You are on page 1of 40

UGANDA 

A Guide to Humanitarian and Development Efforts 
of InterAction Member Agencies in Uganda 

Photo Courtesy of: MAP International

       December 2008 
Produced by Ashley Brush 
With the Humanitarian Policy and Practice Team, InterAction 
And with the support of a cooperative agreement with USAID/OFDA 
 

 
1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 210 Washington DC 20036 
Phone (202) 667‐8227 Fax (202) 667‐8236  
Website: www.interaction.org 
 
 
Table of Contents 
 
 
Map of Uganda ………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………... 3 
Report Summary …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 4 
Current Humanitarian Situation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 
Historical Context ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5 
Organizations by Sector of Activity …………………………………………………………………………………………………….…. 8 
List of Acronyms ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….… 10 
 
 
 
Member Activity Reports 
 
 
ActionAid …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 
ADRA International ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13 
American Refugee Committee International ……………………………………………………………………………………..… 14 
Brother's Brother Foundation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 16 
CARE ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17 
Catholic Relief Services ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 
Christian Children's Fund …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21 
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee    ……………………………………………………………………………………. 24 
Direct Relief International …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 26 
Food for the Hungry …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……… 27  
Holt International ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 29 
International Medical Corps ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 30 
Lutheran World Relief …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 32 
MAP International ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 33  
Management Sciences for Health ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34 
Medical Teams International …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….… 35 
Mercy Corps ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 36 
Refugees International ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 37 
World Learning ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 38 
World Vision, USA ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……………… 39 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2
 
Map of Uganda 
 

 
 
 
       *Source: United Nations, May 2003. Available at: http://www.un.org/Depts/Cartographic/map/profile/uganda.pdf 
 

3
Report Summary 
 
  InterAction is the largest coalition of non‐governmental organizations in the United States, with 
over 170 members. Collectively, InterAction members work in every developing country of the world on 
development issues from poverty to disaster response. InterAction strives to set a bold agenda for the 
world’s poor and most vulnerable by serving as the vocal point for U.S. NGOs at home and abroad, 
increasing the efficiency of humanitarian assistance efforts, and increasing accountability in all sectors of 
international development. 
 
This member activity report highlights the specific humanitarian problems facing Ugandans 
today. Twenty humanitarian organizations are represented in this report, whose activities cover a wide 
range of sectors. InterAction members currently working in Uganda implement programs in agriculture, 
disaster/emergency response, business development, gender issues, healthcare, rural development, 
HIV/AIDS, refugee/migration services, and water and sanitation.  
   
The Current Humanitarian Crisis 
 
Negotiations since 2006 among the LRA, the Ugandan government, and the international 
community suggest a spark of hope for peace and have seen some improvement in conditions. Although 
the peace process remains stalled since May 2008, after LRA leader Joseph Kony repeatedly refused to 
sign the final peace settlement, fragile security has allowed over half of the 1.8 million IDPs to 
spontaneously return home. According to OCHA, in total, some 997,000 people who remained displaced 
throughout the Acholi, Lango and Teso sub‐regions at the start of 2006 have returned to their villages of 
origin, including all 466,100 in the Lango sub‐region. As the pace of IDP return accelerates, there is 
increased pressure on the Ugandan government and other actors to pave the road to reconstruction and 
respond to new challenges such as land ownership issues and lack of infrastructure. A transition is now 
underway to move from a UN led emergency effort to one that is government led. On July 1, 2008, the 
Ugandan government began implementation of its “Peace, Recovery, and Development Plan” for the 
north, with support from international donors. The PRDP is seen as an adequate framework to begin 
meeting needs in the north, but the implementation and impact of the plan remain to be seen. 
 
At writing of this report, renewed conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo between 
Government forces and troops loyal to the rebel Laurent Nkunda led to a renewed influx of Congolese 
refugees crossing the border into Uganda at the end of October. Over 50,000 refugees have fled the 
violence in North Kivu into Uganda. According to OCHA, many agencies have expressed concern about 
the strain on existing water and sanitation, health facilities and the food supply in the host communities. 
The Ugandan government has also expressed concern over the additional pressure on overstretched 
health centers and the food supply that these new refugees will bring to the region. The full effects of 
the spillover conflict from the DRC are still not known. 
 
  While much progress has been made, it is important to note that war has been raging in Uganda 
for over two decades. The main actors in this great tragedy are the Ugandan government under the 
leadership of President Yoweri Museveni and the self proclaimed Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), led by 
Joseph Kony, who alleges to be fighting to replace the current constitution with one based on the Bible’s 
Ten Commandments. The historically strained relations between the Acholi people of northern Uganda 
and southern‐based tribes dominating the government contributed to the forming of the Lord’s 
Resistance Army (LRA) in 1987, after the National Resistance Army (NRA) led by current President 

4
Yoweri Museveni overthrew President Tito Okello, an ethnic Acholi, in January 1986. Although many 
were forced to leave their homes as a direct result of the LRA’s violence, the number of IDPs spiked 
sharply after the Ugandan government made a decision in 1996 to force civilians into IDP camps, which 
they dubbed “protected villages.” By the end of 2005, nearly 1.8 million people had been forced to leave 
their homes. 
 
The brunt of the crisis has been borne by war torn families and especially by children. During 
this period, millions of people have been displaced from their homes and nearly 66,000 children have 
been abducted by the LRA according to a recent report by the World Bank. According to the same 
report, the rebels have focused on abducting males between 13 and 18, but people of all ages and both 
sexes have been taken to fill the ranks of the LRA’s army. Children abducted by the LRA suffer mental 
and physical abuse and commit grave atrocities. Two‐thirds of them are severely beaten, a fifth are 
forced to kill, and nearly 10 percent are forced to murder a family member or friend to bind them to the 
group. The fate of many of the girls abducted by the LRA has been to become "wives" of the 
commanders, essentially sex slaves. In 2005, UNICEF estimated that nearly 30,000 children made the 
trek every night to night commuter centers run by humanitarian aid organizations, some walking 
upwards of 15 kilometers, in order to avoid being abducted by LRA soldiers.   
 
At the height of the conflict, nearly 80% of the region’s inhabitants were forced to live in camps 
which are poorly equipped to house them. More specifically, problems such as starvation, poor 
sanitation, psychological trauma, lack of education, prostitution, and high levels of HIV/AIDS are 
endemic to Ugandan refugee camps. Reports suggest that nearly 1,000 people per week died as a 
consequence. HIV/AIDS continues to be a significant challenge to development. According to Save the 
Children, since the epidemic began, some 1 million Ugandans have died and the majority of Uganda’s 
estimated 2.3 million orphans are largely a result of HIV/AIDs deaths. Furthermore, the country’s other 
health indicators remain among the lowest in sub‐Saharan African.   
 
  In addition to the effects of war, the humanitarian crises has been compounded by three 
consecutive years of shock to the agricultural sector through a severe drought in 2006 and a 
combination of an extended dry spell, late rains, and flooding in 2007 and 2008. Planting was 
significantly delayed and reduced in many areas in 2008.  Goat plague and crop fungus create further 
complications to the food supply. OCHA predicts that in the northern province of Karamoja these factors 
will lead to a period of increasing humanitarian need with elevated levels of household food instability, 
heightened rates of gross acute and severe acute malnutrition, rising morbidity, and loss of livelihoods. 
In August 2008, OCHA estimated that at least 7,500 children could require immediate attention for 
severe acute malnutrition and at least 35,000 needed to be assisted to avoid seeing an increase in these 
estimates.  
 
Historical Context 
 
Uganda gained its independence from Great Britain on October 9, 1962 after nearly 70 years 
under colonial rule. The colonial legacy of social fragmentation is one key driver of conflict in Uganda. In 
addition to societal disparities, the current humanitarian crisis facing Uganda has political and economic 
roots. Specifically, the authoritarian leadership of both Milton Obote and Idi Amin undermined the 
development of strong democratic governance, marginalized certain groups in society, hindered 
economic growth, and created political space for non‐state actors, such as the Lord’s Resistance Army 
(LRA), to emerge.  

5
 
  A National Assembly was formed shortly after Uganda gained its independence, charged with 
establishing a new government. Political discourse surrounding whether or not to create a highly 
centralized state or form a more loose federation was placed on hold in 1966 when Milton Obote, then 
leader of the majority coalition in the National Assembly, suspended the constitution and claimed the 
presidency. In September 1967, a new constitution was instated which expanded presidential power 
and abolished traditional kingdoms.  On January 25, 1971, Obote's government was overthrown in a 
military coup led by Amin. Amin then assumed the presidency, dissolved the parliament, and rewrote 
the constitution in order to give himself absolute power.  
 
  Amin’s tenure marks perhaps the most brutal chapter in Uganda’s recent history, characterized 
by widespread human rights violations, economic contradiction, and social unrest. Estimates suggest 
that he was responsible for the deaths of 300,000 civilians during his eight year term. The main groups 
targeted by Amin’s brutality included people of Asian descent, who were forced to leave the country on 
three days’ notice, and also the Acholi and Langi ethnic groups who had constituted a large proportion 
of Obote’s army. In 1978, Tanzania invaded Uganda and Amin fled to Saudi Arabia. 
 
