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Unit Plan: Being Healthy

By- Allison Webb

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Table of Contents
Rational for Unit………………………………………………………………………3 Content Standards for Unit………………………………………………………...4 Unit Goals and Description…………………………………………………………5-6 Bulletin Board………………………………………………………………………….6-7 Bulletin Explanation………………………………………………………………….8 Summative Assessment………………………………………………………………9-10 References for teachers and kids…………………………………………………..11-12 Lesson Plans…………………………………………………………………………….

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Rational for Unit:
This unit was designed to inform students about their bodies and give them the knowledge of how to take care of themselves in a healthy way. The students will learn about wellness, bones, eating healthy, exercising, and giving back to the community. We have an introductory lesson that gets students to think about what wellness is and what it is not. During this lesson the students will be able to come up with a reasonable goal that is specific and measurable. This goal will be something meaningful to them. The students will also be using their listening, speaking and reasoning skills to participate as a class. Then the students jump into learning about their skeletal system. By understanding the body parts, students will be better able to connect with themselves. Being aware of what you are made of is helpful when giving a reason why it is good to be healthy. During this lesson the students will need to work collaboratively. Next the students will learn about what types of food are good for them to eat. Food is the main source of energy that our bodies need to function, so students need to understand that everything they eat affects how they act and feel on a daily basis. The students will use their background knowledge about food to create a pizza with their partners that includes foods from each of the different food groups. Another lesson will be on getting active. The students will focus on keeping track of their heart rates during physical activity within a week’s time and looking at the results to figure out which exercises they performed are more beneficial for their bodies. Students should know how to perform jumping jacks, running, and sit-ups as well as working collaboratively with their peers. The students should also be able to check their pulse and know how to figure out their heart rate. Lastly the students will work on gaining some empathy by designing a poster that displays the healthy items that the students want to send to the Hurricane Sandy victims. The students will have to use their knowledge about the food pyramid to provide some well balanced food items. They will also need to be able to make an engaging poster with a partner that they will be sharing with the rest of the class.

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Content Standards for Unit:
The students will be able to create a wellness plan using a SMART goal with no more than one error in writing the goal (meaning has all 5 components of the goal), given that they know the seven components of wellness. After the students have put together the skeleton as a class, the fourth grade students will be able to label the bones vocabulary next to the appropriate bone.

After the students learn about the food pyramid as a class, the fourth grade students will be able to create a pizza using the six food groups with the help of their partner, label all the ingredients correctly on a sheet of paper, and clean up their area when they are finished (I should see nothing on their desks or on the floor).

After the students record their heart rate scores for a week, they will be able to draw a bar graph to represent the differences for each exercise task with 95 percent accuracy.

Students will be able to support their graph data with evidence, listens to other’s ideas, and evaluate the data to come to a consensus on which exercise is best for your heart.

The lesson goal for the students is to gain some empathy for the residents who live where Hurricane Sandy hit. They will get inside another person’s feelings and worldview and from this they will want to help them by coming up with things that they would want to send to those in need, students just like themselves.

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Unit Goals and Description:
• Obtain, interpret, understand and use basic health concepts to enhance personal, family, and community health.

Students will be learning about how to eat right and why it is important to exercise regularly. They will do this by creating a pizza that includes all of the foods from the different food groups and by participating in the different exercise activities. The students will also be learning about all of the different types of wellness there are: intellectual, emotional/psychological, physical, social, vocational, environmental, and spiritual. They will then choose one of the types and make a goal for themselves to achieve. The students will also be contributing to their community by designing a care package that they would send to the Hurricane Sandy victims. They will use their basic health concepts to fill up the care package with things that are wellness related and be able to explain why this is important. By doing this they are gaining empathy for others. • Utilize interactive literacy and social skills to establish personal, family, and community health goals.

Students will be able to support their graph data with evidence, listen to other’s ideas, and evaluate the data to come to a consensus on which exercise is best for their heart. They will do this by actively engaging in the exercises and then finding their heart rates. They will display their findings on graph paper to be able to find which exercise was the best for their heart. Every lesson we have is interactive because students are working together and getting to experience things hands-on. Students will also be using what they know about wellness to create a goal for themselves that they will work towards achieving Demonstrate critical literacy/thinking skills related to personal, family, and community wellness.

Students will demonstrate wellness by creating a goal for them to accomplish. They will write it down and give different ways they are going to work towards reaching that goal. Learning how to set goals is important in life because we all have things that we can work on to be happier healthier individuals. A lot of people know how to state a goal, but knowing how to achieve the goal is a little more complicated. By teaching students how to
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approach this they will hopefully take away goal setting and goal achieving skills for them to perform as they progress through life. • Demonstrate behaviors that foster healthy, active lifestyles for individuals and the benefit of society.

By learning about the food pyramid, students are more aware of the types of food they should eat to keep their bodies healthy. This is important because one day these students are going to be living on their own and they will have to make the choice of what food to buy at the grocery store. We want the students to encourage their family members to eat healthy as well so they can be living in a healthier lifestyle with the ones they love. This is also true about teaching physical activity. Being active is important to keep our bones, heart, and brain happy.

Bulletin Board:

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Would  you  rather?  
Healthy  vs.  Non  healthy      

       

       

 
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Bulletin Explanation:

The bulletin board is a way for

students to see the difference between healthy and non-healthy foods. Te question would you rather is a way for students to look at the foods. They will be able to compare the foods generally that they would want to eat rather than the ones they should be eating. As times passes the foal for the bulletin board is that students are able to want to eat more of the healthier foods because they are better for you. Even though some of the healthier foods should be portioned well so that you don’t over eat foods such as cheese or pasta. The bulleting board will be filled with colorful pictures and words to engage the students. The foods will have headings but won’t be put up till later when the students are asked the questions of what is healthy and not healthy. Once they have established that, they will then be able to hang it up above the correct place. By the end of the unit the students will write what foods they should be eating rather than what they want due to the concepts they learned during the unit.

