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THE

GOPHER
SKETCHBOOK
OF 1933
TO OUR READERS
In introducing this novel book we hold the hope that it
will serve a double duty-that of program and record book.
We are giving you action pictures of this year's stars as well as
sketches of former Minnesota gridiron greats. We have also
included features such as lineups and records which will enable
you to keep a complete and compact record of the 1933 football
season.
This is the first year that this publication has appeared
and naturally our work has been more or less experimental.
We may have omitted certain pictures or we may have over-
looked some feature, but with the help of you-our readers-
we intend to put out an even bigger and more interesting book
next year. So send your ideas and criticisms to us, in order
that we may put before Minnesota football fans a more com-
prehensive book-The Gopher Sketch Book of 1934.
Sincerely,
The Gopher Sketch Book of 1933
522 12th Ave. S. E.
Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Edited by
ALFRED C. PAPAS
CLAYTON A . LUND BUD GARTZ
Printed by
THE COLWELL PRESS, INC.
Minneapolis, Minn.
University Coffee Shop
1327 South East 4th Street

+ +
++

A
Spencer Minnesota
Holle Graduate
Proprietor and
IM'Man

++
+ +

Three Reasons why the "COFFEE SHOP" is
the most popular Restaurant on the Campus

I - Qu~lity - Excellent
2 - Price - Reasonable
3 - Service - Unexcelled

Come in for that vacant hour cigarette!

Page l'wd
Football always has been one of the most interesting of American college sports. It
is a splendid game for training young men and teaching them the fundamentals of the
Game of Life. Any project which stimulates a clean, wholesome interest in it merits
consideration of those interested in the development of American Youth.
FRANK G. McCORMICK,
Director of Athletics.

Page Three
Schedules of Outstanding Teams
PITTSBURGH NOTRE DAME
Sept. 30 Wash. Jeff. Sept. 30 Open
Oct. 7 West Virginia Oct. 7 Kansas
Oct. 14 Navy Oct. 14 Indiana
Oct. 21 Minnesota Oct. 21 Carnegie Tech.
Oct. 28 Notre Dame Oct. 28 Pittsburgh
Nov. 4 Centre Nov. 4 Navy
Nov. 11 Duquesne Nov. 11 Purdue
Nov. 18 Nebraska Nov. 18 Northwestern
Nov. 25 Open Nov. 25 Southern California
Nov. 30 Carnegie Tech. Nov. 30 Open
Dec. 2 Army
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA·
ARMY
Sept. 23 --------- --- Whittier-Occidental
Sept. 30 ____________ Loyola (Los Angeles) _____ __ _____ Sept. 30 Mercer
Oct. 7 Washington State Oct. 7 V. M. 1.
Oct. 14 St. Mary's Oct. 14 Delaware
Oct. 21 Oregon State Oct. 21 Illinois
Oct. 28 California Oct. 28 Yale
Nov. 4 Open Nov. 4 Coe
Nov. 11 Stanford Nov. 11 Harvard
Nov. 18 Oregon Nov. 18 Pa. M. C.
Nov. 25 Notre Dame Nov. 25 Navy
Nov. 30 Open Nov. 30 Open
Dec. 2 Georgia Dec. 2 Notre Dame
Dec. 9 Washington
VANDERBILT
STANFORD
Sept. 23 Cumberland
Sept. 23 San Jose Sept. 30 Open
Sept. 30 U. C. L. A. Oct. 7 North Carolina
Oct. 7 Santa Clara -- --- - --- - -- Oct. 14 Ohio State
Oct. 14 Northwestern Oct. 21 Mississippi State
Oct. 21 San Francisco Oct. 28 Louisiana
Oct. 28 Washington Nov. 4 Georgia Tech.
Nov. 4 Olympic Club Nov. 11 Sewanee
Nov. 11 Southern California Nov. 18 Tennessee
Nov. 18 Montana Nov. 25 Open
Nov. 25 California Nov. 30 Alabama

THE ROUSER CHORUS GO-PHER M
Minnesota, hats off to thee! Go! Gopher victory! Minnesota, Go!
To thy colors true we shall ever be; Go! Gopher victory! Hit them hard and low!
Firm and strong, united are we,
Rah! Rah! Rah! for Ski-U-Mah, Rah! Rah! Rah!
(Shouted) Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Go! Gopher victory. We can always win,
Rah! for the U. of M. With a Rah! Rah! Rah! Ski-U-Mah!
Hoorah! Hoorah! Minnesota!
SHORT LOCOMOTIVE We can FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT!
M-I-N-N-E-S-O-T-A Come on Minnesota! Let's go!
(Pause) Minnesota-
(Pause) Minnesota- (Substitute "Michigan," "Iowa," etc., for Vic-
Yea-Gophers. tory)

PageFOI,r

Weare looking forward to the 1933 season with interest; but without predictions.
The schedule is a stiff one, and an interesting one. T he team has a nucleus of old men;
but the majority of the squad will be newcomers. The squad has fine morale, is ambi-
tious, but will be young. We have no championship hopes; but will have a hustling
team that will improve from game to game. Win or lose they will insure an interesting
and spirited game in all their contests.
B. W. BIERMAN.