  During the period following Amin’s exit, power shifted between several different leaders, 
including Obote, before Yoweri Museveni finally assumed power. Since coming to power, Museveni’s 
administration is credited with diminishing the magnitude of human rights abuses, encouraging 
economic liberalization with the help of major development banks, and fostering a freer press. Upon 
assuming the presidency, Museveni also abolished all political parties, claiming they divide the country 
along ethnic and religious lines and promote conflict. In 2005, the government returned to a multiparty 
system, permitting the presence of opposition parties. 

The military approach which Museveni has often taken towards the LRA has failed to resolve the 
conflict and resulted in increasing the devastation and death in the region. In 1993, peace negotiations 
between the LRA and the government were said to have been within hours of completion when 
Museveni presented the LRA with an ultimatum of surrendering within a week, effectively destroying 
the peace process. In the wake of this failure, several different internal and external groups have 
attempted to organize peace talks between the two parties without success.  

In 1998, the government deployed a large military force into neighboring DR Congo, with the 
purpose of preventing rebel attacks. However, with this move came allegations that Ugandan officials 
were involved in the illegal exploitation of Congolese natural resources. In response to international 
pressure, Ugandan troops were pulled out in 2003. Relations continue to be tense between the two 
countries. In 2002, the government continued its trend of military tactics against the LRA by launching 
the offensive known as “Operation Iron Fist,” an initiative which pushed rebels into the northern regions 
of Lango and Teso and dramatically increased the number of internally displaced persons.  

Negotiations between the LRA and the Ugandan government were initiated in July 2006 and 
developed into an ongoing peace process. The July negotiations reached agreement on a five point 
agenda which included: (1) cessation of hostilities; (2) comprehensive solutions to the war; (3) 
reconciliation and accountability; (4) formal ceasefire; and (5) disarmament, demobilization and 
reintegration. In August, an agreement dubbed the “Cessation of Hostilities” brought relative peace to 
Uganda, with few attacks or abductions in the north, and encouraged nearly 300,000 IDPs to return 
home. 

6
  Negotiations in 2007 were initially delayed over disagreement on what items should be included 
on the discussion agenda. After the introduction of UN envoys and African Union representatives, the 
talks were resumed in April. At this time, both sides agreed to a process to reach comprehensive 
solutions to the conflict. In particular, progress has been made on developing an alternative national 
justice mechanism to prosecute violations. When a final consensus is reached the Ugandan government 
has indicated it would ignore arrest warrants from the ICC and handle the matter on a national level.  
 
  At writing of this report, the peace process is suspended, following coordinated attacks on LRA 
bases by the militaries of DRC, Uganda and Southern Sudan.  The LRA has renewed brutal attacks and 
child abductions in the DRC, Kony failed again to sign the final peace agreement on November 29th, and 
fighting within the LRA itself gives weight to concerns that it could drop peace talks altogether and may 
be planning for another major campaign. Despite these challenges, it is essential that the international 
community and regional actors continue to support the gains made in northern Uganda due to the 
peace process, focusing attention on meeting the needs of returnees and those remaining in the camps. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

7
Organizations by Sector of Activity 
 
Agriculture and Food Security  Christian Children's Fund 
ActionAid  Christian Reformed World Relief Committee 
ADRA International  Direct Relief International 
American Refugee Committee International  International Medical Corps 
CARE  Management Sciences for Health  
Catholic Relief Services  MAP International 
Christian Children's Fund  Mercy Corps 
Direct Relief International  World Learning 
Food for the Hungry  World Vision, USA 
Lutheran World Relief   
Management for Health Sciences  Gender Issues/Women in Development 
Mercy Corps  ActionAid 
World Vision, USA  ADRA International 
  American Refugee Committee International 
Business Development, Cooperatives and  CARE 
Credit  Christian Children's Fund 
ActionAid  Christian Reformed World Relief Committee 
ADRA International  Direct Relief International 
American Refugee Committee International  Food for the Hungry 
CARE  Holt International Children's Services 
Catholic Relief Services  International Medical Corps 
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee  Management Sciences for Health  
Direct Relief International  Mercy Corps 
Lutheran World Relief  Refugees International 
Management Sciences for Health    
Mercy Corps  Health Care 
World Vision, USA  ActionAid 
  American Refugee Committee International 
Disaster and Emergency Relief  Brother's Brother Foundation 
ActionAid  CARE 
ADRA International  Catholic Relief Services 
CARE  Christian Children's Fund 
Catholic Relief Services  Christian Reformed World Relief Committee 
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee  Direct Relief International 
Direct Relief International  Food for the Hungry 
Food for the Hungry  Holt International Children's Services 
Management Sciences for Health   International Medical Corps 
Medical Teams International  Lutheran World Relief 
Mercy Corps  MAP International 
  Medical Teams International 
Education/Training  Mercy Corps 
ActionAid  World Vision, USA 
Brother's Brother Foundation   
CARE  HIV/AIDs 
Catholic Relief Services  Catholic Relief Services 

8
Christian Children's Fund  Rural Development 
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee  ActionAid 
International Medical Corps  ADRA International 
Medical Teams International   CARE 
Mercy Corps  Direct Relief International 
  International Medical Corps 
Refugee and Migration Services  Lutheran World Relief 
ActionAid  Management Sciences for Health  
American Refugee Committee International   
CARE   
Food for the Hungry   
International Medical Corps   
Management Sciences for Health    
Refugees International   
World Learning 
World Vision, USA 
 
Water and Sanitation 
American Refugee Committee International 
Catholic Relief Services 
Christian Children's Fund 
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee 
International Medical Corps 
World Vision, USA 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

9
 
List of Acronyms: 
 
ADRA    Adventist Development Relief Agency 
ARC    American Refugee Committee International 
BBF    Brother's Brother Foundation 
BPRM    Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, U.S. Department of State 
BWAid    Baptist World Alliance/Baptist World Aid 
CCF    Christian Children's Fund 
COU    Church of Uganda 
CRS    Catholic Relief Services 
CRWRC   Christian Reformed World Relief Committee 
DANIDA  Danish International Development Agency 
DFID    Department for International Development (UK) 
DOL    U.S. Department of Labor 
DRI    Direct Relief International 
FAO    UN Food and Agriculture Organization 
FH    Food for the Hungry 
GBV    Gender based violence 
HI    Holt International Children's Services 
ICC    International Criminal Court 
IDP    Internally Displaced Person 
IMC    International Medical Corps 
LRA    Lord's Resistance Army 
LWR    Lutheran World Relief 
MAP    MAP International 
MSH    Management Sciences for Health  
MOH    Ministry of Health 
MTI    Medical Teams International 
Norad    Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation 
OCHA    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs 
ODI    Overseas Development Institute (UK) 
OFDA    U.S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance/USAID 
OVC    Orphans and Vulnerable Children 
PAG     Pentecostal Assemblies of God 
PEPFAR   President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief 
RI    Refugees International 
SPLA    Sudan People’s Liberation Army  
UN    United Nations 
UNDP    United Nations Development Program 
UNHCR   United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 
UNICEF   United Nations Children's Fund 
USAID    United States Agency of International Development 
USAID/CMM  USAID Conflict Management and Mitigation 
VCT    Voluntary Counseling and Testing for HIV 
WV    World Vision, USA

10
ActionAid 
   
Overseas Field Contact   
Charles Mbeeta Businge   
Kampala Head Office   
256.392220002   
P. O. Box 676 Kampala, Uganda   
Kansanga Ggaba Road   
aaiuganda.info@actionaid.org 
 
Introduction 
 
ActionAid is an international anti‐poverty agency whose aim is to fight poverty worldwide. Since 
1972, ActionAid has been growing and expanding‐ helping disadvantaged people in 42 countries 
worldwide. ActionAid works with local partners to fight poverty and injustice worldwide, reaching over 
13 million of the poorest and most vulnerable people. ActionAid programs are directed at helping the 
most marginalized in society fight for and gain their rights to food, shelter, work, education, healthcare 
and a voice in the decisions that affect their lives. 
 
Action Aid in Uganda 
 
ActionAid has been working in Uganda since 1982 when it started working in Mityana Sub 
County, Mubende District. Since then it has expanded operations throughout Uganda as part of its long‐
term commitment to working with the socially and economically disadvantaged. ActionAid works and 
collaborates with various partners at all levels. In Uganda, ActionAid lends support to a number of non‐
governmental and community based organizations in over 33 districts in several poverty eradication 
initiatives. Additionally, ActionAid works directly and through partners in 10 district initiatives in 
Bundibugyo, Kalangala, Kawempe, Apac, Masindi, Nebbi, Pallisa, Kapchorwa, Kumi and Katakwi. 
 
Most of these partners are indigenous non‐governmental organizations and community based 
organizations which are closely working with poor and excluded people. Others are networks and 
alliances operating at national, sub‐regional and international levels. ActionAid’s approach emphasizes 
direct contact with poor and excluded people at the community level. 
 
