Kiwanis-sponsored community projects for youth and seniors throughout the year. 6 p.m. Tickets are $35 (includes dinner and bonus $50 in casino dollars) or $40 at the door. DoubleTree by Hilton, 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Order tickets online at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3 70762.

COURIER photos/Jenelle Rensch The COURIERʼs Claremont After Hours bloggers visited Wine Walk on Saturday. Read all about it and view a slide show at www.claremontafterhours.com.

September Saturday

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5K FOR OLA Runners of all ages are invited to a 5K walk/run through Claremont hosted by Our Lady of the Assumption School. Registration is $35 per person and includes a T-shirt, available at www.racewire.com. Same-day registration and check-in begins at 6 a.m. at OLA School, located at 611 N. Bonita Ave., Claremont. A 1K race for children will be held at 10 a.m. as well as a post-race pancake breakfast. For more information, call 626-7135.

LATINO AUTHOR SUMMIT for local middle school through college students, featuring seminars, panel discussions, food trucks, entertainment and exhibitors. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free admission. University of La Verne, 1950 Third St., La Verne. Visit www.lbff.us/summit2014.php for more information. 20-YEAR ANNIVERSARY Celebrate the artwork of Sylvia Megerdichian of the National Watercolor Society and her Art Box Studio, which features paintings, drawings and collage. 4 to 9 p.m. Art Box Studio, 1302 Monte Vista #9, Upland. SPIN CIRCUS “Shakti: Middle East/Indian Aerial Spectacle” featuring aerial performers, belly dancers, a henna tattoo artist, hula hoopers and live Middle Eastern music. Friday and Saturday, September 20 and 21, at 9 p.m. Stay later for the after-party on Saturday. $15. Pilates Studio M, 548 W. First St., Claremont. Call 625-3333 or email m@pilatesstudiom.com. STYLE YOUR SHOE at Nectar. Bring a pair of blank Toms or other shoes and have one of 3 local artists create a one-of-a-kind pair. Simple designs for $5, more detailed for $10. Call in advance to reserve your shoe size. 626-7600. 319 W. First St., Ste. B, Claremont.

September Sunday

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DIA DE LOS MUERTOS sugar skull-making class will take place at Rio de Ojas in the Claremont Village at 250 N. Harvard Ave. Sisters Helen and Barbara will demonstrate how to use the sugar molds, and share what they have learned to create the bestlooking skulls. You will be able to try your hand in using a mold; then you will decorate a pre-dried sugar skull to take home. For ages 10 and up. $25 per person. LIVE JAZZ performance by the Carl Schafer Quartet on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. 946-1398. CELEBRATE 40 years of advancing the gastronomy, art, culture and community of Claremont. The community is invited to celebrate 40 years of Walter’s ownership by Nangy and Fahima Ghafarshad at a fundraising event from 4 to 7 p.m. at Walter’s Restaurant, 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. Enjoy international cuisine, live music, a no-host bar and a silent auction of works by local artists. All proceeds will benefit Claremont Heritage and the Claremont Community Foundation. Tickets are $35 in advance or $40 at the door. Tickets may be purchased at the Claremont Community Foundation,

205 Yale Ave. (398-1060); at Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty, 500 W. Foothill Blvd (624-1617); at Heirloom, 175 N. Indian Hill Blvd. (621-7939) or online at www.claremontheritage.org.

September Monday

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SEMINAR Educational Medicare seminar for seniors at The Claremont Club at 7 p.m. on Monday, September 23 and 1 p.m. on Thursday, September 26. The seminar will feature discussions on how to get the most out of Medicare. Learn who qualifies, enrollment periods and eligibility and what is and isn’t covered. There will also be a general explanation of Medicare, Tricare and Medicaid and a brief description of Obamacare followed by a Q&A. RSVP by calling Laura Van Dran, 921-1033, or The Claremont Club, 625-6791. Light refreshments will be served.

September Tuesday

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KENYA’S 43RD TRIBE Arun D. Tolia, a local real estate professional, will describe how he was born a British subject, became a Kenyan cit9-DAY CALENDAR continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

izen and eventually chose to become an American. Mr. Tolia and his wife Vanita are world travelers, are deeply involved in the community and won the Patriot Award at the La Verne Fourth of July parade. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont. COMPUTER CLUB Ed O’Donnell, web master of the Claremont Senior Computer Club, will share “Everything You Want to Know About the Claremont Seniors Website.” Hosted by the Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 399-5488.

child development, emergent literacy, play and music, children and tantrums and physical fitnesss and movement. Registration is required. Sign up at the Children’s Information Desk or call 621-4902.

live music performances from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s performers include Them Kool Kats (swing/jazz/standards) at the Public Plaza, The Vinyl Number (rock) at the Claremont Chamber and Delta 88 (rock/oldies) at city hall.

September Thursday

26 Saturday

September

28

September Wednesday

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PLAYTIME for parents and children as part of the Family Place Parent Child Workshop, taking place at the Claremont Library from 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. For parents and caregivers of children ages 12 months to 3-and-a-half years old. Participants will be able to play together, do an art activity and meet other families. Parents will also meet local professionals and get resources to help in the challenging but rewarding task of parenting infants and toddlers. This is a 5-session workshop with a different resource specialist available each week to discuss topics such as parenting and

FILM SCREENING Join friends and family for the memorial screening of Dead Man Rockin’ at Mudd Theater on the campus of the Claremont School of Theology, 1325 N. College Ave. The film is approximately an hour and 20 minutes and depicts John Harrelson’s life in music. 7 p.m. There is no admittance charge for this memorial showing. CLAREMONT DAY at the LA County Fair. The festivities begin with a 3:30 p.m. community reception at The Millard Sheets Center for the Arts, followed by the Claremont parade through the fairgrounds at 5 p.m. and a salute to the community heroes at 5:30 p.m. Admission for Claremont residents on Claremont Day will be reduced to $5 when you enter “Claremont” at lacountyfair.com/onlinetickets.

CONCERT UNDER THE STARS featuring the El Roble Marching Band and Jazz Band, Claremont High Orchestra, CHS Jazz Band and CHS Marching Band performing their complete show for upcoming field competitions. The show is free and open to the public, with snacks and refreshments available for purchase. 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. at the Claremont High School athletic field; doors open at 6 p.m.

LECTURE AND PAPER-MAKING Artist and paper-maker John Risseuw presents, “Making Paper Mean Something” as part of the free Frederic W. Goudy Lecture series at Scripps College. 7 p.m. This presentation will look at how one artist came to produce such work and will describe The Paper Landmine Print Projects, which include prints and a limited edition book about landmines, victims and the detritus of war executed on paper made from the clothing of victims, plant fibers from the minefields and the shredded currency of nations that make the landmines. A dinner will be held before the lecture at 5 p.m. at the Scripps College Hampton Room for $25. On Saturday and Sunday, September 28 and 29, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., participate in a paper-making workshop at the Scripps College Press. $150.

September

Friday

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FOOD TRUCK Slummin’ Gourmet will be at Claremont Craft Ales after 4 p.m. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C, Claremont. FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Dine downtown, then stroll the Village to hear free

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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GALLERIES
57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m.; second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —Through October 26: “Spiritual Journeys” featuring Sharon Algozer, Jeanne Andersen and Georga Garside. Ms. Andersen, who painted and taught in Kenya for many years, creates largescale mixed-media canvases. Inspired by the music of George Frideric Handel’s “Messiah” (1741), she uses abstract imagery to suggest what might happen if this music could be viewed through ballet movements. In her linoleum prints on a textile background, Ms. Garside, art teacher and MFA candidate, takes her inspiration from medieval Byzantine icons, which are noted for their extensive use of gold leaf. Ms. Algozer, a Claremont fiber artist and retired professor of design from Chaffey College, integrates a variety of materials to examine the relationship of humanity’s spiritual history and nature’s influence on our inner lives. Reception: Saturday, October 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through September 29: 2013 Ceramic Biennial, a community exhibition and fundraiser featuring southern California artists in association with the American Ceramic Society-Design Chapter, with guest artist Karen Sullivan and guest judge Patrick Crabb. —October 12 through December 29: “Icheon: Reviving the Korean Ceramics Tradition,” an exhibition organized by Icheon, South Korea. Icheon has a history of ceramic culture that began over 5000 years ago and has a reputation for its internationally renowned ceramics cultural events. Now Icheon has reached out to an American institution for the very first time. In the premiere exhibition of its kind in the United States, Icheon will present over 230 objects never before seen on American soil that exemplify the revival of the ceramics tradition in Korea, from antique techniques to contemporary innovations. ART BOX STUDIO: 1302 Monte Vista #9, Upland. www.artboxwork shops.com. —By appointment through September 30: “Mom, it looks like a box” was the comment Sylvia Megerdichian’s son made when they both first saw the studio, thus the name Art Box Studio, which opened in September 1993 as a space where Ms. Megerdichian works, teaches and hosts art workshops. She enjoys creating paintings that are “not real and yet real,” pulling from a place that is familiar. Ms. Megerdichian invites guests to celebrate 20 years at the studio by sharing with the public her drawings, paintings and collage. Artist reception: Saturday, September 21 from 4 to 9 p.m. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Image courtesy of The Colony at Loft 204 A closing reception will be held for artist Fikriye Oz on Thursday, September 26 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. upstairs in the Claremont Packing House, 532 W. First Street.

www.buddhamouse.com. 626-3322. —Through September 30: “Family Archetypes,” acrylic and mixed-media works by Christopher Cousins and his10year-old daughter Sequoia. Mr. Cousins small-surface landscapes depict fields of action or archetypal landscapes in which the struggle to perceive transcendence takes place. Sequoia’s pieces are created working with the same materials. Though born in New York City, Mr. Cousins was raised in Oklahoma where he was greatly influenced by the various artistic expressions of American Indian cultures. He graduated with a BFA from Boston University and is currently working as an actor in Los Angeles. He started showing his work in 2000 in the Los Angeles area. In 2004, he joined Pharmaka a group of like-minded LA-based artists. In 2005, he participated in his first international exhibition in Venice, Italy. Mr. Cousins works with Bert Green Fine Art in LA, the Lowe Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Foster/White Gallery in Seattle, Washington. Christopher now lives in Los Angeles with his wife Laurie, his daughter Sequoia and his son Sean. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. —Through September 30: Eileen Senner has been awarded 2 National Endowment for the Arts Visual Art Fellowships and several Scripps College Faculty Research Grants. She has exhibited her artwork in galleries and museums throughout the United States. She earned her MFA from Claremont Graduate University and her art is in the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery and Pomona College Museum of Art. For more information about Ms. Senner, visit her website at www.eileensenner.com. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in the Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. 626-3066. —Through September 30: “Dream

