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United Nations A/63/305

General Assembly Distr.: General
18 August 2008

Original: English

Sixty-third session
Item 68 of the provisional agenda*
Strengthening of the coordination of humanitarian and
disaster relief assistance of the United Nations, including
special economic assistance

Safety and security of humanitarian personnel and
protection of United Nations personnel
Report of the Secretary-General

Summary
The General Assembly, in its resolution 62/95, requested the Secretary-General
to submit to it at its sixty-third session a comprehensive and updated report on the
safety and security of humanitarian personnel and protection of United Nations
personnel, and on the implementation of the resolution. The present report provides
updates on the safety and security of humanitarian and United Nations personnel
over the past year and on the efforts of the Department of Safety and Security to
implement the recommendations of the Assembly contained in resolution 62/95 that
fall under the responsibility of the Department.
The report highlights significant challenges and threats to the security and
safety of humanitarian and United Nations personnel. 1 It focuses on the
Organization’s efforts to ensure respect for the human rights, privileges and
immunities of humanitarian and United Nations personnel, and to promote a culture
of security consciousness, collaboration and accountability at all levels. The report
calls for international collective responsibility, according to international laws and
principles, and closer collaboration between the United Nations and host
Governments to ensure the safety and security of humanitarian and United Nations
personnel.

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* A/63/150 and Corr.1.
1 The present report is submitted without prejudice to the implementation of recommendations

made by the Independent Panel on Safety and Security of United Nations Personnel and
Premises Worldwide or the Independent Panel on Accountability related to the attack on United
Nations premises in Algiers in 2007. A further report on institutional issues concerning staff,
premises and security will be submitted to the forthcoming General Assembly.

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I. Introduction
1. In its resolution 62/95, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General
to submit to it, at its sixty-third session, a report on the safety and security of
humanitarian personnel and protection of United Nations personnel, and on the
implementation of that resolution. The reporting period is from 1 July 2007 to
30 June 2008.

II. Security challenges and threats against United Nations and
humanitarian personnel
2. The security of humanitarian and United Nations personnel continues to
deteriorate. During the reporting period, humanitarian and United Nations personnel
were the targets of deliberate attacks by extremists, armed groups and disgruntled
sections of populations in all areas of humanitarian and United Nations operations.
3. The attack against United Nations offices in Algiers on 11 December 2007 was
stark evidence of this disturbing trend. While threats by extremists existed in the
past in a few locations, the threats have expanded indiscriminately to all locations.
4. Primary threats against United Nations and humanitarian personnel remain
armed conflict, terrorism, harassment, violent public protests, banditry and
criminality in areas of armed conflict, as well as in countries with economic,
political and social unrest. Abduction and hostage-taking, whether politically,
economically or criminally motivated, remains the most disturbing feature of the
humanitarian working environment. In areas where there were no direct attacks or
targeting of humanitarian workers, harassment and intimidation has been a serious
cause of concern.
5. Key factors contributing to increased challenges for United Nations security
management worldwide include (a) expanded and sustained operations, particularly
in conflict or post-conflict areas; (b) rising criminality owing to deteriorating public
security and limited capacity of local authority in countries facing economic,
political and social tension, even without the presence of armed conflict; (c) the
spread of terrorist tactics; (d) sharp increases in food and fuel prices leading to
violent protests; (e) rising public expectations and local dissatisfaction with United
Nations operations or presence; and (f) the climate of impunity for violent acts
against United Nations and humanitarian personnel.
6. According to information retrieved from reports of United Nations designated
officials for security worldwide (in 156 countries), 2 during the reporting period, the
number of deaths of United Nations civilian staff members as a result of malicious
acts increased by 36 per cent to a total of 25, compared to 16 deaths in the previous
year. Of the 25 deaths, 20 occurred in Africa (including 17 in Algeria, 1 each in
Chad, Kenya and Ethiopia), 1 in Asia (Pakistan) and 4 in the Middle East (1 in
Lebanon and 3 in the occupied Palestinian territories). Annex I to the present report
contains a list of United Nations personnel who lost their lives as a result of
malicious acts and indicates the status of legal proceedings undertaken by the host

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2 The most senior United Nations official responsible for the security of all United Nations staff,
dependants and property in his or her area of assignment.

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Governments. In addition, 10 United Nations staff members died in a helicopter
crash in Nepal.
7. Locally recruited humanitarian and United Nations personnel remained the
most vulnerable and have accounted for the majority of casualties and arrests,
detentions or harassments. For example, out of the total number of 25 deaths, 21
involved locally recruited staff members.
8. In the reporting period, incidents involving the United Nations included 490
attacks, 3 546 harassment and intimidation cases, 578 robberies, 263 physical
assaults, 119 hijackings and 160 arrests by State actors and 39 cases of detention by
non-State actors. There were also 84 forced entries and occupations of United
Nations offices and 583 residential break-ins.
9. The greatest number of reported security incidents against United Nations
personnel 4 occurred mostly in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, according to indicative
information provided by United Nations designated officials for security. Annex III
to the present report contains further details.
10. The Department of Safety and Security received first-hand and second-hand
accounts of security incidents against humanitarian non-governmental organizations
(NGOs). During the year, 63 deaths of international and national staff of
non-governmental organizations resulting from malicious acts were reported,
including 18 in Somalia, 17 in Afghanistan, 14 in the Sudan, 6 in Pakistan, 4 in
Chad and 1 each in Burundi, Iraq, Sri Lanka and Uganda. Other incidents against
humanitarian NGOs included 236 attacks, 70 cases of detention by State authorities
and 103 incidents of unlawful detention by non-State actors, 41 incidents of assault,
132 incidents of harassment, 138 cases of forced entry or occupation of premises,
113 armed robberies, 50 incidents of vehicle hijacking, 70 residential break-ins and
124 cases of theft.
11. It is important to note that the above-mentioned number of incidents against
humanitarian NGOs is not an exhaustive account, but rather, reflects the threats and
incidents reported by NGOs, many of whom work as implementing partners and
contribute to United Nations operations. The escalation of violence directed against
relief workers is indicative of the increased threat levels in complex emergencies.
12. Violent acts against United Nations and humanitarian personnel in conflict and
post-conflict areas continue unabated. In the Sudan, the 297 incidents against United
Nations personnel, include the killing of five World Food Programme contracted
drivers, 18 attacks on convoys and premises, 65 arrests by State authorities, 28
assaults and 94 incidents of harassment and intimidation. In Darfur, the number of
vehicle hijackings has sharply increased to a monthly average of 12 vehicle
hijacking incidents involving United Nations and humanitarian personnel. During
the reporting period, the number of vehicle thefts and vehicle hijackings in Darfur
included 44 United Nations vehicles, 109 NGO vehicles and 83 vehicles of
contractors working for the United Nations.
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3 These included “attacks” on premises, installations and convoys resulting and not resulting in
death and/or injuries.
4 These included attacks, murders, arrests and detentions by State and non-State actors, physical
assaults, cases of harassment and intimidation, forced entries or office occupations, missing
persons, robberies, hijackings and residential break-ins.