  The sectors included in ActionAid’s development efforts are agriculture and food production, 
business development, cooperatives and credit, disaster/emergency relief, education and training, 
gender issues, health care, human rights, refugee and migration services, and rural development. 
ActionAid receives funding for its Uganda programs mostly from individual donors or foundations, with a 
small amount (2.2 billion shillings against a budget of 13.8) coming from the European Union and a small 
subcontract with another NGO. The annual expense budget for 2007 was $13.8 billion Ugandan Shillings 
(approximately $111 million USD) and ActionAid currently supports over 260,000 families, representing 
17% of Uganda’s poorest population. 
 
  Points of special concern to ActionAid include the on‐going peace talks between the LRA and 
government. Encouraged by the optimism of the local populace in the eventual return to peace and 
normality, ActionAid launched a transitional justice pilot project, “Access to Justice for Women,” which 
focuses on the cultural, political, structural and economic barriers that women face in accessing the 

11
justice system in a conflict area such as northern Uganda. In partnership with the Uganda Police Force, 
ActionAid provided tangible benefits such as sexual assault evidence kits, and police kiosks located close 
to vulnerable communities. Additionally, ActionAid has engaged in policy and cultural dialogues about 
the rights of women in times of war and peace.  
 
  Finally, devastating floods which inundated the east and north provided a major obstacle to 
program implementation in districts such as Katakwi, Kumi and Amuria. The torrential rains destroyed 
much of the crops communities expected to harvest in the beginning of 2008. With support from several 
donor agencies, ActionAid responded to the crisis by providing emergency relief for several thousand 
families – with specific focus on new mothers, young children and the elderly.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

12
 
Adventist Development and Relief Agency International
   
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Julio Munoz   Niels Christian Rasmussen  
12501 Old Columbia Pike  Country Director  
Silver Spring, MD 20904  Kireka Hill 
301.680.6373  P.O. Box 9946 
301.680.6370  Kampala, Uganda 
Julio.Munoz@adra.org  256.752.732732.392  
  adra@adrauganda.org 
 
Introduction 
 
The Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) was established in November 1956 by the 
Seventh‐day Adventist Church to provide humanitarian relief and welfare. ADRA was initiated by the 
Seventh‐day Adventist church. Today, ADRA works in over 125 different countries. The basis for its 
existence, its reason for being, is to follow Christ’s example by being a voice for, serving, and partnering 
with those in need. ADRA seeks to identify and address social injustice and deprivation in developing 
countries. The agency’s work seeks to improve the quality of life of those in need. ADRA invests in the 
potential of these individuals through community development initiatives targeting food security, 
economic development, primary health and basic education. ADRA’s emergency management initiatives 
provide aid to disaster survivors.  
 
ADRA in Uganda 
 
  The work of ADRA in Uganda can be classified under a variety of different sectors including food 
security, business development, education, disaster and emergency relief, health, and governance. 
ADRA carries out its humanitarian programming in many areas of Uganda. In Karamoja, ADRA’s projects 
are focused on bolstering agricultural education for self‐reliance. These projects include disbursement of 
high yield crops and the teaching of agricultural skills. In addition, ADRA also has a reintegration project 
for children in Karamoja who have been resettled from the streets. In Ntungamo, the overall 
programming objective is to improve the existing environmental conditions and to raise awareness 
among donors about the need to support environment protection. Finally, in Luwero, Nakaseke, 
Kamwenge, and Wakiso, ADRA implements poverty reduction programs with an aim of reducing poverty 
and increasing capacity for self‐reliance among the people of Uganda.  
   
ADRA receives funding to implement its Uganda programming from ADRA International and 
ADRA offices in: Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Germany. Sources of additional funding include the 
Swedish International Development Agency, DANIDA, European Union and Swedish Mission Council. 
 

13
 
American Refugee Committee 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Scott Charlesworth  Brent Potts 
ARC Headquarters  Country Director 
Director of Field Operations  Plot 104 Luthuli Avenue 
430 Oak Grove St. Suite 204  Blugolobi 
Minneapolis, MN 55403   Kampala, Uganda 
612.872.7060  256.414.221.154  
ScottC@archq.org  brent.potts@arc.co.ug 
 
Introduction 
 
The American Refugee Committee (ARC) works with its partners and constituencies to provide 
opportunities and expertise to refugees, displaced people and host communities. ARC helps people 
survive conflict and crisis and rebuild lives of dignity, health, security and self‐sufficiency. ARC is 
committed to the delivery of programs that ensure measurable quality and lasting impact for the people 
it serves. The overarching vision of ARC is to see that every person who participates in an ARC‐supported 
program will have a better chance to take control of their life and achieve self sufficiency.  
 
ARC in Uganda 
 
ARC in Uganda aims to provide key assistance to returnee and displaced populations and to 
facilitate the transition back to normal lives in their home communities as security permits. ARC is 
working in 16 IDP camps on the Gulu/Amuru region of northern Uganda. Key areas of intervention in 
these camps include a focus on gender‐based violence, camp management, HIV, and livelihoods. ARC’s 
overall Uganda programming can be broken down into several main categories including durable 
solutions, health, gender‐based violence, water and sanitation, conflict prevention/reconciliation, and 
economic livelihoods. 
 
Currently ARC is supporting those displaced by the LRA by identifying and implementing durable 
solutions to enable them to have productive, self‐sufficient lives. On the health front, ARC recently 
began a project funded by USAID/PEPFAR to implement HIV services focusing on prevention, response, 
and organizational development and capacity building for IDP and returnee populations. The objectives 
of this project are to increase basic HIV knowledge, encourage positive behavior change, increase access 
to and utilization of quality HIV/AIDS prevention, care and support services, and to improve 
coordination and capacity of national HIV/AIDS actors operating in the north.  
 
ARC is providing GBV prevention and response services in 6 camps in Gulu and Amuru districts. 
ARC supports survivors of GBV by providing access to all required physical, emotional, social and legal 
support. Additionally, ARC is currently implementing camp management in 16 camps in the Gulu/Amuru 
region and supporting local government in the management of IDP camps. ARC provides immediate 
assistance to those who lose their homes and facilitate vulnerable individuals who wish to resettle. ARC 
educates and informs IDPs on key issues that affect their lives – including re‐settlement options, 
government policies, and human rights. In this light, ARC is currently seeking funding to implement the 
PATHWAY conflict prevention and reconciliation model, previously used by ARC‐Guinea, in Uganda. 

14
 
ARC works to develop, maintain, and ensure the proper functioning of the water infrastructure 
in IDP camps so that residents will have access to adequate quantity and quality of potable water and 
households will have access to and utilize an approved latrine and acceptable waste and water disposal 
system. To support livelihoods, ARC has achieved a level of success with small‐scale livelihoods work in 
the North, and is currently developing proposals and concept papers to greatly expand these efforts. 
 
ARC works primarily in the district of Gulu and Amuru. ARC’s Uganda programming is funded 
primarily by UNHCR, UNICEF, USAID, the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and individual donors. 
ARC reaches 37,798 direct beneficiaries and 200,000 indirect beneficiaries, with 7,310 households 
reached. ARC’s GBV programming reaches 7,521 through awareness raising campaigns, 4,842 through 
community events, 7,044 in small group discussion, and 618 individually managed cases.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

15
 
Brother’s Brother Foundation 
 
U.S. Contact Person: 
Elizabeth S. Visnic 
Grants Coordinator 
1200 Galveston Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA  15233‐1604 
412.321.3160 
412.321.3325 
evisnic@brothersbrother.org 
 
Introduction 
 
Brother’s Brother Foundation was created in 1958 as a dream of a few to help the many around 
the world who lack good healthcare, education and nutrition. Today, Brother’s Brother Foundation has 
served individuals in 135 different countries. From the beginning its founder and leading spirit, Robert A. 
Hingson, M.D., urged that BBF’s resources be shared with local counterpart organizations in developing 
countries who shared the common desire to help those in need. The mission of Brother's Brother 
Foundation is to promote international health and education through the efficient and effective 
distribution and provision of donated medical, educational, agricultural and other resources.  
 
Brother’s Brother Foundation in Uganda 
 
All BBF programs are designed to fulfill BBF’s mission by connecting people's resources with 
people's needs. BBF works in the sectors of education, healthcare, and nutrition in Uganda. In Uganda 
and around the world, BBF works together with host country NGOs (such as Rotary Clubs) and 
government agencies (such as the Ministry of Education and/or Ministry of Health) to clear donations 
through customs and distribute them to target recipients. Similarly, BBF works with international NGOs 
(such as ADRA), USAID (in both field missions and Washington centrally funded projects), or U.S. 
Embassies to be the consignee and assist with distribution of donated books, medical supplies, and/or 
humanitarian assistance. 
 
 
 
 

16
 
CARE 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Emmanuel Mugabi, ECARMU PLC  Kevin Fitzcharles, Country Director 
151 Ellis Street  17 Mackinnon Rd. Naskasero 
Atlanta, GA 30303  PO Box 7280 Kampala 
404.979.9275  Uganda 
emugabi@care.org  256.312.258.100 
  Fitzcharles@careuganda.org 
 
 
Introduction 
 
   CARE is one of the world's largest private international humanitarian organizations, committed 
to helping families in poor communities improve their lives and achieve lasting victories over poverty. 
Founded in 1945 to provide relief to survivors of World War II, CARE quickly became a trusted vehicle for 
the compassion and generosity of millions. Today, CARE focuses on fighting global poverty. CARE places 
special focus on working alongside poor women because, equipped with the proper resources, women 
have the power to help whole families and entire communities escape poverty. Women are at the heart 
of CARE's community‐based efforts to improve basic education, prevent the spread of HIV, increase 
access to clean water and sanitation, expand economic opportunity and protect natural resources. CARE 
also delivers emergency aid to survivors of war and natural disasters, and helps people rebuild their 
lives. 
 