Dancer,” an art exhibition by Mary Beth Fletcher. CLAREMONT GRADUATE UNIVERSITY: 150 E. Tenth St., Claremont. 621-8000. —Through October 25: “Remodel 2: Expanding the Dialog Exhibition.” THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m., with live music sponsored by Live on Analog Records at 8 p.m. Visit www.loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of gallery space. Call Vicki at 626-224-7915 or 626-963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high school age students. —Through September 30: Fikriye Oz, born and raised in Istanbul, is featured this month with her oil paintings in a collection titled, “The Human Condition— Remainders.” Ms. Oz studied at Laguna College of Art and Design and currently lives in Madison, Wisconsin. Learn more about her at www.loft204.com. Closing reception: Thursday, September 26 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. —Tuesdays, starting October 1: Yoga class for all levels. Instructor Jasmin Iskandar has over 400 hours of teacher training in Hatha and Vinyasa Yoga. She was first trained in the Krishnamacharya lineage by Shiva Rea at Exhale Center for Sacred Movement in Venice Beach. Later, Ms. Iskandar traveled to India to study the Sri Sivananda Saraswati lineage of Hatha yoga. Her classes offer the dynamism of Vinyasa with the science of Hatha. Visit www.levitatela.com to learn more about Ms. Iskandar. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesdays: Belly dance class for all levels. Instructor Adina Dane performs at many locations in the area including Mediterranean restaurants and community events. Learn basic upper and lower body isolations, footwork and important

stretching techniques. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. dA CENTER FOR THE ARTS: 252 S. Main St., Pomona Arts Colony. Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m.; Thursday, noon to 9 p.m. 3979716. —Through September 28: “Lesson Plan” is a group exhibition that will explore the social dynamics of pedagogy as it pertains to contemporary art making. The show will feature the multidisciplinary works of 10 Los Angeles-based artists, all of whom recently ended their training together in a yearlong intensive arts education fellowship. The 2-week long exhibition will include works, ranging from painting to video, that seek to highlight the issues artists face when revisiting the classroom as a teacher. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 626-5455. —Through September 22: “Staff Selects,” showcasing both the staff and clients of First Street Gallery Art Center. GALERIA DE PÉROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211, Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment. —Mondays: “Mindful Beauty Meditation Gathering.” Connect, listen, share, create, be, meditate and love. Meditation sessions every Monday evening from 8 to 9:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Space is limited to 10 people per session. Contact Nichoel Ann at nichoel.ann@gmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/mindful.beauty. —Tuesdays: “Tribe Tuesday,” an open studio session for artists to share the space and work on their pieces. Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Space is limited to 10 people per session. Call 236-1562 or visit www.facebook.com/galeriadeperolas. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Ongoing: Visitors welcome, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona Arts Colony. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —Through October 4: “Once in a Blue Moon.” Pick-up: Saturday, October 5. IRENE CARISON GALLERY: The University of La Verne, Miller Hall, 1950 Third St., La Verne. 593-3511, ext. 4281. —Through October 11: David Maisel’s “Black Maps: American Landscape and the Apocalyptic Sublime.” Faculty reflection papers by professor of biology Christine Broussard and associate professor of sociology Roy Kwon. LENZNER FAMILY ART GALLERY: First floor of Atherton Hall on the Pitzer College campus. Free admission. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through December 6: “Emerging
GALLERIES continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

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RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

within prevalent visual-historical renderings. These critical interventions challenge existing discourses, destabilizing the deeply ambiguous and often surreal Artist Series #8: Danielle Adair—“On the Rocks, in the taxonomies of “raced, sexed and gendered” represenLand.” This documentary-performance-video installa- tation. Marking the 50th anniversary of the death tion, analyzes the role of ‘tourist-observer,’ within con- of W.E.B. Du Bois, “Glyphs” presents a slideshow protemporary ‘conflict zones,’ and questions how a ‘tourist’ jection of “The Paris Albums 1900,” a series of portraits perceives and experiences sites of historic and contem- originally commissioned by the renowned African porary political significance. The project incorporates American sociologist, activist and scholar’s groundexperiences of and around the peace lines of Belfast, breaking “American Negro Exhibit” for the 1900 Paris the Berlin Wall, the Stone Walls of New England, the World Exposition. Du Bois’ quintessential counterUnited States-Mexican border in Ciudad Juárez and the archive is positioned in dialogue with those created by Occupy Wall Street Movement. By highlighting these the contemporary artists in “Glyphs.” Screening: “The sites, the exhibition explores the notion of ‘play’ as a Stuart Hall Project: Excerpts” on Friday, September 20 persistent and ethical form of resistance in relation to from 5 to 7 p.m. in the George C.S. Benson Auditorium. the physicality of a ‘wall’ as defined by these specific Walk-through: Thursday, November 7 at 4 p.m. locations. Although exploring the intersection of place, PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL politics and play in these sites, the project resists the ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, urge to enforce a dominant narrative, seeking instead Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections to excavate unfamiliar forms of resistance and protest. of international fine art, folk art and material culture Lecture: “The War-related Murals of Northern Ireland from 10,000 BC to the present, contributed by Pil1979-2010.” Thursday, October 3 from 2:45 to 4 p.m. grim Place residents and community friends, coverin West Hall Q120. Artist lecture: Danielle Adair ing every continent. 399-5544. Thursday, December 5 from 2:45 to 4 p.m. in the —September 20 through November 25: “Stepping Out in Style,” an exhibition exploring the countless Lenzner Family Art Gallery. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & ways human beings have designed and worn footwear CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, all over the planet. Over 100 historic and contempoinfo@malooffoundation.org or www.malooffoun rary shoes, boots, sandals, slippers and stockings— many from the Petterson’s significant collection of dation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays historic Chinese costumes—will be on display. and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Mal- POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 333 N. oof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Mal- College Ave., Claremont. Open Tuesday through Sunoof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, day, noon to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to advance reservations are strongly recommended for all 11 p.m. Open September 5 though December 5; closed tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and Thanksgiving day. For more information, visit $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visi- www.pomona.edu/museum. Contact Pomona College tors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 Museum of Art by email at museuminfo@pomona.edu p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Book- or call 621-8283. store. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native —Through December 22: “David Michalek: Figure Studies.” Mr. Michalek’s work applies the technology to California and other parts of the world. —Through October 27: “With Strings Attached: Art in of high-speed HD video to the recording of human the Craft of Sound.” There are nearly 40 musical in- movement. This exhibition is in conjunction with the struments in the exhibition, representing a broad cross- interdisciplinary symposium, “The Moving Mind,” orsection of cultures and traditions. The performances ganized by the Pomona College departments of dance bring to life a number of the instruments, some of which and neuroscience, and takes place October 3 through 5. —Through October 5: David Michalek’s “Slow Dancare not often heard. NICHOLS GALLERY: First floor of the Broad Cen- ing” evenings on the façade of Bridges Auditorium at ter on Pitzer College campus. Tuesday through Friday, Pomona College. 6 to 9 p.m. 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. —Through December 22: “John Divola: As Far As I Could Get.” This exhibition is a collaborative project 607-8797. —Through December 5: “Glyphs: Acts of Inscrip- led by Santa Barbara Museum of Art and shown simultion” builds on the premise that identities are constituted taneously at SBMA, LACMA and the Pomona College through acts of inscription—real or imagined—into the Museum of Art. visual archives that constitute history, popular icono- —Through December 22: “Resonant Minds: Abstracgraphies and artistic canons. The exhibition explores tion and Perception.” The exhibition includes a range the consequences of such acts on the poetic and political of abstract art, from pivotal works of early European dimensions of representation, difference and visibility. Modernism to key examples of Minimalism in the Working in photography, moving image and mixed United States. media, the artists cannibalize and query such archives —Through October 20: “Project Series 46: Hirokazu to create new image repertoires that point to the lacu- Kosaka—On the Verandah Selected Works 1969nae—the silences, absences and erasures—contained 1974.” This exhibition, co-curated by Rebecca McGALLERIES continued from the previous page

Grew and Glenn Phillips, brings together documentation of Kosaka’s early artworks and rarely-seen films and is accompanied by a publication. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., at 11th and Columbia on the Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 6073397 or www.scrippscollege.edu/williamson-gallery/. —Through October 13: “Chasing Daylight, Philip Latimeer Dike 1927-1943.” Mr. Dike contributed greatly to the California art scene of the 1930s and 1940s through his work in what would later become known as the “California Style” of watercolor painting. As the 1920s drew to a close and throughout the 1930s, Mr. Dike began to master the art of translating the effects of light and color into watercolor. In those early years, his fascination with this work led the rather shy and private artist on a journey throughout the United States and Europe. With more than 50 paintings, the exhibition tells the story of these years in detail. Visitors will view his impressions of life in New York in the late 1920s and his studies at the Arts Students League; his work in Europe, including his time at the American Academy of Art at Fontainebleau; and his travels afterwards. Paintings created after his return from his travels overseas will also be on display, as he continued his exploration of light and color by recording street scenes, architecture and landscapes in southern California and the southwest. Closing reception: Sunday, October 13, featuring a watercolor demonstration. —October 26 through December 15: “Focus on Photographs: Building Photograph Collections at Scripps,” features fine photographs and books, including donations by Virginia Adams; C. Jane Hurley Wilson and Michael G. Wilson; Sharon and Michael Blasgen; and Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin. On view will be works by Ansel Adams, Diane Arbus, Julia Margaret Cameron, Graciela Iturbide, Edward Weston, and many others. Opening reception: Saturday, October 26 from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Williamson Gallery featuring live music and light refreshments. A panel discussion will take place at the Clark Humanities Museum on the Scripps campus from 4 to 5 p.m. These events are free and open to the public. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6 weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through September 30: Claremont artist Jacqueline Knell presents a series of oil paintings, “Linear Thinking,” depicting people amid graphic lines in public spaces. Ms. Knell’s paintings offer a fresh perspective of modern life. All of the paintings in this series are in a square format, creating a contemporary statement. She is inspired by Eduard Manet’s quote, “One must be of one’s time and paint what one sees.” Ms. Knell has exhibited figurative paintings and portraits in numerous local venues.

