SOMALIA – BAIDOA AMISOM FOOT PATROL TRT: 3:02 SOURCE: AU/UN IST RESTRICTIONS: This media asset is free for editorial

broadcast, print, online and radio use. It is not to be sold on and is restricted for other purposes. All enquiries to news@auunist.org CREDIT REQUIRED: AU/UN IST LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/NATS DATELINE: 17 SEPTEMBER 2013 / BAIDOA 1. Wide shot, AMISOM Burundi troops gathering at their base looking at a map 2. Med shot, troops looking at a map of Baidoa town 3. Close up, map of Baidoa 4. Med shot, Major Mudomo Alexis, AMISOM Chief of operations talking to troop before the patrol 5. Med shot, AMISOM Burundian troops 6. SOUNDBITE (French) Colonel Mudomo Alexis, AMISOM Chief of operations: “Al Shabaab has adopted a different type of combat; instead of raging a classic type of combat they have adopted asymmetric combat strategy, for example with IED. So if the population finds something abnormal, we have technicians with us who can help them very quickly to remove this object in the population. It is in this framework that we are undertaking this kind of patrol.” 7. Wide shot, AMISOM troops patrolling on foot 8. Med shot, AMISOM troops walking through the streets 9. Med shot, AMISOM Burundian troops on patrol in the town 10. Wide shot, troops with guns on patrol 11. Med shot, residents on the streets 12. Wide shot, AMISOM troops on the streets as people go about their businesses 13. Med shot, children outside their house 14. Wide shot, AMISOM troops patrolling 15. Wide shot, town center 16. Med shot, woman crossing the street 17. Med shot, man moving his donkey cart on the road as the troops patrol 18. Wide shot, vehicles and donkey-carts moving on the road 19. Wide shot, AMISOM police officers entering a police station 20. Med shot, AMISOM Police entering the police station 21. Med shot, Police officers checking a record book

22. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Abdirahman Mohamed Ali, Deputy Police Commander Of Baidoa “We badly need their support, to help us in many departments. The number of Police in Baidoa is very small and we have managed to secure the town largely due to our efforts and not our numbers, we really want them to support us.” 23. SOUNDBITE (English) Emmanuel Odonkor, Chief Superintendent of Police and Head of the AMISOM Police unit Baidoa. “Ever since our arrival we have been able to able to mentor them in areas of how to keep suspects and the undue delay of suspects in detention has been avoided for now and I must say that we are so much impression about their performance.” 24. Wide shot, AMISOM Burundi troops patrolling the town 25. Med shot, more AMISOM troops patrolling STORY: Members of the AMISOM Burundian contingent stationed in Baidoa the capital of the Bay region of Somalia have begun daily foot patrols around the town as a way to build confidence and deterring elements of the militant group al Shabaab from carrying out attacks on residents. Baidoa situated 256 kilometers by road northwest of the country’s capital Mogadishu is the third largest city in south-central Somalia and had been a stronghold of the Al Qaeda liked insurgents until 2012 when the city was recaptured by government troops and Ethiopian forces. AMISOM troops deployed to Baidoa in May 2012 to support the Somalia National Army (SNA). Baidoa is an important business route for goods transported to from Mogadishu to other parts of the region and although relatively peaceful, al Shabaab sympathizes still pose a challenge with suicide bombs and IEDs. Over a hundred AMISOM peacekeepers carry out the surprise foot patrol within Baidoa town together with Somali forces in a bid to strengthen the security of the city. While briefing the his troops the AMISOM Chief of operations for sector 3, Colonel Mudomo Alexis said al-Shabaab has changed its combat tactic from the face to face gun duels to the use of explosives and other harmful munitions and urged the peacekeepers to be vigilant. SOUNDBITE (French) Colonel Mudomo Alexis, AMISOM Chief of operations:

“Al Shabaab has adopted a different type of combat; instead of raging a classic type of combat they have adopted asymmetric combat strategy, for example with IED. So if the population finds something abnormal, we have technicians with us who can help them very quickly to remove this object in the population. It is in this framework that we are undertaking this kind of patrol.” The AU peacekeepers have ramped up their efforts to secure the city and its environs with two daytime patrols and a nighttime patrol daily. Residents of Baidoa woke up to find scores of Burundian peacekeepers marching along the streets backed by their armored personnel carriers and Somali forces. Residents can be seen walking around and going about their day-to-day duties without fear. Members of AMISOM’s Police component have recently deployed to the city as well to help train, mentor and advise the Somali Police on the ground. The AU Police team is comprised of twelve Individual Police Officers (IPO’s), three each from Ghana, Uganda, Nigeria and Sierra Leone now based in Baidoa and work hand in hand with the Somali Police Force. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Abdirahman Mohamed Ali, Deputy Police Commander Of Baidoa “We badly need their support, to help us in many departments. The number of Police in Baidoa is very small and we have managed to secure the town largely due to our efforts and not our numbers, we really want them to support us.” The AMISOM Police have been stationed in Baidoa for the last twomonth and are already having an impact in how the police operates says Emmanuel Odonkor Chief Superintendent of Police and head of the AMISOM Police unit Baidoa. “Ever since our arrival we have been able to able to mentor them in areas of how to keep suspects and the undue delay of suspects in detention has been avoided for now and I must say that we are so much impression about their performance.” The 17,000 African Union Peacekeeping Force has been supporting the Somali Government Forces in battling al Shabaab since 2007 when they first deployed. The AU troops and are now stretched securing the areas they have captured and need more boots on the ground and force multipliers like Attack-Helicopters and Armored Personnel Carriers (APCs) to push al Shabaab out of areas they still control in South-central Somalia. END.

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