CARE in Uganda 
 
The main goal underscoring CARE’s Uganda programming initiatives is to work with civil society 
and other duty bearers to achieve a measurable improvement in the ability of the poor and marginalized 
to realize their rights by 2013. This overarching goal takes on four main fronts; economic rights and 
livelihoods, conflict and peace building, governance, and social protection.  
 
Working with local actors, women, and civil society, CARE is working towards fulfilling several 
goals. CARE’s goals include that by 2013, the very poor have achieved their economic rights and their 
capacities have been strengthened to demand and fulfill these rights. Secondly, that the right to peace 
and security for every Ugandan, especially the very poor, is protected. Thirdly, that public and private 
duty bearers at different levels are responsible, accountable, and transparent to poor and marginalized 
people. Finally, that as a result of their partnership with CARE, poor women, OVCs, HIV/AIDS‐affected 
and other marginalized people will have taken control over their lives by fulfilling their rights and 
responsibilities. 

The sectors that are encompassed by CARE’s work in Uganda include agriculture and food 
production, business development, cooperatives and credit, disaster and emergency relief, education 
and training, gender issues, health care, human rights, refugee services, and rural development. CARE’s 
programs can be found in northern Uganda, southwestern Uganda, the west Nile region, and 
northeastern Uganda. CARE receives funding for its programming from USAID, CARE Denmark, the 
Government of Austria and CARE Austria, DFID, Norad, CARE Norway, Swedish International 

17
Development Agency, CARE UK, and private donors. CARE works with many different actors including 
the Austrian Development Agency, DANIDA, Irish Aid, the Norwegian Embassy, the Swedish 
International Development Agency, USAID, UNICEF, UN OCHA, Plan International, Oxfam, World Bank, 
World Vision, and the country office of Uganda. 

18
Catholic Relief Services 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Contact Person: 
Michael Hill  Debbie DeVoe  
Sub‐Saharan Africa Media Officer  East Africa Director 
P.O. Box 17090  Regional Information Officer 
Baltimore, MD 21203‐7090  011.254.733.556.868 
443.955.7110  ddevoe@earo.crs.org 
mhill@crs.org 
 
Introduction 
 
Founded in 1943, Catholic Relief Services (CRS) is the official international relief and 
development agency of the Catholic community in the United States. The agency carries out relief and 
development programs in over 100 countries and territories around the world, serving more than 80 
million people on the basis of need, regardless of race, religion or ethnicity. CRS responds to victims of 
natural and manmade disasters, provides assistance to the poor to alleviate their immediate needs, 
supports self‐help programs that involve communities in their own development, helps people restore 
and preserve their dignity and realize their potential, and helps educate Americans to fulfill their moral 
responsibilities to alleviate human suffering, remove its causes and promote social justice. The agency 
maintains strict standards of efficiency, accountability and transparency. 
 
CRS in Uganda 
 
Catholic Relief Services has been working in Uganda since 1965. Initially providing emergency 
relief to Sudanese refugees and later to Ugandans displaced by the northern conflict, CRS now focuses 
efforts on helping communities to grow more food, increase incomes and improve overall health. Today, 
CRS has more than 100 staff members working in Kampala, Gulu, and Fort Portal. Current program areas 
include HIV and AIDS, agriculture, microfinance, water and sanitation, education, partnership and global 
solidarity, and emergency preparedness and recovery.  
 
  Through its HIV/AIDs programming, CRS supports projects that provide care and treatment, 
promote education and prevention, and offer assistance to children left behind. These initiatives are 
aimed at empowering individuals and communities to prevent the spread of HIV and help those affected 
by the pandemic. CRS' largest HIV initiative in Uganda is delivered through the AIDSRelief program, a 
consortium of five members led by CRS that provides high‐quality care, education, and antiretroviral 
therapy to people living with HIV in nine countries. In Uganda, AIDSRelief supports 18 health facilities in 
11 districts, reaching over 62,420 people, including more than 20,785 on antiretroviral therapy.  
 
  The agricultural programs of CRS are aimed at supporting Ugandans' ability to grow and sell 
food. To increase both food availability and incomes, CRS works with local community‐based agricultural 
organizations to increase crop yields and help poor farmers to access markets. The CRS‐led Great Lakes 
Cassava Initiative aims to stem the spread of two devastating cassava diseases in Uganda and five other 
countries. Other agricultural projects in Uganda include innovative voucher‐based fairs in the north. 
These fairs, funded by the U.S. government and the European Union, enable farmers to select seeds, 
tools and goats to resume farming activities.  
 

19
CRS also supports micro finance programs to increase the self‐reliance of Ugandans. Since 
August 2006, CRS has helped Ugandans improve their economic standing through our Savings and 
Internal Lending Communities. Through privately funded initiatives, often integrated with HIV and 
agricultural projects, CRS has helped more than 12,000 clients in six districts form over 600 savings and 
lending groups. These valuable community groups encourage members to save small amounts of money 
each week, typically 50 cents or $1. Members can then withdraw loans against the pooled savings, 
gaining access to capital to start small businesses, such as opening a kiosk shop or purchasing a goat to 
breed livestock. 
 
To increase standards of sanitation and access to water, CRS supports projects aimed at 
improving these conditions in refugee camps. In 2007, CRS began serving more than 14,500 beneficiaries 
in 14 communities through the Global Water Initiative. Currently CRS is in the process of building 
latrines, constructing washing areas, protecting natural springs and training residents in good health and 
sanitation practices. Finally, to help mitigate the impact of disasters, CRS includes emergency 
preparedness and recovery activities in all of its programs. Key activities over the years have included 
providing shelter for night commuters (children seeking safety from rebel abduction), water and 
sanitation projects in camps for displaced people, and innovative fairs that enable farming families to 
select seeds, tools and small livestock to get back on their feet.  
 
In order to implement its Uganda programming, CRS receives funding to implement its Uganda 
programming from PEPFAR, UNICEF, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Howard G. Buffett 
Foundation, as well as private donors. In addition, CRS works closely with local partners and other NGOs 
working in Uganda to improve humanitarian conditions. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

20
Christian Children’s Fund 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact:  
Cynthia Price  Susan Watkins 
Director of Communications  CCF‐Uganda 
2821 Emerywood Parkway  PO Box 3341 
Richmond, Va. 23294  Namirembe Road  
804.756.2722  Kampala, Uganda 
clprice@ccfusa.org  256.41.270.544  
  Susanw@ccf.or.ug 
 
Introduction 
 
Christian Children’s Fund is an international child development organization, which assists 13.2 
million children and families in 31 countries. CCF works for the survival, development and protection of 
children without regard to gender, race, creed or religious affiliation. CCF works for the well‐being of 
children by supporting locally led initiatives that strengthen families and communities, helping them 
overcome poverty and protect the rights of their children. CCF programs are comprehensive in the sense 
that they incorporate health and sanitation, early childhood development, nutrition, education, 
livelihood initiatives and child protection interventions that provide for healthy and secure infants, 
educated and confident children, and skilled and involved youth in the countries where CCF works.  
 
Since its inception in 1938, CCF has received most of its funding from individual contributors in 
the form of monthly child sponsorships. In addition, CCF receives grants from various UN Agencies, the 
U.S. government, host country governments, ChildFund Alliance members, other NGOs, foundations and 
corporations. 
 
Christian Children's Fund in Uganda 
 
CCF has been working in Uganda since 1980 and currently assists approximately 780,000 
children and family members. Recovery from conflict continues in northern and eastern Uganda. The 
key sectors encompassing the work of CCF in Uganda include emergency recovery, health, education, 
nutrition, water sanitation, environmental issues, livelihood promotion, and child protection. Malaria, 
HIV/AIDS, low immunization coverage, poor sanitation and minimal access to safe water sources 
challenge long‐term development in the region and in other parts of the country.  
 
In terms of emergency recovery, CCF Uganda is working in support of the government’s 
Northern Uganda recovery plan to support formerly displaced people to return and settle safely into the 
villages where they lived. On the health front, HIV/AIDS, malaria, and immunization are key points of 
focus. CCF Uganda is providing HIV/AIDS‐related programs in approximately 50 communities, 
implementing both prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS infected and affected families and children. 
CCF also provides home‐based care initiatives, offers training by social workers to teach family members 
how to care for the sick and provides counseling to children who face the challenges of losing parents.  
Through education, information and communications materials and through sensitization interventions 
with children, family members and community leaders, CCF Uganda has been effective in helping to 
reduce the stigma of HIV/AIDS. In addition, CCF Uganda continues its support to children living with 
HIV/AIDS by providing access to care and treatment for prolonging life. In an effort to protect children 

21
from childhood diseases, children under the age of two receive complete immunization in CCF Uganda 
communities. These communities participate in malaria prevention programs including distribution of 
bed nets ‐ proven to decrease the occurrence of malaria in children. 
 