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13. In Chad, examples of incidents against the United Nations include the killing
of a driver employed by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
(UNHCR) in December 2007 and attacks on two UNHCR convoys in March 2008.
A particularly grave incident against humanitarian NGOs took place in May 2008
when armed men attacked a three-car convoy of Save the Children and the United
Nations Children’s Fund, killing the Country Director of Save the Children.
14. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, persistent attacks by armed groups
targeting humanitarian convoys and personnel led to the suspension of humanitarian
activities in certain areas in the eastern part of the country. In Haiti, there were 28
vehicle hijackings and seven kidnappings in the reporting period. During the April
2008 protests against high food and fuel prices, a mob invaded and occupied a
United Nations office, and angry protestors destroyed five United Nations vehicles.
15. Fighting between armed entities, whether State or non-State actors, continue to
affect security of United Nations and humanitarian personnel. In southern Sudan, in
April 2008, during fighting, armed groups looted and destroyed offices of the
United Nations and international NGOs. In Chad, fighting in N’Djamena prompted
United Nations staff to evacuate and caused damage to United Nations premises and
equipment in February 2008.
16. In Afghanistan, United Nations and humanitarian organizations continue to
face direct targeted attacks. In early 2008, there were indications that a United
Nations compound was the target of rocket attacks on two consecutive nights in
March, and one in May. During the reporting period, the incidents against
humanitarian NGOs, included 8 killings, 51 attacks of convoys and premises, 30
cases of abduction or detention by non-State actors, 21 cases of harassment and
intimidation and 22 forced entries to offices.
17. In Somalia, the deteriorating security situation has led to a growing number of
incidents in which perpetrators have targeted, killed and abducted humanitarian and
United Nations personnel. During the period from April to July 2008, numerous
staff of United Nations and humanitarian agencies were abducted, including two
contractors of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, one
UNHCR national staff member and workers from numerous local and international
NGOs, some of which are still detained (as at July 2008). In June 2008, insurgent
militia raided the office of United Nations Political Office for Somalia. There were a
total of 40 attacks on premises and convoys of humanitarian NGOs and the United
Nations, the murders of 2 United Nations staff members and 15 humanitarian
workers, the abduction of 6 United Nations staff members and 13 humanitarian
workers, and vehicle hijackings, 3 of which involved the United Nations and 20
involving NGOs. The figures continued to rise with a total of 81 incidents against
the United Nations in the present reporting period, compared to 54 incidents in
2007.
18. Another disturbing feature of the incidents has been the frequency of collateral
damage to premises of the United Nations and NGOs as a result of crossfire. In Iraq,
United Nations staff and premises have been hit by attacks on the International
Zone, including the 27 March 2008 attack in which one United Nations
subcontractor was killed and two injured.

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III. Arrest, detention and other restrictions
19. In the reporting period, the number of United Nations personnel arrested,
detained or missing, and for whom the United Nations has been unable to exercise
its right to protection, has decreased slightly to 19 cases from 22 cases for the past
year. As at 30 June 2008, 12 United Nations staff members remained under
detention in Israel, 3 in Eritrea and 2 in Somalia; 2 staff members remained missing.
Annex II to the present report contains a consolidated list of missing staff members
and those under arrest and detention.

IV. Respect for the human rights, privileges and immunities of
United Nations and other personnel: implementation of
resolution 62/95
20. The United Nations security management system is based on the principle that
the primary responsibility for the security and protection of staff members, their
dependants and the Organization’s property rests with the host Governments. The
Organization continues to take steps to carry out recommendations contained in
resolution 62/95, in which the General Assembly asked the Secretary-General to
take the necessary measures to ensure full respect for the human rights, privileges
and immunities of United Nations and other personnel carrying out activities in
fulfilling the mandate of a United Nations operation, and to seek the inclusion, in
negotiations of future and existing headquarters and mission agreements, of key
provisions of the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United
Nations, the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the Specialized
Agencies and the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated
Personnel.
21. The United Nations Department of Safety and Security has pursued a joint
strategy with the Office of Legal Affairs and the Office for the Coordination of
Humanitarian Affairs to promote the compliance by Member States with the
conventions on privileges and immunities. The Department, in consultation with the
Office of Legal Affairs, continued to bring specific cases of infringement of the
human rights and privileges and immunities of United Nations personnel, or other
persons undertaking activities in fulfilling the mandate of a United Nations
operation, to the attention of the host Governments.
22. At its meeting in Washington, D.C. in February 2008, the United Nations Inter-
agency Security Management Network 5 discussed the need to put in place
supplementary agreements either between the United Nations system organizations
and host countries, or on a system-wide basis at the duty station, outlining the host
country’s specific responsibilities for the protection of United Nations personnel and
premises. The intention is to supplement, but not replace, the applicable host
country agreements. The designated official, in consultation with the host
Government, would adjust the model supplementary agreement to address country-
specific needs. The Under-Secretary-General for Safety and Security continued to
__________________
5 United Nations security management mechanism, comprising agencies, funds and programmes
and departments, which discusses and considers security policies and issues of the United
Nations security management system.

