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Human body features displayed on bodies on which body hair and male facial hair has been removed

The human body is the entire structure of a human organism and comprises a head, neck, torso, two arms and two legs. By the time the human reaches adulthood, the body consists of close to 100 trillion cells,[1] the basic unit of life.[2] These cells are organised biologically to eventually form the whole body.

Contents
[hide]

1 Size, type and proportion 2 Systems o 2.1 Cardiovascular system o 2.2 Digestive system o 2.3 Integumentary system o 2.4 Lymphatic system o 2.5 Endocrine system o 2.6 Musculoskeletal system 2.6.1 Bones o 2.7 Nervous system o 2.8 Reproductive system 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

Size, type and proportion[edit source | editbeta]


Constituents of the human body
In a normal man weighing 60 kg

Constituent Weight [3] Percent of atoms[3] Hydrogen 6.0 kg 63% Oxygen 38.8 kg 25.5% Carbon 10.9 kg 9.5% Nitrogen 1.9 kg 1.4% Calcium 1.2 kg 0.2% Phosphorus 0.6 kg 0.2% Potassium 0.2 kg 0.07% Main article: Body proportion The average height of an adult male human (in developed countries) is about 1.71.8 m (5'7" to 5'11") tall and the adult female is about 1.61.7 m (5'2" to 5'7") tall.[4] Height is largely determined by genes and diet. Body type and composition are influenced by factors such as genetics, diet, and exercise.

Systems[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Organ systems The organ systems of the body include the musculoskeletal system, cardiovascular system, digestive system, endocrine system, integumentary system, urinary system, lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, nervous system and reproductive system.

Anterior (frontal) view of the opened heart. White arrows indicate normal blood flow.

Cardiovascular system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Cardiovascular system and Human heart

The cardiovascular system comprises the heart, veins, arteries and capillaries. The primary function of the heart is to circulate the blood, and through the blood, oxygen and vital minerals are transferred to the tissues and organs that comprise the body. The left side of the main organ (left ventricle and left atrium) is responsible for pumping blood to all parts of the body, while the right side (right ventricle and right atrium) pumps only to the lungs for re-oxygenation of the blood.[5][6] The heart itself is divided into three layers called the endocardium, myocardium and epicardium,(liquidation) which vary in thickness and function.[7]

Digestive system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Digestive system and Human gastrointestinal tract The digestive system provides the body's means of processing food and transforming nutrients into energy. The digestive system comprises the buccal cavity, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine ending in the rectum and anus. These parts together are called the alimentary canal (digestive tract).

Integumentary system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Integumentary system The integumentary system is the largest organ system in the human body, and is responsible for protecting the body from most physical and environmental factors. The largest organ in the body is the skin. The integument also includes appendages, primarily the sweat and sebaceous glands, hair, nails and arrectores pillorum (tiny muscles at the root of each hair that cause goose bumps).

Lymphatic system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Lymphatic system and Immune system The main function of the lymphatic system is to extract, transport and metabolise lymph, the fluid found in between cells. The lymphatic system is very similar to the circulatory system in terms of both its structure and its most basic function (to carry a body fluid).

Endocrine system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Endocrine system The Endocrine system in the human body consists of glands which secrete hormones that regulate the body and maintain homeostasis. The Endocrine system is used to send messages around the body. It does this differently than the nervous system. The main organs in the system are the Hypothalamus, the Pituitary gland, the Thyroid, and the Kidneys.

Musculoskeletal system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Musculoskeletal system

The human musculoskeletal system consists of the human skeleton, made by bones attached to other bones with joints, and skeletal muscle attached to the skeleton by tendons. Bones[edit source | editbeta] Main articles: Human skeleton and List of bones of the human skeleton An adult human has approximately 206 distinct bones: Spine and vertebral column (26) Cranium (8) Face (14) Hyoid bone, sternum and ribs (26) Upper extremities (70) Lower extremities (62)

Nervous system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Nervous system and Human brain The nervous system comprises cells that communicate information about an organism's surroundings and itself. The nervous system of humans is divided into the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS).[8]