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Summative Assessment:
The students have learned all of these concepts in the classroom during discussion and activities. The assessment is a way for me to see if the students are learning what we have been discussing the last two weeks. If they are unable to meet the requirements they will be able to verbally speak with me to discuss what they missed and how they can fix it. Name of Student Question/Statement Met Students are able to clearly sort 6 foods in healthy and nonhealthy groups Students are able to take a correct heart rate of their partners Students are able to give 4 examples and descriptions of activities or exercises that are good for your health Students are able to put together a list of supplies that will help people if a disaster was to occur Not Met Exceeds Comments

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Name:_____________________________ Date:______________________________

1. With the paper cut outs of food in front of you, I would like you to glue them in the appropriate columns of foods. Make your columns. (there should be a total of 10 items on the page)

2. With a partner, take their heart rate and write down what it is. After you have taken your partners heart rate, write the directions to students who aren’t aware of how to take heart rate.

3. Please describe 4 attributes or exercises that will help you maintain good health.

4. Make a list of supplies that would be needed for people who have experienced a disaster.

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References:
Teacher  References-­‐  

  First  Days  of  School  by  Wong     YouTube  video  on  Hurricane  Sandy     Liked  the  example  you  gave  about  cutting  out  coupons  to  help  feed  a  family  at  Thanksgiving   that  someone  did  in  previous  years,  so  we  thought  about  people  in  need  and  came  up  with   those  affected  by  Sandy.     Product  Criteria  Cards  in  our  brown  packet.     In  the  PE  class  that  I  am  in  right  now  we  talked  about  the  different  parts  of  wellness  and  how  to   write  a  reasonable  goal.     To  come  up  with  the  non-­‐critical  attributes  we  just  used  our  prior  knowledge  to  come  up  with   things  that  we  thought  were  unhealthy.       I  was  inspired  to  do  the  Mr.  Bones  part  because  I  had  a  teacher  in  middle  school  who  had  a   skeleton  at  the  front  of  the  room,  but  never  once  used  it.  I  think  it  would  be  a  good  hands-­‐ on/collaborative  activity  for  students  to  learn  where  the  bones  go.       The  test  that  we  used  was  provided  on  a  website  that  we  found.  This  website  seemed  to   understand  that  we  do  not  need  students  to  know  all  206  of  the  bones  in  the  body,  just  the   major  ones.  ("The  Skeletal  System  |  Printable  Activity." The  Skeletal  System  |  Printable  Activity.   Knowledge  Bears  INC.,  n.d.  Web.  09  Sept.  2012.  <http://www.kbteachers.com/human-­‐ anatomy/skeletal-­‐system-­‐diagram.html>.)  This  is  our  citation  for  the  test  we  used.       We  also  had  the  initiative  that  we  wanted  students  to  be  able  to  practice  what  the  bones  were   and  where  they  went  on  the  skeleton,  as  well  as,  being  able  to  practice  the  spelling  of  the   words.  I  know  that  not  every  family  can  help  their  child  study  their  vocabulary  words  at  home,   so  I  thought  this  would  be  a  good  idea  for  those  that  might  need  a  little  more  practice  before   taking  the  test.       I  remember  in  math  class  we  would  work  in  groups  to  make  bar  graphs  according  to  some  data   that  we  have  to  research.  I  believe  we  were  given  Skittles  or  M&M’s  and  to  separate  them  into   the  different  colors.  From  there  we  had  to  create  a  bar  graph  to  show  if  each  bag  had  the  same   colors  of  Skittles  or  M&M’s.   We  used  the  Curriculum  and  Pedagogy  packet  in  order  to  get  some  ideas  for  social  skills  as  well   as  the  rubrics  for  assessment  purposes.      
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I  remember  having  pizza  parties,  lunch  with  the  teacher,  and  fun  activities  like  that  when  we   were  on  task  for  a  long  period  of  time  (a  month)     I  remember  during  5th  or  6th  grade  reading  we  were  in  different  reading  groups.  In  each  group   there  was  a  recorder,  word  finder,  timer,  and  connector.  We  tried  to  work  that  into  the  four   groups  we  had  for  the  different  exercises.       In  my  PE  and  Health  Science  class  that  I  am  taking  this  semester,  my  professor  brought  the   plastic  food  from  each  food  group  to  share  with  the  class.  I  thought  this  was  a  good  way  for   learners  to  visualize  the  information  rather  than  just  talking  about  it.  You  could  even  pass  it   around  the  room  if  students  have  never  heard  of  a  certain  food  before.  (Expand  their   vocabulary).     Picture  1:  “Food  Guide  Pyramid.”  The  Flannelboard  Set.  The  Food  Guide  Pyramid,  n.d.  Web.  23   Sept.  2012.  http://www.thefeltsource.com/Food-Guide-Pyramid.html.     Picture  2:  Education,  Nutrition.  “Blank  Food  Pyramid  for  Kids  to  Color-­‐  Printable  Food  Pyramid   Image  by  Chef  Solus.”  Flickr.  Yahoo!,  19  Apr.  2010.  Web.  23  Sept.  2012.   http://www.flickr.com/photos/nutritioneducation/4536738067/.   Kid Resourceswww.nourishinteractive.com/nutrition-education-printables kidshealth.org/kid/ www.nourishinteractive.com/  

Lesson Plans:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Student Wellness Week Hangman: Skeletal System You Are What You Eat- Food Pyramid Your Heart Skips a Beat Helping Hands

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Direct Instruction

Presentation w/ Adv Organizer

Concept Attn’ment

Cooperative Learning

Inquiry Teaching

Direct Instruction Lesson Plan (10 pts) Lesson Background:
Your Name: Allison Webb and Jessica Walker Grade Level: (circle one) K 1 2 3 4 5 6 Subject: (circle one) Language Arts Social Studies Mathematics Science

Lesson Title: Hangman: Skeletal System Materials Needed: Pencil A life size skeleton (each bone can detach from the skeleton) Roll on glue Note cards The Skeletal System Test Dry erase markers Mini model of skeleton (bones can detach from the skeleton) Prerequisite Skills: Students will need to be able to understand numbers 1 through 5. They will need to know how to use the glue stick. They will need to know how to form a line and follow directions. Students will need to know how to work in collaboration. A B C D Lesson Objective: After the students have put together the skeleton as a class, the fourth grade students will be able to correctly write the bones vocabulary next to the appropriate bone on the test sheet with no more than two errors in matching and two errors in spelling. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Interaction with Students:
1. Provide objectives: (What are students going to learn?) Time:5 minutes