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intensify his contacts and dialogue with Member States, through their permanent
missions to the United Nations, and direct contacts with various host country
authorities, to increase cooperation with the host Governments.
23. Certain Governments continue to impede the import, deployment and use of
essential communications and security equipment required for United Nations
operations, in contravention of the above-mentioned international legal instruments.
These restrictions have a serious adverse effect on staff security and on the
beneficiaries of United Nations programmes.

V. Promoting and enhancing security consciousness
24. The Department of Safety and Security continued to take steps to enhance
security consciousness, accountability and awareness of security procedures and
policies. Those steps include (a) comprehensive staff training; (b) critical incident
stress management; (c) security information management; (d) threat and risk
analyses and crisis management; and (e) security mainstreaming.

A. Security training programmes and awareness campaign initiatives

25. The Department’s Training and Development Section continued to make
progress in conducting security training programmes, including a new mandatory
two-day induction training for newly appointed designated officials, security
management team training, a security certification programme for new field security
coordination officers and a refresher training programme for serving Department
security personnel.
26. During the reporting period, the Department conducted (a) nine new
designated official induction training sessions; (b) 27 security management team
training sessions; (c) two security certification programmes for 66 security officers;
and (d) five refresher training programmes for 91 security officers. The Department
is developing an intermediate training programme for newly promoted security
advisers to meet its staff development strategy. Moreover, the Department
conducted the following specialized training programmes: (a) hostage incident
management training for 26 security officers of United Nations system
organizations; (b) numerous safe and secure approaches to field environments
training-of-trainer workshops for United Nations staff in six high-risk countries;
(c) two safe and secure approaches to field environments training-of-trainer
workshops, conducted in coordination with the United Nations System Staff
College, for 43 selected security officers; (d) emergency trauma bag and basic first
aid training for 400 staff members; (e) five field security training programmes for
136 peacekeeping mission security officers; and (f) one security and safety service
training-of-trainers workshop for 24 participants.
27. To promote system-wide security awareness, the Department is revising the
online CD-ROM training programme entitled, “Basic security in the field”, initially
launched in 2003. The new version includes updated information on the United
Nations security management structure, living and working in a new cultural
environment, influenza pandemic preparedness and vehicle safety. For the past year,
about 10,691 United Nations staff members completed the Advanced Security in the

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Field security learning programme by using the Department of Safety and Security
website or the CD-ROM.
28. In view of the number of deaths and serious injuries of United Nations staff
members due to vehicle accidents, the Department has launched a global “Road
safety campaign 2008”.

B. Critical incident stress management

29. Critical incident stress management remains a central component of the
Organization’s security response. For the past year, the Critical Incident Stress
Management Unit of the Department of Safety and Security has been proactively
providing services to staff members and developing systems to enhance emergency
responses. The Unit has strengthened collaboration with key United Nations
stakeholders and initiated sustainable systems to increase the availability and quality
of critical incident stress management services.
30. During the reporting period, the Department has focused on responses to key
emergencies, including the attack against United Nations offices in Algeria, the
political unrest in Nairobi, the devastation caused by hurricane Felix in Nicaragua,
the helicopter crash in Nepal, the turmoil in Chad and United Nations staff
evacuation, and the devastating impact of cyclone Nargis in Myanmar, as well as
traumatic events in other countries. The Department’s counsellors assisted 2,676
United Nations staff members during the period.
31. To enhance crisis response preparedness, the Department continued to build
United Nations regional capacity in critical incident stress management. Positive
steps include counsellor certification training with a view to establishing United
Nations counselling networks in different regions. Some 28 counsellors from 17
countries received intensive critical incident stress-management training during the
past year and the Department has facilitated training and workshops for 4,073 staff
members. In addition, the Department continued to build United Nations critical
incident stress-management capacity at the country level. The appointment of
national counsellors in 14 countries has proved cost-effective in responding to the
tragic events in Nepal, Myanmar, Pakistan and Chad; Department counsellors
provided technical support to 11 peacekeeping mission senior counsellors providing
services to 11,518 staff members.

C. Electronic information strategy

32. Over the past year, the Department’s website (dss.un.org) had an increased
number of registered users, from 38,000 to 68,000 staff members, and served as
secure access to security-related information, such as travel advisories, the
Department’s staff directory, security awareness and training materials, and stress
management and mission readiness information. In the reporting period, the
Department processed 22,800 security clearance requests monthly for operations
worldwide through the integrated security clearance and tracking system.

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D. Threat and risk assessment and crisis management

33. The Department of Safety and Security continued to provide management,
support and assistance to designated officials and United Nations country teams on
security risk management. To increase the knowledge of designated officials,
members of security management teams and United Nations security professionals,
the Department has included security risk management as an integral part of security
guidelines and main security training programmes for security officers and key
actors in the United Nations security management system at the country level. The
Department continued to take steps to ensure timely response to all security-related
threats and emergencies. To improve capacity in responding to emergencies, the
Department has strengthened its 24/7 Crisis Management Centre with established
procedures and staff training. During the reporting period, the Centre supported
responses to crises in Chad (twice), Lebanon, Somalia, and Kenya.
34. As part of efforts to mitigate threats against United Nations premises located at
offices away from headquarters, regional commissions and tribunals, the
Department of Safety and Security has carried out standardized access control in
these locations. Based on comprehensive threat and risk assessment, the Department
provided close protection to 73 senior officials travelling to 143 different countries
during the reporting period.

