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SANTA FE COLLEGE

Serving Alachua and Bradford counties since 1966
Northwest Campus
3000 NW 83rd Street, Gainesville, Florida 32606
(352) 395-5000

Andrews Center
209 West Call Street, Starke, Florida 32091
(352) 395-5850 or (904) 964-5382

Blount Center
401 NW 6th Street, Gainesville, Florida 32601
(352) 395-5645

Davis Center
17500 SW Archer Road, Archer, Florida 32618
(352) 395-5254

Kirkpatrick Center
3737 NE 39th Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32609
(352) 271-2900

Perry Center
14101 NW US Highway 441, Alachua, Florida 32615
(352) 381-3750

Watson Center
4150 SE State Road 21, Keystone Heights, Florida 32656
(352) 395-5821

For more information, point your Web browser to www.sfcollege.edu.

Statement of Equal Access/Equal Opportunity
Santa Fe College is committed to an environment that embraces diversity, respects the rights of all individuals,
is open and accessible, and is free of harassment and discrimination based on, but not limited to, ethnicity, race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations, veteran status and/or sexual orientation.
Lela Elmore, Equal Access/Equal Opportunity Coordinator
lela.elmore@sfcollege.edu, (352) 395-5420
3000 NW 83rd Street, R-Annex, Room 105, Gainesville, FL 32606

Santa Fe College is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to
award Associate and Baccalaureate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at
1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500
for questions about the accreditation of Santa Fe College.

This catalog is for information only and does not constitute a contract. The college reserves the right to change,
modify or alter without notice all fees, charges, tuition, expenses and costs of any kind and further reserves the right
to add or delete without notice any course offering or information in this catalog. Visit our Web site at
www.sfcollege.edu for the most up-to-date catalog edition.

This catalog is published by SFC College Relations and the Division of
Academic Affairs and becomes effective March 20, 2009.

© 2009 Santa Fe College, Gainesville, Florida

VERSION: 20100510
www.sfcollege.edu

Table of Contents
College Information ............................................................................................................................................................... 3
President’s Message .........................................................................................................................................................4
District Board of Trustees ..................................................................................................................................................5
Administrative Staff of the College ....................................................................................................................................6
Faculty and Professional Staff ..........................................................................................................................................6
2009-2010 Calendar ..........................................................................................................................................................7
Campus Maps....................................................................................................................................................................8
Helpful Information .......................................................................................................................................................... 11
Admissions .......................................................................................................................................................................... 21
College Expenses................................................................................................................................................................ 31
Student Affairs ..................................................................................................................................................................... 37
Academic Affairs .................................................................................................................................................................. 47
Programs of Study ............................................................................................................................................................... 59
Liberal Arts and Sciences ........................................................................................................................................... 60
Career and Technical Education ................................................................................................................................. 65
Educator Preparation Institute .................................................................................................................................. 112
Bachelor of Applied Science ..................................................................................................................................... 113
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................... 117
Index ................................................................................................................................................................................. 189

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College Information

President’s Message...................................................................4
District Board of Trustees .........................................................5
Administrative Staff of the College .........................................6
Faculty and Professional Staff .................................................6
2009-2010 Calendar ...................................................................7
Campus Maps ............................................................................8
Helpful Information ................................................................11
League for Innovation in the Community College ..............12
Accreditation Status ................................................................12
College Philosophy and Mission ............................................12
History of the College ..............................................................13
SFC Foundation .......................................................................14
Outreach Centers and Programs ...........................................16
Center for Innovation and Economic Development ...........18
Bookstore ..................................................................................18
Library.......................................................................................19
Little School..............................................................................19
Parking and Traffic Regulations ............................................19
Smoking and Eating ................................................................20

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www.sfcollege.edu

President’s Message

Welcome to Santa Fe College.

There are the old and the new. Then there are both.

The name is now Santa Fe College. The new name went into effect when a state
law dropped the word “community” and our institution became Santa Fe College.

The change occurred because Santa Fe will offer its own bachelor’s degrees. SFC’s
two initial degrees are Bachelor’s of Applied Science in Clinical Laboratory Science
and Health Services Administration.

Although new, the degrees spring from the philosophy that has always underlined
every program at Santa Fe: this college exists to offer opportunities to all students
and in doing so enable our state to prosper.

New degrees have not changed Santa Fe’s old traditions. Santa Fe still is an open
admissions college. The college still offers support services to assist students from
every background, Academic Foundations to prepare students for college level
work, and is governed by a local independent board of trustees that understands
our community.

Again, I welcome you to a Santa Fe College that offers new opportunities and
remains committed to our heritage of access, service and an abiding belief in every
student.

Jackson N. Sasser
President, Santa Fe College

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District Board of Trustees
Santa Fe College is governed by a citizen board appointed by the governor. The trust-
ees represent Santa Fe's Alachua-Bradford County service district and ensure that the
education and services provided by the college meet the needs of the region, the state
and the country.

Winston J. Bradley Glenna F. Brashear Robert Hudson

Bessie G. Jackson G . Thomas Mallini Colonel Arlie McRae

Richard C. Solze, Jr. Evelyn T. Womack

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www.sfcollege.edu

Administrative Staff Director, Little School – Karen Bennett
Director, Nursing Programs – Lois Ellis
of the College Director, Radiologic Programs – Bobbie Konter
Office of the President Director, Respiratory Care and Surgical Technology – Paul Stephan
President – Jackson Sasser Director, Title III – Byron Dyce
Interim Provost and Vice President for Director, Watson Center – Robert Wolfson
Academic Affairs – Ed Bonahue Coordinator, Archer Center – Jim McMullen
Vice President for Administrative Affairs – Guy York
Office of the Vice President for Finance and
Vice President for Development – Charles Clemons
Information Technology Services
Vice President for Finance and
Vice President for Finance and
Information Technology Services – Ginger Gibson
Information Technology Services – Ginger Gibson
Vice President for Student Affairs – Portia Taylor
Associate Vice President for Information
Assistant to the President – Lawrence Keen
Technology Services – Tim Nesler
Associate Vice President for College and
Director, Information Technology Services – John Chapman
Community Relations – Bennye Alligood
Director, Purchasing and
Associate Vice President for College Relations – Marilyn Tubb
Auxiliary Services – David Shlafer
Legal Counsel – Patti Locascio
Comptroller – Lee Johnson
Office of the Vice President for Administrative Affairs Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs
Vice President for Administrative Affairs – Guy York
Vice President for Student Affairs – Portia Taylor
Associate Vice President for College and
Associate Vice President for Student Affairs – Steve Fisher
Community Relations – Bennye Alligood
Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs – John Cowart
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs – Kim Kendall
Registrar – Lynn Sullivan
Director, Marketing – Vacant
Associate Registrar – Michael Hutley
Director of Human Resources – Lela Elmore
Director, Advisement Center – Emilia Hodge
Coordinator, Safety and Risk Management – Charles Griggs
Director, Financial Aid – Peggy Werts
Executive Director, East Gainesville Initiative
Director, Ethnic Diversity – Elizabeth O’Reggio
Outreach – Karen Cole-Smith
Director, Student Life – Dan Rodkin
Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Director, Athletics – Jim Keites
Interim Provost and Vice President for
Office for Development
Academic Affairs – Ed Bonahue
Vice President for Development – Charles Clemons
Associate Vice President, Institutional
Associate Vice President for Development,
Research & Planning – Mike Droll
Grants and Projects – Joan Suchorski
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs – Curtis Jefferson
Associate Vice President for Facilities Services – Bill Reese
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs – Dave Yonutas
Director, Facilities Operations – Erik Anderson
Dean, Emerging Technologies – Kelly Gridley
Director, Facilities Planning – Rebecca Rogers
Dean, Educational Centers – Paul Hutchins
Director, Development Services – Mike Curry
Assistant Vice President, Economic Development – Dug Jones
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs – Kim Kendall
Chair, Academic Foundations – Carole Windsor Faculty and Professional Staff
Chair, English – Susan Miller Faculty and professional staff are listed on the college Web site. Visit
Chair, Humanities and Foreign Languages – William Little www.sfcollege.edu for the most up-to-date information.
Chair, Mathematics – Steven Grosteffon
Chair, Natural Sciences – Sture Edvardsson
Chair, Sciences for Health – Linda Nichols
Chair, Social and Behavioral Sciences – Doug Diekow
Chair, Fine Arts – Alora Haynes
Director, Andrews Center – Cheryl Canova
Blount Center – Paul Hutchins
Director, Business Programs – James Geason
Director, Cardiovascular Technology and
Sonography – Reeda Fullington
Director, Construction and Technical Programs – Jane Parkin
Director, Health Sciences Advising – Sheila Baker
Director, High School Dual Enrollment – Linda Lanza-Kaduce
Director, Information Technology Education – Eugene Jones
Chief of Police/Director, Institute of Public Safety – Daryl Johnston
6 Director, Library – Myra Sterrett
College Information
SANTA FE COLLEGE
2009-2010 Academic Calendar
FALL 2009
Convocation .....................................................................Friday .......................................................August 21
Full & A Classes Begin ....................................................Monday ....................................................August 24
Labor Day ........................................................................Monday ............................................... September 7
A Session Classes End ...................................................Wednesday .............................................. October 7
A Session Final Exams ....................................................Friday-Monday .................................October 9 & 12
A Session Grades Due ....................................................Tuesday .................................................. October 13
UF Homecoming ..............................................................Friday ..................................................... October 16
B Session Classes Begin.................................................Monday .................................................. October 19
Veterans Day....................................................................Wednesday .........................................November 11
No Evening Classes (5 p.m.) ...........................................Wednesday ........................................ November 25
Thanksgiving ....................................................................Thursday-Saturday .......................November 26-28
Fall & Fall B Classes End.................................................Friday ................................................... December 4
Final Exams .....................................................................Monday-Thursday ........................... December 7-10
Graduation .......................................................................Friday ..................................................December 11
Grades Due......................................................................Monday .............................................. December 14
Winter Holiday.............................................................................................................................Dec. 21-Jan. 1

SPRING 2010
Convocation .....................................................................Monday .................................................... January 4
Full & A Classes Begin ....................................................Tuesday ................................................... January 5
Martin L. King, Jr. Day .....................................................Monday .................................................. January 18
A Session Classes End ...................................................Friday ....................................................February 19
A Session Final Exams ....................................................Monday-Tuesday ............................. February 22-23
A Session Grades Due ....................................................Thursday .............................................. February 25
B Session Classes Begin ................................................Tuesday ....................................................... March 2
Spring Break ....................................................................Monday–Saturday .................................March 8-13
Spring and Spring B Classes End ...................................Friday ...........................................................April 23
Final Exams .....................................................................Monday-Thursday .................................. April 26-29
Graduation .......................................................................Friday ...........................................................April 30
Grades Due......................................................................Monday .......................................................... May 3

SUMMER 2010
Summer & A Classes Begin ............................................Monday ........................................................ May 10
Memorial Day Observed ..................................................Monday ....................................................... May 31
A Session Classes End ...................................................Monday ....................................................... June 21
A Session Final Exams ....................................................Tuesday-Wednesday ............................. June 22-23
A Session Grades Due ....................................................Friday .......................................................... June 25
B Session Classes Begin ................................................Wednesday ................................................. June 30
Independence Day Observed ..........................................Monday ...........................................................July 5
Summer & B Classes End ...............................................Wednesday .............................................. August 11
Summer & B Final Exams ................................................Thursday-Friday .................................. August 12-13
Summer & B Grades Due ................................................Monday ....................................................August 16

HOLIDAYS
Labor Day ............................................................. September 7, 2009
UF Homecoming ................................................... October 16, 2009
Veterans Day ......................................................... November 11, 2009
Thanksgiving ......................................................... November 26-28, 2009
Winter Holiday ....................................................... December 21, 2009-January 1, 2010
M. L. King, Jr. Day ................................................. January 18, 2010
Spring Break .......................................................... March 8-13, 2010
Memorial Day Observed ....................................... May 31, 2010
Independence Day Observed ............................... July 5, 2010 7
www.sfcollege.edu

Map to Northwest Campus and SFC
centers. For driving directions visit
www.sfcollege.edu.

Campus and
Centers Maps Blount Center NW 6th Avenue

401 NW 6th Street

NW 4th Street
to 8th Avenue

Gainesville, FL 32601
(352) 395-5645

NW 5th Avenue NW 4th Place

NW 4th Avenue
parking

Building DA

NW 3rd Avenue

NW 2nd Avenue
NW 6th Street

NW 1st Avenue

parking N
Building DB
Kirkpatrick Criminal
Justice Training Center University Avenue
3737 NE 39th Avenue to 13th Street to Main Street

8 Gainesville, FL 32609
(352) 334-0300
Northwest Campus

College Information
3000 NW 83rd Street
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 395-5000

Overflow Parking

O

to NW 39th Avenue
Lot 9 Lot 8

Lot 10 Lot 5
Lot 6 Lot 4

Lot 7
Lot 11

(UC)

Lot 12

Lot 1

Lot 2

Lot 1A
Lot 13
Lot 20

Lot 19

Assessment Center: G-25
Lot 14
Bookstore: S-01 Lot 18
Career Resource Center: S-241 Lot 16
Cashier’s Office: F-052 Lot 17

Coffee 101: Y-101
Counseling Center: S-254
Disability Services: S-229
Financial Aid: R-122 Lot 21
Gym: Building V Lot 15
Library: Building Y
Student Nurse’s Station: S-120
Police Department: Building T
Registrar: R-101
Student Leadership and Activities: S-147
Welcome Center: R-112

Motorcycle Parking
Handicap Parking
Bike Racks
Emergency Phones N
Smoking Huts
ATM Machine
Food Court

Fine Arts Hall: (UC) Under Construction 9
www.sfcollege.edu

Andrews Center
209 West Call Street Parking
Pratt Street Davis Center
Starke, FL 32091 17500 SW Archer Road
(352) 395-5850 Stump Building Archer, FL 32618
Center Street (352) 395-5254 N
(904) 964-5382

Andrews Center Cultural Jackson Street
Building
201 East Call Street

Thompson Street

Parking
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Starke, FL 32091 svil
ine
(352) 395-4460 Jefferson Street
G a
to
(904) 964-8011

Parking
Stump Education Building
Call Street

Walnut Street
520 West Pratt Street Court Street

Starke, FL 32091
(352) 395-7334
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(904) 964-2763 Madison Street so
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Br
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to Gainesville

N Andrews Center
and
Andrews Center
Cultural Building

Perry Center Watson Center
14101 NW US Highway 441 4150 SE SR 21
Alachua, FL 32615 Keystone Heights, FL 32656
(352) 395-5821 (352) 395-5821

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College Information
Helpful Information
Answers to many of your questions can be
found at www.sfcollege.edu/askSantaFe
Do you have questions about admissions, degree require-
ments, financial aid, scholarships, school holidays or how
to start a club? Get your answers at askSantaFe, where
you can send an e-mail or chat live with a Welcome and
Admissions Center representative. Or visit the Welcome
and Admissions Center on the Northwest Campus in
Building R, room 112, where you can speak with an
advisor, take a campus tour, or complete the admissions
process.