Over the last few days we have been learning about all the different bones in our body. Today we are going to use Mr. Bones (picture displayed below) to help us identify each bone and put him back together. This will help you review the bones before everyone takes the bone test at the end of the period. I will also have everyone create twenty four note cards (one for each bone we have discussed) in order to help you practice spelling your bones vocabulary, which you also will be tested on during the test.
(I don’t know if this skeleton can come apart, but the one we would use for this activity would- retrieved from http://bsciencecenter.wordpress.com/what-we-do/)

2. Demonstrate knowledge or skill: (Input/Modeling by the teacher)

Time:30 minutes

I will introduce the class to Mr. Bones (as they have not seen him before). Then I will take Mr. Bones apart. I will ask the students to come up to the front of the room and form a line. I will hand each student a different bone. They will then take the bone they have back to their seat and set it on their desk. I will have a mini model skeleton that I will use to show the students what I want them to do as a group. I will take the mini skeleton apart like I did the life size one (except keep all of the parts). I will tell the students that I need to think about which part of the skeleton I should put on first in order for more bones to be added onto the skeleton. I will tell the class, for example, if I choose the phalanges (the scientific word for fingers) I will not have a place to put them yet because there needs to be other parts put on first. (Retrieved from
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/gcaplan/anat/study%20guide/api%20study%20g uide%20f%20skeleton%20pectoral.htm)

What bone do you think I will need to put on first to start putting together the skeleton? (Cranium) The next part would be the mandible and so forth until my mini skeleton is completely together again. I will talk through my thinking process of how I know what comes next to build the mini skeleton asking students to chime in along the way.

(Received from http://www.a3bs.com/Mini-Human-Skeleton-Shorty-onhanging-stand-A18-1,p_1207_65_53_165_22.html)

3. Provide guided practice: (Guided practice with the teacher)

Time:15 minutes

Okay everyone will need to work together as a group to put Mr. Bones back together. This means that we are using teamwork. The better teamwork you have will determine how quickly you can put Mr. Bones back together. You will need to help each other figure out what bone comes next, as well as who has what bone. You need to use the scientific terms when discussing the bones. I will be observing how students work together and provide any additional help that the students may need (such as hint/questions if they get stuck or if they place a wrong bone somewhere).

4. Check for understanding and provide student feedback: (How will you know students understand the skill or concept? How will they know they “get it?”) Time: 3 minutes Does everyone seem to be getting the hang of what all the bones are and where they go on the skeleton? (Thumbs up/thumbs down) I will also be able to tell which students might need more help because I observed them during the guided practice. If thumbs down: If you still do not think that you are fully understanding the bones and where they go hopefully this next activity will help you.

5: Provide extended practice and transfer: (Independent practice of the skill) Time:30 minutes I will pass out a baggy with all of the 24 bones that we have been studying (already cut out, so the students can spend more time on practicing spelling) to each student and a glue stick. On a note card you will glue a bone to one side. The bone name will be typed on the back of each bone piece. You will glue this part down so you cannot see how the bone is spelled. It is there just so you can be sure that you know what bone you are looking at. Then on the opposite side of the note card you will write the name of the bone correctly (or the best you can). These will be good study tools for you to use when we have our comprehensive test later on in the unit. In the background I will be playing a song about bones (kids tune). I will be walking around and making sure that everyone understands what they are to be doing and answering any questions the students have. 6. Assessment / Closure: (How do you evaluate student progress or provide closure to this lesson?) You MUST include rubric, checklist or assessment document. Time: 10min I will hand out the test (provided in references) that the students will complete. They will hand the test in when they are done.
Skeleton  Test  Checklist     Name:   Frank     Yes/No     Yes/No     #  of  Errors     Missed  one     All  correct    

    Spelled  all  vocabulary  words  correctly  (or  missed  two  or  less)      Appropriate  word  to  match  the  bone  (2  or  less  errors)    

       

What  student  missed:  mandible  (spelled  it  -­‐  mandable)    

 

 

 

7. DIFFERENTIATION of Content, Process or Product: a. Adaptation for students who need extra help, time, or attention? b. Extension for students of high ability? (Remember, assigning gifted students to be the tutor for others is not sufficient academic challenging for students who have mastered the lesson). a. I will allow more time to take the test for the students who need it. Also by having the guided practice be collaborative, students can ask peers for explanations that could be beneficial to their learning. At all times I will be there observing so if students are ever struggling I can help them out. b. For students that seem to exhibit high ability I will make sure that if they ask me a question during this lesson, I will ask them a question that will have them using their higher level thinking skills in order to answer their own question (Example, “Why are bones important to learn about?” “ Why do you think they would be something we need to learn?”). I will also provide any extra information/resources that the students want to know about bones and give them the opportunity to research a question they have about bones.

TOTAL LESSON TIME:__93 minutes____ 8. References Consulted (Curriculum books in Drake SOE curriculum lab, previous teachers as resources, online websites, your past experiences, or your own initiatives, etc): I was inspired to do the Mr. Bones part because I had a teacher in middle school who had a skeleton at the front of the room, but never once used it. I think it would be a good handson/collaborative activity for students to learn where the bones go. The test that we used was provided on a website that we found. This website seemed to understand that we do not need students to know all 206 of the bones in the body, just the major ones. ("The Skeletal System | Printable Activity." The Skeletal System | Printable Activity. Knowledge Bears INC., n.d. Web. 09 Sept. 2012. <http://www.kbteachers.com/humananatomy/skeletal-system-diagram.html>.) This is our citation for the test we used. We also had the initiative that we wanted students to be able to practice what the bones were and where they went on the skeleton, as well as, being able to practice the spelling of the words. I know that not every family can help their child study their vocabulary words at home, so I thought this would be a good idea for those that might need a little more practice before taking the test.