E. Mainstreaming of security management

35. The Department of Safety and Security continued to take steps to mainstream
security management at all levels of United Nations activities with the strategic aim
of enabling United Nations operations. The Under-Secretary-General for Safety and
Security continued to hold regular and close consultations with various departments
within the United Nations Secretariat, agencies, funds and programmes to promote
security management as an integral and enabling part of policy, planning,
operational and administrative consideration for United Nations programmes and
activities.
36. In promoting an organizational culture of accountability for staff security, the
Department continued to work closely with United Nations system organizations
and Secretariat departments, to increase awareness of management responsibility for
all actors in the United Nations security management system. The inclusion of
designated official’s responsibilities as a core function of senior officials, such as
resident coordinators, special representatives of the Secretary-General and heads of
missions, marked a positive development. The Department continues to take
measures to integrate safety and security components within the Department,
including integrated training and standardized safety and security policies and
procedures.

VI. Conformity with operating standards
37. In line with General Assembly resolution 62/95, the United Nations continues
to take steps to ensure that United Nations staff members are properly informed
about and operate in conformity with the minimum operating security standards.

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38. The Department’s Policy, Planning and Coordination Unit, which ensures a
unified capacity for security policy developments and coordination, has worked
closely with other units and departments as well as United Nations system
organizations to ensure that security policies, operational procedures and standards
are cohesive and consistent, incorporated into staff training, applicable to the field
and reflective of emerging security challenges. With a view to developing common
security policies for a unified United Nations security management system, the Unit
has undertaken ongoing efforts in revising the United Nations Field Security
Handbook, the United Nations Security Operations Manual and security technical
standards.
39. The revised Guidelines for designated officials, developed and circulated by
the Department in April 2008, was a positive development in promoting designated
officials’ security management responsibilities and accountability at the field level,
particularly with regard to his or her leadership in security management
coordination, security risk management, contingency planning, crisis management
and cooperation with host Governments.
40. The Department continued to provide substantive and secretariat support to the
Inter-Agency Security Management Network to promote increased cooperation and
collaboration among all United Nations departments, organizations, funds and
programmes and affiliated international organizations in planning and carrying out
measures to improve staff security, training and awareness.
41. As a measure to promote compliance with existing security standards, the
Department’s Compliance, Evaluation and Monitoring Unit conducted 10
compliance field visits to increase conformity with all United Nations security
policies, including minimum operating security standards. While compliance levels
varied among those evaluated, on a scale of 1 to 5, the average compliance rate was
3.59, compared to 3.20 in the previous year. The average minimum operating
security standards compliance increased to 83 per cent, compared to 82 per cent in
the previous year. The Unit proposed a total of 349 recommendations for improving
compliance with security policies in various offices.
42. To assist the United Nations country teams in carrying out standardized and
systematic evaluation, the Department continued to establish procedures for
assessing the compliance with security standards. It initiated the minimum operating
security standards self-assessment programme and continued to develop the
compliance information management system to ensure a standardized approach,
transparency and easy access to compliance information.

VII. Collaboration and cooperation on security measures
A. Security collaboration between the United Nations and
host Governments

43. In fulfilling the mandates reflected in General Assembly resolution 62/95, in
which the General Assembly invited the United Nations and humanitarian
organizations to work closely with host Governments to strengthen the analysis of
threats, the United Nations has taken measures to enhance security collaboration
with host Governments, including efforts to support United Nations designated

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officials with regard to collaboration with host Government authorities, particularly
by establishing country-level mechanisms for information exchange, and risk
assessment and situation analysis. The Department has included collaboration with
host Government authorities as a core function of designated officials and continued
to support designated officials through field visits and participation in bilateral,
multilateral, and regional dialogues and through increased interaction with the
permanent missions.
44. The Department continues to promote best practices for further cooperation
with host Governments, through developing guidelines, policies and integrated
training and awareness programmes for staff in the field to increase cooperation
with host Government authorities, particularly in the areas of (a) establishment of
coordination and information-exchange mechanisms; (b) security risk assessment;
(c) the security of locally recruited personnel; (d) joint contingency or emergency
planning and exercises; (e) awareness and sensitivity to local cultures and laws; and
(f) joint efforts to promote the local population’s awareness of the United Nations
role and mandates.

B. Security collaboration between the United Nations and
non-governmental organizations

45. In line with the guidance provided by the General Assembly, the United
Nations continues to work closely with NGOs and intergovernmental organizations
to improve coordination on security management, particularly in challenging
conflict and post-conflict areas. The mechanism for collaboration is the “Saving
Lives Together” framework, endorsed by the United Nations System Chief
Executives Board for Coordination, for the United Nations-intergovernmental
organizations-NGO security collaboration. During the reporting period, the
Department of Safety and Security, albeit with limited extrabudgetary support, was
able to implement and collect, analyse and disseminate lessons learned on Saving
Lives Together initiatives in over two dozen countries around the world.
46. The primary focus of the Department’s NGO liaison activities in the field
during the period under review was on Darfur in the Sudan, in carrying out security
collaboration projects with NGOs working alongside the United Nations in that
complex environment. Efforts are under way to integrate further security
coordination mechanisms between the United Nations and NGOs in the specific
contexts of Somalia, Sri Lanka, Colombia and Haiti. The Department has cultivated
a close working relationship with the NGO consortia recognized by the General
Assembly, including the International Council of Voluntary Agencies, InterAction
and the Steering Committee on Humanitarian Response, which contributed to the
preparation of the portion of the present report on the situation related to NGOs, and
to efforts to enhance further security collaboration. During the last year, the
Department undertook numerous visits to the NGO consortia headquarters to
increase awareness on the Saving Lives Together framework and deployed an
officer to maintain liaison with NGOs in Kenya during the crisis in January and
February 2008. This demonstrated the value of such collaboration by forming an
effective link between the United Nations and other crisis responders.