Helpful Numbers
Northwest Campus Building/Room Number
A.A. Academic Advisement .........................R-201 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5503
Academic Affairs...........................................RAB-249 .....................................................................(352) 395-5843
Admissions ....................................................R-112 ...........................................................................(352) 395-7322
Adult Education ............................................G-028 ..........................................................................(352) 395-5760
Big Open Lab .................................................N-216 ..........................................................................(352) 395-5584
Books and Supplies, Bookstore ...................S-01 .............................................................................(352) 395-5240
Career Advisement .......................................S-254 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5824
Career and Job Placement ...........................S-254 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5582
Career Resource Center ...............................S-241 ...........................................................................(352) 395-4121
College Prep Advisement .............................G-018 ..........................................................................(352) 395-5050
Counseling Center ........................................S-254 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5508
Disabilities Resource Center .......................S-236 ...........................................................................(352) 395-4400
Emergency, Police Department ..................T-002 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5555
Fee Questions ................................................RAB-052 .....................................................................(352) 395-5227
Financial Aid .................................................R-122 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5480
Food Court.....................................................R-001
Health Care Center .......................................S-120 ...........................................................................(352) 381-3777
Health Sciences Counseling........................W-002B .......................................................................(352) 395-5733
International Student Services ...................R-102 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5504
Library............................................................Y-100 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5406
Little School...................................................Z-153 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5597
Lost and Found, Police Department ..........T-002 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5519
Main Campus Operator ...............................RAB Lobby .................................................................(352) 395-5000
Office of Diversity .........................................S-112 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5486
Ombudsman .................................................R-112 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5513
Placement Testing ........................................G-25 ............................................................................(352) 395-5791
Parking, Police Department ........................T-002 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5519
Police Department .......................................T-002 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5519
Records ..........................................................R-100 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5443
Report Matters on Campus .........................U-019 ..........................................................................(352) 395-5521
Student Insurance .......................................S-14 .............................................................................(352) 395-5912
Student Leadership and Activities,
Student Government, Clubs. ..................S-147 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5912
Veterans Affairs.............................................R-110 ...........................................................................(352) 395-5505
Welcome Center ............................................R-112 ...........................................................................(352) 395-7322
Emergency phones are located in all parking lots.

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www.sfcollege.edu

League for Innovation
in the Community College
Santa Fe College is a charter member of the League for Innovation in the Community
College and is one of 19 League Board colleges. More than 750 institutions from 11 dif-
ferent countries are League affiliate members.
The League, founded in 1968, is an educational consortium that functions specifically
to stimulate innovation and experimentation. It is the only organization of its kind in
the community college field and has achieved national recognition for the quality of its
programs and activities.
As a national organization with members in all sections of the country, the League
influences community college development throughout North America. To this end, the
League is not only committed to programs that contribute to the continuing improve-
ment of member colleges, but also to providing opportunities for other community col-
leges to participate in its workshops, conferences, projects, and activities.

Accreditation Status
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Santa Fe College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools to award associate and baccalaureate degrees. Contact the
Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call
404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Santa Fe College.

State of Florida Department of Education
Santa Fe College has also been approved by the State of Florida Department of Educa-
tion to offer the Bachelor of Applied Science degrees in Health Sciences Administration
and in Clinical Laboratory Science. SF holds membership in the Florida Association of
Colleges and Universities and the American Association of Community Colleges.

College Philosophy and Mission
Statement of Philosophy
The philosophy of Santa Fe College is student-centered. Consistent with this philoso-
phy, we value cultural diversity and serve all persons regardless of race, color, creed,
national origin, religion, gender, marital status, age or disability. The college believes
that preparing students for healthy, productive lives in a democratic society is the chief
obligation of the public educational system. Therefore, we seek to enable changes in
individuals that allow them to live richer, more rewarding, and more useful lives.
We further believe that educated people should be guided in their behavior by decency
and civility; accordingly, we prize honesty, integrity, and social responsibility among
both our staff and students. The college aspires to transmit these values as well as foster
in students the critical thinking and problem-solving skills, global perspective, and
creativity necessary to make educated and ethical decisions in all aspects of their lives.

Statement of Vision, Values and Mission
Mission/Vision
Adding value to the lives of our students and enriching our community
Values
Santa Fe College is a dynamic, innovative learning community committed to:
• Academic excellence, academic freedom, and intellectual pursuit
• Individual and social responsibility
• Honesty, integrity, and civility
• Collaboration with our community
• Open access
• Lifelong learning
• Assessment, accountability, and improvement
• Sustainable use of environmental, social, and
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economic resources
College Information
History of the College The college’s educational offerings still are primarily the
Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Ap-
Santa Fe College was established by the state government
plied Science, and Community Education programs. The
in 1965 to offer wide access to quality higher education.
Associate of Arts program consists generally of liberal arts
Florida’s legislature, governor and Department of Educa-
courses. Many students in this program intend to trans-
tion were responding to a request from the Alachua and
fer to four-year colleges or universities. SFC sends more
Bradford county Boards of Public Instruction, which had
canvassed the area to find that the community would be students to the University of Florida than does any other
well served if all citizens had more opportunities for an institution. Many former SFC students go to other four-
education and better life. year schools, public and private, in and out of state.

Since then, SFC has established programs and services Career and Technical Education consists generally of A.S.,
that enable the college to carry out its mission of educa- A.A.S. and certificate programs that prepare students for
tional opportunity, responsiveness to the community, eco- entry into a career, although some programs are transfer-
nomic development and innovation in the public interest. able to universities. Surveys show that more than 90 per-
The philosophy of the college during those years has been, cent of students in these programs either enter a career or
and continues to be, one of student centeredness. proceed to further higher education. Community Educa-
tion offers non-credit leisure courses for personal growth.
Enrollment has grown rapidly. Fewer than 1,000 students
enrolled when classes were first offered in September 1966. In all its programs, the college offers classes to suit the
Today, more than 16,000 students take credit classes and schedules of students. In addition to full semesters, SFC
12,000 more take non-credit classes. Credit classes are has classes in a half semester “flexterm” format, evening
given at the Northwest Campus, Andrews Center in Starke, and “earlybird” classes that can be taken after or before a
Blount Center in downtown Gainesville, Davis Center in student goes to work, and classes on Saturdays.
Archer, and Watson Center in Keystone Heights. The Perry Academic life is highlighted by the SFC-University of
Center for Emerging Technologies in the Alachua area is Florida Foreign Languages Institute, an Honors Program,
planned for opening in 2009. Phi Theta Kappa, a speech and debate team, a Brain Bowl,
The Northwest Campus, which opened in 1972, is set on and an International Initiative that features many study
175 acres in Gainesville next to Interstate 75. The Andrews abroad programs.
Center opened in 1985 in the renovated Bradford County SFC’s Kirkpatrick Criminal Justice Training Center edu-
Courthouse, and expanded in 1991 with the addition of the cates law enforcement and corrections officer recruits and
restored Cultural Building and again in 2001 with the addi- offers programs to retrain sworn officers. The Kirkpatrick
tion of the Lillian Stump Center. The Blount Center opened Center also educates students in the Emergency Medical
in 1990 in the renovated 6th Street railroad depot, expand- Services, Fire Sciences and Aviation Sciences programs.
ed in 1993 with the addition of the renovated Gainesville
Gas Co. Building, and again in 2006 with the new Blount The college is dedicated to economic development. The
Classroom Building. The Davis Center opened in 2004. Center for Innovation and Economic Development, located
The Watson Center opened in 2005 with a second building in a newly refurbished building at University Avenue and
added in 2006. The Perry Center in Alachua is scheduled NW 6th Street, custom designs short, long and “eLearning”
for opening in 2009. All the centers were built with funds online courses for professionals, businesses, industries
raised in community drives headed by the SFC Foundation and governments, and offers incubator services that en-
and operate to bring educational opportunity to residents able new businesses to establish themselves.
in the college’s Alachua-Bradford County service district. Students seeking bachelor’s degrees from institutions
The college has expanded education programs by increas- other than SFC can take classes at several colleges and
ing the number of classes offered by electronic means such universities through the SFC University Center without
as the Internet and live broadcasts to the SFC centers. More leaving Gainesville.
than 3,000 students take Internet classes through the Open
The student-centered learning environment at SFC is
Campus.
sustained by a network of counselors, advisors and help-
SFC has had only four presidents. Dr. Joseph W. Fordyce ful programs. Academic advisors give advice on classes
was president from 1965 to 1971, when he was succeeded to take. Students can choose group support by joining a
by Alan J. Robertson. Dr. Larry W. Tyree was named “learning community” in which they take several courses
president in 1990 and was succeeded on Jan. 1, 2002 by Dr. with the same group of students. The student development
Jackson N. Sasser. offices help students decide upon a career or further higher
education. Academic support programs offer tutoring and
The growth and expansion of the college have two main personal attention to help if students have difficulty in a
causes: educational programs that are designed to meet subject. The college offers the Little School, an on-campus
the needs of students and community and a helpful learn- child care center.
ing environment that enables students to do their best.
Veterans are honored with active ROTC programs and the
Formerly named Santa Fe Community College, Santa Fe
SFC Veterans Affairs office that serves students at SFC and
became a state college in 2008 when it was authorized by
the University of Florida.
Florida’s Governor and Legislature to offer baccalaureate
degrees that meet demand for specific skills needed in the Campus life is rounded out with a student government,
economy. Bachelor of Applied Science programs in Clinical student clubs, activities and intramural athletics. The col-
Laboratory Science and Health Services Administration lege competes intercollegiately in women’s fastpitch soft-
are scheduled for opening at SFC in fall 2009. ball, men’s baseball, and men’s and women’s basketball. 13
www.sfcollege.edu

Its purpose is to receive private gifts, bequests and dona-
tions, and to account for, manage and help appreciate
monies and property submitted to the Foundation. Such
donations are tax deductible within IRS guidelines. Funds
from the Foundation are distributed to benefit and ad-
vance the college and for the encouragement and subsidi-
zation of students and faculty of SFC.
The Foundation Board of Directors is composed of indi-
viduals from Alachua and Bradford counties who represent
positive leadership and community influence and who
have expressed an interest in using their influence to ben-
efit the college through the Foundation.
The Foundation supports programs and activities of the
college that promote college objectives. Foundation sup-
port includes but is not limited to:
• Financial aid for students
• Recognition of outstanding scholarship or
leadership
• Development of special facilities
• Awards for special achievement
• Management and investment of funds
• Procurement of special equipment
• Planning for special college activities and programs
• Development of district-wide interest in support
of the college
Gifts to the Foundation may be made in any one of several
ways and can usually be arranged to achieve maximum
tax benefits for the donor and still provide generous sup-
port to education.
SFC offers many cultural activities to enrich the com-
munity’s quality of life. The Santa Fe Gallery, located on Contributions may be made by gifts of cash, real or per-
the Northwest Campus, features local and contemporary sonal property, securities, by provision of a will, by gifts of
artists. Concerts, plays and dance performances offer insurance policies, or by the establishment of trusts. Gifts
students experience in the performing arts and enrich the may be awarded for specific purposes or given without
cultural life of the community. The Dance Theatre of Santa restrictions regarding their use.
Fe and Theatre Santa Fe hold numerous performances an-
nually both on campus and at the Phillips Center, serving Scholarship Funds and Major Donors
both the college and the public. Music Santa Fe sponsors One of the major purposes of the SFC Foundation is to
workshops and performances in diverse musical tradi- provide financial aid in the form of scholarships and aid to
tions. SFC’s annual Spring Arts Festival attracts 130,000 students enrolled in the college. Following are some of the
visitors to Gainesville and is one of the community’s larg- scholarship programs that merit mention:
est economic events. Santa Fe’s Bradford Fest is a leading Alachua County/SFC Minority Scholarship
community event in Bradford County.
Altrusa International, Inc. of Gainesville Scholarship
The college presents sciences to the public. Adjoining each Altrusa International, Inc. of Starke Scholarship
other in the “Circle of Science” on the SFC Northwest Cam-
Guy and Elizabeth Andrews Scholarship
pus are the Kika Silva Pla Planetarium, the Jean Klein Rock
Cycle Garden which is a series of large boulders arranged Arts and Sciences Scholarship
in geological order with interpretative plaques along a cir- ASA/Automotive Technology Scholarship
cular, park-like walkway, and a geological atrium in Build- Philip H. Baker Gainesville Civitan Club Scholarship
ing X that houses rocks, fossils and exhibits. Nearby is the
Henry H. Beck Scholarship Fund
SFC North Woods nature preserve with a self guided trail
Jeff Block Memorial Scholarship
Santa Fe’s Teaching Zoo is the only nationally accredited
Charles L. Blount Automotive Scholarship
zoo on a college campus and attracts 40,000 visitors per
year. The college offers to students and researchers its Charles L. Blount Scholarship
Geological Studies Field Station, a large network of caverns Patricia M. Blount Scholarship
near Newberry in rural Alachua County. Boone/Bussard Welding Scholarship
Bradford County/Andrews SFC Minority Scholarship
SFC Foundation Bradford County/Joyce Riherd Public
The Santa Fe College Foundation, Inc. is a not-for-profit Health Nursing Scholarship
corporation organized under Florida law and is a direct Billy and Glenna F. Brashear Nursing and
14 support organization of Santa Fe College. Health Related Scholarship
College Information
Jean Rae Bronson Nursing Scholarship
Roxann Kelley Buehn Memorial Scholarship
S. Clark Butler Scholarship
H. Medford and Patricia Connelly Scholarship
Dr. Lamar E. Crevasse Scholarship
Disney’s Animal Kingdom/Animal
Programs Scholarship
Patricia S. Fabrick/Alachua Habitat for
Humanity Scholarship
Dr. Erich and Ellen Farber Scholarship
A.W. Fletcher Memorial Scholarship
Joseph W. Fordyce Scholarship Norris O. Roszel Family Scholarship
Gene Gerber Building Construction Scholarship SFC Employee/Dependent Scholarship Fund
Colonel R. James Glikes Memorial Scholarship Shands at Starke Auxiliary Health Related Scholarship
Nicholas J. Gonzalez Memorial Scholarship Shands at UF Auxiliary Scholarship
Fiona Kathleen Gott Memorial Scholarship Florence Smith Nursing Scholarship
Herron Health Care Scholarship Starke Rotary Club Scholarship
Christa Leigh Hoyt Memorial Scholarship Lillian Stump Nursing and Health Related Scholarship
Davis, Monk & Company/Leo T. Hury James J. and Rena E. Swick Memorial Scholarship
Business Scholarship Veterans Bridge Scholarship
Norman Jensen Art Scholarship Village Nursing Scholarship
Harold A. and Jeanne Cruthirds Johnson Scholarship Bruce P. Walek Memorial Scholarship
Dewitt C. Jones and Jeanne C. Johnson Scholarship Alfred B. Watson, Sr. and Agnes W. Watson Scholarship
Kiwanis Club of Starke Community Alfred B. Watson Family Youth Challenge Scholarship
Service Scholarship
Francis B. Watson Memorial Business Scholarship
Margaret F. Knapp Nursing Scholarship
Jeffrey Mattison Wershow Memorial Scholarship
Danielle Kramer Memorial Scholarship
Rosa B. Williams/Shands at UF Minority Scholarship
Esther Porter Lane Memorial Scholarship
Hung-sen Wu Memorial Scholarship
Joanie Beth Langford Memorial Scholarship
Irene Zimmerman Memorial Scholarship
Laura Lopez Memorial Scholarship
These programs annually provide funds in the form of
Medical and Surgical Affiliates Nursing &
financial assistance (usually tuition, books and incidental
Health Related Scholarship expenses) for more than 350 students to attend college.
James F. Moore Memorial Scholarship These and other funds for the Foundation are generously
Margaret R. T. Morgan Nursing Scholarship contributed by more than 50 major donors.
Mallini Family Scholarship Other major programs sponsored by the Foundation
(first award given in fall 2010) include the annual SFC Spring Arts Festival in Gainesville
Newberry Garden Club Scholarship and the SFC Bradford Fest in Starke. The members of the
board of directors of the Santa Fe College Foundation are
Larry Noegel Memorial Scholarship
elected for a three-year term. The members for 2009-2010
(first award given in fall 2010)
are:
Mazdak Noorbakhsh Memorial Scholarship Charles L. Blount Carol “Brandi” Noegel
Nursing and Health Related Scholarship Program Judy E. Boles Dexter A. O’Steen
Nursing Education Scholarship Winston J. Bradley James F. Painter
Charisma O’Connor Memorial Scholarship Eric J. Brill The Honorable
Dexter and Sarajo O’Steen Family Scholarship Reeves H. Byrd, Jr. George H. Pierce
Pamphalon Foundation Scholarship Ralph W. Cellon, Jr. Freeman Register III
Charles R. Perry Memorial Scholarship Charles W. Clemons, Sr. James D. Salter
Joseph W. “Jody” Davis Jackson N. Sasser
Plus One Scholarship Program (for disabled students)
Stefan M. Davis Richard T. Smith, M.D.
Professional Retail Associate Scholarship
Yvette Godet, D.M.D. Sylvia Tatum
Becky Reddish Memorial Scholarship
(first award given in fall 2010) W. Marvin Gresham Caridad S. Torres
G. Thomas Mallini Robert F. Watson
Mark M. and Flora Yon Richardson
John M. Miller Breck A. Weingart
Memorial Scholarship
Bryan K. Nazworth Evelyn T. Womack 15
Noah Jacob Rodkin Memorial Scholarship
www.sfcollege.edu