Direct Instruction

Presentation w/ Adv Organizer

Concept Attn’ment

Cooperative Learning

Inquiry Teaching

Presentation with Advance Organizer Lesson Plan (10 pts)
Your Name: Allison Webb Jessica Walker Language Arts Grade Level: (circle one) K 1 2 3 4 5 6 Mathematics Science

Subject: (circle one)

Social Studies

Lesson Title: Food Pyramid Materials Needed: each food group represented with plastic food, ingredients for a pizza (sauce, crust, cheese, veggies, meat, pineapple), a picture of the food pyramid, cups for storing ingredients, teacher will cook pizzas during lunch time, projector sheets, 6 different colored markers, white board, markers for students, spoon (to spread sauce) Prerequisite Skills: The students will have a solid background knowledge about food. They will need to know how to put together a pizza and work collaboratively with their partners. ABCD Lesson Objective: After the students learn about the food pyramid as a class, the fourth grade students will be able to create a pizza using the six food groups with the help of their partner the pair will create their pizza with 95% accuracy.

1. Present objectives: (What are students going to learn?)

Time:5 minutes

Today the students will begin learning about the food pyramid. They will learn what foods are in each group and also why it is important to learn the foods and groups, in order to have a balanced diet.

(http://www.thefeltsource.com/Food-Guide-Pyramid.html) 2. Present advance organizer: (A metaphor or logical connection?) Time:

We will begin with a class discussion. Who can tell me what kinds of foods are healthy? (Call on 2-3 students)Those are great answers. Who can tell me what their favorite pizza is? (Have 2 students answer) Oh, that makes me hungry. Who noticed that a pizza contains our different food options? Well the crust of

the pizza is like our grain group in the pyramid. The sauce of a pizza is like our oil group. The cheese of our pizza is like the dairy group. Our green peppers are like our vegetable group. Our sausage is like out meat group. Then the pineapple is like our fruit group. 3. Demonstrate knowledge or skill: (Input/Modeling by the teacher) Time:

We will begin by handing out a food pyramid handout with pictures of different foods in each group. The students will sit at their desks while the teacher is demonstrating on a projection screen. The teacher will explain each group to the class. With each group the teacher will ask the students what foods they think go into each group and then she will write it down on the transparency of the food pyramid. By the end of the class discussion the teacher’s blank food pyramid will be full.

(1st diagram----http://www.thefeltsource.com/Food-Guide-Pyramid.html) (2nd diagram---http://www.flickr.com/photos/nutritioneducation/4536738067/) 4. Check for understanding and provide student feedback: (How will you know students understand the skill or concept? How will they know they “get it?”?) Time: Now the teacher will hold up at least two foods from each food group and have the students write what group it is on their whiteboards. For example, the teacher would hold up an apple, give the students a few seconds to write their answer, and then have them hold up their answer for me to check. If someone gets it wrong—check with your partner and explain why you think it was in a different group to your partner and see who is right. 5. Assessment / Closure: (How do you evaluate student progress or provide closure to this lesson?) Time: The students will be in partners and provided with a pizza crust, sauce in a bowl, a bowl of cheese, a bowl of peppers, a bowl of sausage, a bowl of pineapple, a pan and spoon. (Everything will be prepared and ready to go in the classroom mini fridge) As partners, they are to build their pizza in the correct order. (correct order: crust, sauce, cheese, sausage, peppers, and pineapple—sausage, peppers and pineapple just go on top of cheese) After they build their pizza they will hand their pan to the teacher (who will then cook it later).

After they have handed the pizza, they will then stay in their partners. The partners will write the ingredients of the pizza in the correct food group. (example: cheese=dairy group----make sure their handout is put away) In the background there will be a cd with a song about pizza and the different food groups, playing on repeat. I will be walking around and making sure all the students will be following the directions and keeping them on task. I will also answer any questions the students may have. Making a pizza Checklist-------Names: Tasks yes Prepared pizza correctly Labeled ingredients Cleaned up area What students can do for next time: 6. Adaptation for students who need extra help, time, or attention? and Extension for students of high ability? A. Students requiring extra help will be allowed more time to make their pizza and group the ingredients. Also by having the demonstration (whole group activity), students can ask peers for explanations that could be beneficial to their learning. At all times I will be observing so if the students ever need extra assistance, I will be available. B. For students that seem to exhibit high ability I will make sure that if they ask me a question during this lesson. I will ask them a question that will have them using their higher level thinking skills in order to answer their own question. (Example: “Why is the pepper in the vegetable group?” Why do you think we learn about the food pyramid?”) On labeling their ingredients the students can also think of other ingredients they could have added to their pizza. I will also provide any extra information/resources that the students want to know about the food pyramid and give them an opportunity to research a question they have about the food pyramid. TOTAL LESSON TIME:______ 7. References Consulted: (Curriculum books in Drake SOE curriculum lab, teacher resources, websites, etc): In my PE and Health Science class that I am taking this semester, my professor brought the plastic foods from each food group to share with the class. I thought this was a good way for learners to visualize the information rather than just taking about it. You could even pass it around the room if students have never heard of a certain food before. (Expand their vocabulary). Picture 1: "Food Guide Pyramid." The Flannelboard Set. The Food Guide Pyramid, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2012. <http://www.thefeltsource.com/Food-Guide-Pyramid.html>. Picture 2: Education, Nutrition. "Blank Food Pyramid for Kids to Color- Printable Food Pyramid Image by Chef Solus." Flickr. Yahoo!, 19 Apr. 2010. Web. 23 Sept. 2012. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/nutritioneducation/4536738067/>.

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Direct Instruction

Presentation w/ Adv Organizer

Concept Attn’ment

Cooperative Learning

Inquiry Teaching

Concept Attainment Lesson Plan (10 pts) Lesson Background:
Your Name: Jessica Walker and Allison Webb Language Arts Social Studies Grade Level: (circle one) K 1 2 3 4 5 6 Mathematics Science Subject: (circle one)

Lesson Title: Student Wellness Week Materials Needed: • A sheet of paper (to write out their plan) • Cards • Tape • Pencil • ELMO • Eraser board markers (5) Prerequisite Skills: • Listening, speaking, and reasoning skills • Students will be able to numbers one through six below • Students will know how to come up with a reasonable goal that is specific and attainable

Lesson Objective: The students will be able to create a wellness plan using a SMART goal with no more than one error in writing the goal (meaning has all 5 components of the goal), given that they know the seven components of wellness. Concept Label: Healthy (Wellness)

Critical Attributes: • • • • • • • •

[yes]

Non-critical Attributes [no] -Sad -Tired -Watching TV -Candy -Smoking -Littering -Laziness -Being mean

Sleep Recycling Apples School Having a friend Confidence Swimming Smiling

Definition of Concept: The state or condition of being in good physical and mental health.