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C. Security arrangements for integrated missions

47. The Department continues to intensify efforts to enhance security integration
in peace missions worldwide. Currently, there are 11 United Nations integrated
peace missions directed by the Department of Political Affairs and the Department
of Peacekeeping Operations, and supported by the Department of Field Support.
Integrated missions comprise a peacekeeping or peacebuilding operation and a
United Nations country team under a single head of mission who normally serves as
the designated official for security. To achieve further security coordination, the
Department has established a security cell, comprising the mission security
personnel and security staff of United Nations system organizations.

VIII. Observations and recommendations
48. I am gravely concerned by the wide scale of threats, the rise in deliberate
targeting of humanitarian and United Nations personnel, and their
vulnerability worldwide. In this disturbing trend, hostage incidents and
targeted attacks against humanitarian and United Nations staff in areas of
humanitarian emergencies continue unabated. Locally recruited personnel of
the United Nations and humanitarian organizations are most vulnerable in
conflict and post-conflict areas.
49. I remain deeply distressed and saddened by the loss of 17 United Nations
staff members in the 11 December 2007 attack in Algiers. I condemn in the
strongest terms those attacks, and remain thankful to the General Assembly
and the Security Council for their condemnations of them. This tragic event is
another telling reminder, not only of the changing nature and scale of threats,
but also of the urgent need for closer cooperation between the United Nations
and the host Governments on security matters. In the wake of the tragedy, I
issued instructions for an immediate review of all United Nations policies and
measures to ensure security and safety of our staff and premises worldwide.
The present report is without prejudice to the implementation of
recommendations made by the Independent Panel on Safety and Security of
United Nations Personnel and Premises Worldwide or the Independent Panel
on Accountability related to the attack on United Nations premises in Algiers in
2007. A further report on institutional issues concerning staff, premises and
security will be submitted to the General Assembly at its forthcoming session.
50. As part of this ongoing review, I will continue to encourage the
Organization’s efforts in drawing from lessons learned and taking timely steps
to strengthen the United Nations security management system by improving
accountability, leadership and internal management. In line with the
recommendations of the Independent Panel on Safety and Security of United
Nations Personnel and Premises Worldwide, 6 priorities include addressing key
policy, operational and strategic weakness, improving the safety and security of
locally recruited staff, providing adequate resources, improving the framework

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6 The report, entitled, Towards a Culture of Security and Accountability, was issued 9 June 2008
(www.un.org/News/dh/infocus/terrorism/PanelOnSafetyReport.pdf).

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for accountability, 7 enhancing cooperation with host Governments and
Member States, and restoring public trust in the United Nations at the global
and local levels.
51. On issues under its responsibility, the Department of Safety and Security
will maintain its focus on enabling effective United Nations programme
delivery through achieving the following priority objectives: (a) effective and
timely responses to, and preventive action for, all security-related threats and
other emergencies; (b) effective risk mitigation through well-coordinated
security threat and risk assessment mechanisms; and (c) high-quality security
policies, standards and operational guidelines and procedures and compliance.
52. The Department of Safety and Security will continue to amplify its efforts
on (a) enhancing collaboration and dialogue between the United Nations and
Member States on staff security and promoting best practices; and
(b) establishing effective mechanisms, at the country level, between United
Nations designated officials and the host country authorities for information
exchange, risk analysis and decisions related to security issues. As part of the
efforts to promote closer cooperation with Member States and host
Governments, I will continue to include staff security issues in my regular
conversations with senior officials of Member States.
53. All these efforts are possible only with the proactive participation and
support of all Member States and host Governments. Equally important is the
need for Member States to include the security of humanitarian and United
Nations personnel as an integral part of their considerations and deliberations
in United Nations intergovernmental bodies. Decisions and actions by United
Nations intergovernmental bodies on the scope and mandate of United Nations
operations have significant influence on public trust in, and attitude towards,
the Organization with a direct impact on the security of United Nations staff, as
pointed out by the Independent Panel. The international community’s
continued commitment to ensure that security management is an integral
element of United Nations and humanitarian operations remains crucial for
fulfilling humanitarian mandates.
54. As the primary responsibility for the protection of United Nations staff
rests with the host Governments, current security challenges call for global
collective responsibility and steps to promote compliance with internationally
agreed principles. While most Governments remain committed to carrying out
recommendations on responsibilities and roles of host Government as contained
in General Assembly resolution 62/95, I call upon all Member States to address
three topical issues, namely: (a) unlawful arrests, detention and harassment of
United Nations staff; (b) obstruction of freedom of movement of United Nations
and humanitarian workers; and (c) impunity for crimes committed against
humanitarian and United Nations personnel. Moreover, as public attitudes and
sentiments have a direct effect on the safety and security of humanitarian and
United Nations personnel, I call upon host Government authorities to refrain
from public statements that could jeopardize the safety and security of
humanitarian workers.
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7 See Inter-organizational security measures: framework for accountability for the United Nations
security management system, which outlines security responsibilities of all actors within the
system (A/61/531, annex I).