Outreach Centers and Programs In December 1993 the Downtown Center was named for
Charles L. Blount, its major contributor and fundraiser
with more than $3 million contributed to establish the
Andrews Center center. Charles Blount and his wife Patsy established a $3
In 1983 the historic courthouse in Bradford County, and million scholarship program at the college. The Blount
some of the surrounding properties, were contributed to Center has several purposes:
and purchased by the Santa Fe College Endowment Corpo- • To provide an outreach center and educational
ration to establish a major academic center in Starke. This training facility for the citizens in the central
$2.5 million asset includes a turn-of-the-century facility Gainesville area
that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. • To provide training programs for major businesses,
Renovation of the historic courthouse was the responsi- small businesses and industry in the downtown
bility of the Endowment Corporation, which restored the area
interior to accommodate classrooms, laboratories, offices, • To provide training and educational programs for
a study room and student lounge. In addition to enhanced existing employees of the city and county govern-
educational and cultural opportunities for all citizens of ment that occupy the downtown complex
Bradford County, the Andrews Center is an integral part of • To provide an opportunity for community meeting
downtown redevelopment and restoration. rooms at no cost to civic clubs, business and profes-
sional groups, and underserved populations
In the spring of 1991 the Andrews Center Cultural Build-
ing, a century-old structure in downtown Starke, was An opportunity for a college education is offered at the
renovated by private donations made to the Endowment Charles L. Blount Center by means of a variety of college
Corporation. The $700,000 renovation project provided the credit classes Monday through Thursday evenings. These
college and the community with a performing arts audito- classes, along with the regular day classes, make it easier
for individuals to fit college into their busy schedules.
rium/theater seating 155 people, a facility for the Eugene
L. Matthews Historical Museum, and additional classroom In 2005 the SFC East Gainesville Initiative and Community
and office space for a growing Andrews Center. Outreach offices were relocated to the Charles L. Blount
Center. In the following year Santa Fe’s offices for adminis-
In the fall of 2002 the Lillian Stump Education Center
tering the Carl D. Perkins Education Act were also relo-
opened to provide the Andrews Center with an approxi-
cated to the center.
mately 4,000 square foot facility that includes four major
college classrooms plus faculty and staff office space. The In the spring of 2006 the new Charles L. Blount General
Stump Education Center, a $400,000 project of the Endow- Classroom Building opened. It contains approximately
ment Corporation, enhances the Andrews Center’s dual 10,000 square feet, seven classrooms, an art classroom, a
enrollment program with Bradford County High School computer lab, a testing lab, offices for adult education and
and provides classroom space for college level courses, as programs, and offices for faculty and academic advisors.
well as community and continuing education classes. In In fall 2006 the college made both interior and exterior
October of 2007 the new Bradford County Public Library upgrades to the old Gainesville Gas Co. building to develop
opened adjacent to the Lillian Stump Education Center. SFC’s nexus for business and professional development.
Through financial support from the college, the library The Center for Innovation and Economic Development
contains a 17 station computer lab for use by Andrews (CIED) opened in the spring of 2007. CIED hosts the col-
Center classes and other community groups and organiza- lege’s Center for Business and the Entrepreneur Incubator,
tions. The college also provided three computers that are and offers rental space for meetings, workshops, and semi-
in a dedicated area for access by dual enrollment students. nars. The SFC Center for Business provides short-term,
non-credit “training for excellence” for people or compa-
Blount Center nies desiring improvement of skills.
In 1988 the City of Gainesville deeded the old train depot
on NW 6th Street to the SFC Endowment Corporation for Davis Center
the purpose of establishing an educational center that In the fall of 2003 the Ron and Norita Davis and Family
would be accessible to those living in and around the Davis Center opened to help people in the southwestern
downtown area. Renovation of the old train station was the part of Alachua County and the surrounding Archer area to
responsibility of the Endowment Corporation. All funds for enroll in classes rather than have to journey 21 plus miles
this project came from the private sector and involved the to the Northwest Gainesville campus. The center will pro-
establishment of a major steering committee composed mote advancement and enhancement of higher education
of approximately 20 business and community leaders who and potential vocational training programs locally.
served as “ambassadors of good will” throughout the com- The more than 10,000 square foot facility includes six
munity. general classrooms, a computer lab, ITV classroom, a com-
In the spring of 1993 the SFC Endowment Corporation munity boardroom, faculty and staff offices, and a com-
purchased the old Gainesville Gas Co. building located on munity/common meeting room.
the corner of NW 6th Street and West University Avenue. The Davis Center facility was made possible by a major
Renovation of the building was completed in the fall of contribution from Ron and Norita Davis, and the Davis
1993. The project provided the center an opportunity to family, who made a substantial contribution of in-kind and
expand student services and provide additional upper level property totaling approximately $500,000 (20 plus acres of
16 classes to an increased student population. land) and a $600,000 cash gift for a total of $1.1 million. A
College Information
community-wide leadership of individuals and organiza-
tions to provide additional funding for the establishment
of the Davis Center was comprised of more than 26 com-
munity leaders.

Perry Center
The Charles R. and Nancy V. Perry Emerging Technology
Center, located in the City of Alachua, is scheduled to open
for classes in fall 2009. This facility began in 2005 with a
substantial contribution from Charles and Nancy Perry to-
taling more than $1.36 million. The community embraced
the idea and raised an additional $2 million to help with
the construction.
The new 17,367 square foot facility includes two class-
rooms; computer, biology and biotech labs; director’s
office and five faculty offices; plus conference room, clean
lab, prep room and storage area. The center will promote
the advancement of higher education in life sciences and
health education as home of the college’s Associate of Sci- Open Campus
ence in Biotechnology program and the new Bachelor of
Beginning in the fall semester of 1998, the college made
Applied Science degree in Clinical Laboratory Sciences.
credit courses available to students “any place, any time”
through the Internet. These courses are administered
Watson Center through the Open Campus, located in P-237 on the North-
In January of 2005 the Alfred B. Watson, Sr. and Agnes west Campus. A wide selection of courses is available to
W. Watson Center opened to promote the advancement help students complete A.A., A.S., and A.A.S. degrees or
of higher education for students in southeast Bradford Career and Technical Education certificates. All courses
County and the surrounding Keystone Heights-Lake Re- carry credit equal to the same courses taught in traditional
gion area. The Watsons donated $3.4 million to make the classrooms at any SFC campus location. Students inter-
facility possible. They also made a gift that resulted in the act with their instructor and classmates using discussion
establishment of the $1.4 million permanently endowed boards, e-mail, and online chats within the class itself.
Alfred B. Watson, Sr. and Agnes W. Watson Scholarship. Most courses are designed so they can be completed
without having to attend classes on any campus at a fixed
The Watson Center’s first building included six gen-
time or place. Some instructors may require attendance on
eral education classrooms, a computer lab, community
campus for testing, but arrangements can be made for this
boardroom, faculty and staff offices, community/common at remote sites.
meeting area and an office for the Bradford County consti-
tutional officers and sheriff. The second building opened Because Open Campus classes offer the convenience and
in January 2006 with six additional general education flexibility of attending college from a personal computer
classrooms, faculty offices and a state-of-the-art science via the Internet, students can continue their education
laboratory. while still managing a job, family activities or other class-
es. The calendar is the same as for traditionally delivered
Kirkpatrick Center classes, starting and ending on the same dates. However,
students can set their daily work schedule by connecting to
Institute of Public Safety the course materials and activities via the Web whenever
The Institute of Public Safety at the Kirkpatrick Center is it is convenient and from anywhere the Internet can be
located at 3737 NE 39th Avenue, approximately 11 miles accessed.
east of the Santa Fe College Northwest Campus. It is home Above all, self-discipline and motivation are integral
to the Institute of Public Safety and the Criminal Justice components for success in Open Campus classes. Students
Selection Center, which is housed on 60 acres on the East need some previous computer experience with a high
side of Gainesville across from the Gainesville Regional level of competency in Web-browsing, file management,
Airport. word processing and e-mail. The courses are designed to
The Institute of Public Safety at the Kirkpatrick Center is a run with current computer technology and students need
full-service training center, complete with a firearms and good, dependable access to the Internet.
driving range, providing basic, advanced and specialized
instruction in corrections, emergency medical services, Community Education Program (Non-Credit)
fire science and law enforcement. Successful completion Santa Fe College is dedicated to lifelong learning. Com-
of these programs will typically lead to basic certification, munity Education at SFC provides educational opportuni-
except for fire science, and is designed for those students ties to all members of the community through enrichment
seeking immediate employment. Additionally, the college programs. These programs, offered at Santa Fe’s cam-
offers Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Sci- puses, online, and in community schools, present classes
ence Degrees in Criminal Justice Technology, Emergency taught by community members and SFC faculty and staff
Medical Services and Fire Science. who enjoy bringing their special skills to interested stu- 17
www.sfcollege.edu