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EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open daily from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, September 26: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music featuring Clayton Severson. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. and Saturday at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —Friday and Saturday, September 20 and 21: Luke Ashlocke, as seen on The Daily Buzz, Montreal Comedy Festival, Dr. Phil, Spike TV and Comedy Network. —Sunday, September 22: Two Milk Minimum features a rotation of outlandish and zany comedy magicians, jugglers, musicians, improv artists, puppeteers and novelty acts. $10. 4:30 and 7 p.m. —Sunday, September 22: Al Miller Presents. 7 p.m. — Sunday, September 22: Silly Sundays (open mic/auditions). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, September 25: Comedy Traffic School with Jeff Hodge. 8:30 p.m. —Thursday, September 26: First Timer Funnies with Nick Cobb. —Friday and Saturday, September 27 and 28: Bruce Jingles as seen on Showtime, NUVOTV, NBC, TMZ and USO tours.

NIGHTLIFE

FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.foxpomona.com. —Friday, October 11: Gogol Bordello. —Tuesday, October 15: Disclosure. —Friday, October 25: AFI. —Saturday, October 26: The Naked and Famous. —Thursday, November 21: Sleeping with Sirens. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. 865-3802. —Friday, October 4: Modest Mouse. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, September 20: Flattop Tom and his Jump Cats (swing/blues/rockabilly). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, September 21: Ginger and the Hoosier Daddies (tin pan alley/vintage jazz/swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, September 22: Solid Ray Woods (soul). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, September 24: Hayman & Sako. 9 p.m. —Wednesday, September 25: Open Jam Night with Carl Bunch & Friends. 8 p.m. —Thursday, September 26: The American Parlor Songbook. 7 p.m. —Friday, September 27: The Kid and Nic Show. 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, September 28: Little Faith. 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Call 624-2272 or visit www.casa425.com. —Wednesday, September 28: Lorenzo Grassi (trio) performs 7 to 10 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, September 20: O Sensei (psychedelic/ rock/indie). 10 p.m. —Saturday, September 21: Marlo Rojas & A Saturday Night Pink. 10 p.m.

—Sunday, September 22: Sunday dinner piano music from 6 to 8 p.m. —Tuesday, September 24: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, September 25: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, September 26: The Lunge Trio (jazz). 8 p.m. —Friday, September 27: Soul Identity (rock/soul). 10 p.m. —Saturday, September 28: Joe Atman, “It Took The Village.” 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar and lounge areas. 767-2255. —Margarita Mondays: $2 house margaritas, $3 house wine, $3 delirium tremens and $3 bolawnies. —Tequila Tuesdays: $2 house tequila, $3 house wine, $3 Corona and $3 nachos. —Whiskey Wednesdays: $2 house scotch or bourbon, $3 house wine, $3 Stella and $3 bruschetta. —Thirsty Thursdays: Half-off all drinks and appetizers all evening. —Finest Fridays: $2 house vodka, $3 Pomona Queen, Green Flash and Hanger 24. Plus $3 house wine, $4 nachos and $6 classic burger and fries all evening. Kimera performs Gypsy Kings-style music. —Saturdays and Sundays: $3 Bloody Marys, mimosas and Afghan fries from opening to closing. Live jazz music is performed on weekends.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #229

Across
1. Life's partner 5. After-bath powder 9. Union foe 13. Claremont park 14. Murray or Federer, often 15. "Where the heart is" 16. Edmonton hockey player 17. Bird whose male hatches the eggs 18. ___ and terminer (criminal court) 19. Building for officiating clergy 21. Bladed weapon 22. ___ Getz ("Lethal Weapon 2" role for Joe Pesci) 23. Dairy product 25. Scope for freedom of action 30. Matrix character 31. Palindromic title 32. Destroy

34. Clear a tape 38. GQ competitor 41. Excitement 42. Interlocks 43. Pickle preserver 44. Cool guy 46. Blame 47. Stars and Stripes land 49. Igneous rock with crystals 52. Legendary CHS football coach (goes with 68 across) 56. Ship, affectionately 57. Give 58. Systematic training by repetition 64. Atlas section 65. __ 'n' Andy 66. Military scouting 67. Religious denomination 68. See 52 across

69. Greek mountain nymph 70. On the safe side, at sea 71. Shoelace problem 72. Lays down the lawn

Down
1. Nest 2. Not busy 3. Swiss granola 4. Brightly colored tropical bird 5. Sharp 6. Suffer continuous pain 7. On guard 8. Color stick 9. Fix for a purpose, even though not well-suited 10. SA aquatic rodent 11. Islamic leader 12. Visorless cap 13. Song genre 20. Toby Keith song: "___ Smile" 24. Social misfit 25. "Silence of the ___s" movie 26. Food thickener 27. Subway alternative 28. Inanimate 29. Get to final form 33. Extinct bird 35. Light 36. Hollywood Boulevard sight 37. Spot 39. Flood 40. Arizona town 45. ___while 48. Strong liquor 50. Lighthouse, formerly 51. Different prefix 52. Capital of Tibet 53. Artist equipment 54. Standing by 55. Cruel individual 59. Small salmon 60. "___ she lovely?" 61. Coffee choice 62. Tuber sources 63. Beatty of "Deliverance"

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #228

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

27

PERFORMING ARTS
BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box office hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online; you can easily choose seats at www.pomona.edu/bridges. —October 7 through 16: The Courage to Remember, a traveling Holocaust exhibit. An opening ceremony takes place on Monday, October 7 at 4 p.m. Representatives from the Simon Wiesenthal Center and a Holocaust survivor will speak. Free. The exhibit will be on display and open to the public Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. —Thursday, October 31: Screening of the psychological horror film The Shining, produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall. Not recommended for children or the faint of heart. $10. 10 p.m. —Wednesday, November 6: An Acoustic Evening with Ben Harper. Ben Harper is a musician, artist and activist. Whether it’s through the soul of southern gospel, ‘70s funk, blues, reggae or straightforward rock and roll, Mr. Harper and his trademark Weissenborn guitar have been stunning audiences with incendiary live performances and timeless songwriting for years. Tickets are $30 and $49.50. 8 p.m. —Friday, November 8: SCAMFest—The annual Southern California A Capella Music Festival. Tickets will be available soon. 7:30 p.m. —Saturday, November 16: OLIVER! Music and lyrics by Lionel Bart, based on the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. Tickets will be available soon. 2 p.m. —December 7 through 15: Inland Pacific Ballet presents The Nutcracker. Shows on December 7 and 8 include a live orchestra. Show times are December 7 and 14 at 1 and 7 p.m., and December 8 and 15 at 1 p.m. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College,

150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Saturday, September 21: “Keyboard Delights” featuring Genevieve Feiwen Lee on piano and harpsichord. Music by Beethoven, Copland, Couperin and Karl Kohn. 8 p.m. —Sunday, September 29: Organ recital featuring Douglas Cleveland. Music by J.S. Bach, David Briggs, Alexandre Guilmant and Camille SaintSaëns. 3 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through October 13: Sweeny Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. —October 18 through November 24: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. —November 30 through December 28: Because it’s Christmas. HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000 W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. 626-963-9411 or www.haughpac.com. —Friday, September 27: Columbia Artists presents Hungarian State Folk Ensemble. Costumed dancers perform authentic Hungarian folk dances supported by both a folk orchestra playing traditional instruments and the world-famous Gipsy Orchestra, performing folk music that inspired Liszt, Brahms, Kodály and Bartók. $36 general admission, $34 students/seniors or $18 for those 16 years old and younger. —Saturday, October 12: A Conversation with Edith Head. In her 6 decades of costume design, Edith Head dressed most of the great stars from Mae West to Elizabeth Taylor, received 35 Academy Award nominations and won an unprecedented 8 Oscars. Susan Claassen stars as Edith Head in this behind-the-scenes feast of great movie lore and sto-

ries filled with humor, ambition and, above all, glamour. Complimentary tea and light refreshments will be served starting at 1 p.m. The show begins at 2 p.m. Tickets are $32 or $30 for students and seniors. LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call 477-2752 or visit www.lewisfamilyplayhouse.com. —Sunday, September 22: Wynonna & The Big Noise.

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Salinger [PG13], Prisoners [R], Thanks for Sharing [R], The Family [R], You Will Be My Son (subtitles) [R]. —Saturday and Sunday, September 21 and 22: Museum Hours (subtitles) [NR] at 11 a.m. and Good Ol’ Freda [PG] at 11:10 a.m. —Sunday, September 22: Carmen, opera in cinema from Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour (subtitles). 10 a.m.

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, CA 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

28

All about Joel Harper: musician, author of All the Way to the Ocean

T

he COURIER is delighted to present our secondever Claremont Kids section. This time around, we have a story written by a cub reporter from Oakmont Elementary School, 4th grader Ady Bolinger.

A stork appears to be unhappy in its polluted environment in Joel Harperʼs childrenʼs book All the Way to the Ocean.

Ady, 9, recently took some time to talk to Joel Harper, author of All the Way to the Ocean, a book about the things we do that dirty our oceans and how we can stop polluting them. Her story turned out great and inspired us to take an ocean theme for this edition’s kids pages. For more information on Mr. Harper’s book and the upcoming movie it has inspired, visit www.allthewaytotheocean.com. Our favorite part of Claremont Kids is that it showcases work by kid reporters and photographers. We have been hearing lately from lots of our youngest readers who are interested in putting their creative stamp on a COURIER feature, and we’d love to hear from more. We’re also looking for your jokes, drawings, recipes and other ideas. For instance, you might want to send us a photograph of your favorite pet with a caption describing why he or she is so special. Please include your name, age and school. As with anything you do online, make sure it’s okay with your parents first. You can send your submissions to me, Sarah Torribio, at storribio@claremont-courier.com with the phrase Claremont Kids in the subject line. Our kids pages appear on the third Friday of each month. Look for us next month on Friday, October 18. See you then!
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Photo spectial to the COURIER Nine-year-old Ady Bolinger reports on Joel Harperʼs book.

[Editor’s note: Ady Bolinger, 9, is a fourth grade student at Oakmont Elementary School. Joel Harper’s book, All the Way to the Ocean, is available at the Folk Music Center, museum gift shops and on Amazon.com.]

A

nybody who has ever been to the Folk Music Center knows that the things they sell there are very interesting, but did you know that the people who grew up there are also very interesting?