Page Five
BERT BASTON
Was an All-American end at Minnesota
in 1915 and 1916_ Has been end coach
since 1930 and has developed several
first-class wingmen for Minnesota •



•LOWELL "RED" DAWSON
Accompaniedi Bierman to Minnesota
from Tulane where he played quarter-
back on the championship Green Wave
team of 1931. This is his second year
as backfield coach_


GEORGE HAUSER
Was a team-mate of Bierman's and
Baston's in his undergraduate days at
Minnesota. Was line coach at Ohio State
and came to Minnesota in 1932.

OSCAR MUNSON
\ Has been custodian of equipment at
\ Minnesota for 35 years. Started one of
the oldest traditional rivalries in football
history when he recovered the Michigan
waf.er jug, November 2, 1903. Michigan
and Minnesota have battled for its pos-
session ever since. At present it is in the
hands of Michigan.

BILLY BLOEDEL
Was selected as Student Manager of
the 1933 football team. His selecf.ion
has met with the approval of the entire
squad.


DAVE WOODWARD
Came to Minnesota in 1922 from
Rochester, N. Y., aud has been in the
training game for 25 years. This is the
12th Minnesota team which he has cared
for in his capacity as head trainer.
THE
WALGREEN
Something Different
SYSTEM
Popular Rendezvous for University Students
Since 1887
The word WALGREEN is your
guarantee of courteous service and
Come and enjoy our Famous Steak and Sea dependable drugs and merchan-
Food Dinners, or any of the good old German
dise.
dishes. Clarence Olson's popular Radio Trio
plays from 6:45 to 8:45 P. M. Situated at convenient locations
throughout Minneapolis.
Heine's Original German Band will lead the
"Fun Fest" from 10 o'clock till closing.
Also one on the campus at the
corner of 4th Street and 14th Ave.
Phone Main 2547 for Reservations
S. E.
Louis Schiek, Proprietor 45 So. 3rd St.

Principal Rules Changes for 1933

The most important change made in the rules for this year is that
relating to a ball which becomes dead within 10 yards of a sideline.
When this occurs, or when the ball goes out of bounds between the side-
lines, it shall be put in play at a spot 10 yards in from that sideline and
on a line drawn at right angles to the sideline through the point where
the ball becomes dead .

. Clipping has been defined more clearly and now includes blocking
by running or diving into the back of a player not carrying the ball, in
addition to throwing or dropping the body across the back of the leg or
legs below the knees of such a player.

Page Eight
Prospet.:ts are good for a winning team this year. We lost several men from last
year, but many good replacements are on hand from last year's Freshman team. We will
have several new faces in our starting lineup, and consequently may start slowly, but
by mid-season we will have hit our stride.
CAPT AIN ROY OEN.

Page Nine
The 1932 Season Final Standings
W. L. T. Pct. w. L. T. Pct.
Michigan ._--------------------- ------- 6 0 0 1.000 Minnesota ... ......... ..... ..... .... 2 3 1 .400
Purdue ---.-------.-- --- --- . _-_.------ - 5 0 1 1.000 Illinois ................................ 2 4 0 .333
Wisconsin -------------- ------------ 4 1 1 .800 Chicago ................................ 1 4 0 .200
Ohio State -------._- ._------ ---------- 2 '1 2 .667 Indiana ................................ 1 4 1 .200
Northwestern ---------- . --------- -. 2 3 1 .400 Iowa .......................... .......... 0 5 0 .000

RESUME OF SEASON
Michigan led by its captain, Williamson, and guard and Smith, fullback, were other leading
Newman, All-American quarterback, was the stars under Doc Spears.
undisputed champion of the Big Ten last sea- Ohio State after losing to Michigan early in
son. Other stand-out performers were Bernard, the season developed steadily, but two ties
center, and Regeczi, sensational sophomore with Conference opponents marred her record
punter. Michigan used a defensive style of to some "extent. The Buckeyes played a score-
play throughout a season of close games which less tie with Pittsburgh which was a praise-
was climaxed by a 3-0 victory over Minnesota worthy feat in itself. Captain Hinchman won
in freezing weather at Minneapolis. All-Conference honors for his fine play at half,
Purdue missed a share in the championship and the Buckeye school also has good reason
because of a 7-7 tie game with Northwestern. to be proud of the work of Gailus and Varner
Purdue's most consistent stars were Moss, cap- at guard and Rosequist at tackle.
tain and All-American end, and Horstmann, The other members of the Big Ten all pro-
All-Conference fullback. Purdue possessed duced fighting teams but could not match the
probably the best group of backs in the country man power of the four leaders. At times,
and its running game was brilliant. however, these so-called weaker teams rose up
Wisconsin was the surprise team of the Con- to cause the leaders a lot of worry. Indiana
ference last year and suffered only a one point battled Michigan to a standstill but finally suc-
defeat at the hands of Purdue. McGuire scin- cumbed 0-7. Chicago also fought off the vic-
tillated at half and beat Minnesota almost torious march of the champions only to weaken
single-handed. Captain Kabat, All-Conference at the end of the contest.

Carpenter's
Compliments Cafe
of 418 14th Ave. S. E.