dents. Community Education also offers College for Kids,
a summer camp program for children ages 10-14. Commu-
nity Education non-credit courses are available to anyone
in the community, regardless of race, color, creed, sex or
marital status, although some classes may have special age
limits or other requirements. The classes have no college
admission requirements. Because the Community Educa-
tion program is self-supporting, there are no scholarships
or waivers, except for persons 60 and over when a class
meets certain requirements. Visit online at www.mysfcol-
lege.com.
In 2008 SFC was selected as one of 15 colleges nationwide
to participate in the Plus 50 three-year initiative, which
will develop and benchmark models for innovative pro-
grams reaching out to students over age 50. The project is
funded with a $3.2 million grant from the Atlantic Philan-
thropies and is led by the American Association of Com-
munity Colleges (AACC).
The grant provides SFC $40,000 over three years toward
curriculum development, staff, and marketing. The grant
is being administered through the Community Education Corporate Workforce Education and Training
program and the PrimeTime Institute. Corporate (contract) workforce training is the provision
of courses to meet the needs of a particular business or
Center for Innovation and industry. Training is done at an SFC campus or at the busi-
ness to meet specific requirements in a variety of subject
Economic Development areas. The course curriculum is customized to meet the
Inspiration, education and transformation can happen particular needs of the organization and its staff. Corpo-
at the Center for Innovation and Economic Development rate training may include credit or non-credit courses.
(CIED), Santa Fe’s nexus for business, entrepreneurship In addition, staff members write and administer Quick
and professional development. CIED is home to SFC’s Cen- Response Training Grants for Workforce Florida. A laptop
ter for Business and the college’s Entrepreneur Incubator. computer lab is available for use by the business com-
CIED offers more than 4,000 square feet of comfortable, munity through SFC’s Center for Business. Visit online at
affordable, high-tech space ideal for meetings, trainings, www.sfcollege.edu/cfb.
workshops and seminars. Visit online at www.sfcollege.
edu/cied. Entrepreneur Incubator
SFC’s Entrepreneur Incubator helps entrepreneurs grow
Center for Business new companies. Here they can find business development
The Center for Business at Santa Fe College provides support, mentoring and advice, administrative and techni-
customized corporate and individual training opportu- cal assistance, and work and meeting space.
nities for professional workforce skill enhancement and
continuing education. Courses are offered online and in Professional Development
classrooms in both Alachua and Bradford counties. Classes
Classes are offered as open enrollment opportunities for
at the Center for Business allow individuals to enhance
those seeking to improve their professional skills, gain a
their skills and/or receive training to help them achieve or
new skill, or achieve/renew certifications. The program
recertify professional licenses. Class subjects range from
includes continuing education courses for nurses, child
computer technology training and time management skills
development professionals, insurance and real estate
to CPR, child development, insurance and business skills,
agents and many others. Various computer software,
as well as industry-specific workforce training. No waivers
networking, and special technology skill classes are also
are available for continuing education classes. Visit online
offered through the Center for Business.
at www.sfcollege.edu/cfb.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs) Bookstore
Students who complete continuing education courses may The Santa Fe College Bookstore is located in the Watten-
earn continuing education units (CEUs). CEUs are gener- barger Student Services Building. The bookstore carries
ated when a student completes a non-credit activity. They new and used textbooks, school supplies, SFC logo cloth-
are not transferable for college credit. CEUs are standard- ing, gift items, reference books and convenience items.
ized, based on the number of hours a class is taught. CEUs
allow professional organizations and certifying agencies to Book Buyback
grant recognition for participation in a continuing educa- 1. The best time to sell used books is during finals week.
tion class that fosters professional growth. The college 2. We will pay you 50 percent of the book’s selling price,
keeps a record of each student’s CEUs and transcripts are if it was requested by your professors for required use
18 available on request. Visit online at www.sfcollege.edu/cfb. next term and the bookstore is not overstocked.
College Information
3. If a book does not meet the preceding criteria, the The library is located in Building Y. Hours of service are
prices we pay are based on current national demand. Monday-Thursday 7 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m.,
4. Study guides and workbooks must be “like new” with- Saturday noon-6 p.m., and Sunday noon-8 p.m. Holiday
out any writing on their pages. and exam week hours are posted as needed. A librarian is
5. All books must be in good condition. always available whenever the library is open.
6. Some books have little or no monetary value. Out of
print books and old editions are not in national de-
mand and we can’t buy them. Santa Fe Little School
The Santa Fe Little School offers a developmentally ap-
Bookstore Hours propriate educational program for children ages 14 months
to five years. The Little School is located on the North-
Fall and Spring Terms:
west Campus near the Santa Fe Teaching Zoo. The Tod-
Monday-Thursday 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. dler Program (14 months-approximately two years), the
Friday 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Transition Program (approximately two years-three years),
Summer Term: the Preschool Program (ages three-four years), and the
Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Pre-K program (ages four-five years) are all open from 7:30
a.m.-3:30 p.m. with an Extended Day Program available
For the first three days of fall and spring terms extended
until 5:30 p.m. We are open 12 months a year and enroll
hours: 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
children from college-affiliated families as well as children
For the first two days of summer term extended hours: from families who are not affiliated with the college. We
7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. belong to the USDA Food Program and serve a nutrition-
ally balanced breakfast, lunch, and afternoon snack in a
Refunds family-style atmosphere. Santa Fe Little School is a Gold
A full refund will be given during the first week of class, Seal Program accredited by A.P.P.L.E. (Accredited Profes-
with a receipt. After the first week, a full refund will be sional Preschool Learning Environment). This acknowl-
given up to 30 days after start of classes, with a receipt and edgement validates the quality of our program.
proof of schedule change. Santa Fe Little School is also an educational training site
All merchandise other than textbooks may be refunded for Santa Fe College and University of Florida students who
anytime with a valid receipt. Without a receipt, a merchan- are learning to be teachers. The laboratory school serves as
dise credit will be issued at the current selling price. Cash a field site for students in the Child Development Program,
back on merchandise credits will not exceed $10. Refunds Health Sciences Programs, Zoo Education Program, and
will be given in original form of payment. various social sciences classes. These students spend
many hours at the Little School. They observe and critique,
Exceptions: Custom course materials, outlines, study test their skills, engage the children in carefully created
guides, magazines, and prepaid phone cards. Visit online developmentally appropriate activities, and provide lots of
at whywaitforbooks.com. extra adult attention for the children. We take this train-
ing responsibility very seriously and strive to provide an
exemplary model of educational practices.
Library
The Lawrence W. Tyree Library is committed to service, of- Please call (352) 395-5597 or visit our Web site at www.
fering the highest quality resources and library instruction sfcollege.edu for more information. Visitors are welcome.
for students, faculty and staff. The library team will help
you explore and use the reference collection, books, maga-
zines, electronic databases, multimedia materials, Internet Parking and Traffic Regulations
sites and more. All resources are accessible through the The Santa Fe College Police Department has authority to
library Web site at www.sfcollege.edu. enforce any and all traffic regulations of the state as relat-
ing to Santa Fe College. Santa Fe police also enforce the
The library has ample study areas on all three floors. There
regulations concerning the operation of motor vehicles
are group study rooms on the second floor, computers for
and parking on campus:
students on all three floors, two classrooms, and a cafe.
• Maximum speed on college roadways is 20 mph.
Socializing and cell phone use are limited to the first floor.
The reference area is on the second floor and the entire • Parking is permitted only in designated areas not
third floor is a quiet study area. To keep our library “new,” marked and reserved for special use (e.g. disabled,
food is allowed only in the cafe. All beverages must be in service vehicles, bus stops, faculty).
spill-proof containers. • All pertinent traffic laws of the State of Florida will
be enforced.
Library services include orientation, reference assistance,
circulation, interlibrary loans and course reserves. Library Citations
instruction is provided one-on-one as needed. Librarians
Parking citations are issued under Santa Fe College’s Park-
will also do tailored subject presentations to classes as
ing Rule 6.8. Citations may be paid to the college cashier,
requested by faculty.
Robertson Administration Building, 8:15 a.m.-4 p.m.,
The library also offers one-credit courses: LIS 1002, “Elec- Monday-Friday. A student who wishes to contest a citation
tronic Access to Information,” and LIS 2004, “Internet has 10 working days after the violation to file an appeal at
Research.” Both LIS 1002 and LIS 2004 are available on-site www.sfcollege.edu/parkingappeals. Non-students may
and online through Open Campus. complete an appeal at the Police Department, Building 19
www.sfcollege.edu

T, within 10 working days of the violation. The petitioner
forfeits the right to petition after the 10 day period.
A person with two or more unpaid citations could receive
any or all of the following penalties: the prohibition of the
owner/operator from further registration, the withholding
of transcripts, and the vehicle being booted or towed away
at the owner’s expense.
Disabled parking citations may be written under Florida
Statutes and any fines or appeals would be handled like
other state traffic citations through the Alachua County
Courts.

Reserved Parking
Santa Fe College may require a decal or charge a fee for
student parking; however, the college does provide re-
served parking for its faculty and staff. The parking areas
for faculty and staff are marked with the word “Reserved”
and the lots are outlined in blue.

Parking for the Disabled
Santa Fe College provides reserved parking spaces for
people with disabilities. The spaces are marked with the
international blue and white handicapped signs, and the
curbs and lines are painted blue.
The Police Department may, with a doctor’s note, issue
a special Handicapped Parking Permit to those in need
of temporary parking. For those in need of handicapped
parking for more than one term, an application should
be made to the State of Florida for a permanent parking
permit.

Tow-Away Zones
Because of safety concerns, certain areas on campus have
been marked as tow-away zones. Vehicles parked in these
zones will be towed at the owner’s expense.

Bicycle, Skateboard, Scooter, Roller and
In-line Skate Regulations
Bicycle traffic shall be restricted to those roadways open
to motor vehicles. Sidewalks, passageways, concourses
and hallways are closed to bicycle traffic unless clearly
designated for such. Skateboards, scooters, roller skates
and in-line skates may not be ridden anywhere on the
property of Santa Fe College. Reasonable and necessary
use by disabled persons is not prohibited by this rule. The
college may grant individual use of carts or like devices
for personal transport in the sidewalks, passageways, and
concourses when in the interest of the college as per F.S.S.
3160085.

Smoking and Eating
Santa Fe is a place where people come together to learn.
In that spirit, tobacco use is allowed but only in personal
vehicles, parking lots, and in specifically designated areas
on campus. Food and drink may not be consumed in
classrooms but is allowed in designated common areas
and concession areas as well as in offices and conference
rooms. For information please review College Rule 6.4.

20
Admissions

Admissions ...............................................................................22
Office of Admissions ...............................................................22
Transient Students...................................................................22
Transfer Students.....................................................................22
Assessment and Placement ....................................................23
Orientation ...............................................................................23
Degree Audit.............................................................................23
Registration Procedures .........................................................24
Degree Programs .....................................................................24
New! Bachelor’s Programs Fall 2009 .....................................24
Advisement Center ..................................................................24
Student Responsibilities .........................................................26
Deadlines and Transcripts .....................................................26
High School Dual Enrollment Program................................27
Family and Student Educational Rights (FERPA) ................27
Residence Classification .........................................................28
Student Course Loads .............................................................30

21
www.sfcollege.edu

___ Official score report(s) from testing service(s) for
AP, IB, CLEP and/or DANTES, if applicable
___ Official college transcripts from all postsecondary
schools attended
___ Previous degree students require proof of previous
degree
___ Transient students require transient form from
www.facts.org
Step 2. Apply for Financial Aid
To obtain financial aid students must complete and
file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) form. Apply online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
Step 3. Placement Testing
Take the CPT (given on a walk-in basis in G-25) or
provide proof of exemption. Visit the Assessment
Center Web site at www.sfcollege.edu for more in-
formation.
Note: ALL first time-in-college/freshman A.A.-degree
seeking students beginning in fall 2009 who are
exempted from taking the CPT based on their ACT or
SAT scores will be required to take the College Level
Math (CLM) portion of the CPT.
Step 4. Orientation
Admissions Appointments for orientation are scheduled through
Information regarding admission to the college, deadline students’ eSantaFe accounts after all paperwork
dates for submission of applications, and all forms nec- for admission has been submitted and processed.
essary for admission to the college may be obtained by Students who attend on-campus orientation will
contacting the Office of Admissions, Santa Fe College, 3000 meet with an advisor and register for classes during
NW 83rd Street, Gainesville, Florida 32606, or by visiting orientation. New students are strongly encouraged
our Web site at www.sfcollege.edu. to come on campus for orientation but may com-
plete this program online if necessary. Students may
meet with an advisor only after they have success-
Office of Admissions fully completed their online orientation.
The Admissions Office is where staff can help students
with questions or concerns about getting started, admis- Step 5. See Advisor/Register/Pay for Classes
sions advisement, preliminary academic advisement, new Register for classes online through eSantaFe. Pay-
ments or fee waivers must be processed by the fee
student orientation, the difference between types of degree
deadline or classes will be dropped. See the aca-
programs, and campus tours. Students can also apply for
demic calendar on page 7 for dates when fees are
admission or pick up and submit required forms at the Of-
due.
fice of Admissions.
Step 6. Get Student ID Card
In addition to these services, the Office of Admissions Students may pick up their ID cards in S-147 by pre-
manages askSantaFe, your online source for information. senting a picture ID and their fee paid slip.
Feel free to submit your questions to askSantaFe for a quick
and efficient online response or to chat online with an
Admissions representative. Transient Students
Students attending other postsecondary institutions who
What Next? Steps for Getting Started want to take courses at Santa Fe College and transfer the
credit back to their institutions may be admitted to Santa
Step 1. Apply for Admission/Submit Paperwork
Fe as transient students. These students should apply for
___ Online application at www.sfcollege.edu
admission before submitting the transient form or let-
After applying, check eSantaFe under the My Status/
Info link for a personalized checklist of paperwork ter. Transcripts are not accepted in lieu of transient forms
requirements. and paper forms are not accepted for institutions with an
___ Residency form online form. Completion of the application and transient
___ Official high school transcript with graduation form does not guarantee a seat in any particular class.
date, or GED
___ Placement test (CPT), college level SAT or ACT
scores, (ACT/SAT/CPT less than 2 years old) or Transfer Students
proof of college level math and English passed Transfer students (those students who have attended any
with a grade of C or better postsecondary institution) must furnish a complete official
___ College Level Math (CLM) portion of CPT if transcript or record from each institution attended. Credits
submitting college level math SAT or ACT scores for any course taken at another regionally accredited insti-
(for first-time-in-college/freshman, fall 2009, A.A. tution will be transferred, provided a grade of D or better
22 degree seeking students only) was obtained. Grades of D or lower will not be accepted to
Admissions
satisfy requirements for any college preparatory or Gordon courses only, special programs and seminars, or
Rule course. any of the unrestricted courses and programs in any
term’s registration schedule
Santa Fe College accepts transfer course work from region-
ally accredited institutions. In addition, the college is in C. All transfer or readmission students who have satis-
compliance with and participates in the Florida Depart- factorily completed College Composition (ENC 1101)
ment of Education Statewide Course Numbering System or equivalent and Intermediate Algebra (MAT1033)
for courses at non-regionally accredited institutions under or College Algebra (MAC1105) or equivalent with a C
the state of Florida K-16 Articulation Agreement. or better.