Like Joel Harper. He is an author, musician and a dad (or as he put it—Mr. Mom). He plays a lot of instruments. He plays didgeridoo, slide guitar, lots of percussion and the Native American flute. He says he does not have a favorite instrument, he loves them all. Joel loves to be a dad, and loves to see his kids smile or laugh. He and his wife believe in attachment parenting. Joel says it is very hard. He does not have a lot of babysitters. He has 2 young boys, Matheo, who is one, and Enzo, who is 5. Joel is known for his book All the Way to the Ocean. This book is about how important it is to not throw trash in the “no dumping” drains because the animals get sick and die. Joel got inspired to write his book because in Claremont he began to notice the “no dumping” signs on the curbs by the drains and noticed that there was trash in the “no dumping” areas. During his research, one of the things he learned was in a very heavy storm it only takes 2 hours for the trash to get to the oceans. Joel says the book was easy to write, but the editing process was very hard. He calls his editor his saint! At first he wrote too many words for a short book. Then he opened his own publishing company, because other publishing companies thought that the book was

too depressing for kids. For example, the book has pictures of fish swallowing cigarette butts. Isaac and James, the main characters, are based on Joel and his best friend when they were young. For this book, he found his illustrator on a website that his younger brother Peter had where artists would submit their art and people would vote for the winner every month. Joel is excited because All the Way to the Ocean is being made into a movie! Joel is in the process of writing 2 other books. There is one called Waves of Change. This book will be out in the spring and there’s no words, just illustrations. Joel told his artist how he envisioned the story. His illustrator drew every word he described. This book is also about cleaning up our environment. It’s about a 12-year-old girl who cleans up a lot of trash on the beach and

finds a way to be creative with it. Then she shows her teacher and she thinks it’s so great that the school goes to the beach and has a big beach cleanup! The other book Joel is writing is called Frankie Learns the Blues, which is based on true events. It’s about a boy who is about 13 whose grandma asked him, “Frankie, do you want to go to a blues concert?” Frankie says, “Well, what’s the blues? I like hip hop and rap.” So she takes him to the concert and he falls in love with the blues, and wants to play the blues. He digs out an old guitar and he meets this homeless man who teaches him how to play the blues. Joel says that this book is about a lot of things. It’s about don’t judge a book by its cover, a homeless man with a good spirit and not giving up on your dream. Joel’s illustrator for this book is a dear friend of his. Joel is a great man with great books. He also has a lot of hobbies like hiking, taking walks, reading, skateboarding, biking and eating his wife’s cookies. So, make sure to look out for Joel’s new books and movie!
—Ady Bolinger

A page out of musician and author Joel Harperʼs book All the Way to the Ocean, which discusses the importance of keeping our oceans clean.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

29

Having a ball
Everyone needs to blow off steam and so zookeepers give their animals toys to keep them happy and having fun. But when you bring sharp teeth, long claws, plenty of pounds and boundless energy into the equation, you’re looking at a lot of toy turnover. Enter the One World Futbol, a nearly indestructible ball that takes a licking and keeps on ticking. The same size as a standard soccer ball, it never goes flat and doesn’t pop, even when punctured multiple times. It is being used at animal shelters across the world, from the Oakland Zoo in San Francisco to the Johannesburg Zoo in South Africa. One of the One World Futbol’s biggest fans is Ralph, an elderly Aldabra tortoise who makes his home at the Oakland Zoo. According to the zoological manager, Margaret Rousser, the giant tortoise can lay down on the ball and it will simply snap into shape when he stands. “It is particularly difficult to find an enrichment item that can withstand the weight of a 600-pound tortoise, and it’s even more difficult to find something that a 100-year-old animal will become actively engaged in,” she said. We wonder how the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles would treat this tough-as-nails toy.

A visit from Kareem
Basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar will stop by Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop in La Verne on Friday, October 11 at 7 p.m. to meet fans and sign his new book, Sasquatch in the Paint, which is aimed at middle school readers. At 7 foot 2 inches, the longtime Laker—a record 6-time NBA Most Valuable Player—can understand the challenges faced by his eighth grade protagonist Theo Rollins. Theo is starting school 6 inches taller, and his new height is making everyone expect more from him. Coach Mandrake wants to transform him from science geek into star basketball player, even though Theo has little experience with the game. When Theo tries to hone his skills by playing pickup ball in the park, kids are eager to include him at first; then they quickly see that he has no control of his gangly body, earning him the nickname of Sasquatch. To make matters worse, all his time spent on training is starting to hurt his science club’s chances of winning the “Aca-lympics,” the school’s trivia competition. Just when Theo thinks he can’t handle any more pressure, he’s accused of stealing. Can he find the real thief before he is kicked off the basketball and science club teams, or will his attempt at sleuthing be yet another air ball? This is a ticketed event, with your ticket being the purchase of Sasquatch in the Paint through Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop. You can either stop in to pre-purchase your copy of Mr. Abdul-Jabbar’s book or do so through the bookstore’s website at www.mrsnelsons.com. Mrs. Nelson’s is located at 1030 Bonita Ave. in La Verne. For more information, call 599-4558.

Q. Which fish is the most famous? Q. Why don't oysters share their pearls? Q. Why are fish so smart? A. Because they're shellfish. Q: Why did the sea turtle cross the road? A. The starfish.

If you’re an American kid, you are probably familiar with the US Forest Service’s avian mascot Woodsy Owl. Created in 1971, Woodsy once asked us to “Give a hoot, don’t pollute!” He now suggests that we “Lend a hand, care for the land.” Would you like to learn more about how to help Woodsy conserve the environment? For free learning resources like a Woodsy Owl ABC and coloring pages, type “Woodsy Owl” and “Forest Service” into a search engine like Google. Once you’ve reached Woodsy’s home page, select the material of your choice under Teachers’ Resources. Remember to always ask your parents before hitting the Internet.

Creepy crawl
Step through the shadows into the town’s haunted heritage during the Claremont Village’s first ghost walk, set for Saturday, October 12 and Sunday, October 13. During this family-friendly, 75-minute tour, guests will visit 9 haunts, including Village businesses and college destinations. The experienced, professional docents have researched and written the stories based on information and experiences of Village business owners and Claremont Colleges personnel. Ghostly apparitions may or may not appear. This event is sponsored by the Claremont Village Marketing Group and Girl Scout Troop 1094 from Claremont’s Sycamore School. All money raised from this event will benefit Troop 1094. Tickets, which are $15, are available at Stamp Your Heart Out, 141 Harvard Ave. Tickets are $15 each. Kids under 17 must be accompanied by an adult. Cash or personal checks made out to Girl Scout Troop 1094 only. After the walking tour, the Gypsy Caravan will be in the arcade at Stamp Your Heart Out where fortune telling, tea-leaf reading and other Gypsy activities will take place along with a souvenir craft project. Refreshments will be served. Tours will leave every half-hour from the Claremont Depot (200 W. First St.) from 6 to 9 p.m. on October 12 and from 6 to 8 p.m. on October 13. Your tickets will indicate your chosen departure time. The spirits depart promptly at the scheduled time with 15 guests per tour. For information, call Joan Bunte at Stamp Your Heart Out, 621-4363.

Undersea creatures
anemone coral crab dolphin eel jellyfish lobster octopus seahorse seal shark squid starfish whale

A: To get to the other tide.

Giving a hoot

A. Because they live in schools.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 20, 2013

30

‘Sweeney Todd’ brings twisted flair to Candlelight

A

s fall brings darker nights and the promise of Halloween, the Candlelight Pavilion dinner theater is taking its own dark turn. The local dinner theater trades in its usual lighthearted offerings for its latest presentation, Stephen Sondheim’s twisted tale of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.
But with risk comes rewards, the beloved playhouse has discovered, and the Bollinger family and their Candlelight players aren’t afraid to take chances. Following the success of controversial shows like The Full Monty and Miss Saigon, they are hoping that the musical thriller’s vocal strength and powerful messages are as haunting as the play’s first number. “Yes, there’s blood and guts, but everybody knows it’s theatrical,” said John LaLonde, who is not only the Candlelight’s artistic director but also happens to play the musical’s eponymous character. “[Sweeney Todd] is an incredible piece that needs to be played on this stage, so I pushed for it and pushed for it and eventually they gave in. I’m glad they did.” Mr. LaLonde and director Chuck Ketter know that the heavy play can be a bad bedfellow with a gourmet dinner, and preconceived notions that the play will be as blood-filled as the film presents an uphill battle. Despite the challenges, they refuse to sugarcoat their show. “I wanted to do what Stephen Sondheim wrote the show to do, which was to see if we could scare a contemporary audience,” Mr. Ketter said. Tim Burton’s on-screen version, which used gore excessively, is toned down to fit the stage with red stage lighting and the moderate use of fake blood. The dark comedy, winner of the Tony Award for Best Musical and Olivier Award for Best New Musical, starts off on a somber note as the cast gathers on Fleet Street in 19th-century London. The play grows grimmer as the barber Benjamin Barker returns to town after a 15year exile over false charges handed down by a corrupt judge, coveting Mr. Barker’s wife and daughter for himself. Mr. Barker, redubbed Sweeney Todd, reunites with his razor to exact revenge on the judge and those helpless people who stumble into his Fleet Street barber shop. With the aid of his landlord—the slightly crazed, self-serving Mrs. Lovett, played by Debbie Prutsman—his victims are sealed off, disposed of and served up hot with a bit of flaky crust at Mrs. Lovett’s pie shop. As unsavory as the plot sounds, the Candlelight’s production seamlessly circumnavigates the grotesque, drawing hearty laughs even in the midst of the macabre. The audience is so heartily engrossed by musical numbers like “A Little Priest” that one almost forgets the

