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NSA Whistleblower: NSA Spying On and Blackmailing Top Government Officials and Military Officers

By George Washington Created 06/20/2013 - 16:42

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Submitted by George Washington [1] on 06/20/2013 16:42 -0400 ABC News [2] Bank of America [3] Bank of America [4] Barack Obama [5] Department of Justice [6] FBI [7] Fox News [8] Illinois [9] Iraq [10] MSNBC [11] national security [12] New York Times [13] North Korea [14] Obama Administration [15] White House [16]

NSA Whistleblower: NSA Spying On and Blackmailing Top Government Officials and Military Officers
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NSA whistleblower Russel Tice a key source [18] in the 2005 New York Times report [19] that blew the lid off the Bush administrations use of warrantless wiretapping told [20]Peter B. Collins on Boiling Frog Post News (the website of high-level FBI whistleblower Sibel Edmonds):

Tice: Okay. They went afterand I know this because I had my hands literally on the paperwork for these sort of thingsthey went after high-ranking military officers; they went after members of Congress, both Senate and the House, especially on the intelligence committees and on the armed services committees and some of theand judicial. But they went after other ones, too. They went after lawyers and law firms. All kinds ofheaps of lawyers and law firms. They went after judges. One of the judges is now sitting on the Supreme Court that I had his wiretap information in my hand. Two are former FISA court judges. They went after State Department officials. They went after people in the executive service that were part of the White Housetheir own people. They went after antiwar groups. They went after U.S. internationalU.S. companies that that do international business, you know, business around the world. They went after U.S. banking firms and financial firms that do international business. They went after NGOs thatlike the Red Cross, people like that that go overseas and do humanitarian work. They went after a few antiwar civil rights groups. So, you know, dont tell me that theres no abuse, because Ive had this stuff in my hand and looked at it. And in some cases, I literally was involved in the technology that was going after this stuff. And you know, when I said to [former MSNBC show host Keith] Olbermann, I said, my particular thing is high tech

and you know, whats going on is the other thing, which is the dragnet. The dragnet is what Mark Klein is talking about, the terrestrial dragnet. Well my specialty is outer space. I deal with satellites, and everything that goes in and out of space. I did my spying via space. So thats how I found out about this.

Interviewer: Now Russ, the targeting of the people that you just mentioned, top military leaders, members of Congress, intelligence community leaders and theoh, Im sorry, it was intelligence committees, let me correct thatnot intelligence community, and then executive branch appointees. This creates the basis, and the potential for massive blackmail.

Tice: Absolutely! And remember we talked about that before, that I was worried that the intelligence community now has sway over what is going on. Now heres the big one. I havent given you any names. This was is summer of 2004. One of the papers that I held in my hand was to wiretap a bunch of numbers associated with, with a 40-something-year-old wannabe senator from Illinois. You wouldnt happen to know where that guy lives right now, would you? Its a big white house in Washington, DC. Thats who they went after. And thats the president of the United States now.

Other whistleblowers say the same thing. When the former head of the NSAs digital spying program William Binney disclosed the fact that the U.S. was spying on everyone in the U.S. and storing the data forever [21], and that the U.S. was quickly becoming a totalitarian state [22], the Feds tried to scare him [23] into shutting up:

[Numerous] FBI officers held a gun to Binneys head as he stepped naked from the shower. He watched with his wife and youngest son as the FBI ransacked their home. Later Binney was separated from the rest of his family, and FBI officials pressured him to implicate one of the other complainants in criminal activity. During the raid, Binney attempted to report to FBI officials the crimes he had witnessed at NSA, in particular the NSAs violation of the constitutional rights of all Americans. However, the FBI wasnt interested in these disclosures. Instead, FBI officials seized Binneys private computer, which to this day has not been returned despite the fact that he has not been charged with a crime.

Other NSA whistleblowers have also been subjected to armed raids and criminal prosecution [24]. After high-level CIA officer John Kiriakou blew the whistle on illegal CIA torture, the government prosecuted him for espionage [25]. Even the head of the CIA was targeted with extra-constitutional spying and driven out of office Indeed, Binney makes it very clear that the government will use information gained from its all-pervasive spying program [27] to frame anyone it doesnt like [28]. (More examples here [29].) Retired high-level CIA analyst Ray McGovern [30] the top CIA briefer to numerous presidents said this a few weeks ago on a radio program [31]:
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Which leads to the question, why would [Obama] do all these things? Why would he be afraid for example, to take the drones away from the CIA? Well, Ive come to the conclusion that hes afraid. Number one, hes afraid of what happened to Martin Luther King Jr. And I know from a good friend who was there when it happened, that at a small dinner with progressive supporters after these progressive supporters were banging on Obama before the election, Why dont you do the things we thought you stood for? Obama turned sharply and said, Dont you remember what happened to Martin Luther King Jr.? Thats a quote, and thats a very revealing quote.