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Interaction with Students:
1. Provide examples and non-examples to the class: (Distinguish yes/no attributes) Time : 10-15 min.

(Before starting the lesson, put up the YES and NO cards on the whiteboard so all students can see. Have the critical attributes and the non-critical attributes already typed up on cards and put tape on the back of them). Today, class, instead of telling you what we are going to learn, you are going to think about some clues that I will give you and figure out what concept you think we are learning about today. I have several cards which I am going to put in one of two columns. There is a YES column and a NO column. If a card describes the concept, it will go in the YES column. Likewise, if it does not describe the concept it will go in the NO column. At first I am going to put some cards in the columns so you have some clues to figure out what the concept is. If you think you know what the concept is, please keep it to yourself so you do not ruin it for someone else. As soon as more people get it then we will talk about it as a class. (Place the words sleep, recycling, apples, and school in the YES column. Then place the words sad, tired, and watching TV in the NO column). Now I will show you the cards one by one and if you think you know where the card belongs you may raise your hand. If I call on you, you will get the chance to come put the card in the column in which you think it belongs and explain why you think it goes there. I will let you know if you are right or if you need to keep brainstorming. (Show the students the remaining cards and have them place them in the columns. If they place it in the wrong column, set the card in the middle and say we will come back to this one when we are more certain that it goes in a certain column).

2. Test for attainment: (Do the students understand the concept?) Time:5-8min. Thank you to our volunteers. I would like you to put your thumbs up if you think you know what the concept is. (If there are more than 2 or 3 students that do not have their thumbs up, have the students who do know the concept put the rest of the cards up of what would go under the YES and No columns). Now I would like you to turn to a partner sitting close to you and share what you thought the concept is and why. (During this discussion time listen to student’s responses making sure that everyone seems to understand the topic and are giving explanations as to why they think it is a particular concept). Have one or two students explain to the class what they thought the main concept was and why they thought that.

3. Analyze student thinking processes and integration of learning: Time: 10-15 min. (Are they able to provide additional examples and non-examples?) Now that everyone understands what the concept is, everyone can contribute at least one example to go under either column. (Call up 3 or 4 students at a time to have them each write an example on the board with a eraser board marker. Then go over them as a class.) Now that everyone has written an example we are going to discuss why each of you put the example you did under the YES or NO column, so everyone can understand everyone else’s thinking.

4. Clarify lesson objectives: (What are students going to DO with these?)

Time:2-3min.

Now that you have all figured out what we are going to be learning about today, being healthy (wellness), you are going to create your own wellness plan using the words under the YES column. The wellness plan will go on for three weeks, so about a month. You will make a goal for yourself that has to do with one of the seven components of wellness: intellectual, emotional/psychological, physical, social, vocational, environmental, and spiritual. You will also write down how you will achieve this goal (I will stop…, I will reduce…, I will increase…, I will start…). After a week, you will evaluate how your goal is coming along and make any changes that deem necessary. I will be checking your wellness plans and making sure you have all five parts of the SMART goal (meaning specific, measurable, attainable-realistic, relevant, and timely) we have learned.

5. Procedures for Using the Concept in a meaningful way? Time: 15 min. To make sure that students are thinking and ready to write their wellness plans, I will have them help me make a list of examples for each of the seven components of wellness that they could make their goals about. Intellectual• Expand knowledge • Share your gifts and knowledge with others • Pursue personal interest and growth • Challenge your mind rather than being self-satisfied and unproductive Emotional/Psychological• Recognize and manage feelings • Express feelings freely • See value in a support system • Relationships are built on trust and respect • Self-esteem • Self-acceptance • Self-confidence • Self-control • Self-efficacy Physical• Regular physical activity • Conscious of what you put in your body • Strength, flexibility, and endurance • Take care of yourself (annual exams, listening to your body) • sleep Social• Importance in society • Have a support system which makes you feel connected • Living in harmony with yourself and others • Sense of belonging Vocational-

• Feeling of satisfaction with career choices • Exploring and embracing your personal strengths • Ability to access your strengths and weaknesses • Do what you love, love what you do! Environmental• Desire to be respectful of nature/environment • Knowing that your actions can have an impact • Protecting yourself from environmental hazards (noise and air pollution) Spiritual• Meaning and purpose • Recognizing the world is bigger than you • Your actions are consistent with your own values and beliefs I will also work through with them an example goal and how I would like it set up, so they know what I will be expecting.

6. Assessment / Closure (How do you evaluate student progress or provide closure for this lesson?) Include rubric, checklist, assessment documents. Time: 15-20min. I will collect their wellness plans and assess them according to the rubric below. I will also look at their results at the end of the month to see how they progressed toward their goal (that part is more just completion rather than an actual grade because the goal is more for the students to learn how to goal set). Name of student: Neat and organized All 5 SMART goal parts are included Gives at least 4 ways to achieve their goal Yes No Comments

7. DIFFERENTIATION of Content, Process or Product: a. Adaptation for students who need extra help, time, or attention? • • • Have an example worksheet of a goal for students who might need the reference to create their own goal. Have students share their ideas with a partner to help them get ideas about how they are going to achieve their goals. Provide extra time for any student that needs it.

b. Extension for students of high ability? (Remember, assigning gifted students to be the tutor for others is not sufficient academic challenging for students who have mastered the lesson). • • • After creating their goal have them write a letter to themselves explaining why they chose the goal they did and how they are going to try and achieve that goal. If they want they could create a second in a different area of wellness. Do some research on a specific area of wellness to find out more about it.

TOTAL LESSON TIME:___about 76 min.___ 8. References Consulted (Curriculum books in Drake SOE curriculum lab, previous teachers as resources, online websites, your past experiences, or your own initiatives, etc):

In the PE class that I am in right now we talked about the different parts of wellness and how to write a reasonable goal. To come up with the non-critical attributes we just used our prior knowledge to come up with things that we thought were unhealthy.