TWIN CITY
THE BEST FOOD
LINES at a
REASONABLE PRICE

Booth Service

Page Ten
L eft

STANLEY LUNDGREN
Guard
Weight-207
No. 71

Right

ELLSWORTH HARPOLE
Guard
Weight-171
No. 43


• •
Left

WOODROW NOLD

• Center
Weight-192
No. 74

Ri[Jht

BILL BEVAN
Guard
Weight 181
No. 38


.,
Left

MILTON BRUHN
Guard
Weight-185
No. 36

Right

HAROLD HAlDEN
Center
Weight-189
No. 56


The 1933 Season
According to all the pre-season dope Michi- Northwestern will have a green line this
gan and Purdue, last year's champion and run- year as Coach Hanley has been forced to rely
ner-up, respectively, are the teams to bet on on several Sophomores. However, he has the
again this year. However, Ohio State and nucleus' of a good backfield in Olson, Sullivan
Minnesota cannot yet be counted out of the and KawaI. Riley, tackle, will also be much in
running, and Northwestern and Wisconsin can evidence this year, and Manske is a dependable
be depended upon to make their presence felt. end. The Wildcats should be a dangerous crew
The remaining teams will all be better than by the end of the season.
they were last year but can hardly be expected Illinois, after a slow start last year, showed
to be contenders for the championship. a lot of strength towards the end of the season,
Michigan will miss Newman and William- and may continue where they left off. Captain
son very much, but have Ward, the brilliant Berry will be greatly missed but Coach Zuppke
negro athlete, to fill the latter's position. They has replacements for all others graduated.
will have a veteran line from tackle to tackle; Yanuskus, Froschauer, and Kowalski will be
and Regeczi, one of the nation's best punters main stays of the IIlini this year.
last year, leads a group of dependable backs. Indiana was strong defensively last season
but its offense failed to click at critical mo-
Purdue will again present a brilliant galaxy
ments. Coach Billy Hayes may have the same
of backs, but Coach Noble Kizer will have to trouble again but at present hopes are high
rely on several new men in the line. The among the Hoosiers that their team will finish
veteran Pardonner is a clever quarterback, and
higher than it did last year. The back field
Carter, Purvis, Moore, and Hecker are depend- will probably be built around Veller. Other
able ground-gainers. Fehring, this year's cap-
returning lettermen are Opasik, Staub and Babb.
tain, will be a bulwark at tackle, as will Febel Chicago enters its first season under Coach
at guard. Shaughnessy, former Gopher, and Maroon fans
Ohio State's greatest loss through graduation are awaiting his first attempt with great inter-
was Hinchman, but Coach Willaman has several est. Enthusiasm is running high at the Windy
other dependable backs. Cramer, quarterback, City school; good prospects are better than they
may return to his 1931 form when he won All- have been in years. Several experienced backs
Conference honors; he was handicapped by in- are returning, including Sahlin, a clever quar-
juries last year. Gailus, Rosequist, and Gilman terback, and Zimmer and Cullen. The line con-
are back to form part of what should be a good tains no outstanding stars but Baker, end, and
line. Mahoney, tackle, are better than average.
Wisconsin suffered heavily through gradua- Iowa expects to do better this year under
tion, but Doc Spears can always be depended Ossie Solem, former Gopher, than it did last
upon to produce a scrappy aggregation. Smith, year. Several veteran backs are on hand, but
this year's captain, will take care of the full- a few replacements are needed in the line.
back assignment very capably. Other returning Moffitt is a flashy open field runner and Teyro
backs are Peterson and Linfor. Prominent fine- and Laws are also dependable ground-gainers.
men are Koenig, center, Haworth, end. Hass and Schammel are veterans in the line.