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55. The reputation of the United Nations for impartiality promotes public
trust and a positive attitude towards the Organization which contributes to the
protection of United Nations personnel and humanitarian partners. I remain
fully committed to ensuring that United Nations staff members strictly observe
high standards of conduct and carry out their mandates with moral authority,
as well as respect for those they are helping.
56. I continue to be gravely concerned by the difficulties we encounter in a
few countries over the import of communication equipment. I appeal to all
Member States that have imposed such restrictions to lift them immediately.
57. Locally recruited United Nations staff members continue to face increased
security threats and have become victims of targeted abuse, harassment and
unlawful detention in areas where their services are most critical for sustaining
United Nations activities. The Organization and the international community
urgently need to review the policies and arrangements necessary to provide
locally recruited personnel with adequate safety and security.
58. I wish to commend the host Governments and their relevant national and
local officials who continue to observe the internationally agreed principles on
the protection of humanitarian and United Nations personnel. Beyond the legal
obligations, I urge all Member States to forge a common and forceful political
will in taking steps, at the national and international levels, to ensure the safety
and security of United Nations and humanitarian personnel through their
individual and collective joint actions with the United Nations. I cannot
overemphasize the importance of security collaboration between the United
Nations and the host country on contingency planning, information exchange,
risk assessment and combating impunity as a strategic priority of the United
Nations security management system.
59. While the Organization and the humanitarian community will continue to
intensify efforts in reforming and bettering its security management, support
by host Governments and local authorities and leaders remains the first line of
defence in the protection of humanitarian and United Nations personnel.
60. I am deeply disturbed by the trend of politically or criminally motivated
targeting of humanitarians, which is most evident in Somalia, where, during the
reporting period, 18 NGO staff members were murdered. Although
investigations are difficult in this context, evidence and statements by insurgent
groups suggest that the majority of them were victims of targeted assassination.
I condemn such behaviour in the strongest terms and call upon all parties to
respect humanitarian principles and to allow the safe and unhindered delivery
of humanitarian assistance.
61. I wish to express my deepest condolences to the families of all
humanitarian and United Nations staff who lost their lives in the line of duty. I
highly commend the humanitarian and United Nations staff, who are working
in increasingly dangerous and challenging conditions to fulfil their mandates,
for their sacrifice and courage.
62. On behalf of all United Nations staff members, I wish to express our deep
appreciation to the Member States for their significant support to the continued
development of the Department of Safety and Security. Effective provision of

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services by the Department continues to require partnership and investment by
all stakeholders.
63. I wish to recommend that the General Assembly remain seized of this
critical issue and continue its robust support of the United Nations Security
Management System.

14 08-46469
08-46469 Annex I
Civilian personnel who lost their lives as a result of malicious acts
during the reporting period (1 July 2007-30 June 2008)
No. Name Nationality/organization Place and date of incident Cause Legal action

1 Mustapha Benbara Algeria/UNFPA Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
2 Karim Bentebal Algeria/UNHCR Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
3 Saadia Boucelham Algeria/UNDP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
4 Hind Boukroufa Algeria/UNDP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing

5 Samia Hammoutene Algeria/UNDP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
6 Chadli Hamza Algeria/UNDP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
7 Abderrahim Hanniche Algeria/ILO Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing

8 Mohamed Khelladi Algeria/UNDP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
9 Mohamed Laseli Algeria/UNIDO Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
10 Gene Nunez Luna Maria Philippines/WFP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
11 Babacar Ndiaye Senegal/DSS Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
12 Steven Olejas Denmark/UNDP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
13 Djamal Rezzoug Algeria/UNDP Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
14 Kamel Sait Algeria/UNFPA Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
15 Hakim Si Larbi Algeria/UNAIDS Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
16 Nabil Slimani Algeria/UNHCR Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing

17 Adnane Souilah Algeria/UNFPA Algiers, 11 December 2007 Algiers bombing Police investigation ongoing
18 Mahamat Mamadou Chad/UNHCR Chad, 6 December 2007 Gunshot Police investigation ongoing
19 Kifle Woldu Tsega Ethiopia/WHO Hardin, Ethiopia, 3 July 2007 Gunshot Police investigation ongoing

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20 Wafa’ Al Daghmah Palestine/UNRWA Gaza, 7 May 2008 Gunshot Not reported
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16 No. Name Nationality/organization Place and date of incident Cause Legal action

21 Iman Hamdan Palestine/UNRWA Gaza, 6 January 2008 Gunshot Not reported
22 Nasser Masara Palestine/UNRWA Gaza, 13 December 2007 Air strike Not reported
23 Silence Chirara Zimbabwe/WFP Lokichiggio, Kenya, 7 May 2008 Gunshot Police investigation ongoing
24 Jihad Mahmoud El Saleh Lebanon/UNRWA Lebanon, 23 January 2007 Gunshot Not reported
25 Muzaffar Khan Pakistan/WHO Peshawar, Pakistan, 13 October 2007 Gunshot Police investigation completed

Note: ILO — International Labour Organization
UNAIDS — Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS
DSS — Department of Safety and Security of the United Nations Secretariat
UNFPA — United Nations Population Fund
UNHCR — Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
UNIDO — United Nations Industrial Development Organization
UNRWA — United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East
WFP — World Food Programme
WHO — World Health Organization
08-46469
08-46469 Annex II
Consolidated list of civilian staff members under arrest, detained or missing
with respect to whom the United Nations, the specialized agencies and related
organizations have been unable to exercise fully their right to protection during
the reporting period (1 July 2007-30 June 2008)
No. Name Organization Place and date of incident

1 Mohammed Sheik Abdi FAO Arrested in Afgoye Corridor, Somalia, 30 June 2008
2 Yonas Wolderufael OCHA Arrested in Afabet, Eritrea, 3 September 2007
3 Hassan Mohamed Ali “Keynan” UNHCR Arrested in Eelasha Neighbourhood, Somalia, 21 June 2008
4 Abner Tsehaye UNMEE Arrested in Asmara, 26 September 2008

5 Dereje Hailmariam UNMEE Arrested in Assab, Eritrea, 28 April 2008
6 Issa Abu Rouk UNRWA Arrested in Khuza’a Area, Gaza, 23 August 2007
7 Mohammed Qasem Obeid UNRWA Arrested in Jenin Camp, West Bank, 15 January 2007