Direct Instruction

Presentation w/ Adv Organizer

Concept Attn’ment

Cooperative Learning

Inquiry Teaching

Cooperative Learning Lesson Plan (10 pts) Lesson Background:
Your Name: Allison Webb and Jessica Walker Subject: (circle one) Language Arts Grade Level: (circle one) K 1 2 3 4 5 6 Mathematics Science Social Studies

Lesson Title: Your Heart Skips a Beat Materials Needed: • Pencil • Crayons/markers • Paper • Clock • Graph paper • Gym room (large enough area to perform athletic activities) • Yoga mats (to do sit-ups on comfortably) Prerequisite Skills: • Students should know how to perform jumping jacks, running, and sit-ups • Students should be able to work collaboratively with their peers • Students should be able to check their pulse and know how to figure out heart rate (read a book previously on how to figure out heart rate a week before this lesson would happen) • Students will need to be able to understand numbers 1-6 below Lesson Objective(s): a. Academic in A B C D formatAfter the students record their heart rate scores for a week, they will be able to draw a bar graph to represent the differences for each exercise task with 95 percent accuracy. b. Social Goals for your lessonStudents will be able to support their graph data with evidence, listen to other’s ideas, and evaluate the data to come to a consensus on which exercise is best for your heart. Cooperative Learning Grouping Structure: (see course pack….Jigsaw? Think Pair Share? etc)Teammates in small heterogeneous groups (4-5 students in each group) will work together cooperatively to learn about different types of exercises (and how it affects the heart) and accomplish creating a bar graph showing their results at the end of the week (mutual learning goal). Both the academic goal of creating a bar graph using the data that the students will gather and the social goal of evaluating the data the students receive as a group, listening to each other’s ideas, and supporting their graph with evidence. In this activity the students will be working on all 5 basic elements of cooperative learning: positive interdependence (being positive with group mates), individual accountability (making sure they get their task done so they can contribute their findings to the group), face-to-face interaction (discussing their findings), social skill building (making sure they are listening to other’s ideas, supporting their findings, and evaluating as a class), and effective group processing (coming to a consensus of which exercise is the best for your heart).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Interaction with Students:
1. Present objectives: (Tell students what they are going to learn?) Time:10 minutes Today we are going to learn about…._________ (academic) and practice ____________(social). Today we are going to learn about different types of exercise (jumping jacks, running, sit-ups, and sitting while reading) and how each one affects heart rate. We are doing this in order to be able to create a bar graph comparing the different group’s findings after four days of getting evidence (actually performing the exercises in their groups). We will have four different groups that are performing different activities to compare which one is best for your heart (jumping jacks, running, sit-ups, and sitting while reading). As a group you will be practicing some social skills. The first one will be making sure you have evidence to support your bar graph at the end of the week. This means that you need to be recording all of your results on a sheet of paper each day, so at the end of the week you can create your bar graph. The second one will be making sure you are listening to your group members’ ideas. Each of you will be responsible for creating your own bar graph according to your results, but you will also need to be able to get an average of your group’s scores to create a bar graph for the group’s findings. This is the one that will be presented to the class on Friday. The third one will be evaluating the entire class’s findings by looking at each groups bar graph. From these bar graphs you will be able to determine which exercise is the most beneficial for your heart. Each day during math class we will be going to the gym in order get our findings. Each of the four groups is to perform a certain physical activity and everyone will record their heart rate and keep track of it for a week. At the end of the week during math class you will graph your findings and have each group share out what they researched (found) to the rest of the class. This will help you determine how different exercises affect the heart. 2. Present information for the academic goal: (What are procedures for the academic goal?) Time:45-50 minutes Monday through Thursday we will be going to the gym during math time (approximately 45 minutes). When we get there the students will split up into four different groups (jumping jacks, running, sit-ups, and sitting while reading group). The groups will be picked according to number 3 below. The jumping jacks group will perform jumping jacks for about 10 minutes (they are allowed to stop and take breaks as necessary). They just need to make sure that they are on task and keeping their heart rates up. At the end of the 10 minutes they are to get with one person from their group and find their heart rates. One partner will start out watching the clock for a minute while the other partner is counting their pulses and then they should switch as quickly as possible, so as not to skew their results. The students will be responsible for recording their own heart rate on a sheet of paper. The running group will just be running laps around the gym for about 10 minutes (they are allowed to walk if they get tired). They just need to make sure that they are on task and keeping their heart rates up. At the end of the 10 minutes they are to get with one person from their group and find their heart rates. One partner will start out watching the clock for a minute while the other partner is counting their pulses and then they should switch as quickly as possible, so as not to skew their results. The students will be responsible for recording their own heart rate on a sheet of paper. The sit-ups group will have mats that they will lay on and perform sit-ups for 10 minutes (again it does not have to be continuous). They just need to make sure that they are on task and keeping their heart rates up. At the end of the 10 minutes they are to get with one person from their group and find their heart rates. One partner will start out watching the clock for a minute while the other partner is counting their pulses and then they should switch as quickly as possible, so as not to skew their results. The students will be responsible for recording their own heart rate on a sheet of paper.

The reading group will have articles/books about exercise and how it is good for the heart. They just need to make sure that they are on task. At the end of the 10 minutes they are to get with one person from their group and find their heart rates. One partner will start out watching the clock for a minute while the other partner is counting their pulses and then they should switch as quickly as possible, so as not to skew their results. The students will be responsible for recording their own heart rate on a sheet of paper. This group will also write one or two interesting facts that they learned about exercise from a book they read that day.