McGovern also said [32]:

In a speech on March 21, second-term Obama gave us a big clue regarding his concept of leadership one that is marked primarily by political risk-avoidance and a penchant for leading from behind: Speaking as a politician, I can promise you this: political leaders will not take risks if the people do not demand that they do. You must create the change that you want to see.

John Kennedy was willing to take huge risks in reaching out to the USSR and ending the war in Vietnam. That willingness to take risks may have gotten him assassinated,

as James Douglass argues in his masterful JFK and the Unspeakable.

Martin Luther King, Jr., also took great risks and met the same end. There is more than just surmise that this weighs heavily on Barack Obamas mind. Last year, pressed by progressive donors at a dinner party to act more like the progressive they thought he was, Obama responded sharply, Dont you remember what happened to Dr. King?

Were agnostic about McGoverns theory. We dont know whether Obama is a total corrupt sell-out or a chicken. We don't think it matters ... as the effect is the same.

Head of Mainstream News Group: The Government May Love This [Destruction of the Free Press]. I Suspect That They Do. But Beware The Government That Loves Secrecy Too Much
The CEO of the Associated Press said yesterday that the government is dramatically interfering with the newsgathering ability of the press [33]:

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What I learned from our journalists should alarm everyone in this room and I think should alarm everyone in this country. The actions of the DOJ against AP [the Department of Justice bugging AP's phones] are already having an impact beyond the specifics of this particular case.

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Some of our longtime trusted sources have become nervous and anxious about talking to us, even about stories that arent about national security. In some cases, government employees that we once checked in with regularly will no longer speak to us by phone, and some are reluctant to meet in person.

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I can tell you that this chilling effect is not just at AP, its happening at other news organizations as well. Journalists from other news organizations have personally told me it has intimidated sources from speaking to them.

The government may love this. I suspect that they do. But beware the government that loves secrecy too much.

Indeed, the Attorney General of the United States isnt sure how often reporters records are seized [34]. Further, the Department of Justice is prosecuting a whistleblower regarding North Korea as well as the chief Washington correspondent for Fox News [35] who reported on what the whistleblower told him [36]. As the Washington Post notes [35]:

[Department of Justice investigators] used security badge access records to track the reporters comings and goings from the State Department, according to a newly obtained court affidavit. They traced the timing of his calls with a State Department security adviser suspected of sharing the classified report. They obtained a search warrant for the reporters personal e-mails.

Moreover, a CBS News reporters computer was spied upon while she was working on stories about government hijinks [37] (more [38]). And ABC News reports that an armed minder trailed reporters preventing them from being able to talk to whistleblowers [39]:

As we traveled the public hallways of the building watched over by security cameras an armed uniformed police officer with the Federal Protective Service followed us. We were looking for a particular officeof someone who would not want to be seen talking to reportersbut chose to bypass it because of our official babysitter.

Asked why we were being escorted in a public building, the officer identified himself as Insp. Mike Finkelstein and said he was only trying to make sure that the newsmen were not a nuisance. He brushed aside further questions. The cop said a supervisor would call to explain.

One of the reporters wanted to know if the act of following the journalists was an effort intended to scare off any federal employee who might have considered speaking to the press. Thats sure what it looked like; and, even if that wasnt the goal, it was the effect.

As of Friday night, no supervisor had called back.

After ABC News phoned and e-mailed the spokespeople in Washington repeatedly for more than 24 hours, a low-level staffer with Homeland Security finally responded. After review by a supervisor, it was determined that the inspector acted according to proper security procedures and that no improper conduct occurred, the spokesman said.