Reproductive system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Reproductive system Human reproduction takes place as internal fertilization by sexual intercourse. During this process, the erect penis of the male is inserted into the female's vagina until the male ejaculates semen, which contains sperm, into the female's vagina. The sperm then travels through the vagina and cervix into the uterus or fallopian tubes for fertilization of the ovum. The human male reproductive system is a series of organs located outside the body and around the pelvic region of a male that contribute towards the reproductive process. The primary direct function of the male reproductive system is to provide the male gamete or spermatozoa for fertilization of the ovum. The major reproductive organs of the male can be grouped into three categories. The first category is sperm production and storage. Production takes place in the testes which are housed in the temperature regulating scrotum, immature sperm then travel to the epididymis for development and storage. The second category are the ejaculatory fluid producing glands which include the seminal vesicles, prostate, and the vas deferens. The final category are those used for copulation, and deposition of the spermatozoa (sperm) within the female, these include the penis, urethra, vas deferens and Cowper's gland.

The human female reproductive system is a series of organs primarily located inside of the body and around the pelvic region of a female that contribute towards the reproductive process. The human female reproductive system contains three main parts: the vagina, which acts as the receptacle for the male's sperm, the uterus, which holds the developing fetus, and the ovaries, which produce the female's ova. The breasts are also an important reproductive organ during the parenting stage of reproduction. The vagina meets the outside at the vulva, which also includes the labia, clitoris and urethra; during intercourse this area is lubricated by mucus secreted by the Bartholin's glands. The vagina is attached to the uterus through the cervix, while the uterus is attached to the ovaries via the fallopian tubes. At certain intervals, typically approximately every 28 days, the ovaries release an ovum, which passes through the fallopian tube into the uterus. The lining of the uterus, called the endometrium, and unfertilized ova are shed each cycle through a process known as menstruation.

See also[edit source | editbeta]


Body image Body schema Human development

References[edit source | editbeta]


1. Jump up ^ Page 21 Inside the human body: using scientific and exponential notation. Author: Greg Roza. Edition: Illustrated. Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, 2007. ISBN 1-40423362-8, ISBN 978-1-4042-3362-1. Length: 32pages 2. Jump up ^ Cell Movements and the Shaping of the Vertebrate Body in Chapter 21 of Molecular Biology of the Cell fourth edition, edited by Bruce Alberts (2002) published by Garland Science. The Alberts text discusses how the "cellular building blocks" move to shape developing embryos. It is also common to describe small molecules such as amino acids as "molecular building blocks". 3. ^ Jump up to: a b Page 3 in Chemical storylines. Author: George Burton. Edition 2, illustrated. Publisher: Heinemann, 2000. ISBN 0-435-63119-5, ISBN 978-0-435-63119-2. Length: 312 pages 4. Jump up ^ http://www.human-body.org/ (dead link) 5. Jump up ^ "Cardiovascular System". U.S. National Cancer Institute. Retrieved 2008-09-16.[dead
link]

6. Jump up ^ Human Biology and Health. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. 1993. ISBN 0-13-981176-1. 7. Jump up ^ "The Cardiovascular System". SUNY Downstate Medical Center. 2008-03-08. Retrieved 2008-09-16. 8. Jump up ^ Kandel ER, Schwartz JH, Jessel TM, ed. (2000). "Ch. 17: The anatomical organization of the central nervous system". Principles of Neural Science. McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 978-0-8385-7701-1.

Further reading[edit source | editbeta]

Raincoast Books (2004). Encyclopedic Atlas Human Body. Raincoast Books. ISBN 978-1-55192747-3.

Daniel D. Chiras (1 June 2012). Human Body Systems: Structure, Function, and Environment. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. ISBN 978-1-4496-4793-3. Adolf Faller; Michael Schnke; Gabriele Schnke; Ethan Taub, M.D. (2004). The Human Body: An Introduction to Structure and Function. Thieme. ISBN 978-1-58890-122-4. Richard Walker (30 March 2009). Human Body. Dk Pub. ISBN 978-0-7566-4545-8. DK Publishing (18 June 2012). Human Body: A Visual Encyclopedia. ISBN 978-1-4654-0143-4. DK Publishing (30 August 2010). The Complete Human Body: The Definitive Visual Guide. ISBN 978-0-7566-7509-7. Saddleback (1 January 2008). Human Body. Saddleback Educational Publ. ISBN 978-1-59905234-2.