In accordance with §1001.64(8)(a) F.S., Santa Fe College The placement testing requirement is intended to provide
may consider the past actions of any person applying the college with an indication of the student’s achievement
for admission or enrollment and may deny admission of college level communication and computation compe-
or enrollment to an applicant because of misconduct if tencies. Students whose placement test scores are below
determined to be in the best interest of the college. Santa college level will enroll in college preparatory courses.
Fe reserves the right to refuse admission or re-enrollment These courses will earn credits, but will not be counted
or to place conditions on admission or re-enrollment of ap- toward meeting the required or elective credits necessary
plicants and students whom Santa Fe determines would be for the Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science or
disruptive of the orderly process of the college’s programs, Associate of Arts degree.
would interfere with the rights and privileges of other stu-
dents or employees, and/or would represent a safety risk
to Santa Fe students, employees or property. Applicants/ Orientation
students have the right to appeal any decision to the Vice (first-time Santa Fe students)
President for Student Affairs within 10 calendar days of the The application packet must be complete before orienta-
date the notice was received. tion can be scheduled.
Step 1 Check in at self-scheduled date and time
Assessment and Placement Step 2 Orientation/information
Rule 6A-10.315, College Preparatory Testing, Placement Step 3 Academic advisement
and Instruction, states that first-time-in-college applicants Step 4 Registration
for admission into degree programs shall be tested for Step 5 Pay fees online through eSantaFe, in person at
reading, writing and mathematics proficiency prior to the the cashier’s office (RAB-52), or by mail
completion of initial registration, using the Florida College
Step 6 Pick up student ID card in S-147
Entry Level Placement Test (CPT). Students who present
scores on the SAT or E-ACT that meet or exceed college
level placement scores may be exempted from taking the Online Orientation
Florida College Entry Level Placement Test, provided the SFC orientation can be completed online via eSantaFe.
scores are less than two years old. This program provides information for prospective and
new students, their families and anyone who has a general
ALL first-time-in-college (freshman) A.A.-degree seeking interest in SFC. New first-time-in-college students are
students beginning in fall 2009 who are exempted from strongly encouraged to come on campus for orientation.
taking the CPT based on their ACT or SAT scores will be
Transfer students may opt to complete orientation online
required to take the College Level Math (CLM) portion of
in lieu of on-campus orientation.
the CPT to determine proper mathematics placement.
Potential students are encouraged to apply to the college Orientation Learning Communities
and take the CPT as early as possible. Pre-selected clusters of classes, known as Orientation
Students who score below the designated state cut-scores Learning Communities, are available to students who
are required to develop college level skills and are encour- attend orientation. Please see an advisor at orientation for
aged to do so before they enroll in college level courses. permission to register for these classes.
Both public and private providers are available. Students
can also take college remediation courses while they at-
tend Santa Fe.
Degree Audit
All currently enrolled and readmit students must access
Students whose native language is not English may have their degree audit for degree requirements, graduation sta-
additional testing requirements. tus, grades, GPA and university admission requirements
The Santa Fe Assessment Center will administer the CPT prior to registration. All current and returning students
on a walk-in basis, Monday-Thursday 8 a.m.-6 p.m. and are required to view their degree audit via eSantaFe prior
Friday 8 a.m.-2 p.m. in Building G, room 25. A picture ID is to registration and are encouraged to meet with an advisor
required (driver’s license, military ID, passport). Exempted for proper course selection.
from this testing requirement are the following: Degree audits are available online via eSantaFe. Log in to
A. All students who have earned an Associate of Arts eSantaFe, click on View Degree Audit, and select Degree
degree or higher from an accredited institution in Audit Detail. If students have questions about degree re-
the United States quirements, they are strongly encouraged to meet with an
B. All students intending to enroll in vocational academic advisor prior to registration. 23
www.sfcollege.edu

Registration Procedures eSantaFe or meet with an advisor for proper course selec-
tion prior to registration.
Entering students must schedule an orientation session
online at eSantaFe or complete the online orientation Location R-201 (NW Campus)
prior to meeting with an advisor and registering for their Phone (352) 395-5503
first term. Students can access their application status on Advising Hours Monday-Thursday
eSantaFe by clicking the My Info/Status link. Registration 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
appointments for current students will be posted on eSan- Friday 1-4:30 p.m.
taFe 10 business days prior to the start of registration. Students may make an appointment or be seen on a walk-
in basis. Advisors are also available at the Blount, Andrews,
Readmittance Watson and Davis Centers.
Students who have previously attended Santa Fe College If you plan to transfer to one of Florida’s state universities,
may readmit online through eSantaFe. There is no fee to the Associate of Arts degree (A.A. degree) is the transfer-
readmit. able degree. The A.A. degree contains the general educa-
tion portion (lower division) of the baccalaureate degree
(B.A. degree).
Santa Fe College
To help us advise you properly, please make sure you have
Degree Programs indicated which university you want to transfer to and
Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree programs for students who what major you would like to study. It is extremely help-
wish to transfer to a four-year college or university upon ful to have your academic program fully planned no later
graduation. This degree is composed of 36 credit hours of than the beginning of the second term. All A.A. students
general education and 24 credit hours of electives that are must indicate a major or program code by the time they
usually comprised of the preprofessional courses required have completed 24 college level hours (effective summer
for entrance to a particular major. At least 60 credit hours registration 2005).
in courses designated with a P (Parallel) must be success-
Students who have not indicated a major upon comple-
fully completed in order to graduate with an A.A. degree.
tion of 24 hours will be blocked from registration. Students
Associate of Science (A.S.) and Associate of Applied Sci- who are still undecided about their major, students who do
ence (A.A.S.) degree programs designed for entry into not plan to transfer to a university, or students who do not
employment after completion of the two-year degree. They see their major listed must select one of the three general
include 15-18 credit hours of general education courses interest categories under program codes 1100 (Social &
and approximately 42 credit hours specific to the degree Behavioral Sciences), 1105 (Science & Engineering), or 1110
that is being earned. (Humanities & Letters).
Technical Certificate programs designed to meet the oc- A.A. students can select their major online via eSantaFe
cupational needs of the community by preparing students by selecting Change Major on the menu. Choosing a major
for employment. These programs of instruction are less does not commit you to that selection; you can change
than 60 credit hours of college level courses. your major at any time. The A.A. Advisement Center can
give you specific information about the university and
major of your choice.
New! Fall 2009
If you have questions about a major, please meet with an
Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) degree programs in
advisor in R-201. If you are undecided, please contact a ca-
Clinical Laboratory Science and Health Services Admin-
reer counselor in the Counseling Center, S-255 or visit the
istration. These programs provide degree completion
career counselor in the A.A. Advisement Center, R-210.
opportunities for students from a variety of educational
backgrounds, but primarily those with Associate of Science
degrees or the equivalent. State Universities of Florida
Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University

Advisement Center Florida Atlantic University
Florida Gulf Coast University
Associate of Arts Degree Advisement Florida International University
Santa Fe College is committed to quality academic advis- Florida State University
ing for all students. Our mission is to help students reach
their educational goals from matriculation to graduation. New College of Florida
The A.A. Advisement Center acts as an information and University of Central Florida
referral center with timely and accurate information for
University of Florida
students regarding admissions advisement and A.A. degree
graduation requirements. Advisors help A.A. students plan University of North Florida
their program of study for transfer to a four-year university. University of South Florida
All new students (first-time-in-college and transfer) must
University of West Florida
attend orientation, either on campus or online, prior to
meeting with an academic advisor. All current and return- Not all majors are listed here. If your major is not here,
ing students are required to view their degree audit via please discuss your educational plans with an academic
24 advisor in R-201.
Admissions
A.A. Program Codes
Santa Fe College offers the preprofessional courses required for most college and university majors. The following
are the 40 most popular majors at Florida’s state universities, but not all majors are listed. If you do not see your major
listed, please see an A.A. academic advisor in R-201 or at any center to choose the appropriate course of study.

Florida’s Top 40 Majors
Code Major Intended Code Major Intended Code Major Intended
1031 Accounting 1022 Chemistry 1062 Music
1010 Agriculture – (Including 1131 Criminal Justice/Criminology 1071 Nursing
Agricultural Operations Man- 1066 Dance 1073 Pharmacy
agement, Animal Science, 1136 Economics 1048 Physical Education
Entomology & Nematology, 1041 Elementary Education 1023 Physics
Food Science & Human Nutri-
1055 Engineering 1133 Political Science
tion, Horticultural
1081 English 1072 Pre-Occupational Therapy
Sciences, Microbiology, etc.)
1054 Environmental Science 1074 Pre-Physical Therapy
1059 Anthropology
1042 Exercise and Sport Science – 1134 Psychology
1051 Architecture
(Including Athletic Training, 1069 Recreation
1061 Art-Studio – (Including Art
History, Art Studio, Creative Fitness/Wellness, etc.) 1130 Religion
Photography, Graphic Design, 1123 Fashion Merchandising 1122 Social Work
etc.) 1012 Forestry 1135 Sociology
1068 Astronomy 1132 History 1044 Special Education
1021 Biological Sciences 1121 Home Economics 1043 Sports Management
1063 Botany 1053 Interior Design 1067 Theatre
1052 Building Construction 1064 Journalism – (Including Adver- 1058 Zoology
1030 Business Administration (B.S.) tising, Photojournalism, Public 1075 Pre-Dental
– (Including Computer Infor- Relations, Telecommunica- 1076 Pre-Medical
mation Sciences, Finance, tions, etc.)
1011 Pre-Veterinary
Management, Marketing, etc.) 1139 Mathematics
1032 Business Administration (B.A.) 1086 Medical Technology

REGISTRATION FLAGS COURSE IDENTIFIER (ID) CODES COLLEGE PREP RESTRICTION FLAGS
D = Permission required to drop C = College Preparatory Course, Students with a College Prep flag may not
E = Computer placement exam required Not Transferable register for a course for which the College Prep
L = Must register for attached lab section D = Educator Prep Institute, course is a co-requisite or pre-requisite. College
N = No time conflict check made Not Transferable Prep restricted courses are designated with the
P = Department permission required H = High School Course, following flags:
U = Sunday Restricted Enrollment G = Reading
M = Monday O = Occupational: Credit, M = Mathematics
T = Tuesday Transfer Not Guaranteed W = Writing
W = Wednesday P = Parallel: Credit, College Transfer
H = Thursday S = Supplemental, Restricted Enrollment
F = Friday V = Postsecondary Adult Vocational,
S = Saturday Contact Hour
TBA = To Be Arranged

25
www.sfcollege.edu

The following documents are required as part of the ad-
missions process:
• Completed application for admission form. Note:
International students with a non-immigrant visa
must contact the International Student Services of-
fice for an International Student application.
• Official high school transcript or GED diploma.

Student Responsibilities
Students are ultimately responsible for knowing and fulfill-
ing all graduation requirements as well as pre-professional
requirements for their major/program of study. In order to
meet that goal, they are responsible for:
• attending orientation to receive advisement prior to
their first term of enrollment;
• meeting with an advisor on a regular basis about
graduation requirements and understanding admis-
sion requirements for their major;
• reviewing the degree audit to ensure the remaining
degree requirements are fully understood;
• seeking advisement when in academic difficulty;
• maintaining their own personal academic records,
including the catalog of their year of admission to
Career and Technical Education Advisement Santa Fe, transcripts, degree audits, evaluation of
Students interested in any of the Career and Technical transfer work, and notes from previous advising ses-
Education programs, which have selective admission re- sions.
quirements, are urged to contact the appropriate program
Students who at any time are confused about academic
advisor as early as possible. Admission to the college does
requirements or their progress toward a degree are encour-
not guarantee entry into any program that has selective
aged and expected to meet with an advisor. Check our Web
admission requirements. Career and Technical Education
site at www.sfcollege.edu for the following information:
programs offered at the college are listed on page 65.
• general education requirements
High school graduation or a high school equivalency • pre-professional courses (courses required by your
certificate (GED) issued by a state board of education is re- university major)
quired of all applicants seeking admission to college credit • SUS foreign language requirement
programs and courses at SFC with four exceptions: • university links
• Non-high school graduates 18 years of age, or older • bulletin board
students possessing certificates of completion, are
• degree audit
eligible to enroll for certain certificate courses only.
• Early admission students will be accepted only from
the college district upon the recommendation of the Deadlines and Transcripts
Alachua or Bradford county school boards in accor- SFC requires final, official transcripts from all entering stu-
dance with the regulations set by those organiza- dents as a part of the application for admission. Transcripts
tions. should be on file with the Office of Records and Admissions
• Alachua or Bradford county senior high school prior to registration. This includes high school transcripts
students are permitted to enroll in individual credit for entering freshmen and college transcripts for students
courses on recommendation of their high school transferring from other colleges or universities. Transfer
principals. Specific units of high school preparation students must submit final, official transcripts from all
are not required, but students should have complet- institutions they have attended. Transfer students with
ed courses in English, social studies, mathematics less than 60 college credit hours from previous institutions
and the natural sciences. must also provide high school transcripts.
• In the case of a student who is home educated, a
signed, notarized affidavit submitted by the stu- The deadline for applying to the college, with all sup-
dent’s parent or legal guardian attesting that the porting documents for any given term, is the last day of
student has completed a home education program late registration. For this and other official college dates,
pursuant to the requirements of §232.02(4) F.S. is check the calendar online at www.sfcollege.edu or contact
required. This affidavit may be obtained in the Of- the Welcome and Admissions Center or askSantaFe. This
fice of Admissions (Building R, room 112) or online date is subject to change without notice. Please refer to
at www.sfcollege.edu/admissions. the Admissions Web site at www.sfcollege.edu for updated
information regarding admissions deadlines.
Note: Students who have earned high school certificates of
completion should contact the Welcome and Admissions All students are strongly encouraged to apply early and
Center in Building R, room 112 for information regarding complete all registration procedures before the first day of
26 college course work. class.
Admissions
High School Dual College placement scores determine eligibility for
college level work. Fine Arts students select a major
Enrollment Program and enroll in courses in the areas of studio art, music,
Santa Fe College, in cooperation with the School Boards of dance or theatre.
Alachua and Bradford counties, provides dual enrollment 4. Part-time Academic Dual Enrollment Academically
opportunities for high school students. County articulation eligible seniors may take college level courses and
agreements specify eligibility for program options. Tuition apply the credit toward high school graduation and
is free and textbooks are loaned free of charge to students an Associate of Arts degree. Eligibility is based on a
affiliated with a public school. Private and home schooled combination of college placement test scores and GPA.
students (not affiliated with a public school) must pur- The college course load is dependent on the number
chase their own college textbooks. The free and reduced of classes a student is registered for at the high school.
lunch program is available to those students affiliated with (Bradford County students in grades nine through
an Alachua County public school. twelve may participate in this option.)
1. Technology and Applied Science Dual Enrollment 5. Part-time Fine Arts Dual Enrollment Eligible juniors
(Career and Technical Programs) Selected eleventh and seniors may enroll in college studio art, dance,
and twelfth grade students who qualify through the music or theatre courses. Credit earned will apply
CPT, SAT or ACT, their GPA and other criteria, enroll toward high school graduation and an Associate of Arts
in Career and Technical Programs on campus. Once degree.
accepted, students register for the full-time program 6. Early Admission This option is available to seniors.
enrolling in college technology, high school and/or
Students attend Santa Fe on a full-time basis and are
college academic course work to fulfill high school
registered in college courses that apply toward a high
graduation requirements. There are over 30 career
school diploma and an A.A. degree. Eligibility is based
related areas from which students may choose a major.
on a 3.5 GPA and a college level score on the ACT, SAT,
(Technical programs not offered at the Bradford Voca-
or CPT as well as additional entrance criteria.
tional Technical Center are available to Bradford High
School juniors and seniors.) The CPT is administered at Santa Fe College and is free to
School of Construction Eleventh and twelfth grade students who apply to the Dual Enrollment Program.
Alachua County students may enroll in the School of
Information concerning the application process can be
Construction. This program provides an early entry
obtained from the High School Dual Enrollment office in
opportunity for high school students to study one of
Building R, room 5 or by calling (352) 395-5490. Applica-
the professional construction trades. The School of
tions for fall enrollment at the Northwest Campus will be
Construction offers courses in carpentry, electrical,
accepted beginning in January. Notification of acceptance
plumbing, masonry, and heating and air conditioning.
begins the end of May. The program fills quickly, so stu-
After graduation from high school, students will be
dents should submit an application and college placement
eligible for the college’s Apprenticeship Program.
test results as early as possible.
High school students may choose one of two options
for the School of Construction:
Full-time Dual Enrollment Under this program, stu- Family and Student
dents will take either high school or college classes to
meet high school graduation requirements, and college Educational Rights (FERPA)
construction classes on the SFC campus. In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and
Part-time Dual Enrollment Students choosing this Privacy Act (FERPA) and Florida Statutes (Privacy Rights
option take academic classes at their home high school of Parents and Students), the college has identified as
during the morning and attend the college in the after- “directory information” a student’s name, local address,
noon for construction classes. For information about telephone number, date of birth, major field of study,
this program call Tony Pavai at (352) 395-5048 or the participation in officially recognized activities and sports,
Dual Enrollment office at (352) 395-5490. weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of
2. College Academic Dual Enrollment Juniors and attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most
seniors who qualify through the CPT, SAT or ACT, their recent previous educational agency or institution attended
GPA and other criteria, are eligible to become full-time by the student. This information is available to the public.
College Academic Dual Enrollment students. These Other information about students can be released only
students take all college academic courses that lead when a written authorization, signed by the student, is
toward an Associate of Arts degree. College courses presented to the college.
also meet high school graduation requirements. All Any student who does not want this directory informa-
Associate of Arts degree course work offered through tion released must file a directory information exclusion
Dual Enrollment is transferable to the State University request with the Office of Records (Building R, room 101).
System. Upon written request from a student, the custodians of
3. Fine Arts Dual Enrollment Juniors and seniors may
educational records will insure that all access rights speci-
enroll in the full-time Fine Arts Dual Enrollment Pro-
fied by this act will be accorded within three business days
gram. All students must qualify through the CPT, SAT
after a request has been made.
or ACT, their GPA and other criteria. Once accepted,
students register for college Fine Arts, high school Each semester, the college prepares a listing containing
and/or college academic course work to fulfill high the name, address, and telephone number of each student
school graduation requirements. College Fine Arts enrolled. Copies of that listing are occasionally made
courses also apply toward an Associate of Arts degree. available to companies who wish to contact SFC students.
27
www.sfcollege.edu