The Basics
WHAT: Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street WHEN: Thursdays, Fridays and Saturday evenings through October 13. Dinner seating is at 6 p.m. with curtain call at 8:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday matinees, 11 a.m. with show time at 12:45 p.m., and Sunday evening performances with dinner at 5 p.m. and the show at 6:15 p.m. WHERE: Candlelight Pavilion, 455 W. Foothill Blvd. COST: Starting at $53, includes dinner. INFO: www.candlelightpavilion.com

song is about the fillings of Mrs. Lovett’s (best-selling) meat pies. While part of the magic lies with the cast’s vocal power—as integral to Sondheim’s production as Sweeney’s razor blades—the other most certainly lies with the electricity between Mr. LaLonde and Ms. Prutsman. Among Broadway’s most iconic musical pairings, Sweeney Todd and Mrs. Lovett stand near the top. Their constant quips and bizarre relationship breathe life amid the lifeless, and Mr. LaLonde and Ms. Prutsman do the pairing justice. They are aided by the fact that they have played opposite each other in previous roles and have been longtime friends. “When you work with someone new, even if they are a great name, you are always a little scared,” Ms. Prutsman said. “Are they great because they are just going to take it all for themselves or are they great because they know how to collaborate? [With John] there was comfort going in. I knew I could depend on him.” Ms. Prutsman is no stranger to the lopsided buns and wacky ways of Mrs. Lovett, having reprised the role 4 times in her acting career. Despite her familiarity with the role and the production, Ms. Prutsman found a fresh perspective working with Mr. Ketter. “[Mr. Ketter] would ask me why I was doing something, and I’d give him my reasoning, and my reasoning was of course influenced from previous directors. He gave me new things to consider,” Ms. Prutsman said. “Mrs. Lovett became a much more diverse character for me in the extremes of her person and the manipulation, rather than just being kooky.  There was a different level to it.” Bringing to life the rage-filled emotions that characterize Sweeney Todd can be equally complex, Mr. LaLonde recognized, though he seemed to navigate those waters with ease. “I’m rather dark inside so I can get there pretty quickly,” he joked. “The hard part is going to that level 4 shows in a row. It’s important to learn to pace yourself.” Having the chance to direct Sweeney Todd was a dream fulfilled for Mr. Ketter, who first saw the musical thriller as part of its debut on Broadway. Then

Photo courtesy of Candlelight Pavilion

came the challenges. An integral part of the Sweeney set is a rotating, 8-foot piece that serves as the barbershop atop Mrs. Lovett’s Pie Shop. The cast didn’t have access to the prop or the Candlelight stage until 4 days before curtain call. While the size of the small dinner theater atmosphere was initially a daunting prospect, it ended up working in their favor. “It’s so much easier to scare 300 people than 3000,” Mr. Ketter said. “I mean the fear factor gets dissipated. With the closeness of this theater, the play works better.” Mr. Ketter used the intimate atmosphere to his advantage, instructing his actors to use the theater floor as part of their stage to effectively draw in the audience. As Mick Bollinger gives his traditional welcome speech before the play’s start, the actors are already beginning to congregate on the stage, seamlessly starting into the play’s opening act. “By bringing the actors into the audience and creating staging in unusual places—that sort of spookiness and element of breaking the fourth wall is amplified,” Mr. Ketter said. Adding to the theatrical experience are

the creative touches complementing the production. Guests are invited to sip on Sweeney-inspired cocktails, garnished with a lychee eyeball, dine on meat pies (tri-tip only) and cap the night with desserts, some with a side of lady fingers that, when decorated, actually resemble their namesake. While keeping their cuisine creative and their guests’ theater experience oneof-a-kind, the Candlelight family plans to continue to diversify, dishing out the edgier productions along with the familial staples. For the team at the Candlelight, theater is not just something to enjoy, but something to think about. “Musical theater is not only supposed to entertain, but educate and open your mind to new things,” Mr. Ketter said. “[Sweeney Todd] is the kind of theater piece that continues with you on the car ride home.” Take a walk down Fleet Street at the Candlelight Pavilion, 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Thursdays through Sundays through October 13. For tickets, visit www.candlelightpavilion.com.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Friday 09-20-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
NEED Class A CDL training? Start a career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best InClass” training. New academy classes weekly. No money down or credit check. Certified mentors ready and available. Paid while training with mentor. Regional and dedicated opportunities. Great career path. Excellent benefits package. Please call 520-226-4362. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: A-CDL train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. 877-369-7091. www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.co m. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: At National Carriers we’ll call you and your pet by name! But you have to hire on first! Call 888-440-2465. Six month OTR. Refresher training program. www.dri veNCI.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Owner operators wanted. New Century is hiring CDL-A owner operators. Sign-on incentives. Competative pay package. Long haul frieght paid loaded and empty miles. Also hiring company teams, or solo drivers looking to team. Call 866-938-7803 or apply online at www.dri vectrans.com. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million plus Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth, 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Financial
WANTED: Tax practice/bookkeeping service. West end of San Bernardino County to the east end of LA County. Established buyer EA, 25 years at this location. Full service, year-round, seasoned staff. Branch site or merger ok. Principals only, cash/ carry, asking one year guarantee. Call 593-7431, ask for Bernie.

BULLETINS
Business
AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-7068325. (Cal-SCAN) REDUCE your cable bill! Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for free and programming starting at $24.99 per month. Free HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, so call now! 877-366-4509. (Cal-SCAN) DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1-888806-7317. (Cal-SCAN)

Vacation Rental
$399 CABO San Lucas all inclusive special. Stay 6 days in a luxury beachfront resort with unlimited meals and drinks for $399! 888-481-9660. www.luxurycabohotel.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Garage Sales
UNIVERSITY Terrace community garage sale. Saturday, September 21, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Claremont Blvd. and Windham Drive, Claremont.

Antiques
AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 214 W. Foothill Blvd. 6216628. A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com.

REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale
THIRTY-eight acre wilderness ranch, $193 monthly. Prime 38 acre cabin site atop evergreen wooded ridge, overlooking wilderness valley, on secluded north Arizona ranch. Plentiful groundwater, good soil, beautiful rock formations, 6200 foot elevation. Borders 640 acres of State Trust Land. $19,900, $1990 down, $193 monthly. Order brochure, 800-966-6690, 1st United-Woodland Valley Ranch #32. www.woodlandval leyranchsale.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Want To Buy
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime! 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN) CASH for cars. Vintage Mercedes convertibles, Porsche, Jaguar, Alfa, Lancia, Ferrari, Corvettes, Mustangs, early Japanese cars, other collector cars of significant value desired. 714-267-3436. michaelfield204@gmail.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Donations
DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE your car. Fast, free towing. 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

Office Space For Rent
VILLAGE office. Exceptional building. Utilities, waiting room, parking. 419 Yale Ave. Weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Education
AIRLINE careers begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM, 877804-5293. (Cal-SCAN)

House For Rent
THREE bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms with approximately 1598 sq. ft. Fresh paint, fireplace. Includes water, trash, gardener and appliances. $2250 monthly. WSPM, 621-5941. WALK to Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, 2-car garage. Includes refrigerator, water, sewer and trash. No pets. $1400 monthly. WSPM, 621-5941.

BULLETINS
Business
DIRECTV. Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call now! Triple savings! $636 in savings, free upgrade to Genie and 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free! Start saving today! 1-800-2910350. (Cal-SCAN) MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections. Fix it now! Professional, US-based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888-8650271. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE on cable TV, internet, digital phone, satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN)

Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
THE business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californians with a classified in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! Combo-California daily and weekly networks. Free brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) “MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card-sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure. elizabeth@cnpa.com. 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
EARN $500 a day. Insurance agents needed. Leads, no cold calls. Commissions paid daily. Lifetime renewals. Complete training. Health/dental insurance. Life insurance license required. Call, 1-888713-6020. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Earn $1000 plus per week. Full benefits and quality home time. New trucks arriving. CDL-A required. Call www.ad-drivers.com. 877258-8782. (Cal-SCAN)

Financial
GUARANTEED income for your retirement. Avoid market risk and get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for a free copy of our safe money guide plus annuity quotes from A-rated companies! 800375-8607. (Cal-SCAN) CUT your student loan payments in half or more, even if late or in default. Get relief fast, much lower payments. Call Student Hotline, 855589-8607. (Cal-SCAN) GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (CalSCAN)

ANIMALS
Coyote Sightings
ONE coyote seen multiple times on September 16 on Martin Way.

Townhome For Rent
GATED courtyard with pool. Two bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Washer, dryer. Central heating and air. Gas fireplace. No pets, smoking. $1595 monthly. Water and trash paid. 605 Colby Cr. 964-5954.

Lost Pet
LOST: Beloved adult male cat named Trash. Black short hair with white spot on stomach. Lost near N. College and Eleventh St. 243-2357.

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds.

DEADLINES
Classified: Wednesday by noon Real Estate: Tuesday by 5 pm Service Pages: Tuesday by 5 pm

PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $10 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing. All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