Songs and Yells
LOCOMOTIVE MINNESOTA FIGHT SONG
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Minnesota! Come on! Let's go!
Min-ne-so-ta It's a loyal crowd that's here;
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! (Faster) With a Sis-boom-ah, and a Ski-U-Mah!
Min-ne-so-ta For the var-si-ty we cheer Rah! Rah!
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! (Faster) The old fight gang! On your toes-Slam! Bang!
Min-ne-so-ta Hit 'em hard and hit 'em low.
RAH! So Fight, Minnesota-Fight!
Minnesota! Come on! Let's go!
HIT 'EM HARD
Hit 'em hard!
Hit 'em low! OVR MINNESOTA
Come on, Minnesota On, you Gophers, you fighting Gophers!
Let's go! Break that line and win this game!
Fight it through, men, win the Big Ten,
SKY ROCKET Make them sorry that they came.
Siss-s-s-s-s-s ! For the glory of Minnesota!
Boom! For the honor that's her due!
Ah- For Maroon and Gold be warriors bold
Minnesota. For Dear Old "V."
Gopher Roster
No. Player Pos. Weight Yrs. of Play Home
21 Walter Hargesheimer ____ ________ __Q.B. ________________ ____156 ___________________ 2 __________ ____ ___ _____ _______ Rochester, Minn.
22 George Champlin ____ __.______ ________H.B. ____________________ 138 ____________________3 ________ ________ ___ ____________ ___ __ Cresco, Iowa
25 Malcolm Eiken ____ _______ _____ ________ H.B. ____ ________ ________167 ____ ________ ________ 1 __ __ ____ _____ __ ____ __ _________ Caledonia, Minn.
26 Walter Ohde _____________ _____ ________ __ E. __ _____ _____ ____ _______ _·168 _______ ________ ____ 3 . ___________________________ ______ Mound, Minn.
28 George Rennix ____ ____________________ H.B. __________ _174 _________ ____ ____ __1. ___ ___ ___ __ ____ __ __________ Aberdeen, S. D.
30 Erwin Bnrg _______ ________ ____________ Q.B. _______ _____ ______ __ 174 _____ ___ ___ _________ 2 ___ ____ _______ ___ _______ __ ____ l\'l ilwaukee, Wis.
31 Jay Bevan ____ __ ~ __ ______________ __ ___ G. ___________179 _______ ___ _] ______ _________________________ St. Paul, Minn.
32 Bob Holmstrom ___________ _____ . _____ G. . _______________________ 175 ____________________ 1 __ ___ ._. ___ ._. ___________ . ____ .. Laurium, Mich.
34 Roy Oen ____ _. ______ .. _. ______ . ___ . ____ ___ C. ____ . _____ ._. __ _... __ _._ 17L __ . _____._. _______ 3 __ . ___.. ___ . ______ Thief River Falls, Minn.
36 Vernal Le Voir ___ . __________________ __ Q.B. _ _____ 174 ________ ___ __ _______ L __ . ____ . _____ . __ ________ _Minneapolis, Minn.
38 Bill Bevan ______ _________.. ___ . __ ____ .. G. _______ 18L __________________ L _______ __ ____ _____ . ____ _______ St. Paul, Minn.
39 Milton Bruhn ______ _____ _____ . ___ ._... G. ______ __ __________185 _________ ___ _____ __2 ._____ __ _____________ St. Bonifacius, Minn.
40 Dale Rennebohm . _____ __ _. ______ . __C. ___ ___ _____ _____ ___ ___ __ 184 ____ ___ __ __ _______ L __ __ ___ ____ ______ ____ ______________ Austin, Minn.
41 Julius . Alfonse __ .. ... ____ ____________ H.B. __ ____ __ ____ __ . _____ 175 ___ .. __ . _________ L ____ ___ __ __ ____ .--- --------Cumberland, Wis.
42 Lloyd Hribar ____ _. ___ . __ ______ .. _. ____ Q.B. . __ ___ ____.. ______ ._171 __ ____ 3 ___ __ __________ ___________ _ Nashwauk, Minn.
43 Ellsworth Harpole ____.. ____ ._ . __ . __ G. ___ . ___ ______________ __ _172 ____ ______ _____ _____ 3 _____ __ . ____ .. ________________ Kansas City, Mo.
44 Myron UbI .... _ . ~ ___.. ______ . __ . ________ H.B. ____________ ________ 175 ____ _____ 2 _____________ _. ____ ______ Minneapolis, Minn.
45 Francis Lund _____________________ ... _H.B. ___ __ ____ ____ 18L _______ __ . _______ __ 2 ______ _____ __ . ______ __ __ _ ____ Rice Lake, Wis.
46 W. Smith _________ . ___ ... __ ____ __________ T. ________ ___________ _____ 189______ __ L ____________________ _____ Minneapolis, Minn.
47 Lawrence Bugni ________ _. ____ . ___ .. __ F.B. ________ ____ ____ ._ .. 185 _____ . _____ . ____ ___ 1 _____ ___________ _______ ______ ___ Montreal, Wis.
48 Spencer Wagnild ____________________ C. ._. _____ .. _____________ .17L ___ . ________ . ______ 2 .. __________ _. ____ __ _____ Minneapolis, Minn.
49 Frank Larson __ _________ . _______ ______ _E. ___________ 183 ____ ________ ____. ___ 2 ______ _______ ____ ___ __ ____________ Duluth, Minn.