There have been many similar scandals [40] over the last couple of years. For example: The Pentagon recently smeared USA Today reporters because they investigated illegal Pentagon propaganda [41] Reporters covering the Occupy protests were targeted for arrest [42] The Bush White House worked hard to smear CIA officers [43], bloggers [44] and anyone else who criticized the Iraq war After Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Chris Hedges, journalist Naomi Wolf, Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg and others sued the government to enjoin the NDAAs allowance of the indefinite detention of Americans the judge asked the government attorneys 5 times whether journalists like Hedges could be indefinitely detained simply for interviewing and then writing about bad guys. The government refused to promise [45] that journalists like Hedges wont be thrown in a dungeon for the rest of their lives without any right to talk to a judge An al-Jazeera journalist in no way connected to any terrorist group was held at Guantnamo for six years so the U.S. could find out about the Arabic news network [46]. And see this [47] Indeed, reporters who even speak with whistleblowers may be treated as terrorists [48]. And see this [49] In an effort to protect Bank of America from the threatened Wikileaks expose of the banks wrongdoing, the Department of Justice told Bank of America [50] to a hire a specific hardball-playing law firm to assemble a team to take down WikiLeaks (and see this [51]). Wikileaks head Julian Assange could face the death penalty [52] for his heinous crime of leaking whistleblower information which make those in power uncomfortable i.e. being a reporter [53]. But whatever you think of Wikileaks that was the canary in the coal mine in terms of going after reporters. Specifically, former attorney general Mukasey said the U.S. should prosecute Assange because its easier than prosecuting the New York Times [54]. Subsequently, Congress considered a bill which would make even mainstream reporters liable [55] for publishing leaked information [56]. Journalist and former constitutional lawyer Glenn Greenwald notes [36]:

The Washington Posts Karen Tumulty [says that "The alternative to 'conspiring' with leakers to get information: Just writing what the government tells you."]

That, of course, is precisely the point of the unprecedented Obama war on whistleblowers and press freedoms: to ensure that the only information the public can get is information that the Obama administration wants it to have. Thats why Obamas one-side games with secrecy well prolifically leak when it glorifies the president and severely punish all other kinds is designed to construct the classic propaganda model. And its good to see journalists finally speaking out in genuine outrage and concern about all of this. *** Heres an amazing and revealing fact [57]: after Richard Nixon lost the right to exercise prior restraint over the New York Times publication of the Pentagon Papers, he was desperate to punish and prosecute the responsible NYT reporter, Neil Sheehan. Thus, recounted the NYTs lawyer at the time, James Goodale, Nixon concocted a theory:

Nixon convened a grand jury to indict the New York Times and its reporter, Neil Sheehan, for conspiracy to commit espionage . . . .The governments conspiracy theory centered around how Sheehan got the Pentagon Papers in the first place. While Daniel Ellsberg had his own copy stored in his apartment in Cambridge, the government believed Ellsberg had given part of the papers to anti-war activists. It apparently theorized further that the activists had talked to Sheehan about publication in the Times, all of which it believed amounted to a conspiracy to violate the Espionage Act.

As Goodale notes, this is exactly the same charge Obamas Justice Department is investigating Assange under today, and its now exactly the same theory used to formally brand Foxs James Rosen as a criminal in court [58].

Indeed, this is not a partisan issue. Bush was worse than Nixon [59] on unlawful spying and harassment of reporters but so is Obama [60].

Whistleblower Witch Hunt


But Obama has gone after whistleblowers more viciously than Bush, Nixon, or any president in history. Indeed, the Obama administration has prosecuted more whistleblowers than all other presidents combined [61]. And the government goes out of its way to smear whistleblowers [40] and harass honest analysts [62]. Even high-level government employees are in danger. For example, after the former head of the NSAs digital spying program William Binney disclosed the fact that the U.S. was spying on everyone in the U.S. and storing the data forever [21], and that the U.S. was quickly becoming a totalitarian state [22], the Feds tried to scare him [23] into shutting up:

[Numerous] FBI officers held a gun to Binneys head as he stepped naked from the

shower. He watched with his wife and youngest son as the FBI ransacked their home. Later Binney was separated from the rest of his family, and FBI officials pressured him to implicate one of the other complainants in criminal activity. During the raid, Binney attempted to report to FBI officials the crimes he had witnessed at NSA, in particular the NSAs violation of the constitutional rights of all Americans. However, the FBI wasnt interested in these disclosures. Instead, FBI officials seized Binneys private computer, which to this day has not been returned despite the fact that he has not been charged with a crime.

Other NSA whistleblowers have also been subjected to armed raids and criminal prosecution [24]. After high-level CIA officer John Kiriakou blew the whistle on illegal CIA torture, the government prosecuted him for espionage [25]. Even the head of the CIA was targeted with extra-constitutional spying and driven out of office [26]. Indeed, the government will use information gained from its all-pervasive spying program [27] to frame anyone it doesnt like [28]. The mainstream media is finally awakening to the fact we are flirting with tyranny [63] and is finally starting to push back [64]. The best defense is a strong offense, and it is use it or lose it time [65] for the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The press should shake of its sleepiness and start talking to the whistleblowers its been ignoring for years to find out what the government is working so hard to hide.
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