LEGAL TENDER
T.S. No: V542818 CA Unit Code: V Loan No: SIEMON/SIEMON AP #1: 8671-039-011 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.D. SERVICE COMPANY, as duly appointed Trustee under the following described Deed of Trust WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (in the forms which are lawful tender in the United States) and/or the cashier's, certified or other checks specified in Civil Code Section 2924h (payable in full at the time of sale to T.D. Service Company) all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property hereinafter described: Trustor: TROY M SIEMON, DONNA M SIEMON Recorded December 19, 2001 as Instr. No. 01-2426860 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County; CALIFORNIA , pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded June 4, 2013 as Instr. No. 2013-0830938 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County CALIFORNIA. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED DECEMBER 13, 2001. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. 2306 BRADLEY AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 "(If a street address or common designation of property is shown above, no warranty is given as to its completeness or correctness)." Said Sale of property will be made in "as is" condition without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest as in said note provided, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. Said sale will be held on: OCTOBER 3, 2013, AT 10:30 A.M. *NEAR THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA, CA 91766 At the time of the initial publication of this notice, the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above described Deed of Trust and estimated costs, expenses, and advances is $77,533.56. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 480-5690 or (800) 843-0260 ext 5690 or visit this Internet Web site: http://www.tacforeclosures.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this case V542818 V. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
return of the monies paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Date: September 4, 2013 T.D. SERVICE COMPANY as said Trustee, T.D. Service Company Agent for the Trustee and as Authorized Agent for the Beneficiary CHERYL L. GRECH, ASST SECRETARY T.D. SERVICE COMPANY 4000 W. Metropolitan Drive, Suite 400 Orange, CA 92868-0000 The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If available , the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or (800) 843-0260 ext 5690 or you may access sales information at http://www.tacforeclosures.com/sales . TAC# 965736 PUB: 09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013186734 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as GIFTING TRAVELER, 6021 Milana Drive, Eastvale, CA 92880, Riverside County. Eren Cello, 6021 Milana Drive, Eastvale, CA 92880. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Eren Cello This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/06/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 13, 20, 27 and October 4, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 138170131 APN: 8713-012-019 TRA: 10069 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx3576 REF: Magdesian, Arthur IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED August 20, 2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On September 26, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-western Reconveyance Llc, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded August 29, 2003, as Inst. No. 03 2528156 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Arthur Magdesian and Sherri Magdesian, Co-trustees Of The Arthur And Sherri Magdesian Living Trust U/d/t Dated March 9, 1990, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust *series 2003-18 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2707 Wagon Train Lane Diamond Bar CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $396,240.52. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.dlppllc.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1381701-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance LLC, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: August 27, 2013. (DLPP-432794 09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13) County of Los Angeles Department of the Treasurer and Tax Collector Notice of Divided Publication Pursuant to Sections 3702, 3381, and 3382, Revenue and Taxation Code, the Notice of Sale of Tax Defaulted Property Subject to the Power of Sale in and for the County of Los Angeles, State of California has been divided and distributed to various newspapers of general circulation published in said County for publication of a portion thereof, in each of the said newspapers. Public Auction Notice (R&TC 3702) Of Sale Of Tax-Defaulted Property Subject To The Power Of Sale (Sale No. 2013A) Whereas, on June 18, 2013, I, MARK J. SALADINO, Treasurer and Tax Collector, was directed by the Board of Supervisors of Los Angeles County, State of California, to sell at public auction certain tax-defaulted properties which are Subject to the Power of Sale. Public notice is hereby given that unless said properties are redeemed prior thereto, I will, on October 21 and 22, 2013, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at the Fairplex Los Angeles County Fairgrounds, 1101 W. McKinley Avenue, Building 5, Pomona, California, offer for sale and sell said properties at public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier's check in lawful money of the United States for not less than the minimum bid. If no bids are received on a parcel, it will be re-offered at the end of the auction at a reduced minimum price. The minimum bid for each parcel is the total amount necessary to redeem, plus costs, as required by Section 3698.5 of the Revenue and Taxation Code. Prospective bidders should obtain detailed information of this sale from the County Treasurer and Tax Collector. Pre-registration and a $5,000 deposit in the form of cash, cashier's check or bank issued money order is required at the time of registration. No personal checks, two-party checks or business checks will be accepted for registration. Registration will be from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., beginning Monday, September 16, 2013, at the Treasurer and Tax Collector's Office located at 225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los Angeles, California, and will end on Friday, October 4, 2013, at 5:00 p.m. If the property is sold, parties of interest, as defined by Section 4675 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, have a right to file a claim with the County for any proceeds from the sale, which are in excess of the liens and costs required to be paid from the proceeds. If excess proceeds result from the sale, notice will be given to parties of interest, pursuant to law. All information concerning redemption, provided the right to redeem has not previously been terminated, will upon request be furnished by MARK J. SALADINO, Treasurer and Tax Collector. If redemption of the property is not made according to the law before 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 18, 2013, which is the last business day prior to the first day of auction, the right of redemption will cease. The Assessor's Identification Number (AIN) in this publication refers to the Assessor's Map Book, the Map Page, and the individual Parcel Number on the Map Page. If a change in the AIN occurred, both prior and current AINs are shown. An explanation of the parcel numbering system and the maps referred to are available from the Office of the Assessor located at 500 West Temple Street, Room 225, Los Angeles, California 90012. A list explaining the abbreviations used in this publication is on file in the Office of the Treasurer and Tax Collector, 225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los Angeles, California 90012, or telephone 1(213) 974-2045. I certify under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed at Los Angeles, California, on August 22, 2013.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 20, 2013

32

MARK J. SALADINO Los Angeles County Treasurer and Tax Collector State of California The real property that is subject to this notice is situated in the County of Los Angeles, State of California, and is described as follows: PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF TAXDEFAULTED PROPERTY SUBJECT TO THE POWER OF SALE(SALE NO. 2013A) 6193 AIN 8302-002-013 HAVIVI,AMRAN LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $2,703.00 6194 AIN 8303-016-023 TELARROJA,PEDRO A AND MARIA C LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $20,155.00 6198 AIN 8313-024-009 BARNICK,CAROL J AND RAMIREZ,MICHAEL LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $13,042.00 6617 AIN 8666-001-019 PATEL,HEMANT V ET AL TRS PATEL FAMILY TRUST AND PATEL,JAYSHREE CO TR PATEL TRUST LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $2,092.00 6622 AIN 8673-004-014 POULSEN,NORMAN L LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $1,571.00 6623 AIN 8673-012-012 POULSEN,NORMAN L LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $2,702.00 6624 AIN 8673-012-013 POULSEN,NORMAN L LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $1,699.00 6625 AIN 8673-017-013 SUTTER INVESTMENT CORP C/O C/O N L POULSEN LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $1,311.00 6626 AIN 8673-018-016 LASCANO,PHILLIP LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $2,031.00 6627 AIN 8675-022-001 POULSEN,NORMAN L LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $1,726.00 7111 AIN 8678-019-027 BUSUTTIL,ROBERT AND BRENDA TRS BUSUTTIL FAMILY TRUST LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES $29,743.00 CN889329 PUBLISH: 9/13/13, 9/20/13, 9/27/13 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 194558 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as CLAREMONT CHIROPRACTIC, TRI CITY WELLNESS, 2440 W. Arrow Route, Ste. 5A, Upland, CA 91786. Mailing address: 689 W. Foothill Blvd., Ste. C, Claremont, CA 91711. MARK WATERMAN CHIROPRACTIC CORP., 689 W. Foothill Blvd., Ste. C, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in February, 1999. /s/ Mark Waterman Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/16/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 190975 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Actua!!y HandyMan, 766 W. 1st Street, Claremont, CA 91711. Miles Lee Bennett, 766 W. 1st Street, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Miles Lee Bennett This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/11/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013192988 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as CLAREMONT ACUPUCTURE HEALTH CENTER, 250 W. First St., Ste#112, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 1016 Trevecca Place, Claremont, CA 91711. Lu Zhao, 881 Orchid Ct., Apt#16, Upland, CA 91786. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 09/12/2013. /s/ Lu Zhao This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of LosAngeles County on 09/13/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013

REAL ESTATE OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
1-3 p.m. 795 W. Tenth St., Claremont. Curtis Real Estate.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
1-4 p.m. 5776 Parkcrest St., La Verne. Curtis Real Estate. 1-4 p.m. 871 Scripps Drive, Claremont. Curtis Real Estate. 1-4 p.m. 1042 Belmont Abbey Ln., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 189249 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Dr. Lisa Hypnotherapy, 250 West First Street, Suite 250a, Claremont, CA 91711. Dr. Lisa Pion-Berlin, 630 Perdue Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 07/01/12. /s/ Dr. Lisa Pion-Berlin This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/10/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013 SUMMONS(CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (A VISOALDEMANDADO): ILENE D. NICELY aka ILENE DENISE NICELY, an individual; THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, acting by and through the CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES, a government entity; and DOES 1 to 20, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): LBS FINANCIAL CU, a California corporation NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court's lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direcciόn de le corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso) KC065879 ‘G’ The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Thomas J. Prenovost, Jr., SBN 77813 Tom R. Normandin, SBN 102265 PRENOVOST, NORMANDIN, BERGH & DAWE 2122 North Broadway, Suite 200 Santa Ana, CA 92706-2614 Tel. 714-547-2444, 714-835-2889 Date: (Fecha) March 20, 2013, Clerk: John A. Clarke, by (Secretario): L. Mascorro, Deputy(Adjunto). (For proof of service of this summons, use Proof of Service of Summons (form POS-010).) (Para prueba de entrega de esta citation use el formulario Proof of Service of Summons, (POS-010). PUBLISH: 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13,10/11/13 Claremont Courier

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 176321 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Irene’s Market, 4157 Las Casas Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Carla I. Christensen, 4157 Las Casas Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 07/23/13. /s/ Carla I. Christensen ThisstatementwasfiledwiththeRegistrar-Recorder/CountyClerk of LosAngeles County on 08/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 181608 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Burwell Center For Better Sleep, 2050 N. Mills Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Robert M. Burwell DDS, 695 W 10th St., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in April, 2012. /s/ Robert M. Burwell This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/29/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013182758 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as YWCA SAN GABRIEL VALLEY & INLAND COMMUNITIES, YWCA OF THE INLAND COMMUNITIES, 943 North Grand Avenue, Covina, CA 91724. YWCA OF SAN GABRIEL VALLEY, 943 North Grand Avenue, Covina, CA 91724. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Lisa Brabo Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/30/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 177951 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as S & C Elite LLC, 1014 Fuller Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. S & C Elite LLC, 1014 Fuller Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Christopher Ward JR Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/26/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 6, 13, 20, and 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 170983 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as POMONA VALLEY CHIROPRACTIC CENTRE, 520 E. Foothill Blvd., Ste. A, Pomona, CA 91767. George B. McClellan III, 1387 N. Shirlmar Ave., San Dimas, CA 91773. Renee McClellan, 1387 N. Shirlmar Ave., San Dimas, CA 91773. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 08/12/08. /s/ Renee McClellan This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/15/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days

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after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 188586 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as AMERICARE AMBULANCE, AMERICARE AMBULANCE SERVICE, AMERICARE FIRE LIFE SAFETY, AMERICHAIR, AMERICARE EMS, AMERICARE TOWING, AMERICARE PROTECTION, AMERICARE PROTECTIVE SERVICE, METRO ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITY, 1059 E. Bedmar St., Carson, CA 90746. AMERICARE MEDSERVICES INC., 1059 E. Bedmar St., Carson, CA 90746. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in 1999. /s/ John Beltran Title: Secretary This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/09/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 13, 20, 27 and October 4, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. 460192CALoan No. 0015526635Title Order No. 130133714 ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY. PURSUANT TO CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE 2923.3 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 03-18-2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 10-11-2013 at 11:00 A.M., CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 03-28-2005, Book NA, Page NA, Instrument 05 0701107, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: TEDDY RACZOK, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor, BEST RATE FUNDING CORP., as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. Legal Description: LOT 32 IN TRACT NO. 22444 IN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 712, PAGES 26 TO 28 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $515,019.17 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 880 SYRACUSE DRIVE CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN Number: 8303-012-032 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 09-20-2013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee BRENDA BATTEN, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales and Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting and Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for "Advanced Search" to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1- 800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. A-4414438 09/20/2013, 09/27/2013, 10/04/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20120015001935 Title Order No.: 120154549 FHA/VA/PMI No.: ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY APPLIES ONLY TO COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR, NOT TO THIS RECORDED ORIGINAL NOTICE. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/20/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 12/30/2005 as Instrument No. 05 3228503 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: JOHN W TULAC AND ELIZABETH TULAC, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 10/10/2013 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 706 N INDIAN HILL BLVD, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 APN#: 8309-021-011 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $691,417.13. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120015001935. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 09/12/2013 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 6617800 A-4414934 09/20/2013, 09/27/2013, 10/04/2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 20, 2013
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20110015004771 Title Order No.: 110429485 FHA/VA/PMI No.: ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY APPLIES ONLY TO COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR, NOT TO THIS RECORDED ORIGINAL NOTICE. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/07/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 07/08/2005 as Instrument No. 05 1608614 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: BERNADETTE B KENDALL, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 10/10/2013 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 872 W HIGHPOINT DR, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 APN#: 8669-029-072 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $465,871.77. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20110015004771. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 09/12/2013 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 6617800 A-4414673 09/20/2013, 09/27/2013, 10/04/2013 Trustee Sale No. 257772CA Loan No. 3061898742 Title Order No. 1116951 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 04-04-2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 10-11-2013 at 9:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 04-11-2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 06 0785685, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: RAMESHCHANDRA K. NATHA AND PURNIMABEN NATHA, HUSAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day