Any student who wants his or her information excluded preceding year, has purchased a home which is oc-
from the college directory must file the request before the cupied by him as his residence, or has established a
first day of class for the full term. A directory exclusion re- domicile in this state pursuant to 222.17.
quest will remain in effect until rescinded in writing by the • The term “parent” means the natural or adoptive
student. Names of students who have requested directory parent or legal guardian of a dependent child. Ex-
exclusion will not be printed in the commencement book ample: A “resident for tuition purposes” is a person
for the graduation ceremony. who qualifies as provided in subsection (2) for the
in-state tuition rate; a “non-resident for tuition
The college has designated the following individuals, by
purposes” is a person who does not qualify for the
virtue of their responsibilities, as custodians of educa-
in-state tuition rate.
tional records:
(2) To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes:
Vice President for Student Affairs: Portia Taylor
• A person or, if that person is a dependent child,
College Registrar: Lynn Sullivan his parent or parents must have established legal
If students wish to challenge the accuracy of their educa- residence in this state for at least 12 months imme-
tional records, questions may be settled through informal diately prior to his qualification.
hearings or upon the request of either party (the educa- • Every applicant for admission to an institution
tional institution or the eligible student) through formal of higher education shall be required to make a
proceedings which will be conducted in compliance with statement as to his length of residence in this state
this statute. These procedures are intended to apply only and, further, shall establish that his presence or, if
to challenges to the accuracy of institutional records con- he is a dependent child, the presence of his parent
taining the grade assigned. Thus, eligible students could or parents in the state currently is, and during the
seek to correct an improperly recorded grade, but could requisite 12-month qualifying period was, for the
not, through the hearing requested pursuant to this law, purpose of maintaining a bona fide domicile, rather
contest whether the teacher should have assigned a higher than for the purpose of maintaining a mere tempo-
grade because the parents or student believe that the stu- rary residence or abode incident to enrollment in an
dent was entitled to a higher grade. institution of higher education.
• However, with respect to a dependent child living
Parents or guardians desiring access to the records of a with an adult relative other than the child’s parent,
student who is their dependent should ask the student to such child may qualify as a resident for tuition pur-
grant permission in writing to the college. Without written poses if the adult relative is a legal resident who has
permission from the student, the parents or guardians maintained legal residence in this state for at least
must certify in writing to the Office of Records that the 12 months immediately prior to the child’s qualifi-
student is economically dependent upon them as defined cation, provided the child has resided continuously
by Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, and
with such relative for the 5 years immediately prior
must document this dependency by providing a copy of
to the child’s qualification, during which time the
the previous year’s income tax return.
adult relative has exercised day-to-day care, super-
vision, and control of the child.
Residence Classification • The legal residence of a dependent child whose
parents are divorced, separated, or otherwise living
For the purpose of assessing matriculation and tuition
apart will be deemed to be this state if either parent
fees, a student shall be classified as a “resident” or “non-
is a legal resident of this state, regardless of which
resident” based upon Florida Statute 1009.21. A complete
parent is entitled to claim, and does in fact claim,
copy of the state statute follows. Please contact the Office
of Enrollment Services if you have questions about your the minor as a dependent pursuant to federal indi-
initial residency classification or the Office of Records vidual income tax provisions.
if you would like to petition to reclassify your residency (3) An individual shall not be classified as a resident for tu-
status. ition purposes and, thus, shall not be eligible to receive
the in-state tuition rate until he has provided such
evidence related to legal residence and its duration as
1009.21 Determination of resident may be required by officials of the institution of higher
status for tuition purposes education from which he seeks the in-state tuition rate.
Students shall be classified as residents or non-residents (4) With respect to a dependent child, the legal residence
for the purpose of assessing tuition fees in public commu- of such individual’s parent or parents is prima facie
nity colleges and universities. evidence of the individual’s legal residence, which
(1) As defined under this section: evidence may be reinforced or rebutted, relative to the
• The term “dependent child” means any person, age and general circumstances of the individual, by
whether or not living with his parent, who is eligible the other evidence of legal residence required of or pre-
to be claimed by his parent as a dependent under sented by the individual. However, the legal residence
the Federal Income Tax Code. of an individual whose parents are domiciled outside
• The term “institution of higher education” means this state is not prima facie evidence of the individual’s
any of the constituent institutions under the juris- legal residence if that individual has lived in this state
diction of the State University System or the State for 5 consecutive years prior to enrolling or reregis-
Community College System. tering at the institution of higher education at which
• A “legal resident” or “resident” is a person who resident status for tuition purposes is sought.
28 maintained his residence in this state for the (5) In making a domiciliary determination related to the
Admissions
classification of a person as a resident or non-resident
for tuition purposes, the domicile of a married person,
irrespective of sex, shall be determined, as in the case
of an unmarried person, by reference to all relevant
evidence of domiciliary intent. For the purposes of this
section:
• A person shall not be precluded from establishing
or maintaining legal residence in this state and
subsequently qualifying or continuing to qualify as
a resident for tuition purposes solely by reason of
marriage to a person domiciled outside this state,
even when that person’s spouse continues to be do-
miciled outside of this state, provided such person
maintains his legal residence in this state.
• A person shall not be deemed to have established or
maintained legal residence in this state and subse-
quently to have qualified or continued to qualify as
a resident for tuition purposes solely by reason of
marriage to a person domiciled in this state.
• In determining the domicile of a married person,
irrespective of sex, the fact of the marriage and the
place of domicile of such person’s spouse shall be
deemed relevant evidence to be considered in ascer-
taining domiciliary intent.
(6) Any non-resident person, irrespective of sex, who mar- (a) Active duty members of the armed services of the
ries a legal resident of this state or marries a person United States residing or stationed in this state,
who later becomes a legal resident may, upon becom- their spouses, and dependent children, and active
ing a legal resident of this state, accede to the benefit members of the Florida National Guard who qualify
of the spouse’s immediately precedent duration as a under s. 250.10(7) and (8) for the tuition assistance
legal resident for purposes of satisfying the 12-month program.
durational requirement of this section. (b) Active duty members of the armed services of the
(7) A person shall not lose his resident status for tuition United States and their spouses and dependents
purposes solely by reason of serving, or if such person attending a public community college or state uni-
is a dependent child, by reason of his parent or parents’ versity within 50 miles of the military establishment
serving, in the armed forces outside this state. where they are stationed, if such military establish-
(8) A person who has been properly classified as a resi- ment is within a county contiguous to Florida.
dent for tuition purposes but who, while enrolled in an (c) United States citizens living on the Isthmus of Pan-
institution of higher education in this state, loses his ama, who have completed 12 consecutive months of
resident tuition status because he or, if he is a depen- college work at the Florida State University Panama
dent child, his parent or parents establish domicile or Canal Branch, and their spouses and dependent
legal residence elsewhere, shall continue to enjoy the children.
in-state tuition rate for a statutory grace period, which
(d) Full-time instructional and administrative person-
period shall be measured from the date on which the
nel employed by state public schools, community
circumstances arose that culminated in the loss of res-
colleges, and institutions of higher education, as
ident tuition status and shall continue for 12 months.
defined in s. 1000.04, and their spouses and depen-
However, if the 12-month grace period ends during a
dent children.
semester or academic term for which such former resi-
dent is enrolled, such grace period shall be extended to (e) Students from Latin America and the Caribbean
the end of that semester or academic term. who receive scholarships from the federal or state
(9) Any person who ceases to be enrolled at or who gradu- government. Any student classified pursuant to
this paragraph shall attend, on a full-time basis, a
ates from an institution of higher education while
Florida institution of higher education.
classified as a resident for tuition purposes and who
subsequently abandons his domicile in this state shall (f) Southern Regional Education Board’s Academic
be permitted to re-enroll at an institution of higher Common Market graduate students attending
education in this state as a resident for tuition pur- Florida’s state universities.
poses without the necessity of meeting the 12-month (g) Full-time employees of state agencies or political
durational requirement of this section if that person subdivisions of the state when the student fees are
has re-established his domicile in this state within 12 paid by the state agency or political subdivision for
months of such abandonment and continuously main- the purpose of job-related law enforcement or cor-
tains the re-establishment domicile during the period rections training.
of enrollment. The benefit of this subsection shall not (h) McKnight Doctoral Fellows and Finalists who are
be accorded more than once to any one person. United States citizens.
(10) The following persons shall be classified as residents (i) United States citizens living outside the United
for tuition purposes:
29
www.sfcollege.edu

States who are teaching at a Department of Defense
Dependent School or in an American International
School and who enroll in a graduate level education
program which leads to a Florida teaching certifi-
cate.
(j) Active duty members of the Canadian military
residing or stationed in this state under the North
American Air Defense (NORAD) agreement, and
their spouses and dependent children, attending
a community college or state university within 50
miles of the military establishment where they are
stationed.
(k) Active duty members of a foreign nation’s military
who are serving as liaison officers and are resid-
ing or stationed in this state, and their spouses and
dependent children, attending a community college
or state university within 50 miles of the military
establishment where the foreign liaison officer is
stationed.
Petitions for reclassification of residency status and all
necessary accompanying documentation must be submit-
ted to the Office of Records before the first day of class for
the term in which residency status is sought. Retroactive
changes and refunds for prior terms will not be made.

Student Course Loads
A full-time student for fall, spring, and summer terms
is one who enrolls in 12 or more semester hours or any
combination of 12 or more hours in the full or mini ses-
sions within the individual term. Credit hours for courses
audited are counted toward a full load. Students may not
register for more than 19 semester hours in any term at SFC
except with special permission. Students seeking permis-
sion to enroll in more than 19 semester hours must see the
associate vice president of Academic Affairs or a designee
in room 253 of the Robertson Administration Building on
the Northwest Campus.

30
College Expenses

Computer Access Policy ..........................................................32
Financial Aid ............................................................................32
Official Withdrawal .................................................................33
Refund and Adjustment of Fees .............................................33
Social Security .........................................................................32
Student Financial Obligations ...............................................33
Fees .....................................................................................33
Waivers ...............................................................................35
Refunds ..............................................................................35
Third Attempt Limit ................................................................35

31
www.sfcollege.edu

Minimum Specifications
Open Campus courses, as well as any course using an on-
line component, are delivered by the Angel LMS (Learning
Management System). The Angel LMS supports specific
browsers, namely Internet Explorer 7 and Firefox 2. This
is true for Windows and Mac OS X. Some courses may
require specific software such as Microsoft Office and so
forth. Your computer should be fast enough that you do
not feel hampered by its speed or capabilities. Almost any
computer purchased new in the past five years is capable
of running one of the supported browsers. Support for spe-
cific extra software such as Microsoft Office may require
a specific operating system that will have its own require-
ments. In general, your instructor must be able to open and
view any documents and so forth that you create as part of
your course work. SFC faculty and staff use Microsoft Of-
fice, which is also installed in labs.