(Two examples of books that could be used in this group. http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=Health%20%26%20Fitness%20%2F%20Exercise& page=1&rh=n%3A4%2Ck%3AHealth%20%26%20Fitness%20%2F%20Exercise) After each of the groups does 10 minutes of their physical activity they will each record their heart rates and start making their bar graph. They will compare with their peers within their group. Hopefully the group members have similar findings within each group. Note: During the ten minutes that the students are working as a group they can share ideas on how to make their exercise more fun. For example, the jumping jacks group could stand in a circle and have each student do one jumping jack at a time and repeat. This is additional data that they could include when presenting to the class. Students might find out that doing jumping jacks this way is not the best way to get your heart rate up compared to everyone jumping jacks at the same time. On Friday, the students will work in their groups to average their heart rates and draw a larger bar graph that will be shared with the rest of the class. From this information the students will be able to compare the results from each group’s graphs. 3. Organize students into learning teams: Time:15-20minutes a. Explain how they’ll practice the social goal? In their groups, the students will have evidence supporting their heart rates from checking their pulse by making sure to write down on a sheet of paper. They will also collaborate with their peers in order to find the average heart rate of each exercise and share out to the whole group. Each group will have to listen to everyone else’s results. When each of the groups has shared their findings, the students will evaluate the data and determine which physical activity has the most dramatic/beneficial heart rate. (Note: at the beginning of the week the students could predict which exercise they think has the biggest impact on the heart).

b. How will you organize the groups? The groups will be determined according to the student’s birthdays (January-December). Adjusting will happen if necessary to make the groups more even. Also if there are certain issues with asthma or any other health conditions, we would adjust accordingly so everyone is comfortable. c.What group roles will you have? They will each be individually accountable for recording their own scores and making their own graph. They will be working as a group to find the average heart rate scores in order to make a bar graph that shows each group members contribution to this activity. They will also be responsible for making sure everyone in the group has a part in sharing their final graph/findings with the rest of the class. In groups: Timer- watches the clock for a minute in order for their partner to find their pulse Recorder- everyone will be recording their heart rate scores Encourager- each day a new student will encourage the rest of their group to work hard and keep their heart rates up Reporter- one student will tell something interesting they learned at the end of math class about exercise (each day there would be a new student performing this role). 4. Assist team work and study: Time:10 minutes a. How will you monitor academic progress? I will monitor academic progress by clipboard cruising and making sure the students are recording their scores and creating their bar graphs at the end of each math period. b. How will you monitor the social goals? I will be listening/ clipboard cruising (keeping sticky notes for anything that I notice could be improved on) for the social goals as well. These will be more spread out. Some of the goals with be monitored during the exercising time, some during discussions, and during when the students share their findings with the rest of the class. 5. Provide recognition: Time:5-10minutes (How will students know they have met both academic and social goals?) I really like the idea of the marble jar, so as the teacher I would have a jar for each of the four different groups. After clipboard cruising every day during math class I will determine which groups can receive marbles (they will be able to receive two marbles a day: one for their academic goal and one for their social goals). As a class we will talk about possible rewards (extra recess, lunch with the teacher, watch a movie on Friday, popcorn party, etc.) I also think it is important for peer evaluations to happen. At the end of the week on Friday the students will have a chance to share anything they need to on a sheet of paper and evaluate themselves and their peers. 6. Assessment / Closure: (How do you evaluate student progress or end this lesson?) Include documents for assessing both the academic and social goals. Time:30 minutes

Academic goal will be assessed by having the students share their graph/findings with the rest of the class.

Rubric for Bar Graph Names: Very Satisfactory Satisfactory Needs Improvement Comments:

Is colorful Is organized and easy to read Has at least one extra point from each group member* Averages were correct according to their data *Each member knows that they need to tell the class about something they learned during this activity, whether it be able teamwork or math related. The social goal will be for the students to fill out a group work evaluation sheet. It is broken up into two parts. The first one is for the students to fill out on each other and the second one is more for the teacher while clipboard cruising to assess the social goals of the students. Date: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Members: Yes Did your group get quickly organized? Did you have an encourager? Did you agree who should be the encourager? Did you divide your tasks among the members of the group? Were the members willing to do their tasks? Did everyone participate? Were everyone’s ideas accepted? Did some members dominate discussions? Did you feel free to express your own opinions? Does everyone support the decisions of the group? Would you have preferred to work alone? No

Strongly Agree 1. This group is able to work well together. 2. This group quickly reviews what the day’s task or assignment is or means. 3. This group is able to effectively divide its work among the members of the group. 4. The members of the group willingly share. 5. This group works on the assigned task most of the time. 6. The members of this group help one another to

Agree

Disagree

learn. 7. DIFFERENTIATION of Content, Process or Product: a. Adaptation for students who need extra help, time, or attention? I will be keeping a close eye on all students during the whole activity/discussion time, so I will make sure that anyone who looks like they need some help will get it as soon as possible. If someone is not doing so well in the group that they were placed in, I will make adjustments so everyone is learning and being productive. I will allow extra time for students who need it to finish making their bar graphs. It will be a more relaxing atmosphere because students are able to talk in their groups and ask questions openly if they do not understand something. b. Extension for students of high ability? (Remember, gifted students need challenge). Students who have higher abilities will have a chance to research any of the exercises further or conduct their own experiment dealing with exercise and bar graphs. They would also get a chance to share these with the class to report their findings. TOTAL LESSON TIME:__Around 130 minutes (this is over a weeks time) 8. References Consulted (Curriculum books in Drake SOE curriculum lab, previous teachers as resources, online websites, your past experiences, or your own initiatives, etc): I remember in math class we would work in groups to make bar graphs according to some data that we have to research. I believe we were given Skittles or M&M’s and to separate them into the different colors. From there we had to create a bar graph to show if each bag had the same colors of Skittles or M&M’s. We used the Curriculum and Pedagogy packet in order to get some ideas for social skills as well as the rubrics for assessment purposes. I remember having pizza parties, lunch with the teacher, and fun activities like that when we were on task for a long period of time (a month) I remember during 5th or 6th grade reading we were in different reading groups. In each group there was a recorder, word finder, timer, and connector. We tried to work that into the four groups we had for the different exercises.

Direct Instruction

Presentation w/ Adv Organizer

Concept Attn’ment

Cooperative Learning

Inquiry Teaching

Problem-Based / Inquiry Instruction Lesson Plan (10 pts) Lesson Background
Your Name: Jessica Walker and Allison Webb Subject: (circle one) Language Arts Grade Level: (circle one) K 1 2 3 4 5 6 Mathematics Science

Social Studies

Lesson Title: Helping Hands Materials Needed: • Posters (one for each group) • Colored pencils/ markers/ crayons • Magazines (to cut things out for their posters if desired) • Scissors • Glue • Construction paper • Youtube video • Transparency of the food pyramid for reference • Piece of paper Prerequisite Skills: • Student will have prior knowledge about the food pyramid and why it is important to having a healthy balanced diet. • We will have talked about Hurricane Sandy so everyone is aware if they had not already heard. • Should know how to create an engaging poster that is easy to follow. • Work collaboratively with peers. • Be able to perform numbers 1-5 below.