External links[edit source | editbeta]

Referencing site and detailed pictures showing information on the human body anatomy and structure

Look up body in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Human body [show]

v t e

Human systems and organs

Bone
o o o

Carpus Collar bone (clavicle) Thigh bone (femur) Fibula Humerus Mandible Metacarpus Metatarsus

Skeletal system

o o o o o

o o o o o o o o o o o o

Ossicles Patella Phalanges Radius Skull (cranium) Tarsus Tibia Ulna Rib Vertebra Pelvis Sternum

Cartilage

Fibrous joint Cartilaginous joint Synovial joint

Joints

Muscle Tendon Diaphragm

Muscular system

URT
o

Nose Nasopharynx Larynx

mostly Respiratory system Thoracic

o o

LRT
o

Trachea

o o

Bronchus Lung

Mouth
o o

Salivary gland Tongue

upper GI
o o o o

Oropharynx Laryngopharynx Esophagus Stomach

Digestive system+ adnexa

lower GI
o o o

Small intestine Appendix Colon Rectum Anus

mostly Abdominopelvic

o o

accessory
o o o

Liver Biliary tract Pancreas

Kidney Ureter Bladder Urethra

GU: Urinary system

GU: Reproductive system

Female

o o o o o

Uterus Vagina Vulva Ovary Placenta

Male
o o o o o

Scrotum Penis Prostate Testicle Seminal vesicle

Pituitary Pineal Thyroid Parathyroid Adrenal Islets of Langerhans

Endocrine system

peripheral
o

Artery Vein Lymphatic vessel

Cardiovascular system Circulatory system

o o

Heart

primary
o o

Lymphatic system

Bone marrow Thymus

secondary
o o

Spleen Lymph node

o o

Brain Spinal cord Nerve

Nervous system

Sensory system
o o

Ear Eye

Skin Subcutaneous tissue Breast


o

Integumentary system

Mammary gland

Myeloid

Myeloid immune system

Lymphoid

Lymphoid immune system

[show]

v t e

Medicine

Surgery

Cardiac surgery Cardiothoracic surgery Colorectal surgery Eye surgery General surgery Neurosurgery Oral and maxillofacial surgery Orthopedic surgery Hand surgery Otolaryngology (ENT) Pediatric surgery Plastic surgery Reproductive surgery Surgical oncology Thoracic surgery Transplant surgery Trauma surgery Urology
o

Andrology

Vascular surgery

Internal medicine

Allergy / Immunology Angiology (Vascular Medicine) Cardiology Endocrinology Gastroenterology


o

Hepatology

Geriatrics Hematology Infectious disease Nephrology Oncology Pulmonology Rheumatology

Obstetrics and gynaecology


Gynaecology Gynecologic oncology Maternal-fetal medicine Obstetrics Reproductive endocrinology and infertility Urogynecology

Diagnostic

Healthcare sciences Radiology


o

Interventional radiology, Nuclear medicine

Pathology
o

Anatomical pathology, Clinical pathology, Clinical chemistry, Clinical immunology, Cytopathology, Medical microbiology, Transfusion medicine

Other specialties

Addiction medicine Adolescent medicine Anesthesiology Dermatology

Disaster medicine Diving medicine (Undersea and hyperbaric medicine) Emergency medicine Family medicine General practice Hospital medicine Intensive-care medicine Medical genetics Neurology
o

Clinical neurophysiology

Occupational medicine Ophthalmology Pain management Palliative care Pediatrics


o

Neonatology

Physical medicine and rehabilitation (Physiatry) Preventive medicine Psychiatry Radiation oncology Reproductive medicine Sexual medicine Sleep medicine Sports medicine Transplantation medicine Tropical medicine
o

Travel medicine

<img src="//en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:CentralAutoLogin/start&amp;type=1x1" alt="" title="" width="1" height="1" style="border: none; position: absolute;" /> Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Human_body&oldid=573881070" Categories:

Human body Human anatomy

Human body features displayed on bodies on which body hair and male facial hair has been removed The human body is the entire structure of a human organism and comprises a head, neck, torso, two arms and two legs. By the time the human reaches adulthood, the body consists of close to 100 trillion cells,[1] the basic unit of life.[2] These cells are organised biologically to eventually form the whole body.