50 Bob Winkler .... __ ...... ______ ... _____ T. ____ ____________________ 185 _________ ___ ___ ____ L ______ __ ___ . _____________ Minneapolis, Minn.
51 Glenn Seidel ____________________ .... _.Q.B. __________ ._ .. __. ___ 184 .___ ________________ L _________________ . ____ __ Minneapolis, Minn.
52 Mark Klonowski _.. _._ .. ______... __ ... E. ___________________ ___ __ 196 ___ .. _... __ . ________ 1 ___ _____ ____________ __ ____ _____ Winona, Minn.
53 Frank Dallera .... _. ____.. ____ ........ G. _______________ _______ __ 179 __ ._ .. ______________ L _________ . ___ . ____ _____ _____ __ St. Paul, Minn.
54 Dick Farmer ____........ ____ ............ H.B. __________________ __187 ____ . ___ __ ___ _______ 1 ______ _._. ____ __ ____ ___ _______ Stillwater, Minn.
55 Carl Tengler . __ _.. ___________ . ______ ._ .. F.B. .. __________________ 190 __________ .. _..... __2 __ _____ . ___ ....... __ _____ _Minneapolis, Minn.
56 Harold Haiden ____ .. ____ .. ____ . _______ C. _____________________ _.. 189_._.. _. ____________ 2 ___ __. __ .. ______________ __ ____ __ La Crosse, Wis.
57 George Roscoe ______________ . ______ . __ H.B. -------------------_180. ___ . __. ___ .. ____ .. _1 .. _._ .-r __ . __ ... ____ . __ ___ Minneapolis, Minn.
58 Dick Potvin ... _... __________ . __ . ___ ____G. _.. _... _.. __ . ___________ 183 ____________ ___ . ___ .2 .. _._ ....... _... __ ..... _______ Cass Lake, Minn.
59 Caifson Johnson . _________ .. ______ ____G. .. __ . ___________________ 187 __________ .. _. ______ 2 .. __ ... ____ . ___ ... __________ __ Constance, Minn.
60 Sheldon Beise .. _... ____ .. ____ ________ F.B. _________________ ... 188_... _._: ____________ L ... _. ____ . _________ __ ______ __ .. ___ Mound, Minn.
61 Bud Kliner ____.. ____.. ____............. _G. . ___ .. ________________ .. 182_...... _.. __ .. ______ L_. ___ . _____________ ______ . .__ St. Paul, Minn.
62 John Roning _____ ... __ .... _____________E. __.. _.. _... . _... _. ______ 182 _____ __ ___ ...... _... 2.. __ .. ___ ... ___ . __ ._ .... __ Minneapolis, l\'linn.
63 Wes Brown ________ ______ .. _.... _________ T. __ ....... _. _. ___ . _______ 192 __________ ____ ._ .. __ 1 _____ . ____ __ ... ___________ ______ St. Paul, Minn.
65 Bob Tenner .. ____ .. _... ______ .. __ ... ___ E. _______________ . ______ __ 184. __._ . __ ___ __ -------2_. _____ ____ . ___ . _______ _._Minneapolis, Minn.
66 George Svendsen _______ . ____ .. ____ .. T. __ .. __ ...... _... ... _____ 205 ____________________ 1 __ _____ _. ___________ ______ Minneapolis, Minn.
67 Ray Willahan ____........ _. ___ .. _... __ T. . ___________________ ... _207_ ....... _____ .. _____ 3 _____________ __ . ________________ __ Sisseton, S. D.
68 Andrew Schommer ____ .... _. __ .... _.T. ________. _______________ 184 ____ ... _._ ..... _... _L .. _. ________ . ______ ___ . __ Eden Valley, Minn.
69 Bill Proffitt ____ ._ ....... ____ ... ____ .. __ H.B. _______ . __ .. ___ ._ ... 199 ____________________ 2 _________ . ________________ __ ___ . __ Buffalo, N. Y.
70 Phil Bengtson ____ __ .......... __ ____ .. T . . _________________ ____ __ 201 __ .. _..... _.. _____ __2 _. ___ _____ __._. __ _________ Minneapolis, Minn.
71 Stan Lundgren ____.......... _.........G. __ .. _...... _. ___ .. ______ 207 ___________ . ___ . ____ 2 _____ _. ____ '- ____ .. _. ____ Mlnneapolis, Minn.
72 Les Knudson ____ __ ...... ____.. ____ .. __ T. __ .. __ . __ .. _.. __ ..... ___ 206 _________________ . __ 2 :_. ____________ . ___ _.. ____ __ Albert Lea, Minn.
73 Sylvester Schnickles . ____ ___________ E. _________ .... ........ __ .188 __ ___ _______________ 1 ...... __ .... __ .. __________ ._. ___ __ Hector, Minn.
74 Woodrow Nold . ____ ..... _. ____ .. ____._C. ___ . ___ ..... ........ ___ .192 ___________________ _2 ... ___ . ________________ _._ Minneapolis, Minn.
75 Bill Friemuth ........ ____ .. _... _.... _..T. ___ . __ .. _... ___ ......... 211 .......... _._. ______ 1_._. __ .... ______ . __________ _______ Duluth, Minn.
76 Dick Smith ____ .... _... ____ .. _._._. ____ T. . __ .. __ . __ . ___ . _____ .... 225 ......... _.. ___ ___ L_._ ...... ___ .. ____________________ Rockford, Ill.
78 Louis Gerischer .................. ___ . T. . ______________________ _210 ___ ... _.. ___ . _______ 3. _______ .. _.~ ....... ___ .. ___ . ___ St. Paul, Minn.