Logistics: (Are special arrangements necessary?) I will have the desks arranged for group work, so that each group has enough space to create their poster. There will also be plenty of room for each group to share their end product. On the back table I will have all the materials that the students might need laid out and ready to go before hand, so they can get straight to work after I orient them with the problem.

Lesson Goal (not ABCD objectives): The lesson goal for the students is to gain some empathy for the residents who live where Hurricane Sandy hit. They will get inside another person’s feelings and worldview and from this they will want to help them by coming up with things that they would want to send to those in need, students just like themselves.

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Interaction with Students:
1. Orient students to the problem or dilemma? (Must first get their attention to SOLVE a problem!) Have students watch this Youtube video to get them familiarized with what has happened in the Northeast (Hurricane Sandy): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLBQ2-6Rnvg&feature=endscreen&NR=1 A lot of these people have lost things that are very important to them, as you just saw in the video. Today I want you all to work in groups to think of things that you would send to schools in a care package. These people would be so grateful that you are thinking of them enough to send them things that they will use. They can use all the help they can get right now. Just think about how you would feel if your home and school was destroyed. You will design a poster with your group-mates any way you want, but I do want you to have somewhere on your posters a focus on things that will help these people stay healthy through the hardships. Examples: food (canned vegetables, boxes of cereal or macaroni, etc.), hygiene products (toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, etc.) I put a food pyramid transparency up for you to look at if you need to. On the back table I have provided all of the supplies that you might need to create your poster. (Example of a care package that I could show students;
http://www.shopcreativegifts.com/college-carepackages.htm)

2. Organize students for study: a. Size of group? There will be four or five students in each group, depending on how many students are there. b. How groups are formed? I will have them count to four or five and the ones would be in a group, the twos in another, and so forth. b. Transition from large group orientation or instruction to small group work? I will tell the students before they all get up and scramble around where the ones, twos, threes, fours, and fives go. Then I will have one student from each group go and grab the materials their groups need from the back table.

3. Assist independent and group investigation: (Input/Modeling so kids know what to do) Once students have grabbed their materials and are sitting down in their groups I will go “Ch ch ch” and the students will repeat what I just said, which means voices off and look at me. I will explain to them that they should come up with a list of things that they are going to be putting in their care package before they put it on their poster. They will be coming up with a rough draft, so they can change or add ideas as they talk in their groups. I can show them an example of what my poster looked like (I would have done this in advanced as to give the students an idea of what I was looking for). It would have different types of items such as: Hygiene: toothbrush, toothpaste, hairbrush, deodorant, shampoo, conditioner, lotion, etc. Food: canned foods (corn, green beans, beans, etc.), macaroni, non-perishable food items School supplies: glue, scissors, folders, notebooks, pencils, pens, etc. Fun: books (kid and adult), board games, movies, etc. They will see that my poster is very colorful and has pictures (I would print out a picture of each item that I had on my poster) and words that take up the whole poster. Hopefully seeing an example will get them excited to share ideas that popped into their heads. I will also be walking around when the students are working and listening to students’ conversations. They way if they have any questions that need to be answered I can quickly respond. I will also make sure everyone is staying on task and participating in the group.

4. Develop and present artifacts and exhibits

(How do students share what they have learned?)

When everyone is finished creating their poster I will have each group get up in the front of the class and present what they have come up with. They will share how they came up with what they put on their poster and why they decided to decorate it the way they did. Then I will have one person from each of the other groups tell me one thing they saw on the group’s poster that they did not include on their own, but thought it was a good idea. This will let me know who is paying attention. When everyone is finished sharing, I will take the posters and hang them up around the room so everyone can see them. (Maybe even showing the principal these lovely posters and seeing if we could actually have a fundraiser at our school to help those in need.)

5. Analyze and evaluate the problem-solving process: Analysis and Evaluation of Questions Thank you class, for doing such a great job. It is so interesting to see how you all handled the same problem differently. To help us all understand why and how different groups came up with different solutions, each of you will share your thoughts by answering a few questions I have on a piece of loose leaf paper.

Questions: 1. What was the hardest part about solving the problem? 2. What is one thing that worked well for your group in coming to one decision? 3. How did you contribute to the decision-making process in your group? 4. Tell me something you learned and why it was important. These questions will be answered by the students to help them analyze their own thought process. These questions will not be graded. It was intended to be used for the students to reflect on their work in groups and it will let me know why things happened and how the groups came to their decisions. It will also bring to my attention any concerns that the students had during this activity. 6. Assessment / Closure: (How do you evaluate student progress or provide closure to this lesson?) Again, include documents for assessment. I will evaluate student’s posters with the following criteria: Names of students: Title correctly spelled Attractive/colorful visuals Clear and neat writing Original and creative Shows topic well Yes No Comments:

I will also make a note about if everyone had a part in the presentation piece. (Did everyone have a speaking part during the presentation?)

7. DIFFERENTIATION of Content, Process or Product: a. Adaptation for students who need extra help, time, or attention?

• • • •

I will give the students plenty of time to work in their groups to come up their ideas. The students will be working collaboratively, which will help students catch on to things more quickly. I will be walking around if any questions need to be asked. I showed an example that will help jump start student’s thinking to give them some ideas.

b. Extension for students of high ability? (Remember, gifted students need challenge). • I am not telling the students how to make their poster or how to present their ideas, which allows for the creativity of students coming up with ideas on their own.

• •

They could maybe make a brochure that tells why it would be important to help those that have suffered through Hurricane Sandy. They could research schools that have been effected by the Hurricane and report to the class.

TOTAL LESSON TIME: This lesson could take 2 or 3 days of social studies because I don’t want to rush students. 8. References Consulted (Curriculum books in Drake SOE curriculum lab, previous teachers as resources, online websites, your past experiences, or your own initiatives, etc): • • • First Days of School by Wong YouTube video on Hurricane Sandy Liked the example you gave about cutting out coupons to help feed a family at Thanksgiving that someone did in previous years, so we thought about people in need and came up with those affected by Sandy. Product Criteria Cards in our brown packet.