In an effort to promote education and early childhood development, CCF Uganda provides 
assistance to local communities to build and furnish school classrooms.  Additionally, they support child 
programs that focus on the rights of women and girls by promoting education for girls. CCF Uganda also 
promotes children’s rights, ensuring their participation in school governance activities, and child friendly 
school programs. CCF Uganda promotes adequate early childhood development through center and 
home‐based programs. At the centers, child growth monitoring takes places and provisions made for 
therapeutic feeding as needed, in addition to other activities. Parents bring their children to the centers 
and take turns volunteering as well. To date, the organization has established 99 centers. CCF trained 
home visitors to make follow up visits in children’s homes to supplement learning as needed. 
  
Water sanitation efforts take on a variety of program initiatives in Uganda. CCF Uganda works to 
provide access to clean water in 28 districts and sinks borehole wells ‐ each one serving about 300 
families. Emphasis is placed on community participation, ownership, and management of all safe water 
initiatives. This involves proper training and collaboration with local authorities and institutions. For 
each water source that is established, a village committee of parents and youth is formed to oversee its 
operation and maintenance, and to address community concerns. To improve sanitation conditions, CCF 
Uganda constructs toilets in accordance with the government standards. 
 
One of the major components of improving childhood survival is improving nutrition. CCF 
encourages participating families to plant home gardens to give added calories and nutrients to the 
children’s diets and to those living with HIV/AIDS. As part of CCF Uganda’s Kitchen Gardening Program, 
families cultivate seeds to provide nutritious foods for their children. More than 100 families take part in 
this program. The program areas procure the seeds and then distribute them to parents for planting. 
Mothers are also encouraged to include these fruits and vegetables in their own diets. The CCF Uganda 
initiative includes a men's awareness program about the importance of children's nutrition. 
 
Once a beautiful greenbelt dominated by natural forests and grassland swamps, much of central 
Uganda has been left barren. Kiboga District is one of the major charcoal and firewood supply centers 
for Uganda’s capital city, Kampala. With this constant reminder of the forest's destruction humming in 
the background, the Masodde program community staff and children have embarked on a campaign to 
replant the trees. More than 10,000 eucalyptus trees and 5,000 pine trees have been planted on land 
that was once uncultivated. In addition, CCF Uganda promotes environment friendly agricultural 
practices in its livelihood and other program areas. 
 
CCF focuses on support for environmental care programs, support for modern agricultural 
practices and food security initiatives, as well as support services for income generating activities. CCF 
Uganda also supported the acquisition of vocational and apprenticeship life skills in communities where 
they work. Livelihood programs enable local families to improve their incomes and consequently 
improve their ability to meet family needs like school fees and health care. The program has a 
component on vocational and apprenticeship skills to help especially vulnerable youth ‐ school 
dropouts, youth infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, child headed families, teenage girls and the 
disabled. 
  

22
CCF Uganda promotes child protection work through the creation of child federations and 
committees. These federations and committees facilitate child participation in the entire program cycle. 
CCF believes and has proven that if children are empowered with knowledge of their rights and 
responsibilities, sustainable child protection efforts will be achieved. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

23
 
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Beth DeGraff  Jim Zylstra 
U.S. Media Contact  Country Consultant 
2850 Kalamazoo Avenue SE  CRWRC‐Uganda 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 49560‐0600  Plot 397 Bunga hill, off Ggaba Rd 
616.241.1691  P.O Box 4473  
degraffb@crcna.org  Kampala, Uganda 
  256.414.510318 
 
 
Introduction 
 
Christian Reformed World Relief Committee (CRWRC) is a relief, development, and education 
agency of the Christian Reformed Church in North America. With bi‐national offices in Ontario and 
Michigan, CRWRC’s 100 field staff provide support for a broad range of programs in North America and 
in more than 30 countries worldwide. CRWRC works with people in their communities to create 
permanent, positive change. Through hundreds of international partner organizations, CRWRC’s 
interventions touched the lives of millions of participants in relief and development programs. CRWRC’s 
mission is to engage people in redeeming their resources and developing their gifts through 
collaborative acts of love, mercy, and justice.  
 
CRWRC in Uganda 
 
CRWRC has been working in Uganda since 1982 and has strong ties with the Church of Uganda 
(COU) and the Pentecostal Assemblies of God (PAG). CRWRC maintains a consulting and/or funding 
presence in a dozen locations across Uganda. Today, the PAG and COU are nationally recognized for 
their expertise in food security, adult literacy, community‐based health care, rural savings and credit, 
water and Sanitation, and Environmental programs. The community leadership and development 
program at Uganda Christian University trains national mid‐level managers in leadership skills and 
competence. CRWRC also facilitates an amaranth program through the Unity Church of Christ in Uganda 
and trains COU and PAG clergy in theology through a partnership with Calvin Seminary in Grand Rapids, 
Michigan. The CRWRC‐Uganda office in Kampala houses CRWRC’s East & Southern Africa Relief 
Coordinator.  
 
  CRWC’s work in Uganda encompasses a broad range of sectors including agriculture, business 
development, disaster relief and preparedness, women in development, health care, and human rights. 
Issues of insurgency, ethnic violence, civil unrest and their subsequent effect on programming efforts 
are of special concern to CRWRC in Uganda. CRWRC’s work is carried out in many parts of Uganda 
including Katakwi, Amuria, Soroti, Kaberawaido, Kumi, Kitgum, Iganga, Koboko, Lira, Arua, Hoima, and 
Gulu. CRWRC‐Uganda programs are funded by voluntary donations, government and private foundation 
grants, and peer grants. In the fiscal year 07/08, CRWRC‐Uganda served 9,663 program participants 
through ten partner agencies in 218 communities with an annual budget of U.S.$630,000. In addition, 
5,000 individuals received emergency relief assistance through private donations and government 
grants.  

24
 
CRWRC’s efforts are carried out in cooperation with numerous affiliates such as the Church of 
Uganda, the Pentecostal Assemblies of God National Development Secretariat in Uganda, the Unity 
Church of Christ, Foods Resource Bank, Partners Worldwide, Project Africa, Calvin College and Seminary, 
the Katakwi Integrated Development Organization, the Kaberamaido Mission Development Program, 
Kumi Planning and Development Secretariat, Soroti Mission Development Office, Nebbi Planning and 
Development Office, Madi‐West Nile Planning and Development Office, Diocesan Planning and 
Development Office (Kitgum, Lango, and Hoima), and the Northern Uganda Planning and Development 
Office. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

25
 
Direct Relief International 
 
U.S. Contact Person: 
Jim Prosser 
27 S. La Patera Lane 
Santa Barbara, CA 93117 
Press Secretary  
805.964.4767 
 
Introduction 
 
Since 1948, Direct Relief International has worked to help people who confront enormous 
hardship to improve the quality of their lives. The tradition of direct and targeted assistance, provided in 
a manner that respects and involves the people served, has been a hallmark of the organization since its 
founding. 
 
Direct Relief's Activities in Uganda 
 
  Direct Relief International’s humanitarian efforts in Uganda encompass a wide variety of sectors 
including agriculture and food production, business development, disaster/emergency relief, education, 
health care, gender issues, human rights, refugee services, and rural development. Since 2000, Direct 
Relief has provided over $6.1 million (wholesale) in medical material assistance to Uganda focusing on 
HIV/AIDS, in addition to preventing and reducing other common endemic diseases and infections. 
 
Direct Relief’s key partners in Uganda include the Jinja Municipal Council and the Uganda 
Reproductive Health Bureau (URHB). The Jinja Municipal Council operates seven health centers with a 
total of 300 beds within its jurisdiction and treats over 10,000 patients per month. Each of the facilities 
runs outreach programs in school health, vector control, and community health development. Direct 
Relief assistance to Jinja Municipal Council has included providing children’s vitamins, HIV test kits, 
blood glucose test kits, and cough medicine. The Uganda Reproductive Health Bureau is a 
nongovernmental organization established in 1994 with a mission to provide free and low cost medical 
care, with a particular focus on HIV/AIDS, for people living in the capital of Kampala and outlying 
communities. URHB provides HIV/AIDS testing, health services, and education to people throughout the 
area through its network of clinics and mobile outreach programs. Direct Relief's assistance to URHB has 
included diagnostic products and medications. 
 
  Other partners in Uganda include AMREF Uganda, Hospice Africa Uganda, Jinja Hospice 
Jinja Municipal Council, Joy Hospice, Kitovu Mobile Hospice, Marie Stopes Uganda, Rakai Community 
Based Health Center, Rugendabara Foundation for Health, and the Uganda Reproductive Health Bureau. 

26
 
Food for the Hungry 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Brennen Matthews   Brennen Matthews  
Country Director  Country Director 
Food for the Hungry Uganda  Plot 40 Zzimme Road 
256.414.267.854  Muyenga, Kampala 
Plot 40 Zzimme Road  256.414.267 854 
Muyenga, Kampala  bmatthews@fhi.net 
bmatthews@fhi.net 
 
Introduction 
 
Food for the Hungry is an international relief and development organization that answers God’s 
call to meet the physical and spiritual needs of the poor in more than 26 countries. Founded in 1971 by 
Dr. Larry Ward, Food for the Hungry exists to help individuals reach their God‐given potential. In 
developing countries on nearly every continent, Food for the Hungry works with churches, leaders and 
families to provide the resources they need to help their communities become self‐sustaining. 
 