Page Thirteen
Minnesota Songs
MINNESOTA HAIL MINNESOTA
Rah.! Rah ! Rah ! Minnesota, hail to thee!
Ski-U-Mah! Hail to thee, our college dear!
Fight for Minnesota Thy light shall ever be
For the old maroon and gold. A beacon bright and clear.
Fight for Minnesota Thy sons and daughters true
With the ~oyalty of old. Will proclaim thee near and far.
We'll show them how to play! They will guard thy fame and adore thy name,
We'll hold the field today! Thou shalt be their Northern Star.
So run the ends and hit the line,
A touchdown every time. Like the stream that bends to sea,
Fight for Minnesota Like the pine that seeks the blue;
For the glory of her name. Minnesota, still for thee
Ramble down the field! Thy sons are strong and true.
Today it's Minnesota's game.
So Rah! Rah! Rah! From thy woods and waters fair,
For Ski-U-Mah! From thy prairies waving far,
Rah! Rah! Rah! At thy call they throng with their shout and
Fight you Minnesota, song,
Fight! Hailing thee their Northern Star.

East vs. West -- Augu st 24, 1933
On the night of August 24 two of the Lineup of Both Tearns
greatest football teams ever assembled ran onto
Soldiers Field, in Chicago, to again settle that EAST (13) WEST (7)
annual football problem that perplexes fans Robinson, Minn. LE Sparling, So. Cal.
throughout the country: who has the better Wells, Minn. LT Brown, So. Cal.
teams, the East or the West? Munn, Minn. LG Gill, California
As you all know the East triumphed over Ely, Neb. C Williamson, So. Cal.
the West by the decisive score of 13-7. The Harriss, Notre Dame RG Baker, So. Cal.
East clearly showed their superiority over the Riley, Northwestern RT E. Smith, So. Cal.
West in this brilliant contest. Fesler, Ohio State RE Nesbit, Washington
However, the superiority of the East was not Newman, Michigan Q Schaldach, So. Cal.
a matter of as much importance to Minnesota Zimmerman, Tulane LH Drury, So. Cal.
as was the fact that four Gopher stars played Purvis, Purdue RH Krause, Gonzaga
with the Eastern All-Stars. The University of Horstmann, Purdue FB Shaver, So. Cal.
Minnesota received further recognition through Scoring: West touchdown-Nesbit. Point
the selection by Hanley of Bernie Bierman as after touchdown-Baker (placement).
one of his chief aides.
In the starting lineup were Robinson, Wells East: Touchdowns - Horstmann, Ronzani
(substitute for Horstmann). Point after touch-
and Munn playing the left side of the rugged
East line. A few minutes later Jack Manders down-Manders (substitute for Horstmann).
entered the East lineup in place of Roy Horst- Referee-James Masker, Northwestern. Um-
mann, All-American fullback from Purdue. pire-H. G. Hedges, Dartmouth. Head lines-
These four Gophers performed creditably man-J. J. Lipp, Chicago. Field judge-Colo-
throughout the game and Minnesotans have nel H. B. Hackett, West Point.
every reason to be proud of the type of football Substitutes: For East - Linemen - Fencl,
played at the University of Minnesota. Their Northwestern; Baker, Northwestern; Marvil,
play reflects great credit on the Minnesota Northwestern; Boswell, Texas Christian; Mus-
coaching staff of the last few years. so, Milliken; Kekich, Indiana; Summerfelt,
The statistics clearly show the East's majority. Army; Crow, Hasket. Backfield men-Mc-
The East gained 199 yards to the West's 126, G~ire, Wisconsin; Hinchman, Ohio; Mande~s,
and made nine first downs to the West's three. MlOnesota; Ronzani, Marquette; Berry, Illinois.
The East attempted 22 passes, completed 10 West - Linemen - Mulhapt, U. C. 1. A.,
for 82 yards as against 15 attempted by the Slavic?, Santa Clara; Johnson, Utah; Schwegler,
west with two completed for 20 yards. WashlOgton; Fletcher, St. Mary's; O'Brien,
Washington; Sargent, Loyola. Backfield men
Score by periods: -Sander, Washington State; Beasley, St.
West __________________________ 0 7 0 0- 7 Mary's; Hufford, Washington; Tipton, U. S. c.;
East ___________________________ _ 7 0 0 6-13 Christensen, Utah.

Page Fourteen
L eft

CARL TENGLER
Fullback
Weight-190
No. 55

Right

VERNAL "BABE" LEVOJR
Quarterback
Weight-174
No. 36

• •

L eft

JULIUS ALFONSE
Halfback
Weight-175
No. 41

Right

FRANCIS "PUG" LUND
Halfback
Weight-lSI
No. 45

• •
L eft

ERWIN BURG
Quarterback
Weight-I 75
No. 30

R ight

BILL PROFFITT
Halfback
Weight--I99
No. 69
Big Ten Schedules
MINNESOTA MICHIGAN
Sept. 30 .... 19.... South Dakota .... 6....
Oct. 7 Michigan State
Oct. 7 Indiana Oct. 14 Cornell
Oct. 14 Purdue Oct. 21 Ohio State
Oct. 21 Pittsburgh Oct. 28 Chicago
Oct. 28 Iowa
Nov. 4 Illinois
Nov. 4 Northwestern
Nov. 11 Iowa
Nov. 11 Open
Nov. 18 Minnesota
Nov. 18 Michigan
Nov. 25 Northwestern
Nov. 25 Wisconsin

CHICAGO PURDUE
Oct. 7 Cornell College Oct. 7 Ohio University
Oct. 14 ........... Washington University ............ Oct. 14 Minnesota
Oct. 21 Purdue Oct. 21 Chicago
Oct. 28 Michigan Oct. 28 Wisconsin
Nov. 4 Wisconsin Nov. 4 Carnegie Tech.
Nov. 11 Indiana Nov. 11 Notre Dame
Nov. 18 Illinois Nov. 18 Iowa
Nov. 25 -. ---------- . Dartmouth Nov. 25 Indiana

INDIANA
Sept. 30 .... 7.... Miami .... 0 .... OHIO STATE
Oct. 7 Minnesota Oct. 7 Virginia
Oct. 14 Notre Dame Oct. 14 Vanderbilt
Oct. 21 Northwestern Oct. 21 Michigan
Oct. 28 Open Oct. 28 Northwestern
Nov. 4 Ohio State Nov. 4 Indiana
Nov. 11 Chicago Nov. 11 Pennsylvania
-----------.
Nov. 18 Xavier Nov. 18 Wisconsin
Nov. 25 Northwestern Nov. 25 Illinois

ILLINOIS
Sept. 30 .... 13.... Drake .... 6... . WISCONSIN
Oct. 7 ........... Washington University ........... . Oct. 7 Marquette
Oct. 14 Wisconsin Oct. 14 Illinois
Oct. 21 Army Oct. 21 Iowa
Oct. 28 Open Oct. 28 Purdue
Nov. 4 Michigan Nov. 4 Chicago
Nov. 11 Northwestern Nov. 11 West Virginia
Nov. 18 Chicago Nov. 18 Ohio State
Nov. 25 Ohio State Nov. 25 Minnesota

IOWA
Northwestern .... 0 .... NORTHWESTERN
Sept. 30 .... 7....
Oct. 7 Bradley Sept. 30 0 .. __ Iowa . ... 7.. __
Oct. 14 Open Oct. 14 Stanford
Oct. 21 Wisconsin Oct. 21 Indiana
Oct. 28 Minnesota Oct. 28 Ohio State
Nov. 4 Iowa State Nov. 4 Minnesota
Nov. 11 Michigan Nov. 11 Illinois
Nov. 18 Purdue Nov. 18 Notre Dame
Nov. 25 Nebraska Nov. 25 Michigan