Financial Aid
Many students who need financial assistance are able to
obtain help through scholarships, loans, grants and part-
time work. Financial aid programs at SFC include but are
not limited to Federal Pell Grant, Academic Competitive-
ness Grant, Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grant,
Computer Access Policy Federal Work-Study, Federal Direct Student Loan, Santa
In the 21st century ongoing use of an Internet connected Fe Scholarship, Florida Student Assistance Grant, Florida
computer is a requirement for successful completion of Bright Futures Scholarships, and Federal Plus Loan. These
college programs. Santa Fe College expects and requires programs are financed by federal, state and institutional
that all students acquire access to the computer hardware
funds. Awards are made on an academic year basis and the
and software necessary for their programs. The cost of
amount of assistance is determined by individual need,
meeting this requirement varies from student to student,
student eligibility, and availability of funds.
but may include purchase or lease of a computer and/or
printer, Internet access fees, software purchases, and cost SFC’s Board of Trustees offers scholarships to outstand-
of maintenance and supplies. Costs of meeting this re- ing students in the following areas: Athletics, the College
quirement will be included in financial aid considerations. Achievement Program, Academics (Honors and Need
No student will be denied access to Santa Fe College be- Based), Creative Arts, Public Service, Student Ambassa-
cause of an inability to purchase or lease a computer, and dor, Student Government, and Technology and Applied
accordingly, the college offers access to computers through Sciences.. Inquiries should be directed to Financial Aid,
its computer labs and the library. Scholarship Office, Building R, in the student services
complex or by calling (352) 395-5470. In addition, there are
General Specifications privately funded scholarships offered to SFC students by
• Computer with DVD drive Santa Fe’s Endowment Corporation. Information may be
• Internet access obtained from the Office for Development.
• E-mail
• Web browser—Internet Explorer 7 or Firefox 2 Students are encouraged to apply for financial aid by
• Word processor and spreadsheet software (Micro- March 15 for the following academic year starting with the
soft Office, OpenOffice) fall term. Detailed information concerning financial aid is
• Contact your program area for discipline-specific available in the Financial Aid Handbook. You may obtain
software and software requirements this information by visiting the Financial Aid Web site at
www.sfcollege.edu or writing to the Financial Aid Office,
Recommended Specifications Building R, room 122, 3000 NW 83rd Street, Gainesville,
Florida, 32606, or by calling (352) 395-5480.
Personal Computer IntelR CoreTG2 Duo Processor; 2 GB
memory; 160 GB hard drive; 16x DVD RW drive; broad-
band; 19” flat panel monitor; inkjet or laser printer; MS Social Security
Windows XP or Vista; virus scanning software.
Students should direct inquiries related to Social Security
Macintosh Intel Core Duo Processor; 1 GB memory; 160 benefits to their local Social Security office. SFC’s Office of
GB hard drive; 8x double layer SuperDrive; broadband; Records will certify student enrollment for the Social Se-
inkjet or laser printer; OS X; Office 2004 or 2008; virus curity Administration. Educational benefits are awarded
32 scanning software. through the Social Security office.
College Expenses
Official Withdrawal If the college cancels a class at any time prior to its comple-
tion, the student’s enrollment in that class will be canceled
A student may officially withdraw from one course or from
and the student will be entitled to a 100 percent refund of
the college prior to the late withdrawal deadline. For this
fees paid for that class, less any indebtedness to the col-
and other official college dates, check the calendar online
lege. The college will notify the student and the college will
at www.sfcollege.edu.
initiate the refund process.
The withdrawal procedure is initiated by the student in
Refunds will be processed after the fee refund deadline
the Office of Records and may affect the student’s athletic
dates. For these and other official college dates, check
eligibility, financial aid or veterans benefits, as well as
the calendar online at www.sfcollege.edu. While refund
benefits received from other federal agencies. Students are
checks will be processed and distributed as soon as pos-
required to obtain signatures from various departments
sible, a fair expectation for their receipt would be approxi-
in order to withdraw, and it is the responsibility of the stu-
mately two weeks after the deadline.
dent to deliver a completed withdrawal form to the Office
of Records, Building R, room 101.
Students will not be permitted to routinely withdraw from
Student Financial Obligations
college preparatory courses (ENC 0020; REA 0010; MAT Students shall be held responsible for their financial
0002; MAT 0024). Special permission for withdrawal must obligations to Santa Fe College. Accordingly, a student
be obtained from the College Prep advisor or chairperson. who is delinquent in satisfying such obligations shall not
be permitted to graduate, register, receive a transcript for
The withdrawal procedure does not guarantee any refund completed course work or benefit from other regular col-
of money, nor is it related in any way to the refund policy lege services. Student financial obligations include, but are
(see Refund and Adjustment of Fees). not necessarily limited to:
Any student seeking an exception to the withdrawal policy • fee deferments;
must request a late withdrawal through the Office of Re- • delinquent payments (e.g. Short Term Loan, Per-
cords, Building R, room 101. Refunds past published dead- kins, Title IV Repayments, Accounts Receivable);
lines are seldom given. Exceptions are by petition, and only • unpaid matriculation, tuition, laboratory or other
fees associated with registration;
documented extenuating circumstances are considered.
• unpaid fines or penalties duly assessed by appropri-
ate college authorities;
Refund and Adjustment of Fees • checks or epayments drawn to the order of the col-
Students who wish to withdraw from the college or who lege that have been returned because of insufficient
seek refunds of fees paid may do so via eSantaFe or at the funds or any other reason.
SFC Records Office, Building R, room 101. Any student who has paid for course registration fees with
a check or epayment that is dishonored for any reason
Refund/Repayment Policy must make immediate restitution to the college. After
As a result of the Higher Education Act of 1998, a student determination by the Office for Finance that timely restitu-
who completely withdraws may be required to repay a per- tion is unlikely, the student’s registration will be canceled.
centage of Title IV Federal Financial Aid funds received. In no instance shall the student’s enrollment be continued
beyond the point where the dishonored check has been
College refund policy dictates that fees will be refunded in
rejected by the bank on resubmission.
full for course work dropped during the drop/add period
or canceled by the college. However, the federal refund/
repayment policy supersedes the college refund policy for Audit Fees
students receiving financial aid and completely withdraw- Any student in the college may elect to audit a college
ing from the college. credit course at the time of registration. A student may not
switch from credit to audit or from audit to credit after the
For specific information about the refund/repayment poli- drop/add period. No credit is granted when the course is
cy, please visit the Financial Aid Web site at www.sfcollege. completed, nor can any be given at a future date. Audit stu-
edu or call a financial aid specialist at (352) 395-5480. dents pay the same tuition fees, application fees, labora-
tory fees and special fees as credit students.
Last Day to Drop With Refund
A student who withdraws from the college for one or more
courses during the first five instructional days of fall,
Lab Fees
spring and summer terms, or during the first three instruc- The lab fee schedule is available at Santa Fe’s Web site,
tional days of flexterm, may receive a full refund of fees www.sfcollege.edu. Select Class Schedule, View the Course
paid for the course work officially discontinued. Courses Schedule, then Fee Information.
officially dropped will be removed from the student’s re-
cord. The official deadline date for fee refunds will be pub- Credit Fees
lished in the college academic calendar, online at www. If you are not currently attending Santa Fe College you
sfcollege.edu, and in the enrollment guide. These refunds must submit one of the following to the Welcome Center,
are automatically processed without further action by the Building R, room 112:
student. Refund checks will be processed and distributed • An online application through eSantaFe if
as soon as possible; a fair expectation for their receipt you have never applied to SFC
would be approximately three weeks after the deadline. OR 33
www.sfcollege.edu

Non-Credit Postsecondary Adult Vocational Courses
(per semester hour equivalent)
Florida Resident
Tuition $60.00
Technology** 3.00
Subtotal 63.00
Access** .90
Total $63.90
Non-Florida Resident
Tuition $60.00
Non-Resident Tuition 180.30
Technology** 12.00
Subtotal 252.30
Access** .90
Total $253.20
• An online readmission application through
your eSantaFe account if you have previously Adult Education Courses (per semester hour equivalent)
submitted a credit application
Florida Resident
Laboratory fees may be required for some courses. These
Tuition $29.40
fees are listed online at www.sfcollege.edu under eSan-
taFe. Net Tuition $29.40
All fees must be paid by the due date each term. For this Non-Florida Resident
and other official college dates, check the online calendar Tuition $29.40
at www.sfcollege.edu or check Critical Dates at the Regis- Non-Resident Tuition 88.80
tration Web site. Failure to pay fees by this deadline will
Net Tuition $118.20
result in cancelation of registration.

Fee Schedule Effective Fall 2009 Credit Courses - Upper Division
Credit Courses - Lower Division (Advanced and Professional)
These fees only apply to the Clinical Laboratory Science and
Fees Subject to Change Health Service Administration Degree courses.
All fees listed below are per credit hour.
Florida Residents
Florida Residents Tuition $74.95
Tuition $64.66 Capital Improvement 7.50
Capital Improvement 6.47
Financial Aid 3.75
Financial Aid 3.23
Student Activities* 7.50
Student Activities* 6.01
Technology** 3.75
Technology** 3.23
Subtotal $97.45
Subtotal $83.60
Access Fee** 1.00
Access Fee** 1.00
Total per Credit Hour $98.45
Total per Credit Hour $84.60
Non-Florida Residents
Non-Florida Residents
Tuition $74.95
Tuition $64.66
Non-Resident Tuition 455.20
Non-Resident Tuition 194.11
Capital Improvement 7.50
Capital Improvement 25.86
Financial Aid 12.93 Financial Aid 17.90
Student Activities* 6.01 Student Activities* 7.50
Technology** 12.93 Technology** 17.90
Subtotal $316.50 Subtotal $580.95
Access Fee** 1.00 Access Fee** 1.00
Total per Credit Hour $317.50 Total per Credit Hour $581.95

*Not covered by the Florida Prepaid Program *Not covered by the Florida Prepaid Program
(except “Local Plan”). (except “Local Plan”).

**Not covered by any Florida Prepaid Program **Not covered by any Florida Prepaid Program
or any fee waivers. or any fee waivers.

34 Returned check fee: $25.00 Returned check fee: $25.00
Additional College Credit Course Fee
An additional fee will be assessed to students enrolling in a
college credit course more than two times. The additional
fee to be assessed shall be equal to the amount of the non-
resident tuition fee.

College Preparatory Course Fee
An additional fee will be assessed to students enrolling in
certain college preparatory courses more than two times
in order to meet the state requirement to pay 100 percent
of the instructional cost of the course. The additional fee
to be assessed shall be equal to the amount of the non-
resident tuition fee.

Deferred Fees
Veterans and other eligible persons who request fee defer-
ments must have the deferment processed at the cashier’s
window in the Robertson Administration Building by
the due date. Tuition, for financial aid recipients, may be
deferred or charged if fees are less than or equal to the
amount of projected financial aid for the term. Additional
information may be found in the financial aid handbook.

Fee Waivers
State of Florida employees or senior citizens can only regis-
ter on the last day of drop/add for any term/session if they
wish to use a fee waiver for that term/session. Any registra- • All grades from the third and subsequent attempts
tions prior to this date will not be eligible for a fee waiver. are part of the GPA.
• A fourth attempt may be allowed only through aca-
Credit Card Payment demic appeals based on major extenuating circum-
stances.
(MasterCard, VISA or American Express) • Students enrolled prior to fall term 1997 may come
On the Web, log onto www.sfcollege.edu and click on under the old catalog.
eSantaFe. Select Pay Fees and follow the menu. Remember,
you must have your PIN number to use the Web version of Cost of Repeat Courses
payment.
(fees subject to change)
Who May Receive Refunds Starting fall term 1997, a student enrolled in the same col-
lege credit course more than two times shall pay the full
A student who withdraws from the college for one or
cost of instruction.
more courses during the first five instructional days of
fall, spring or summer full terms, or during the first three The full cost of instruction is currently $282.05 per credit
instructional days of A or B sessions, may receive a full hour (the same as non-resident fees), subject to change by
refund of fees paid for the course work officially discontin- the Florida Legislature.
ued. The official deadlines for fee refunds are on the last
official day of drop/add. These refunds are automatically Repeating Classes With a
processed without action by students. Refund checks will
be processed and distributed as soon as possible; a fair Grade of C or Above
expectation for their receipt would be about two to four Repeat enrollment in courses in which a grade of C or
weeks after the deadline. above has been earned is prohibited.
• Repeating such a course is considered only under
special circumstances. Examples are a need for
Third Attempt Limit teacher recertification, specifications of a regulatory
Starting fall term 1997, Florida law requires that any col- agency, licensure and program requirements.
lege credit course that has been repeated and taken the • The initial grade and subsequent grade appear on
third time should be regarded as the final attempt. the transcript. Only the first grade is included in the
• Work attempted at all Florida public postsecondary GPA with credit earned. The second attempt will not
institutions is not counted. Courses taken at private earn credit, will not be included in the GPA, and the
institutions or out-of-state institutions are not Grade Forgiveness Rule will not apply.
counted. • Registrations for such a course without approval
• Courses attempted prior to fall term 1997 are not will be canceled, the course dropped and fees re-
counted. funded.
• Attempts include the original grade, repeat grades,
and withdrawals at any point in the semester. 35
www.sfcollege.edu

Appeals
Students wishing to appeal the “Third Attempt Limit” or
the “C or Above Repeat” rules should obtain an appeal
form in the Registrar’s office, R-101.
The deadline to file an appeal is the last day to drop with
a refund in the term or session in which the appeal is re-
quested. Students are encouraged to make their request as
early as possible. Please allow at least three working days
for the appeal to be processed.