   When disasters strike, Food for the Hungry is often one of the first organizations on the ground 
to provide and facilitate emergency relief assistance to those in urgent need of food, shelter, and 
medical care. Food for the Hungry’s ministry staff members are also immersed in hundreds of 
developing communities around the world, implementing long‐term development programs such as 
agriculture training, clean water and food security programs, church development, child development, 
nutrition education and HIV/AIDS care and prevention. 
 
Food for the Hungry in Uganda 
 
Food for the Hungry has been working in Uganda since 1988. One the first initiatives of FH was 
the distribution of seeds, blankets and clothing to local prisons. Since then, Food for the Hungry has 
expanded its work in Uganda to include many long‐term projects. Currently, the sectors of focus for 
Food for the Hungry include agriculture, women in development/gender issues, health care, rural 
development, and disaster/emergency relief. The Uganda country program is focused heavily on three 
major sectors: food security (including food availability, access and utilization), health (HIV/AIDS and 
malaria) and child protection and child survival.  
 
In Kitgum, Food for the Hungry provides psychosocial care for children impacted by war 
including; literacy, education and income generation for returning victims of the LRA. It is heavily 
focused on a specific target group to achieve the resilience of the children and expand the program into 
adults.  The impact of this program also affects child headed households, orphans and vulnerable 
children as well. Food for the Hungry implements water and sanitation programs in Uganda which 
include drilling wells and installing hand pumps, building and installing pit latrines, and hygiene 
education and training for community members 
 
The Uganda specific goal in terms of food security is to boost and diversify agricultural 
production and improve beneficiary purchasing power and access to market through cash for work.  

27
Within the IDP households, FH promotes intensive vegetable gardening and the introduction of organic 
fertilizers and pesticides, and the provision of farm implementation. Food for the Hungry hosts seed 
fairs and direct seed and farm implementation distribution. Food security also promotes the planting of 
disease resistance and high nutrition content root crops.  
 
Lastly, to promote child development, Food for the Hungry has a goal of ensuring children to 
grow as God intends, and for the parents, community leaders, and churches to satisfy the needs of their 
children. To accomplish this goal, FH works with the leaders, churches, and parents in a community to 
build capacity and internal motivation for them to meet the needs of their children. Through training 
and awareness programs, these key groups learn about the needs of the children and how to meet 
them. At the same time, FH works directly with the children through activities appropriate for their 
context, promoting their development in four areas ‐ spiritual, intellectual, emotional, and physical.  
 
Specific locations where Food for the Hungry currently works within Uganda include Kitgum, 
Pader, Kapchorwa, Mbale, Apac, Mbale, Piswa and Mukono Districts. Food for the Hungry is also 
considering strategies for how to best enter into the northern Karamoja District. Country programming 
in Uganda is funded by institutional donors, private donors, and also the UN. The 2008 operating budget 
for programs in Uganda was $2 million (U.S.). Food for the Hungry works closely with USAID, UNICEF, 
FAO, and UG district and Kampala level government agencies to execute its humanitarian efforts in 
Uganda. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

28
 
Holt International 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Bruce Dahl  Jolly Nyeko 
Director of International Programs   Founder and Chairperson 
P.O. Box 2880  Action for Children 
Eugene, Oregon  97402   Plot 85, Kira Road 
541.687.2202   Kamwokya, P.O. Box 25417 
bruced@holtintl.org  Kampala, Uganda 
  jnyeko@yahoo.com
 
Introduction 
 
   Holt International Children’s Services was officially incorporated in 1956. The vision of Harry and 
Bertha Holt, Holt International is committed to achieving permanency for children, who are either at risk 
of losing family care, or who are outside of family care completely. Holt believes that every child should 
have a family. Holt works in 15 countries, including 2 countries in Africa (Uganda and Ethiopia). Holt 
supports intervention services including counseling, medical care, school sponsorship, day care, access 
to income generation programs, temporary foster care services, and the development of referral 
networks. 
 
Holt International in Uganda 
 
   Holt has partnered with the local NGO, Action for Children since 2001. Its major program in 
Uganda has been family preservation services, directed at HIV/AIDS affected children and their families 
in Kampala, Masindi and Apac.  Through the development of community support groups, grandparent 
and child headed families develop self‐reliance and the ability to better support themselves. 
 
   In order to fulfill its humanitarian mission in Uganda, Holt International works with the Bernard 
Van Leer Foundation, the Micro Enterprise Development Initiative, the Uganda Ministry of Gender and 
Labor, and others actors. In terms of the scale of recent programming, Holt International assisted 2500 
families and 8900 children in 2007. 
 
 
 
 
 

29
 
International Medical Corps 
   
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Ben Hemingway  Anthony Koomson 
Deputy Director, International Operations  Country Director 
1313 L St., NW, Suite 220  P.O. Box 39, Ntinda II Road 
Washington DC, 20005  Naguru 
202.828.5155  Kampala, Uganda 
bhemingway@imcworldwide.org  256.39.22.22.806 
  akoomson@imcworldwide.org 
 
Introduction 
 
International Medical Corps (IMC) is a global humanitarian nonprofit organization dedicated to 
saving  lives  and  relieving  suffering  through  relief  and  development  programs.  Established  in  1984  by 
volunteer  doctors  and  nurses,  IMC  is  a  private,  voluntary,  nonpolitical,  nonsectarian  organization.  Its 
mission  is  to  improve  the  quality  of  life  through  health  interventions  and  related  activities  that  build 
local  capacity  in  areas  where  few  organizations  dare  to  serve.  By  offering  training,  medical  care,  and 
other  health  interventions  to  people  at  highest  risk,  IMC  rehabilitates  devastated  health  care  systems 
and helps bring them back to self‐reliance. 
 
IMC in Uganda 
 
International Medical Corps aims to not only provide relief, but also create sustainable solutions 
to some of the most difficult challenges facing Uganda. IMC provides support to the internally displaced 
in mother and satellite camps in northern and southwestern Uganda with primary health care, nutrition, 
food security, sexual and gender‐based violence awareness, HIV/AIDS testing and treatment, and 
alcohol and substance abuse services.  In addition to satisfying immediate needs, IMC focuses on 
training and education to empower communities to handle current and future challenges on their own. 
IMC’s work encompasses many sectors including education and training, gender issues, health care, 
HIV/AIDs, refugee services, water and sanitation, and alcohol and substance abuse prevention and 
rehabilitation.   
 
All IMC programming prioritizes education and training so vulnerable populations can transition 
to self‐reliance.  Training efforts work to give Ugandans the skills they need to diagnose and treat basic 
health problems, as well as counsel and educate their peers. IMC trains locals to become community 
health workers, psychosocial counselors, and community educators so they can reach out to their peers 
on HIV/AIDS, sanitation, rape prevention, alcohol and substance abuse, and other areas critical to public 
health. 
 
International Medical Corps is working to address rape and gender‐based violence in four 
refugee camps in southwestern Uganda. The program targets approximately 14,000 refugees and 6,000 
host population members. IMC trains locals and policemen in how to address the issue of gender‐based 
violence effectively, including emotional support for victims and rape prevention outreach.  IMC also 
runs an extensive HIV/AIDS program in Kyaka II Refugee Settlement with voluntary testing and 
treatment services, including prevention of mother‐to‐child transmission.   

30
 
International Medical Corps makes nutrition and other health services available in and around 
displacement camps in northern and refugee camps in southwestern Uganda. Its extensive health care 
programming includes basic health care, as well as maternal and infant health, HIV/AIDS testing and 
treatment, and emergency nutritional support. In addition, IMC launched a cutting‐edge program with 
UNICEF that combined nutrition activities with early caregiver‐and‐child interaction to promote healthy 
child development. While providing food to malnourished children, the innovative program trained 
mothers how love, play, and nutrition all have an important role in a child’s development.   
 
International Medical Corps works in four refugee camps in southwestern Uganda and 
approximately nine displacement camps in Northern Uganda. IMC’s work includes both mother and 
satellite camps. IMC runs an extensive HIV/AIDS program in Kyaka II Refugee Settlement with voluntary 
testing and treatment services, including prevention of mother‐to‐child transmission.  With education 
and training also critical in the HIV/AIDS effort, IMC also runs community outreach campaigns on basic 
awareness, safe sex, and other areas critical to prevention. International Medical Corps’ work in the 
southwest focuses on reducing HIV transmission and providing care and support to people living with 
HIV in Kyaka II refugee settlement. In Nakivale, Oruchinga, Kyangwali, and Kyaka II, IMC runs an 
integrated response to sexual exploitation and gender‐based violence, which works to prevent gender‐
based violence and provide services to survivors.  
 