Contents
[hide]

1 Size, type and proportion 2 Systems o 2.1 Cardiovascular system

2.2 Digestive system 2.3 Integumentary system 2.4 Lymphatic system 2.5 Endocrine system 2.6 Musculoskeletal system 2.6.1 Bones o 2.7 Nervous system o 2.8 Reproductive system 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

o o o o o

Size, type and proportion[edit source | editbeta]


Constituents of the human body
In a normal man weighing 60 kg

Constituent Weight [3] Percent of atoms[3] Hydrogen 6.0 kg 63% Oxygen 38.8 kg 25.5% Carbon 10.9 kg 9.5% Nitrogen 1.9 kg 1.4% Calcium 1.2 kg 0.2% Phosphorus 0.6 kg 0.2% Potassium 0.2 kg 0.07% Main article: Body proportion The average height of an adult male human (in developed countries) is about 1.71.8 m (5'7" to 5'11") tall and the adult female is about 1.61.7 m (5'2" to 5'7") tall.[4] Height is largely determined by genes and diet. Body type and composition are influenced by factors such as genetics, diet, and exercise.

Systems[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Organ systems The organ systems of the body include the musculoskeletal system, cardiovascular system, digestive system, endocrine system, integumentary system, urinary system, lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, nervous system and reproductive system.

Anterior (frontal) view of the opened heart. White arrows indicate normal blood flow.

Cardiovascular system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Cardiovascular system and Human heart The cardiovascular system comprises the heart, veins, arteries and capillaries. The primary function of the heart is to circulate the blood, and through the blood, oxygen and vital minerals are transferred to the tissues and organs that comprise the body. The left side of the main organ (left ventricle and left atrium) is responsible for pumping blood to all parts of the body, while the right side (right ventricle and right atrium) pumps only to the lungs for re-oxygenation of the blood.[5][6] The heart itself is divided into three layers called the endocardium, myocardium and epicardium,(liquidation) which vary in thickness and function.[7]

Digestive system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Digestive system and Human gastrointestinal tract The digestive system provides the body's means of processing food and transforming nutrients into energy. The digestive system comprises the buccal cavity, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine ending in the rectum and anus. These parts together are called the alimentary canal (digestive tract).

Integumentary system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Integumentary system The integumentary system is the largest organ system in the human body, and is responsible for protecting the body from most physical and environmental factors. The largest organ in the body is the skin. The integument also includes appendages, primarily the sweat and sebaceous glands, hair, nails and arrectores pillorum (tiny muscles at the root of each hair that cause goose bumps).

Lymphatic system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Lymphatic system and Immune system

The main function of the lymphatic system is to extract, transport and metabolise lymph, the fluid found in between cells. The lymphatic system is very similar to the circulatory system in terms of both its structure and its most basic function (to carry a body fluid).

Endocrine system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Endocrine system The Endocrine system in the human body consists of glands which secrete hormones that regulate the body and maintain homeostasis. The Endocrine system is used to send messages around the body. It does this differently than the nervous system. The main organs in the system are the Hypothalamus, the Pituitary gland, the Thyroid, and the Kidneys.

Musculoskeletal system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Musculoskeletal system The human musculoskeletal system consists of the human skeleton, made by bones attached to other bones with joints, and skeletal muscle attached to the skeleton by tendons. Bones[edit source | editbeta] Main articles: Human skeleton and List of bones of the human skeleton An adult human has approximately 206 distinct bones: Spine and vertebral column (26) Cranium (8) Face (14) Hyoid bone, sternum and ribs (26) Upper extremities (70) Lower extremities (62)

Nervous system[edit source | editbeta]


Main articles: Nervous system and Human brain The nervous system comprises cells that communicate information about an organism's surroundings and itself. The nervous system of humans is divided into the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS).[8]

Reproductive system[edit source | editbeta]


