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Frontier of Environmental Science  December 2012, Volume 1, Issue 1, PP.

7‐9 

Study on Coke Dry Quenching Production and Recycling of Coking Wastewater
Mingjun Shan#, Peng Yang, Dawei Pan, Xianyi Zhao, Xue Ao
College of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan, 114051, China #Email: shanmj@126.com

Abstract
Compared with wet quenching, coke dry quenching technology can increase the M40 and M10 of coke by 3-8% and 0.3-0.8% respectively, and decrease release of the pollutants, such as ammonia, phenol, cyanide and so on. After the application of coke dry quenching technology, the effluent from the wastewater treatment station of coking plant cannot be used for wet quenching as before, and is not allowed to be discharged either. In this paper, membrane technology was used as advanced treatment after the current secondary biological treatment. As a result, the effluent quality standard could be improved from the -class criteria specified in “Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard” (GB 8978-1996) to criteria specified in “Design Specifications of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse” (GB 50335-2002). According to the balance of quality and quantity of wastewater in coking plant, the effluent after advanced treatment was reused as circulating cooling water, which could save precious water resources and reduce emissions of pollutants. Keywords: Coke Dry Quenching; Coking Wastewater; Membrane Technology; Reuse

I. INTRODUCTION   
The production process in coking plant can generally be divided into the steps of coal preparation, coke making, gas purification and recovery, refinement of chemical products, and so on. Large quantities of coking wastewater with complex components come from the processes of coke making, gas purification and refinement of chemical products. Properties of coking wastewater vary with the different kinds of raw coals and coking processes. The source of coking wastewater includes the introduced water (surface water and combined water) during coke making, and the discharged water from the process of chemical products recovery and refinement. Residual ammonia water separated from the coke oven gas condensate and the separation water from the processes of chemical products recovery and refinement are high-concentration organic wastewaters. There are a large number of non-renewable and non-biodegradable substances in the wastewater separated from tar distillation and phenol refinement. Such high-concentration organic wastewater was usually sent to tar plant and treated by tubular incinerator. Other high-concentration organic wastewaters separated from the processes of gas purification and refinement of chemical products were mixed with residual ammonia water, undergone the process of ammonia distillation, and delivered to wastewater treatment station as ammonia distillation wastewater. Then the treated wastewater was sent to coke quenching tower for wet quenching. The effluent quality after wet quenching was required to reach the primary standard of “Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard” (GB8978-1996). In order to improve the quality of coke, the technology of dry quenching was widely used in recent years. Compared with wet quenching, the dry quenching technology can increase the M40 and M10 of coke by 3-8% and 0.3-0.8% respectively. This is advantageous to reduce ironmaking costs and improve pig iron outputs. The cold inert gas was used in the CDQ shaft (Coke Dry Quenching) and exchanged heat with the hot red coke to cool the red coke. Then the inert gas transferred the heat absorbed from red coke to CDQ boiler to generate steam. The cooled inert gas was recycled to cool red coke in CDQ shaft; the steam generated from the CDQ boiler could be merged into steam network or used for power generation. When wet quenching was adopted, 0.5 ton steam containing large amounts of
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phenol, cyanide, sulfide and dust would be released into the air each quenching 1 ton red coke. The atmosphere was seriously polluted, and was difficult to be improved. By contrast, the dry quenching technology was more environmental friendly. The red coke was quenched by inert gas in a closed system; efficient dust removing facilities was equipped, so the atmosphere would not be seriously polluted. During the CDQ process, a large amount of steam was produced for power generation, which could avoid the emission of SO2 and CO2 from coal-fired boiler. For a coking plant that can produce 100 million ton coke per year, the CDQ technology can decrease the combustion of 80-100 kiloton steam coal, and thereby reduce atmospheric pollution. After the application of CDQ technology, the effluent from the wastewater treatment station of coking plant cannot be used for wet quenching as before, and is not allowed to be discharged either. Therefore, looking for an effective technology for the treatment of coking wastewater is now becoming a new subject for the sustainable development of coking enterprises. In this paper, the advanced treatment of coking wastewater was applied after the current secondary biological treatment. The effluent quality standard could be improved from the -class criteria specified in “Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard” (GB 8978-1996) to criteria specified in “Design Specifications of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse” (GB 50335-2002). According to the balance of quality and quantity of wastewater in coking plant, the effluent after advanced treatment was reused as circulating cooling water, which not only saved precious water resources, but also reduced emissions of pollutants.

II. PROCESS FLOW FOR ADVANCED TREATMENT 
Membrane technology was used in the advanced treatment process after the current secondary biological treatment. The process flow diagram of advanced treatment for the coking wastewater is shown in Fig. 1.
Effluent from Secondary Biological Treatment Back Washing Water

Ultra filtration System

Ultra filtration Water Producing Tank

Clean Water Tank

Reverse Osmosis System Chemical Cleaning Water

Reuse

Concentrate Tank

Coking Process

FIG.1 THE PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM OF ADVANCED TREATMENT FOR COKING WASTEWATER

The water quality index of secondary biological effluent is shown in tab. 1. The secondary biological effluent was pumped into the ultra filtration system. Macromolecular substances or particles were removed in this stage, and part of the effluent entered into reverse osmosis system for desalination. The permeate water of reverse osmosis system was then mixed with the rest effluent of the ultra filtration system. The quality of mixed water could reach the demand for reuse. As the final disposal, the concentrate water of reverse osmosis system was sent to coke oven for evaporation.
TAB. 1 WATER QUALITY INDEX OF SECONDARY BIOLOGICAL EFFLUENT
pH 6.0~9.0 CODCr (mg/L) <150 NH3-N (mg/L) <15 SS (mg/L) <70 Petroleum(mg/L) <10 EC (μS/cm) <3000

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The water quality index after advanced treatment is shown in tab. 2. The effluent quality after the advanced treatment can reach the criteria specified in “Design Specifications of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse” (GB 50335-2002), and can be used for make-up water of circulating cooling of coking plant.
TAB. 2 WATER QUALITY INDEX AFTER ADVANCED TREATMENT
pH 6.0~9.0 CODCr (mg/L) 25 NH3-N (mg/L) 4 Petroleum (mg/L) <5 water hardness (mg/L) 100 Turbidity (NTU) 3 EC (S/cm) ≤500

III. CONCLUSION 
The application of membrane technology in the advanced treatment for secondary biological effluent can realize the reuse of coking wastewater, reduce the wastewater drainage, save water resource and then protect environment. Zero discharge of coking wastewater can solve the problems of water pollution and water balance, and promote the development of coke dry quenching technology.

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AUTHORS 
Mingjun Shan (1962 -), male, the Han nationality, national third-grade professor, gaining bachelor's degree from Tsinghua University, master's degree in engineering from Harbin Institute of Technology, and doctor's degree from Northeastern University; director of industry industrial water treatment research center in Liaoning University of Science and Technology, engaged in the scientific research and teaching work of environmental protection

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