8 Shareef Qasem Nassar Nassar UNRWA Arrested in Madama Village, West Bank, 6 March 2007
9 Ibrahim Fayyad Sheikh Yusef UNRWA Arrested in West Bank, 31 July 2005
10 Ibrahim Ayoub Mohd. Abu Leil UNRWA Arrested in Sadra West Bank, 16 May 2004
11 Nidal Dauod UNRWA Arrested in Qalandia West Bank, 25 September 2002
12 Nahed Rashid Attallah UNRWA Arrested in Gaza, 14 August 2002
13 Mahmoud Abdul Rahman Khatatbeh UNRWA Arrested in Beit Forik, West Bank, 31 August 2007
14 Ziyad Fararjeh UNRWA Arrested in Dheisheh, West Bank, 10 October 2007
15 Ali Mohd Qura’ny UNRWA Arrested in Balata camp, West Bank, 18 January 2008
16 Rasem Sarhan UNRWA Arrested in Fara’a camp, West Bank, 13 February 2008

17 Hussein Masharqeh UNRWA Arrested in Dura, West Bank, 4 September 2007

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18 No. Name Organization Place and date of incident

18 Arob Arob UNMIS Missing in Abyei, the Sudan, 14 May 2008
19 Aeyrn Gillern UNIDO Missing in Vienna, 29 October 2007

Note: FAO — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
OCHA — Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat
UNHCR — Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
UNIDO — United Nations Industrial Development Organization
UNMEE — United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea
UNMIS — United Nations Mission in the Sudan
UNRWA — United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East
08-46469
08-46469 Annex III
Number of security incidents involving United Nations staff members
from 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2008
Arrest and Detention Harassment Forced entry Missing
detention by non-state and and/or office staff Residential
Country or area Total Attack Murder by state actors Assault intimidation occupation member Robbery Hijacking break-in Theft

1 Albania 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2 Armenia 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4
3 Austria 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
4 Azerbaijan 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
5 Belarus 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6 Belgium 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0
7 Bosnia and Herzegovina 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4
8 Bulgaria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
9 Croatia 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
10 Cyprus 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11 Czech Republic 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
12 Denmark 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
13 Estonia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
14 Finland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
15 France 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4
16 Georgia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
17 Germany 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 1 0
18 Greece 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
19 Hungary 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 1
20 Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
21 Italy — — — — — — — — — — — — —
22 Latvia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
23 Lithuania 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
24 Macedonia (the former Yugoslav
Republic of) 8 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 5

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20 Arrest and Detention Harassment Forced entry Missing
detention by non-state and and/or office staff Residential
Country or area Total Attack Murder by state actors Assault intimidation occupation member Robbery Hijacking break-in Theft

25 Malta 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
26 Moldova 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
27 Monaco — — — — — — — — — — — — —
28 Montenegro 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
29 Netherlands 17 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 4 0 1 8
30 Norway 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
31 Poland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
32 Portugal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
33 Romania 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
34 Russian Federation 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
35 Serbia* 62 0 1 1 0 6 2 3 1 3 0 29 16
36 Slovakia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
37 Spain 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
38 Sweden 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
39 Switzerland — — — — — — — — — — — — —
40 Ukraine 8 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 5
41 United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Europe Total 143 0 1 1 0 11 10 7 3 17 0 39 54

1 Argentina 19 0 0 0 0 1 7 2 0 6 0 1 2
2 Barbados 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
3 Belize 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 3
4 Bolivia 5 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 Brazil 26 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 10 0 2 10
6 Canada — — — — — — — — — — — — —
7 Chile 14 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 2 0 6 1
8 Colombia 34 0 0 1 0 0 7 1 0 10 0 10 5
9 Costa Rica 15 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 4 0 1 1
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08-46469 Arrest and Detention Harassment Forced entry Missing
detention by non-state and and/or office staff Residential
Country or area Total Attack Murder by state actors Assault intimidation occupation member Robbery Hijacking break-in Theft

10 Cuba 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 4
11 Dominican Republic 11 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 0 0 4
12 Ecuador 27 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 10 0 2 11
13 El Salvador 18 0 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 5 0 4 0
14 Guatemala 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 5 0 8
15 Guyana 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
16 Haiti 147 2 0 13 0 58 21 4 0 13 28 6 2
17 Honduras 11 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 0 2 2
18 Jamaica 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4
19 Mexico 23 0 0 1 0 9 7 0 0 0 0 6 0
20 Nicaragua 15 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 5 1 3 1
21 Panama 9 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 5
22 Paraguay 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 0
23 Peru 41 0 1 0 0 0 8 0 0 10 0 7 15
24 Suriname 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
25 Trinidad and Tobago 25 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 6 1 2 11
26 Uruguay 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0
27 Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2

Americas Total 510 4 2 15 2 94 69 17 0 114 35 66 92

1 Bahrain 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 Egypt 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 6
3 Iran (Islamic Republic of) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0
4 Iraq 25 3 1 0 2 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 3
5 Israel and occupied Palestinian territories 145 48 6 5 11 5 32 14 0 2 1 6 15
6 Jordan 36 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 10 0 0 24
7 Kuwait 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
8 Lebanon 61 6 2 12 2 9 14 8 0 1 0 4 3
9 Oman 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

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22 Arrest and Detention Harassment Forced entry Missing
detention by non-state and and/or office staff Residential
Country or area Total Attack Murder by state actors Assault intimidation occupation member Robbery Hijacking break-in Theft

10 Qatar 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11 Saudi Arabia 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2
12 Syrian Arab Republic 19 0 0 0 0 2 7 0 0 1 0 2 7
13 Turkey 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
14 United Arab Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
15 Yemen 6 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0