International Medical Corps also implemented the first program aimed at filling the need for 
targeted alcohol and drug prevention services. In northern Uganda, International Medical Corps works in 
nine displacement camps in Pader and Kitgum districts and provides community‐based malnutrition 
programming and joint livelihood and substance abuse programming. The high substance abuse rate 
compounds existing issues, such as poverty and gender‐based violence. To lower physical and financial 
dependence of residents living in camps on alcohol and production/selling of alcohol, IMC pioneered an 
innovative substance abuse prevention and response program that combines health education, group 
counseling, local media, and income generation projects.  
 
IMC receives funding for its Uganda programming from UNHCR, U.S. Department of 
State/Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (BPRM), USAID/Food for Peace, UNICEF, and 
OFDA. In order to best execute its mission prerogatives, IMC works in cooperation with UNHCR and 
other UN agencies, U.S. BPRM, USAID, Mercy Corps, the government of Uganda, and other local and 
international non‐governmental organizations. 
 
 
 
 
 

31
 
Lutheran World Relief 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Alissa Karg  Evelyn Nassuna 
Lutheran World Relief  LWF Complex 
700 Light Street  Plot 1401 Gaba Road, Nasambya 
Baltimore, MD  21230  PO Box 5827 
410.230.2820  Kampala, Uganda 
akarg@lwr.org  256.312.26.400.678 
  enassuna@lwr‐earo.org 
 
Introduction 
 
For more than 60 years, Lutheran World Relief worked with partners in 35 countries to help 
people grow food, improve health, strengthen communities, end conflict, build livelihoods and recover 
from disasters. Empowered by God's unconditional love in Jesus Christ, Lutheran World Relief envisions 
a world in which each person and every generation lives in justice, dignity, and peace. 
 
LWR in Uganda 
 
LWR’s strategy in Uganda includes promotion of civil society, sustainable income generation, 
community‐based initiatives against the spread of AIDS, and empowering communities to respond to 
risks and emergencies. The work of LWR can be grouped under the categories of agriculture and food 
production, business development, cooperatives and credit, health care, and rural development. Of 
special concern to LWR is seeing that security in Northern Uganda increases to allow access to certain 
difficult to reach areas.  
 
The specific areas where LWR is active in Uganda include Rakai, Lyantonde, Mbale, Kitgum, 
Wakiso and Masaka Districts. Funding for project implementation comes from LWR internal designated 
and undesignated funds. Currently, LWR partners collaborate with the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal 
Industry and Fisheries at Entebbe, the National Agricultural Advisory Services (NAADS), the National 
Seed Certification Service (NSCS) and coordinate with community, district and national authorities other 
stakeholders working in health care, agriculture extension and community development.  
 
In addition to the aforementioned partners, LWR also works specifically with five key Ugandan 
and International NGO’s including the Community Enterprises Development Organization, Community 
Integrated Development Initiative, Gumutindo Coffee Cooperative Enterprise Ltd., Lutheran World 
Federation Department of World Service, and Voluntary Action for Development. In total, these 
partnerships serve over 175,000 beneficiaries in Uganda. 
  
 
 
 
 

32
 
 
MAP International 
 
 
U.S. contact person:   Overseas Field Contact: 
Jack Morse  Paul Okello 
50 Hurt Plaza, Suite 400  pokello@map.org 
Atlanta, GA 30303   
404.492.6583   
jmorse@map.org   
 
Introduction 
 
Founded in 1954 as Medical Assistance Programs, today MAP International is a leading nonprofit 
relief and development agency that provides healthcare for people in more than 115 countries plagued 
by war, natural disaster, disease and poverty. MAP works with more than 100 major relief agencies and 
pharmaceutical companies in the world’s poorest communities to provide essential medicines, promote 
community health development, and prevent and mitigate disease, disaster and other health threats. 
Each year, MAP distributes approximately $300 million in medicines and medical supplies to more than 
25 million people across the globe. MAP also operates health clinics and community‐based healthcare 
programs throughout Africa, Asia and the Americas. Since its inception, MAP has provided more than $3 
billion in medicines to people in some of the world’s poorest areas.  
 
MAP International in Uganda 
 
The efforts of MAP International in Uganda fall largely under the sectors of healthcare and 
education. Efforts are based mostly in northern Uganda with operations in the districts of Gulu and 
Amuru. In particular, MAP is working with the Anglican Church in Gulu, Uganda to operate seven health 
clinics in camps for IDPs. MAP is also supplying medicines and health supplies for the clinics, which serve 
a population of 50,000 people. Communities are working with MAP to identify local health priorities and 
risks, and MAP is training hundreds of new healthcare workers to mitigate such threats. MAP is also 
working to reduce the prevalence of malaria by supplying malaria medicines and treatment and 
distributing mosquito nets coated with insecticide. 
 
MAP is conducting education classes for local villagers in which participants learn about 
preventative healthcare measures, basic healthcare techniques and warning signs for malaria and other 
diseases common to the area. MAP is also providing AIDS counseling and testing for Ugandans. 
 
MAP International receives its funding from grants and private donors. In terms of the scale of 
programming in Uganda, it plans to disburse more than $1 million over the next three years on malaria 
and AIDS programming, serving a population of around 50,000 people. MAP International works with 
the Anglican Church in Uganda as well as the Ministry of Health to fulfill its programming objectives in 
Uganda. 

33
 
Management Sciences for Health 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact:  
Kelley Laird   Saul Kidde 
Strategic Information Officer  Senior Technical Advisor 
4301 North Fairfax Drive,Suite 400  Uganda Office 
Arlington, Virginia 22203  Plot 6 Kafu Rd, Nakasero 
248.860.0283  P. O. Box 71419, 
klaird@msh.org  Kampala, 
  Uganda 
  256.774.308.828 
 
Introduction 
 
Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is a nonprofit international health organization 
composed of nearly 1,300 people from more than 60 nations. The mission of MSH is to save lives and 
improve the health of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people by closing the gap between 
knowledge and action in public health. Together with partners, MSH is helping managers and leaders in 
developing countries to create stronger management systems that improve health services for the 
greatest health impact. 
 
MSH in Uganda 
 
The overall aim of MSH is Uganda is to strengthen health systems. The current objectives of 
MSH in Uganda are to strengthen the capacity of the national malaria control program and its key 
partners to assure a rational uninterrupted supply of malaria commodities and to promote their rational 
use. Additionally, MSH is continuing its more than a decade long effort strengthen the national health 
system to better equip the country to combat HIV/AIDS and other critical health concerns. Finally, MSH 
is also working to expand our bandwidth.  
 
The sectors encompassed by MSH in Uganda include agriculture and food production, business 
development, disaster and emergency relief, education and training, gender issues, health care, human 
rights, refugee services, and rural development. MSH executes its programs in Kampala. MSH receives 
most of its funding from the U.S. government and PMI with an operating budget of around $500,000. 
MSH works with many partners in Uganda such as the World Health Organization, USAID/NUMAT 
Project, USAID MCP Project, and National Medical Stores. 
 
 
 

34
 
Medical Teams International  
 
U.S. Contact Person:  
Tammy Teske 
Disaster Response Project Officer 
PO Box 10 
Portland, OR 97207 
503.624.1000 
tteske@medicalteams.org 
 
Introduction 
 
Medical Teams International, (MTI) is a relief and development agency based in Portland, 
Oregon, works with the vulnerable and marginalized in developing countries to address their health 
needs.  The mission of MTI is to demonstrate the love of Christ to people affected by disaster, conflict 
and poverty around the world. MTI specializes in long‐term development work and disaster relief by 
providing health care services and training through volunteer teams.  
 
MTI in Uganda 
 
  The goal of MTI’s programs in Uganda is to improve the health status of resettling communities. The 
methodology employed by MTI to achieve this goal is three fold and includes increasing access to 
primary health care services for members of displaced and resettling communities in the sub‐counties of 
Apala, Okwang, Purunga, and Kilak through strengthening maternal child health programs, investigating 
and responding to outbreaks in targeted sub counties and other areas requested as capacity permits, 
and finally improving access to HIV prevention and treatment services including social mobilization, 
education, VCT, preventing mother to child transmission of HIV/AIDs, and youth friendly services. 
 
  MTI executes its programming in many parts of Uganda such as Apala, Ogur, Okwang, Erute 
North, Otuke, and Moroto sub counties in the Lira District and Puranga and Kilak sub counties in the 
Pader District. The sectors touched by MTI’s work in Uganda included disaster and emergency relief, 
health care, and HIV/AIDS. MTI receives funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, UNICEF, and 
private donors. In terms of the scale of MTI’s program, plans include serving 200,000 resettling 
community members, with an annual program budget of $670,000. MTI works with the local Ministry of 
Health, USAID, UNICEF, and other NGOs in the health sector. 
 
MTI is becoming increasingly concerned about the access to quality medications for the 
population, especially for HIV/AIDS. In addition, disease outbreaks (like Hepatitis E) threaten the 
people’s health and livelihoods.  
 