Page Sixteen
• •
• L eft

SYLVESTER SCHNICKLES
End
Weight-188
No. 73

R i gh t

FRANK "BUTCH" LARSON
End
Weight-183
No. 49

• •

L eft

AL PAPAS
End
W eight-173
No. 33

R ight

LLOYD HRIBAR
Quarterback
Weight-172
No. 42

L eft • •
JOHN RONING
End
Weight-182
No. 62

Right

BOB TENNER
End
W eight-l84
No. 65

• •
Spectators l Dictionary
CLIPPING:--is ' blocking by running or diving LOSS OF FivE YARDS
into the back, or throwing or dropping the Request for time out more than three times
body across the back of the leg or legs be- during a half.
low the knees, of a player not carrying the Violation of kick-off formation.
ball-even though the blocker's first contact Encroachment of neutral zone.
be above th,e knees and he then slips below. Player in motion less than five yards back.
Penalty-I5 yards. Second, third or fourth incomplete or illegal
pass.
CRAWLING-is an attemp,t by the player in Illegal use of the hands and arms by players
possession of the ball to advance the ball of defense team.
after he has been downed. A balJ-carrier is Crawling by runner.
considered down when any portion of his
person except his hands or feet touches the LOSS OF FIFTEEN YARDS
ground. Penalty-5 yards. Substitute communicating before ball is put
in play.
HURDLING-applies only to the man carry-
Failure to come to stop in shift play.
ing the ball. Hurdling in the open-is
Intentionally grounding pass to save loss of
jumping over or attempting to jump over an
yardage.
opponent who is still on his feet. (A player
Interference by passing te.a m with player
who is on one knee may be hurdled without
eligible to catch.
penalty) . Penalty-I5 yards. Hurdling in
Illegal use of hands and arms by players of
the line is jumping over or attempting to
offensive team.
jump over a player on the line of scrimmage,
Defensive players striking opponents above
with both feet or both knees foremost, within
shoulders with palms of hand.
the distance of 5 yards on either side of the
Roughing the kicker.
point where the ball was put in play.
Piling up.
Hurdling.
SAFETY-A safety is made when a free ball
Tripping, tackling runner out of bounds.
or a ball legally in possession and control of
Clipping.
a player guarding his own goal becomes
dead, any part of it being on, above, or be-
hind the goal line, provided the impetus LOSS OF TWENTY-FIVE YARDS
which sent it across the goal line was given Team not ready to play at scheduled time.
by a player of his OWN team. Two points Illegal return to game.
awarded to the opponents of team making
the safety. LOSS OF HALF DISTANCE TO GOAL LINE
The team making the safety shall then put Striking, kneeing or kicking (also disquali-
the ball in play by a free kick anywhere on fication).
its own 20 yard line or any point back of it. Foul within one yard line.
Foul by defensive team behind its goal line.
TOUCHBACK-is made when a free ball or a
ball legally in possession of a player guard- LOSS OF BALL
ing his own goal becomes dead, any part of Second kick out of bounds at kick off.
it being on, above, or behind the goal line, Forward pass touched by ineligible player.
provided the impetus which sent it across the Interference by team which did not make
line was given by an OPPONENT. pass.
PERSONAL FOULS-All players are prohib- SUSPENSION
ited from- Illegal return to game (also 25 yards).
1. Striking with fists, locked hands or el- Illegal equipment.
bows;
2. Kicking, kneeing or meeting with the BACKWARD PASS AND FUMBLE - A
knee; player may at any time pass (hand or throw)
3. Striking on the head, neck or face with the ball in any direction except toward His
the heel, back or side of the hand, wrist opponent's goal, and any player of his team
or forearm. Penalty-disqualification and may catch such a pass, or recover the ball if
loss by offending team of one-half the dis- it is muffed, fumbled or strikes the ground,
tance to its own goal. and may run with it, pass it backward, or
kick it. If an opponent recovers the ball, on
LOSS OF A DOWN a backward pass or fumble, after it strikes
Forward pass made from less than 5 yards the ground, it is dead at the point of recov-
back or second forward pass during the same ery and may not be advanced. If it is re-
play. covered by an o'Jponent before it touches the
Incomplete forward pass. ground it may be advanced.

Page E ighteen
- ~ ~--~--

Left

PHIL BENGTSON
Tackle
Weight-20l
No. 70

Right

LES KNUDSON
Tackle
Weight-206
No. 72

"
Left

GEORGE SVENDSEN
Tackle
Weight-205
No. 66

Right

RAY WILLA HAN
Tackle
Weight-207
No. 67


• Left

FRANK DALLERA
Guard •
Weight-l 79
No. 53 •
Right

LOUIS GERISCHER
Tackle and Center
Weight-210
No. 73


• •
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Special Delivery Service Within City Joe Crane's U. of M. Supply Store
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STATIONERY SUPPLIES
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From South Tower of Stadium NEW TUXEDOS FOR RENT

Page Twenty
MINNESOTA1S ALL.AMERICANS
• •

• JOHNNY McGOVERN

JIMMY WALKER AIl-Alllerican quarterback 1909. The invincible
McGovern stood head and shoulders above all
AII-Alllerican tackle 1910. One of the best quarterbacks of his day and becallle Minnesota's
tackles of Minnesota gridiron history. Falllous for first AIl-Alllerican. A terror in the open field.
the blocking of two punts in a single Michigan
gallle.