33

of sale. Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA Legal Description: LOT 11 OF TRACT NO. 27355, IN THE CITY OF WALNUT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 858 PAGES 57 TO 60 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $521,674.82 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 19650 CHALINA DR. WALNUT, CA 91789 APN Number: 8734-011-009 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 0916-2013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee RIKKI JACOBS, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P1060357 9/20, 9/27, 10/04/2013 Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES If an application for a premises to premises transfer or original license at a premises located in a census tract with undue concentration of licenses, the following notice must be published once a week for three consecutive weeks pursuant to Government Code Section 6063, in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication. The publication must be in the city in which such premises are situated, or if such premises are not in a city, then publication shall be made in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication nearest the premises. Affidavit of publication shall be filed with the following office: Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control 222 E. Huntington Dr. Ste 114 Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 256-3241 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: September 12, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: MAXBIZZ LLC The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 1 N INDIAN HILL BLVD STE D102 & D103 CLAREMONT, CA 91711-4769 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 – On-Sale Beer And Wine – Eating Place CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Ste 205B, Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761. Publish: September 20, 27 and October 4, 2013 ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO: 2013187103 Current File Number: 2013192973 The following person has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CLAREMONT ACUPUNCTURE HEALTH CENTER, located at 250 W. First Street, #112, Claremont, CA 91711-4743. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on 09/06/2013 in the County of Los Angeles. Registered Owner(s) are: Tammy Wang, 1016 Trevecca Place, Claremont, CA 91711. Yi Zhou, 17690 Osbourne Ave., Chino Hills, CA 91709. The business is conducted by Copartners. This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/ County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/13/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tammy Wang Publish: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 09-20-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

Electrician
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Gardening

Handyman

Hayden’s Services Inc.

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Drywall

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795. PLASTER, stucco, drywall. Texture. Acoustics. Small job specialist. 909-629-7576. Unlicensed. Local 30 years.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

Electrician
ASA ELECTRIC Any and all electrical needs Residential and Commercial Low price/Craftsman quality Service panel upgrades, etc. Call for free estimate. Claremont resident. 951-283-9531 Lic.860606 CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

Girl Friday

Concrete
SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

909-599-9530

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

House Cleaning
TOP notch care. Errands, pet and house sitting. Bonded, experienced, reliable. References. Call Colleen 909-489-1862. I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime! ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed. 909-986-8009. TRUSTWORTHY woman will clean your home. Excellent references. 15 years experience. Eva, 909-753-6517. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Senior care, day or night. Call Lupe, 909-452-1086.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846. DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Contractor
PPS General Contractor. Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951-237-1547. Custom Construction Kitchen and bathroom remodeling, room additions and more! Lic.630203. 1072 W. Ninth St. Suite C, Upland. 909-996-2981 909-946-2924 WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951640-6616.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

Garage Doors

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial.
Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, troubleshooting, landscape lighting, rewires and LED lighting. Free estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

Claremont Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to finish remodeler. Kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting. Lots more! Paul, 909-919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Friday 09-20-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

35

Landscaping
Dale's Tree & Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting, irrigation and yard cleanup. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381

Painting
COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Roofing
DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Tree Care
Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

Sprinklers & Repair
SPRINKLER Experts. Repairs, installation, water saving sprinklers, artificial turf. Call 909-749-2572. State Contractor Lic.B/C27 856372. ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Landscaping
SEMIRETIRED landscaper will work by the hour. Charles Landscape and Sprinkler Service. 909-217-9722. DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

Please call 909-989-9786.

BAUER TREE CARE 40 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning available for your perennials. 909-624-8238.

Tutoring
TUTOR available for summer. K-12 only. Literacy, test taking and study skills taught. All subjects. Call Kristen, 909-261-3099.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

Upholstery

Patio & Decks
Patio Repairs, balconies and decks. New construction and remodeling. Serving the Inland Empire since 1988. Free estimates. Isom Construction Jesse Isom. Lic.B531291. 909-234-3261 ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Learn Japanese

Want to Buy
WANTED: Tax practice/bookkeeping service. West end of San Bernardino County to the East end of LA County. Established buyer EA, 25 years at this location. Full service, yearround, seasoned staff. Branch site or merger ok. Principals only, cash/carry, asking one year guarantee. Call 909-5937431, ask for Bernie.

Tile

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688. MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 731-3511.

Weed Abatement
ADVANCED DON DAVIES

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095. D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

Pet Sitting

Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Power Washing
D&L Services FROM ROOFTOP TO SIDEWALK Hot or cold exterior washing. Owner operated for 25 years. Free estimates. 909-262-5790

Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning and removals. Landscaping, corrective and restoration trimming and yard clean up. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909629-6960.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-2146773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

OFFERING free one month minimum sabbatical coverage to Claremont residents. Experienced, responsible pet sitters. claremontpets@hotmail.com.

Piano Lessons
EVELYN Hubacker. Piano teacher accepting new students. 909-626-2931. 909868-8284. www.evelyn hubacker.com.

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

909.621.4761
Friday 09-20-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

SERVICES
AUTOMOTIVE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Pieces Auto Parts
We have new and rebuilt engines. We sell auto body parts for foreign and domestic models. We have all kinds of motors, Cummins diesel engines and Caterpillar engines. We have radiators, mirrors, transmissions, engine parts, trailer axles, car fenders and everything you need for your car or truck. Call Us First!

810-334-8801

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS
Do you know if your service provider can pass a background check? We do! REAL Connections provides quality service providers, vetted through the Department of Justice. Looking for a painter, roofer, plumber, electrician? Call us, we’ve got the best!
Looking for more? We’ve got that too! We offer social events to connect with your community, and vetted volunteers to help with all of life’s to-do’s!

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

Call us to find out more! 909-621-6300 www.realconnections.org

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HOME IMPROVEMENT

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Friday 09-20-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

37

REAL ESTATE
M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

SAMUELSON
Realtor - Lic.# 01326104 & 01733616

CARLOS & PAT

Any thoughts of selling your house?
At what price would you become a seller? (It's okay to be unreasonable.) Call us.
CARLOS, 909-964-7631 PAT, 909-214-1002

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

255 W. Foothill Blvd., Upland, CA 91786

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

REAL ESTATE
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1 - 4 PM

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
5776 PARKCREST ST., LA VERNE HEIGHTS Listing agent: Carol Wiese Luxury 2-story Mediterranean home in prestigious gated community. Soaring 18 ft. ceilings in the living and formal dining rooms. Curved grand staircase. The kitchen has a granite island and sunny breakfast area. The backyard features a custom patio cover, built-in BBQ with sink and a waterfall. Community tennis and basketball courts, playground and a park. $975,000. (P5776)

OPEN HOUSE SUN 1 - 4 PM

871 SCRIPPS DRIVE, CLAREMONT Listing agent: John Baldwin
This 2-story, 3 bedroom pool home has been updated with bamboo floors and upgraded bathrooms. Eat-in kitchen is finished with dark wood cabinets, tile flooring, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Nearly a 1/4 acre lot with fruit trees, covered patio and balcony. Pool has newer plaster and tile. Dual-pane windows, sliding glass doors and newer HVAC. Open floor plan opens to the patio and balconies displaying views of the mountains. $559,000. (S871)

New listing!

795 W. TENTH ST., CLAREMONT
Listing agent: John Baldwin

New listing!

Tenth Street custom home. Red brick walkway and original curved top door. Built in 1942, this 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom home features a grand living room with real plaster crown molding, built-in bookcases and fireplace. Back yard with brick patio area and detached 2-car garage with alley access. Hardwood floors throughout. Updatedbathrooms with tile. (T795)
2576 SAN ANDRES WAY, CLAREMONT Outstanding Claraboya pool home. This single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home is perfect for entertaining. It features a large sunken living room and family room next to the kitchen with a breakfast nook. The spacious back yard is a private oasis with a pool, spa, patio, fountains, planters and views of the valley and city lights. Over-sized, detached, 2-car garage with storage. $799,900. (S2576)

OPEN HOUSE SAT 1 - 3 PM

REAL ESTATE

Curtis Real Estate. Claremont’s longest established Real Estate firm. “Corinna is the perfect combination of efficiency, honesty and friendliness. Above all, she was the consummate professional and we would not hesitate to use her services in the future or recommend her to others.” —Mr. & Mrs. Althorp

Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

Connecting people with homes they love.
Corinna K. Soiles Broker Associate
107 Harvard Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909)263-7378 • cksathome@aol.com
DRE# 01227205

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 20, 2013

38

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

(909) 625-6754 (909) 973-5582
www.bjnichka.com email: bj@bjnichka.com

Broker Associate
D.R.E. #00961915

NORTH CLAREMONT
Lovely 2-story, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom, detached, turnkey home located in an exceptional planned unit development. Built in 1992, this great home features approximately 1648 sq. ft. New interior paint and carpeting, vaulted ceilings, light-filled floor plan, fireplace in the living room, formal dining room and large master suite. Low maintenance backyard, 2car attached garage. List price $435,000.

SAN ANTONIO HEIGHTS LEASE

I can't say enough about Mason's easy-going professionalism. I have worked with many real estate agents—buying and selling a home—some good and some not so good, but Mason stands above the rest. Although a busy agent, he made us feel like we were his only clients. It is obvious that Mason takes pride in his work and helped us through what has usually been a very stressful process. We were always informed, updated and met personally when needed. There was never pressure, unnecessary stress or unanswered questions. I will recommend everyone I know to Mason!