Middle East Total 312 59 9 17 15 18 74 22 0 18 3 15 62

1 Angola 40 0 0 2 0 0 1 4 0 21 0 4 8
2 Botswana — — — — — — — — — — — — —
3 Comoros 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
4 Djibouti 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 Eritrea 3 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6 Ethiopia 35 0 1 2 0 1 18 0 0 5 0 1 7
7 Kenya 66 0 1 2 0 2 7 1 0 21 0 13 19
8 Lesotho — — — — — — — — — — — — —
9 Madagascar 63 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 4 0 25 25
10 Malawi — — — — — — — — — — — — —
11 Mauritius 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
12 Mozambique — — — — — — — — — — — — —
13 Namibia 14 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 2 0 5 0
14 Seychelles 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
15 Somalia 81 20 2 5 6 0 35 1 0 1 3 2 6
16 South Africa 64 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 27 4 16 15
17 Sudan (UNMIS) 212 10 5 65 0 23 87 1 1 14 0 1 5
18 Sudan (UNAMID) 85 8 1 0 5 5 7 3 0 8 44 2 2
19 Swaziland 7 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 2 1
20 Uganda 28 5 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 3 0 8 8
21 United Republic of Tanzania 35 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 8 1 3 18
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detention by non-state and and/or office staff Residential
Country or area Total Attack Murder by state actors Assault intimidation occupation member Robbery Hijacking break-in Theft

22 Zambia 31 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 22
23 Zimbabwe 50 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 10 0 17 19

East Africa Total 818 44 10 84 12 37 167 20 1 129 54 104 156

1 Algeria 21 1 17 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
2 Benin 54 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 9 1 8 33
3 Burkina Faso 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
4 Burundi 51 3 0 0 0 4 30 0 0 6 0 2 6
5 Cameroon 35 13 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3 2 5
6 Cape Verde 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7 Central African Republic 8 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
8 Chad 36 6 1 1 0 1 3 0 0 2 5 17 0
9 Congo 14 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 5 2
10 Côte d’Ivoire 28 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 13 2 4 5
11 Democratic Republic of the Congo 383 0 1 0 0 17 37 3 0 95 0 139 91
12 Equatorial Guinea 6 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 0
13 Gabon 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3
14 Gambia 12 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 6
15 Ghana 30 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 7 1 13 7
16 Guinea 29 0 0 1 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 6 16
17 Guinea-Bissau 13 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 4 0 6 0
18 Liberia 413 5 0 0 2 25 37 0 1 56 0 45 242
19 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 6 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 1 0
20 Mali 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 2
21 Mauritania 6 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
22 Morocco 4 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
23 Niger 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
24 Nigeria 47 2 0 1 0 2 1 2 0 22 6 1 10
25 Rwanda 20 0 0 3 0 0 2 1 0 4 0 1 9

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24 Arrest and Detention Harassment Forced entry Missing
detention by non-state and and/or office staff Residential
Country or area Total Attack Murder by state actors Assault intimidation occupation member Robbery Hijacking break-in Theft

26 Sao Tome and Principe 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
27 Senegal 17 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 5 5
28 Sierra Leone 29 5 0 0 0 2 8 0 0 4 0 6 4
29 Togo 9 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 1 2 1
30 Tunisia 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3
31 Western Sahara 11 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 1 5

West Africa Total 1 305 37 19 16 2 71 129 12 1 252 22 287 457

1 Afghanistan 31 12 0 1 2 1 10 0 0 2 0 3 0
2 Australia — — — — — — — — — — — — —
3 Bangladesh 14 0 0 1 0 0 6 0 0 2 0 0 5
4 Bhutan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 Brunei Darussalam — — — — — — — — — — — — —
6 Cambodia 34 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 12 0 9 11
7 China 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
8 Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
9 Fiji 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
10 India 13 0 0 1 0 0 6 1 0 1 0 0 4
11 Indonesia 23 1 0 1 1 3 9 0 0 0 0 5 3
12 Japan 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0
13 Kazakhstan 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7
14 Kyrgyzstan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
15 Lao People’s Democratic Republic — — — — — — — — — — — — —
16 Malaysia 12 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 2 0 0 5
17 Maldives — — — — — — — — — — — — —
18 Mongolia 7 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 3
19 Myanmar 12 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 3
20 Nepal 18 6 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 2 0 4 0
21 Pakistan 33 4 1 1 2 1 7 1 0 5 5 3 3
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detention by non-state and and/or office staff Residential
Country or area Total Attack Murder by state actors Assault intimidation occupation member Robbery Hijacking break-in Theft

22 Papua New Guinea — — — — — — — — — — — — —
23 Philippines 9 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 5
24 Republic of Korea 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
25 Samoa 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1
26 Singapore 0 — — — — — — — — — — — —
27 Sri Lanka 77 2 0 14 3 4 43 1 0 5 0 4 1
28 Tajikistan 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
29 Thailand 55 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 0 4 42
30 Timor-Leste 404 321 0 2 0 11 4 0 0 3 0 20 43
31 Turkmenistan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
32 Uzbekistan 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0
33 Viet Nam 9 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 4

Asia and Pacific Total 783 346 2 27 8 32 97 6 0 48 5 72 140

Asia and Pacific Total 783 346 2 27 8 32 97 6 0 48 5 72 140

Middle East Total 312 59 9 17 15 18 74 22 0 18 3 15 62

Europe Total 143 0 1 1 0 11 10 7 3 17 0 39 54

Americas Total 510 4 2 15 2 94 69 17 0 114 35 66 92

West Africa Total 1 305 37 19 16 2 71 129 12 1 252 22 287 457

East Africa Total 818 44 10 84 12 37 167 20 1 129 54 104 156

3 871 490 43 160 39 263 546 84 5 578 119 583 961

* Including Kosovo.

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