Main article: Reproductive system

Human reproduction takes place as internal fertilization by sexual intercourse. During this process, the erect penis of the male is inserted into the female's vagina until the male ejaculates semen, which contains sperm, into the female's vagina. The sperm then travels through the vagina and cervix into the uterus or fallopian tubes for fertilization of the ovum. The human male reproductive system is a series of organs located outside the body and around the pelvic region of a male that contribute towards the reproductive process. The primary direct function of the male reproductive system is to provide the male gamete or spermatozoa for fertilization of the ovum. The major reproductive organs of the male can be grouped into three categories. The first category is sperm production and storage. Production takes place in the testes which are housed in the temperature regulating scrotum, immature sperm then travel to the epididymis for development and storage. The second category are the ejaculatory fluid producing glands which include the seminal vesicles, prostate, and the vas deferens. The final category are those used for copulation, and deposition of the spermatozoa (sperm) within the female, these include the penis, urethra, vas deferens and Cowper's gland. The human female reproductive system is a series of organs primarily located inside of the body and around the pelvic region of a female that contribute towards the reproductive process. The human female reproductive system contains three main parts: the vagina, which acts as the receptacle for the male's sperm, the uterus, which holds the developing fetus, and the ovaries, which produce the female's ova. The breasts are also an important reproductive organ during the parenting stage of reproduction. The vagina meets the outside at the vulva, which also includes the labia, clitoris and urethra; during intercourse this area is lubricated by mucus secreted by the Bartholin's glands. The vagina is attached to the uterus through the cervix, while the uterus is attached to the ovaries via the fallopian tubes. At certain intervals, typically approximately every 28 days, the ovaries release an ovum, which passes through the fallopian tube into the uterus. The lining of the uterus, called the endometrium, and unfertilized ova are shed each cycle through a process known as menstruation.

See also[edit source | editbeta]


Body image Body schema Human development

References[edit source | editbeta]


1. Jump up ^ Page 21 Inside the human body: using scientific and exponential notation. Author: Greg Roza. Edition: Illustrated. Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, 2007. ISBN 1-40423362-8, ISBN 978-1-4042-3362-1. Length: 32pages 2. Jump up ^ Cell Movements and the Shaping of the Vertebrate Body in Chapter 21 of Molecular Biology of the Cell fourth edition, edited by Bruce Alberts (2002) published by Garland Science. The Alberts text discusses how the "cellular building blocks" move to shape developing embryos.

It is also common to describe small molecules such as amino acids as "molecular building blocks". 3. ^ Jump up to: a b Page 3 in Chemical storylines. Author: George Burton. Edition 2, illustrated. Publisher: Heinemann, 2000. ISBN 0-435-63119-5, ISBN 978-0-435-63119-2. Length: 312 pages 4. Jump up ^ http://www.human-body.org/ (dead link) 5. Jump up ^ "Cardiovascular System". U.S. National Cancer Institute. Retrieved 2008-09-16.[dead
link]

6. Jump up ^ Human Biology and Health. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. 1993. ISBN 0-13-981176-1. 7. Jump up ^ "The Cardiovascular System". SUNY Downstate Medical Center. 2008-03-08. Retrieved 2008-09-16. 8. Jump up ^ Kandel ER, Schwartz JH, Jessel TM, ed. (2000). "Ch. 17: The anatomical organization of the central nervous system". Principles of Neural Science. McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 978-0-8385-7701-1.

Further reading[edit source | editbeta]


Raincoast Books (2004). Encyclopedic Atlas Human Body. Raincoast Books. ISBN 978-1-55192747-3. Daniel D. Chiras (1 June 2012). Human Body Systems: Structure, Function, and Environment. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. ISBN 978-1-4496-4793-3. Adolf Faller; Michael Schnke; Gabriele Schnke; Ethan Taub, M.D. (2004). The Human Body: An Introduction to Structure and Function. Thieme. ISBN 978-1-58890-122-4. Richard Walker (30 March 2009). Human Body. Dk Pub. ISBN 978-0-7566-4545-8. DK Publishing (18 June 2012). Human Body: A Visual Encyclopedia. ISBN 978-1-4654-0143-4. DK Publishing (30 August 2010). The Complete Human Body: The Definitive Visual Guide. ISBN 978-0-7566-7509-7. Saddleback (1 January 2008). Human Body. Saddleback Educational Publ. ISBN 978-1-59905234-2.