 
 
 

35
 
Mercy Corps 
   
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Nathan Oetting  Darius Radcliffe 
Senior Program Officer  Country Director 
3015 SW First Avenue  Plot 3327 Kateeba Close 
Portland, OR 97201  Kironde Road, Muyenga 
503.450.1964  P.O. Box 32021 Clock Tower 
noetting@mercycorps.org  Kampala, Uganda 
  256.312.265.358 
  dradcliffe@field.mercycorps.org 
   
Introduction 
 
  Since 1979, Mercy Corps has provided $1.5 billion in assistance to people in 106 nations. 
Supported by headquarters offices in North America and Europe, the agency's unified global programs 
employ 3,500 staff worldwide and reach nearly 16.4 million people in more than 35 countries. Mercy 
Corps works amid disasters, conflicts, chronic poverty and instability to unleash the potential of people 
who can win against nearly impossible odds. Mercy Corps exists to alleviate suffering, poverty and 
oppression by helping people build secure, productive and just communities. 
 
Mercy Corps in Uganda 
 
  Mercy Corps Uganda’s goal is to work in partnership with communities to build their capacity 
and to support their economic development so they will be cohesive, self reliant and healthy. The main 
objectives of Mercy Corps in Uganda include promoting a more vibrant economy in northern Uganda, 
facilitating the return of displaced populations supported with basic services and improving 
opportunities for youth throughout the region. These efforts encompass a broad spectrum of sectors 
including agriculture and food production, business development, cooperatives and credit, 
disaster/emergency relief, education/training, gender issues, health care, human rights, rural 
development, water and sanitation, livelihoods, cash for work, and rehabilitation of critical 
infrastructure such as roads. Additionally, Mercy Corps Uganda is providing support and assistance to 
ODI during their three‐year longitudinal study of “Livelihoods in Crisis” in northern Uganda. 
 
  Mercy Corps executes its Ugandan programming efforts in the districts of Pader, Kitgum, 
Kaabong, and Karamoja. Mercy Corps receives funding from USAID, USAID/OFDA, USAID/CMM, and 
private donations. Mercy Corps has an operating budget in Uganda of approximately $13 million USD 
reaching 60,000 direct beneficiaries and 225,000 indirect beneficiaries. 
 
Cooperative development efforts are of special concern to Mercy Corps in Uganda. Mercy Corps 
maintains close working relationships with and has in place memorandums of understanding with local 
and regional government counterparts in northern Uganda.  Similarly, Mercy Corps Uganda is currently 
in the process of securing a Host Country Food for Peace Agreement with the Government of Uganda. 

36
 
Refugees International 
 
U.S. Contact   Field Contact: 
Camilla Olson and Melanie Teff  Camilla Olson and Melanie Teff 
2001 S Street NW Suite 700  2001 S Street NW Suite 700 
Washington, DC 20009  Washington, DC 20009 
202.828.0110  202.828.0110 
ri@refintl.org  ri@refintl.org 
 
Introduction 
 
From its beginnings in 1979, Refugees International (RI) has advocated for lifesaving assistance 
and protection for displaced people and promotes solutions to displacement crises. In the belief that 
timely responses to refugee crises can increase stability in a region before the conflict spreads across 
borders, each year, Refugees International conducts 20 to 25 field missions to assess crisis situations. 
Based on up‐to‐date information gathered in the field, RI provides governments, international agencies 
and non‐governmental organizations with effective solutions to improve the lives of displaced people. 
 
Refugees International in Uganda 
 
Refugees International is conducting periodic humanitarian advocacy missions to northern 
Uganda. In its advocacy on northern Uganda, Refugees International is focusing on the following issues: 
the safe and voluntary return and reintegration of IDPs, continued assistance for vulnerable displaced 
people, including women, children, and the elderly, who remain in camps and transit sites, robust and 
flexible funding from international donors to rebuild the north, particularly basic services in return 
areas, support for local protection mechanisms (specifically the police and community development 
officers), the commitment by the Government of Uganda to allocate additional funding for 
reconstruction in the north, and international support for a negotiated settlement to the conflict. 
 
RI conducted an assessment mission to Uganda in 2008, its sixth since 2002, and expects to 
return in 2009 to conduct another follow up assessment. Advocacy will focus primarily on the U.S. 
Government and key UN humanitarian agencies, including the Office of the UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees.   
 
 

37
 
World Learning 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact:  
Azra Kacapor   Ben Miller 
Director, Child and Youth Programs   Academic Director  
World Learning International Development  Uganda  
Programs  256.773.377.559 
202.408.5420, ext. 6144  Ben.Miller@sit.edu  
Azra.kacapor@worldlearning.org 
 
Introduction 
 
World Learning is a global non‐profit organization with operations in more than 75 countries. 
Through its international education programs, World Learning fosters global citizenship by connecting 
over 3,000 young ambassadors annually across cultural differences and social barriers. Through its 
International Development Programs, World Learning practices what it teaches, undertaking 
community‐driven international development, training, and exchange projects in 20 countries. Over 75 
years, World Learning has built a deep and diverse array of offerings and services that transform lives 
and strengthen the capacity of communities and institutions to address pressing global needs. 
 
World Learning in Uganda 
 
The two primary objectives underpinning World Learning’s programming in Uganda are to 
develop leadership skills in northern Ugandan youth and to provide reintegration and recovery support 
for vulnerable children. The main sectors encompassed by these objectives are education, human rights, 
and refugee services. 
 
Currently, World Learning is implementing the IDP Kitgum Project aimed at serving the needy 
and vulnerable children of northern Uganda, by utilizing the strongest resource at their disposal: the 
older brothers, sisters, and neighbors of the at‐risk children. World Learning, through partnership with 
the Ugandan NGO Straight Talk Foundation, will implement a youth leadership program, training youth 
to raise awareness and analyze the problems facing the younger children in their communities.  
Following the youth leadership program, young Uganda leaders from Kitgum District will return to their 
home villages to implement reintegration, recovery and support program for vulnerable children of 
northern Uganda. This program also includes training of four Ugandan university graduates on 
conducting needs assessment, research, monitoring and evaluation, and program design. 
 
World Learning funds its Uganda projects through private donors. The IDP Kitgum project has a 
one year budget of $100,000 USD and will directly benefit 450 youth and children. World Learning fulfills 
its humanitarian missions in Uganda by working with local NGOs such as Straight Talk Foundation. 

38
 
World Vision 
 
U.S. Contact Person:  Overseas Field Contact: 
Karl Rosenberg, Grants Officer        Lawrence Tiyoy, Operations Director 
300 I Street, NE           World Vision Uganda 
Washington, DC 20002          15 B Nakasero Road 
202.572.6550        Kampala, Uganda 
krosenbe@worldvision.org       256.41.345758 
  ltiyoy@wvi.org 
 
Introduction 
 
Founded in the 1950s, World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organization dedicated to 
working with children, families, and their communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling 
the causes of poverty and injustice. World Vision serves close to 100 million people in nearly 100 
countries around the world. World Vision serves all people, regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, or 
gender. 
 
World Vision in Uganda 
 
World Vision began working in Uganda in 1972, and over the decades has conducted activities 
working with refugees, training farmers, offering child sponsorship, developing clean water, increasing 
public health and hygiene awareness, improving nutrition and food production, encouraging small 
business development, addressing issues related to HIV/AIDS, and providing emergency assistance.  
 
Today, World Vision is committed to partnering with the people of Uganda to enhance their 
lives and to help enact sustainable solutions for the future of their communities, families, and children.  
Currently, more than 150,000 children in Uganda are registered in the World Vision child sponsorship 
program.  Several times this number of children and other family members benefit from World Vision 
activities.  Of these registered children, many have World Vision sponsors in other countries.  U.S. 
donors sponsor more than 40,000 girls and boys.  In addition, World Vision operates 50 area 
development programs, 13 of which are supported by U.S. donors. 
 
World Vision has five grant programs in Uganda.  The overall goal of the Food for Peace Title II 
assistance program is to improve livelihood security for 30,000 households in northern Uganda over a 
five‐year period.  This goal was achieved through strategic objectives that aimed to develop safety nets 
for households by strengthening agricultural systems and improving the health & nutrition of vulnerable 
groups.  World Vision is working through the U.S. Department of Labor funded KURET program to 
sustainably reduce and prevent the engagement of children in the worst forms of child labor in select 
provinces of Uganda.   
 
The SPEAR project, funded by USAID, seeks to enhance HIV/AIDS prevention among adults 
through expanded access to HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care for selected public sector 
workers.  Though the LANoH grant program, World Vision is working to improve the quality of life for 
OVCs in north central Uganda through increased coverage and utilization of essential services.  World 
Vision will accomplish this through a series of small sub‐grants to local community services 

39
organizations, which provide socio‐economic security, education, and/or health and psychosocial 
support to OVCs.  Through the NUMAT grant program, World Vision is working to expand access to and 
utilization of HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria prevention, treatment, care, and support services by actively 
building upon existing networks within north central Uganda. Geographic coverage of current programs 
will be expanded and populations served through strengthening local government responses and 
increasing the role of communities in planning, implementing, and monitoring activities.   
 
  World Vision’s programs reflect a broad sector of influence including agriculture, children in 
crisis, education, business development, health care, HIV/AIDs, refugee and migration services, and 
water and sanitation. World Vision has humanitarian program in the following districts: Masaka, Rakai, 
Nakaseke, Apac, Gulu, Bundibugyo, and Hoima. In order to implement these programs, World Vision 
receives funding from USAID, DOL, and private donors. 

40