—Rosie V.
To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

Circa 1930 estate in Upland. Sweeping corner lot studded with stately oak trees. Approximately 4000 sq. ft. with 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms. Great room consists of family room with fireplace, billiard room with pool table and bar plus a large kitchen. Hardwood floors. Handsome living room, formal dining room and breakfast room. Picturesque backyard with 2 patios. Pool, spa, BBQ and patio furniture. Gated driveway, large 2-car garage. Minimum one year lease. $4200 monthly.

UPLAND KNOLLS
Great 2-story upgraded condo located in northwest Upland, situated in a well maintained, planned unit development. Approximately 1700 sq. ft. with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Features first floor master suite plus den/office, kitchen and large living room. Second floor has large multi-use loft, 2 bedrooms and one bathroom plus an attic storage area. Attached 2 car garage with laundry area. Lovely private patio area. Complex has manicured greenbelt areas, running stream and community pool, spa and club house. List price $330,000.

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 20, 2013

39

GEOFF T. HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

Celebrating 25 years of service 1988-2013!
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 PM NEW PRICE! NEW LISTING!

Tell a Friend...

New Listing!
1042 E. BELMONT ABBEY LANE NORTH CLAREMONT MEDITERRANEAN ESTATE PLUS GUEST HOUSE - $2,000,000 Tranquil setting in one of the most coveted neighborhoods near the Claremont foothills. Panoramic views! Custom built by Marti Enterprises in 2001. Main home offers 6 bedrooms and 6.5 bathrooms. Formal entry with limestone floors, a chandelier and staircase. Chef's kitchen features granite counters and stainless steel appliances plus a large breakfast room. Built-in entertainment center in family room. Formal living room, butler's pantry off formal dining room. Master suite features a lavish bathroom and walk-in closets. Three fireplaces, soaring ceilings, crown molding and built-ins throughout. Separate guest house. Approximately 3/4 acre lot features park-like grounds with mature shade trees, swimming pool and spa, custom BBQ area. (B1042) ALEGRIA MAJESTIC LA VERNE OAKS 2-ACRE GATED HILLSIDE ESTATE - $3,000,000 - $3,200,000 Six bedroom, 7 bathroom home on 2-acres of beautiful landscape. Includes a wine cellar, cigar bar, fireplace, elevated ceilings with skylights, crown molding, wrought iron doors, custom lighting, French doors, plantation shutters plus slate and carpeted floors. Master suite is on ground floor with full bathroom, formal dining and living rooms, spacious gourmet kitchen, music room with access to the lanai, media room, guest wing with 2 suites and chauffeur quarters. Two suites on second floor with 3 walk-in closets, family room and studio with full-ceiling skylight. Wrap around driveway, 4-car garage and 3-car porte-cochère. Pool has 3 waterfalls and a Jacuzzi. (B25553) OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE MID-CENTURY HOME - $600,000 Quality custom built in 1948 with a spacious traditional one level floor plan includes 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms plus a den. Features extensive oak hardwood floors and numerous built-ins throughout. Large living/great room with fireplace. Perfect for entertaining and comfortable family living. Central air and heating plus indoor laundry. Over 1/4 acre sweeping wide corner lot boasts mature landscape and tall shade trees. Prime locale convenient to Village, shopping, Memorial Park, Metrolink and fine schools. Desirable Sycamore Elementary School locale. (T666)

"Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!"

COMING SOON:
• One Story Southwest Style - $600,000 • Spanish Moorish Style in Claremont Village - $750,000 • Claremont Club Chic Condo - $395,000 • Stylish Griswolds Townhome - $475,000 • Lincoln Park Classic Craftsman - $325,000

NEW LISTING!

NEW PRICE!

SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home. Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property. Thank you!

GATED GRISWOLD'S TOWNHOME - $475,000 Choice locale in community on interior cul-de-sac street. Attractive Spanish Mediterranean architecture. Prime end unit PUD townhome in immaculate condition. Three bedrooms and 3 full bathrooms (one bedroom and one bathroom downstairs), approximately 1850 sq. ft. Enjoy a light and airy floor plan boasting vaulted ceilings, gleaming wood floors throughout, kitchen opens to family room with fireplace, dining room, indoor laundry room, private patio, attached garage plus driveway parking. Manicured resort-quality grounds, community pool and 2 spas. Condit Elementary School locale. North of Foothill close to Colleges, schools, shopping, Village and more. (S1422)

CONTEMPORARY CRAFTSMAN ESTATE IN THE FOOTHILLS - $1,250,000 Panoramic views on over an acre in Live Oak Canyon, designed by Pasadena architect, Ivo Clarich. Original owner/builder. A high quality one story rambling residence with large bonus room upstairs. Recently renovated by Hartman Baldwin Design/Build. Open design with light wood and vaulted ceilings, magnificent great room setting with handsome stone fireplace. One-of-a-kind architectural details throughout. Long gated driveway leads to motor court, 3-car garage plus carport. Private well, comes with stock in Webb Oak Mutual Water Company. Zoned for horses plus additional agriculture if desired. Standard sale. (L4825)

PADUA HILLS PANORAMIC VIEWS CUSTOM SPANISH CONTEMPORARY - $798,000 Spectacular unobstructed western views of mountains, hills, canyons and valley. Recently redesigned and renovated by architects Wheeler & Wheeler. Gated entry leads to front entrance accented with mosaic tiled waterfall, fountain and pond. Enjoy sunsets every day in this open and airy one level floor plan with soaring ceilings, 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Master suite features walk-in closets plus a lavish spa bath. Remodeled gourmet chef's kitchen. Balcony with expansive view featuring a bubbling spa is shaded by oak tree canopies. Convenient to Padua Hills Theatre, Claremont Hills Wilderness Park and trails nearby. (V4257)

909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

D.R.E. #00997900

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

Your Local Real Estate Resource

NT O EM R A CL

NT O EM R A CL

TIMELESS ROMANTICISM
Extraordinary single story custom home in northeast Claremont is available for the first time. Designed for the discerning owner, with architectural detailing rarely found in new construction. Step into another world as you breathe in the elegant living room with custom designed fireplace and coffered ceilings, the spacious family room with wet bar, the billiard room and so much more! Show stopper kitchen boasts oversized center island, professional grade Thermador appliances, exceptional custom cabinetry, granite counters and butler's pantry with beautiful built-ins that leads to the formal dining room. Sumptuous master suite has a cozy private courtyard with a fireplace for romantic interludes. Artfully manicured grounds are complete with pool, spa, patios and an orchard. Call to schedule your appointment, 909398-1810. $2,498,000. (B659)

UNPARALLELED VIEWS
A rare opportunity to acquire this stunning hillside estate with a large level and open backyard in the exclusive community of Claraboya is available. Classically elegant home offers a sanctuary for anyone with a truly sophisticated and elite sense of artistic style. Impeccably renovated kitchen offers newer stainless steel appliances and granite counters for the gourmet. The breakfast bar and nook open to the generously sized family room. Serve your guests in the fabulous dining room that shares a dual-sided fireplace with the spacious living room. This home is an entertainer’s delight with the expansive yard where you will be mesmerized by the breathtaking city light and valley views. This spectacular backdrop is the perfect place for intimate gatherings or hosting parties on a grand scale with 100 plus guests. The 3-car garage and long list of enhancements and improvements are a bonus. Call for your private tour, 909-398-1810. $1,195,000. (S2703)

NT O M E AR L C

NT O M E AR L C

NOT JUST ANOTHER HOME
This amazing property is a dream come true! Enter to find high ceilings and numerous windows that bring in streams of natural light. The home is beautifully appointed with flooring and architectural detailing that will surprise and delight. Entertain guests in the interior courtyard and the formal living spaces. For informal gatherings there is a generously sized great room and family room with cozy fireplace. The most selective chef will appreciate the open kitchen featuring granite counters, stainless steel appliances, center island and breakfast bar. Sparkling pool and spa set the stage for outdoor entertaining on a grand level. Imagine enjoying parties with family and friends in this easy to care for backyard. This is truly a unique opportunity to own a newer property on a quiet cul-de-sac in Claremont. 909-398-1810. $945,000. (C799)

FRENCH CHATEAU
Immerse yourself in the Manior Residence, perfectly situated in northeast Claremont on over one acre of land. Reminiscent of a classic, Brittany Styled French Chateau with architectural and upscale details that surprise and delight. Embrace wood and travertine flooring, an elevator, game room, teen loft and more! Be the ultimate chef in the kitchen that Julia Child would have adored. Hand laid stone façade is the first blush of the exotic grounds which include a pool pavilion and a guest casita. Other exceptional features include a 5-star energy rating. This is an exceptionally appealing residence with distinctive character that enjoys the proximity of downtown Claremont. Please call today for your appointment, 909398-1810. $2,995,000. (S1015)

! NG I T IS  L W NE

EXCEPTIONAL LIVING
This home welcomes you with warmth and elegance. Enter to find a huge, open kitchen and great room with cozy fireplace as well as a large casual dining area and spacious game room perfect for entertaining family and friends! Unwind from a busy day by taking a swim in the sparkling pool and spa, perfect for summertime fun. There is a separate out building with restroom; great for hobbies, music studio, pool house, etc. Donʼt delay! 909-398-1810. $565,000. (A1164)

CLAREMONT CONTEMPORARY
Clean lines and bright open spaces connect the outdoors to the indoors in this home behind private gates of the Griswold’s community. Solid wood floors and plantation shutters accent the vaulted ceilings, cheery kitchen and master suite. Private yard offers relaxation in a tranquil environment. 909-398-1810. $425,000. (V406)

CELEBRATE LIVING
Step through the beautiful leaded beveled glass door into this spacious home to be impressed with the open and bright floor plan with numerous windows that let in an abundance of light. Generously sized living and family rooms boast gleaming hardwood floors, crown moldings and plantation shutters. Large cul-de-sac lot is the perfect venue for summer BBQs with friends and family. A must see! 909-3981810. $399,000. (L7359)

UPLAND HILLS COUNTRY CLUB
Stunning Upland Hills condominium is designed for quiet family moments and relaxing outdoor living. Private patio is situated on the sixteenth tee with lovely views of the links and not normally subject to errant golf balls disturbing the evening repast of wine and cheese. Immaculate and inviting with a 3-car garage, everything has been recently remodeled and upgraded to provide a perfect place for any golf aficionado. 909-398-1810. $465,000. (A1366)

If you or someone you know are struggling with your mortgage don't wait until it is too late. There are options and solutions for you. Call me today!

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