External links[edit source | editbeta]

Referencing site and detailed pictures showing information on the human body anatomy and structure

Look up body in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Human body [show]

v t

Human systems and organs

Bone
o o o o o o o o o o

Carpus Collar bone (clavicle) Thigh bone (femur) Fibula Humerus Mandible Metacarpus Metatarsus Ossicles Patella Phalanges Radius Skull (cranium) Tarsus Tibia Ulna Rib Vertebra Pelvis Sternum

Skeletal system

o o o o o o o o o o

Cartilage

Joints

Fibrous joint Cartilaginous joint

Synovial joint

Muscle Tendon Diaphragm

Muscular system

URT
o o

Nose Nasopharynx Larynx

mostly Respiratory system Thoracic

LRT
o o o

Trachea Bronchus Lung

Mouth
o o

Salivary gland Tongue

upper GI
o o

Oropharynx Laryngopharynx Esophagus Stomach

mostly Abdominopelvic

Digestive system+ adnexa

o o

lower GI
o o o o

Small intestine Appendix Colon Rectum

Anus

accessory
o o o

Liver Biliary tract Pancreas

Kidney Ureter Bladder Urethra

GU: Urinary system

Female
o o o o o

Uterus Vagina Vulva Ovary Placenta

GU: Reproductive system

Male
o o o o o

Scrotum Penis Prostate Testicle Seminal vesicle

Pituitary Pineal Thyroid Parathyroid

Endocrine system

Adrenal Islets of Langerhans

peripheral
o

Artery Vein Lymphatic vessel

Cardiovascular system

o o

Heart

Circulatory system

primary
o o

Bone marrow Thymus

Lymphatic system

secondary
o o

Spleen Lymph node

o o

Brain Spinal cord Nerve

Nervous system

Sensory system
o o

Ear Eye

Skin Subcutaneous tissue Breast

Integumentary system

Mammary gland

Myeloid

Myeloid immune system

Lymphoid

Lymphoid immune system

[show]

v t e

Medicine
Surgery

Cardiac surgery Cardiothoracic surgery Colorectal surgery Eye surgery General surgery Neurosurgery Oral and maxillofacial surgery Orthopedic surgery Hand surgery Otolaryngology (ENT) Pediatric surgery Plastic surgery Reproductive surgery Surgical oncology

Thoracic surgery Transplant surgery Trauma surgery Urology


o

Andrology

Vascular surgery

Internal medicine

Allergy / Immunology Angiology (Vascular Medicine) Cardiology Endocrinology Gastroenterology


o

Hepatology

Geriatrics Hematology Infectious disease Nephrology Oncology Pulmonology Rheumatology

Obstetrics and gynaecology


Gynaecology Gynecologic oncology Maternal-fetal medicine Obstetrics Reproductive endocrinology and infertility

Urogynecology

Diagnostic

Healthcare sciences Radiology


o

Interventional radiology, Nuclear medicine

Pathology
o

Anatomical pathology, Clinical pathology, Clinical chemistry, Clinical immunology, Cytopathology, Medical microbiology, Transfusion medicine

Other specialties

Addiction medicine Adolescent medicine Anesthesiology Dermatology Disaster medicine Diving medicine (Undersea and hyperbaric medicine) Emergency medicine Family medicine General practice Hospital medicine Intensive-care medicine Medical genetics Neurology
o

Clinical neurophysiology

Occupational medicine Ophthalmology Pain management Palliative care

Pediatrics
o

Neonatology

Physical medicine and rehabilitation (Physiatry) Preventive medicine Psychiatry Radiation oncology Reproductive medicine Sexual medicine Sleep medicine Sports medicine Transplantation medicine Tropical medicine
o

Travel medicine

<img src="//en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:CentralAutoLogin/start&amp;type=1x1" alt="" title="" width="1" height="1" style="border: none; position: absolute;" /> Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Human_body&oldid=573881070" Categories:

Human body Human anatomy