BERT BASTON
• EARL MARTINEAU

All-American halfback 1923. A slippery, elu-
AIl-Alllerican end 1915-1916. Great receiver of sive runner with an uncanny ability for pulling
forward passes. Defensive unbeatable, great himself free of tacklers. A wonderful passer and
blocker, seldolll, if ever, taken out of play. kicker as well as a great defensive player.

Page Twenty-one
193 3 Minnesota Schedule
Sept 30 Minnesota 19; South Dakota State 6. Nov. 4. Minnesota ________ ; atNorthwestern _______ _
Oct. 7 Minnesota __ ______ ; Indiana _____ ___ Nov_ 11 Open Date
Oct 14 Minnesota __ ______ ; Purdue ___ ___ __. Nov. 18 Minnesota ______ __; at .Mich~gan
Oct_ 21 Minnesota _____ __ _; Pittsburgh ________ . Nov. 25 Minnesota _____ ___ ; Wlsconslll _______ _
Oct. 28 Minnesota ____ __ __; Iowa _____ __ _

This is one of the most severe schedules that B. Bevan, and H_a rpole will fight it out for the
Minnesota has faced in several years but de- other first teap position_ Captain Roy Oen
spite this Gopher fans are confident that the will take care of the pivot post and his under-
Maroon and Gold will land in one of the upper studies will be Rennebohm, Nold and Haiden.
rungs of the Conference ladder. Hass and Manders will be missed -in the back-
Several men will be missed from last year, field but there are several good first year men
but in most cases replacements are adequate. coming up as well as several returning letter-
Robinson, at end, is gone but the flank posi- men. Lund, Proffitt, UbI, Tengler, Champlin
tions will be well taken care of by Larson, and Hribar are returning lettermen; and Eiken,
Tenner, Roning, and Papas and the Sopho- Sperry and Hargesheimer are reserves from last
mores, Schnickles and Klonowski. The tackle year_ Several prominent newcomers are on
positions will probably cause the coaching staff hand from last year's Frosh team including
its greatest concern. Wells and Gay, last year's Rennix, Roscoe, Beise, LeVoir, Farmer, AI-
regulars are through, and Bengtson is the only fonse, Seidel and Bugni.
returning letterman. The other tackle po.si-
tion will probably be filled by George Svend- All in all it is probable that the 1933 Gopher
sen, star Sophomore. Other tackle candidates team will end up as one of the best in the Big
are Knudsen, Willahan, Friemuth, and Lund- Ten_ After a little experience the new Sopho-
gren. Koski, Appman and Dennerly will be mores will strike their stride and by mid-season
missed at the guard positions, but the veteran the Minnesota team will be a well coordinated
Bruhn will I?e back at his position. J- Bevan, unit_

BERT BASTON
CHEVROLET CO.
3038 Hennepin Ave.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.

fo r E conomical Trans portation

With


EDNA MAY OLIVER
Conrad Nagel - Bruce Cabot
1\ Pandro S. Bermd n production,
di rec t ed b y Jo hn C romwell .
MER/AN C COOPER, executive
producer.
RKO RADIO Picture
SAI,ES USED CARS SERVICE
ORPHEUl\1
MINNEAPOLIS
Ken. 8282 Starts Friday, Octol.er 6
20c to 2:00; 25c to 6:30

Page Twe nty-two
MINNESOTA1S ALL-AMERICANS


• KENNETH HAYCRAFT
• HERB JOESTING
All-American fullback 1926-1927. The great-
est line plunger that ever played on a Gopher
All-American end 1927. Splendid forward pass
team. As a scorer he equalled the Big Ten record
receiver. Quick to diagnose opponent's plays.
of 13 touchdowns. Doubly valuable as a passer.
Excellent blocker and tackler.

BRONKO NAGURSKI
CLARENCE MUNN
All-American tackle 1929. A great all-around
player, equally effective as tackle, end or full- All-American guard 1931. A tower of strength
back. A supreme defensive player at tackle. By and versatility, great kicker. A type of all-around
opening large holes in line he made any back- line playing ability that gladdens the heart of
field man look good. any coach.

Page Twenty-three
Acknowledgments
Charles Johnson-Minneapolis Star
Bernard Swanson-Minneapolis Star
Fred Hutchinson-Minneapolis Star
Tom Foley-Minneapolis Star
Dick Cullum-Minneapolis Journal
Jack Quinlin-Minneapolis Journal
George Barton-Minneapolis Tribune
Irwin Rudick-Minneapolis Tribune
Louis McKenna-St. Paul Dispatch
R. H. Benham
Larry Tollefson
Bert Rogers
Minneapolis Junior Association of Commerce
Les Etter-V. of M. News Service
John L. Kauth-N. W. Umpires Ass'n
Caroll Geddes .

GOPHER DRAWINGS
by
AL PAPAS
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obtained for the price of SOc.
A magic word . • . its mention causes a train The printed pictures are made suit-
. able for framing.
of pleasant thoughts . • . Good things to eat,
AL PAPAS
merry companions and a soothing "let down". 522 12th Ave. S. E. Call
Minneapolis, Minn. GI. 2929
The Curtis Hotel provides all these things with
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Page TlVenty-lour
I

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