36
Student Affairs

Official College Notifications.................................................38
Petitions Committee ...............................................................38
Student Conduct Code ............................................................38
Student Life ..............................................................................39
Athletics, Intramural Sports and Fitness .............................39
Center for Student Leadership and Activities .....................39
Office of Diversity ...................................................................40
Honor Society ...........................................................................40
International Students ............................................................40
Student Development Programs............................................41
TRIO Programs ........................................................................42
College Reach-Out Program (CROP) .....................................43
Veterans Services .....................................................................43

37
www.sfcollege.edu

record and refund of fees or a late withdrawal. College Rule
7.16 establishes, pursuant to Florida State Rule 6A-14.54,
conditions under which fees may be refunded to students.
The college rule states: Fees may also be refunded when a
student drops a course due to any of the following emer-
gency circumstances beyond the control of the student:
A. Illness of a student of such severity or duration, as
confirmed in writing by a physician, to preclude
completion of the course(s).
B. Death of the student or death in the immediate fam-
ily (parent, spouse, child, or sibling).
C. Involuntary call to active military duty.
D. A situation where the college is in error.
E. A change of a course or section(s) initiated by the
college because of a cancellation, time, and/or loca-
tion.
F. Other emergency circumstances that may be
approved by the college president or his/her
designee(s).
Petition forms are available in the Office of Records, Build-
ing R, room 101, or on the Petitions Web site. The student
is expected to present a clear and convincing written
rationale along with supporting documentation for the
petition. Written support from physicians, instructors and
others may be necessary. Each petition is considered on an
individual basis. Please visit the Petitions Web site at www.
Official College Notifications sfcollege.edu for additional procedural information and to
Santa Fe College (SFC) uses eSantaFe to send official print the appropriate forms.
notifications to students including, but not limited to,
notifications regarding financial aid, student records, ad- The SFC Petitions Committee meets weekly to review stu-
missions, registration, and academic status. Students are dent petitions. Students submitting petitions are welcome
responsible for accessing their student records and student to appear before the committee at the time their petitions
notifications via eSantaFe. All SFC students are expected are heard. Notification of the committee’s decision is made
to access their eSantaFe account from SFC’s home page for via the college’s official notification system, which may be
important information regarding their student records. An accessed through eSantaFe.
e-mail reminder is sent to students informing them of any
notifications; however, it is strongly advised that students Petitions for Graduation Waivers
regularly and frequently check their eSantaFe account and
keep their e-mail address up to date in Santa Fe’s student or Course Substitutions
records system. Failure to do so may cause students to miss The committee that considers petitions for graduation
critical information that may affect a student’s status. waivers or course substitutions consists of advisors from
the Office of Academic Advisement. Students may petition
to substitute a course(s) within discipline areas toward
Petitions Committee completion of their degree. Please refer to the Petitions
The college Petitions Committee reviews student peti- Web site for additional information regarding procedures
tions to adjust records and makes recommendations to the and to obtain the appropriate form(s).
college registrar for approval or denial. The committee is
composed of SFC faculty and staff. Students may petition
through the committee to drop a course with a full refund Student Conduct Code
or to withdraw from a course after the published with-
Students enrolled at Santa Fe College are expected to con-
drawal date.
duct themselves in a manner that will reflect favorably on
the college, the community and themselves. Each student
Petitions to Drop With a is advised to become familiar with the Student Conduct
Refund or for Late Withdrawal Code and to abide by it. The Student Conduct Code can be
Students who withdraw from one or more classes after the found at www.sfcollege.edu. A copy of the Student Conduct
last date to drop and receive a refund who wish to have the Code may be obtained from the vice president for Student
course removed from their record and to receive a refund, Affairs office in Building R, room 211. If found guilty of vio-
or who wish to withdraw from a course after the published lating the Student Conduct Code, a student may be subject
withdrawal date for reasons of extreme hardship that can to one or more penalties as described in the Student Con-
be documented, may consult the Office of Records (Build- duct Code, in accordance with procedures adopted by the
38 ing R, room 101) about petitioning for removal of the course college’s president for handling student disciplinary cases.
Student Affairs
Student Life
Athletics, Intramural Sports and Fitness
Santa Fe College fields four intercollegiate athletic teams.
Additionally, there are opportunities for student involve-
ment in a variety of intramural sports as well as an on-
campus fitness center.

Athletics
SFC offers intercollegiate athletics for men (basketball and
baseball) and women (basketball and fast-pitch softball).
NJCAA and FCCAA institutional memberships provide
a high level of competition for those students wishing to
participate.
For more information, contact the SFC Athletics Depart-
ment at (352) 395-5535 or visit www.sfcollege.edu.

Intramurals
The SFC Intramural Program offers organized flag football,
basketball, soccer, golf and volleyball leagues. In addition,
yoga classes are offered a couple of afternoons a week from
5-6:30 p.m. Weightlifting contests are held in both the fall
represent students’ interests to the college administra-
and spring terms. For more information contact the Intra-
tion. Cabinet positions are great ways to begin on-campus
murals Office at (352) 395-5541 or visit www.sfcollege.edu.
involvement.

Fitness Center The student senate is comprised of representatives from
student organizations, academic senators representing
The Fitness Center is open to current SFC students, faculty, specific majors, and at-large members representing the
and staff. It has a wide variety of aerobic equipment, free general student populace. As the legislative body for SG,
weights, and Cybex selectorized resistance machines. the senate votes on resolutions, allocates funding, and ap-
The center is open Monday-Thursday from 6:30 a.m.- proves the charters for new student organizations. Senate
9 p.m., and Friday from 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. For more infor- meetings, held each Wednesday at 4 p.m. in S-29/30, are
mation contact Fitness Center Manager Harry Tholen at open to everyone.
(352) 395-5540, visit room V-33 in the gym, or look online Student government programming (SGP) puts on large-
at www.sfcollege.edu. scale programs open to all students. A sampling of this
year’s programs includes: Hispanic Heritage Month food
Center for Student tasting, movie nights, Fall Fest, Black History Month block
party, spring concert series, Casino Night, Art on the
Leadership and Activities Grove, and trips to Halloween Horror Nights at Universal
The Center for Student Leadership and Activities, located Studios. The SGP leadership team is always looking for
in Building S, is committed to creating and supporting additional members to help plan and implement these fun
opportunities for student involvement in campus and programs. SGP meets every Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. in S-141.
community activities. Components of the center include
For more information on SG, stop by S-147 or visit
student government, student organizations, and the rec-
www.sfcollege.edu/studentgovernment.
reation room. Several student life functions are housed
within the center, including Student Legal Services, the
Leadership Institute, the Multicultural Student Center, the Multicultural Student Center
Office of Community Service, and the Student Health Care The Multicultural Student Center is located in S-137 and
Center. provides services to international and multicultural
students enrolled at Santa Fe College. Information is also
Student Government (SG) provided through the center to prospective students inter-
ested in continuing their education at Santa Fe. Students
Student government is the representative body for stu-
are helped with a variety of counseling services including
dents at Santa Fe College. It provides students a voice to
academic advisement, study skills, the career decision-
the college administration through active participation
making process, and cultural adjustment. An additional
in institutional decision making. SG is comprised of three
service to students includes referrals to a variety of on-
branches: an executive board, a student senate, and stu-
and off-campus resources. Academic, social and cultural
dent government programming.
activities are planned for international and multicultural
The executive board, elected each spring by the student students to help them adjust to college life. For more infor-
body, is charged with the overall administration of SG. mation about the center call (352) 395-5807.
The four executive officers work with an executive cabinet
to ensure a student presence on various committees to 39
www.sfcollege.edu

Leadership Institute Office of Diversity
The Leadership Institute, located in S-130, educates stu- The Office of Diversity provides the following student sup-
dents about leadership theory, principles and applications port services and programs:
• academic and personal advisement
through seminars, workshops, and classes for academic
• academic monitoring
credit. Through involvement in leadership training,
• career counseling
students have the opportunity to develop their personal • cultural enrichment
capacity for leadership while gaining skills necessary for • computer/study lab
success in today’s global community. • consultation on diversity and cultural issues
• Global Roundtable Series
Student Health Care Center • mentoring
The Student Health Care Center, in S-120, is a collabora- • registration assistance
tive venture between Santa Fe College and the University • tutoring (individual/group)
of Florida. It was opened to help meet the educational and • College Achievement Program (CAP)
medical needs of Santa Fe students. The center is active The College Achievement Program is a six-week academic
in promoting a wellness lifestyle that encompasses an enrichment experience that occurs each summer. It is
individual’s physical, emotional, environmental, social designed to provide selected high school graduates with
and spiritual health. Services are available to SFC students necessary instruction and skills to enhance overall college
only. Walk-ins are welcome. readiness. Typically, students from Alachua and Bradford
counties apply to the program during the last term of their
The SHCC is NOT set up or intended to provide emergency
senior year. Applicants must complete a Santa Fe admis-
care. For emergencies call 911 or contact the SFC Police sion application and plan to enroll full time for the upcom-
department at (352) 395-5519. ing academic year.
The Student Health Care Center can provide the follow- For more information, students may visit the Office of
ing services for SFC students: physical exams, first aid, Diversity in room 112 of the Wattenbarger Student Services
women’s gynecological exams, immunizations, acute Building on the Northwest Campus; call (352) 395-5486; or
illnesses such as headaches, sore throat, eye problems, visit www.sfcollege.edu and select Diversity in the index.
skin problems, STD testing, HIV testing, contraception,
morning after pills, and more. Payment is due at the time
of service and is accepted in cash or by credit card; insur-
Honor Society (Phi Theta Kappa)
ance is not accepted. Phi Theta Kappa is the International Honor Society for
two-year colleges. The chapter at Santa Fe College is one
The center is staffed by a registered nurse and a nurse of over 1200 chapters. The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is
practitioner. The nurse practitioner, who is capable of to recognize and encourage scholarship among two-ykear
diagnosing and treating illnesses and prescribing medi- college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa
cation, is available by appointment on a part-time basis. provides opportunities for the development of leadership
The nurse can be reached at (352) 381-3777 or at student. and service; an intellectual climate for the exchange of
health@sfcollege.edu. ideas and ideals; lively fellowship for scholars; and the
stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence.
Student Legal Services Membership is extended by invitation to those students
who have completed at least 12 semester hours of college
Student Legal Services provides legal advice in a variety
work at SFC and have at least a 3.50 grade point average
of areas to help Santa Fe College students better manage based on those courses. Students interested in Phi Theta
the life issues that often interfere with their ability to meet Kappa should contact either Charles Schultz in K-247,
academic and personal goals. The service is provided in phone (352) 381-3802, or Marisa McLeod in B-216, phone
collaboration with Three Rivers Legal Services and is free (352) 395-5010.
to SFC students. Student Legal Services is located in S-147.
Call (352) 395-4134 or visit www.sfcollege.edu.
International Students
Office of Community Service
Community service, civic engagement, and volunteerism Application Process
are supported through the Office of Community Service. Santa Fe College (SFC) considers anyone who is not a Unit-
The office connects individual students and entire classes ed States (U.S.) citizen or permanent resident of the U.S.
with service opportunities through local non-profit agen- as international. If residing in the U.S. the student must
cies. For more information about service opportunities call also have legal status in the U.S. If the student does not
have legal status the student is considered undocumented
(352) 395-5912, come by S-147, or visit www.sfcollege.edu.
and has to complete a special admission process with the
Office of the Registrar. If the student is on an F-2 or B-1/B-2
Performing Arts Programming visa, the student must change status before enrolling at
Student Life provides financial support for programming SFC. International students are required to complete and
in the performing arts. Santa Fe College has active student submit an international student application, an official
organizations for dance, theatre, music, visual arts, film high school diploma (with official high school transcripts)
40 and video, and graphic design. and official transcripts from any postsecondary school(s),
Student Affairs
both in their native language and in an official English
translation. All applicants whose native language or ex-
clusive language of instruction is not English must submit
a recent (two years or less) Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) examination score with a minimum
score of 400 on the paper test or 32 on the Internet-based
test. Please refer to the most recent International Student
Admission Checklist.
All necessary paperwork for admission must be received in
the International Student Services office two months prior
to the semester start date. International students will not
be accepted during B terms. The only exception is if a stu-
dent is applying for the Adult Education Program (4100).
The application, checklist and deadlines for international
students can be accessed online at www.sfcollege.edu/iss.

Check-in Requirement
All international students must check in at the Interna-
tional Student Services office with all of their original
documentation proving their status prior to registering for
classes. Such documentation may include passport, visa,
I-94, I-20, DS-2019, Employment Authorization Document
(EAD Card), I-797 (approval/receipt letters), Asylee Ap-
proval Letters, and so forth.

Housing
Santa Fe does not provide on-campus housing. The Inter- lege. The staff will gladly help students with immigration
national Student Services office is unable to make rental regulations, educational planning, personal problems, and
reservations, negotiate lease agreements or act as an agent other areas of concern. Contact james.schwartz@sfcol-
for the students. Referral information is made available lege.edu for additional information.
solely to aid students in their search for housing. Interna-
tional students desiring more information may contact Health Insurance for International
the International Student Services office, Building R, room
102, phone (352) 395-5504 or visit the Web site at www. Students on F-1 Visas
sfcollege.edu. Students on F-1 visas are required, per SFC Board Rule
7.6, to provide proof of health insurance. The college has
International Students Requiring contracted with Insurance for College Students (IFCS) to
certify that insurance coverage meets the minimum re-
or on F-1 Student Visas quirements. Contact IFCS for additional information at:
Santa Fe College is authorized by the United States • collegeinsurance@bellsouth.net
Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to enroll • www.insuranceforstudents.com
non-immigrant alien students on F-1 visas. If the student • www.ifcs.us
already has a valid I-20 a transfer form is also required and • (800) 971-3921
the new I-20 can only be issued after the release date set
in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System
(SEVIS).
Student Development Programs
The units that comprise Student Development Programs
College financial aid is not available to non-immigrant collaborate to assist students with access to college, devel-
students on F-1 visas whose parents/legal guardians do oping personal and educational goals, transitioning into
not reside in the U.S. Non-immigrant students may not school and the workforce, and the improvement of aca-
be employed while attending college in the United States, demic success skills.
unless the International Student Services office and the
USCIS have granted permission. Normally, employment is Career and Job Placement Services
not granted although, occasionally, on-campus employ- Career and job placement services are provided for stu-
ment is authorized. dents and graduates. Counseling and instruction regard-
To maintain non-immigrant student status, students must ing career opportunities, résumé and interview prepara-
enroll for a minimum of 12 credit hours every fall and tion, conducting effective job searches, and employability
spring term. If summer is their first term, they must enroll skills development are available. Students are actively as-
in 12 credits during that summer term. Failure to maintain sisted in obtaining part-time or full-time employment. The
enrollment will result in the loss of student status and pos- coordinator of this program is responsible for employer
sible deportation. Santa Fe has an International Student development. Business, industry and government agencies
Services office to help international students make the are encouraged to list job opportunities with this office.
transition from their home countries to Santa Fe Col- Many community employers take advantage of this free 41
www.sfcollege.edu

service to meet their human resources needs. Job opportu-
nities are posted on a bulletin board located on the second
Displaced Homemaker Program
floor of Building S. Referral information for these job The Displaced Homemaker Program: Focus on the Future
listings is accessible from the computer terminals located offers empowerment and employment assistance to
in the Office of Student Development Programs, Building homemakers who are 35 years of age or older, who have
S, room 254. Internet access for career opportunities and mostly been homemakers during their adult lives, who
information is also available. have been dependent upon someone for support which is
no longer available to them, who are unemployed or not
Career and Job Placement sponsors two major job fairs adequately employed and who would have difficulty in
each year—one in the fall and another in the spring—and securing adequate employment. The program offers free
virtual job fairs are held quarterly. For the latest informa- classes and workshops throughout the year with regard to:
tion, visit the Career and Job Placement Web page at www. • Life management skills including self-esteem
sfcollege.edu. building, stress management, assertive communi-
cation skills, time management, problem solving
Career Resource Center and goal setting
• Employability skills including applications, résumé
The Santa Fe Career Resource Center maintains infor-
development, interview techniques, professional
mational resources to assist students in choosing career
image, job search plans and job retention
goals, majors, colleges, and life directions, and to learn
• Basic computer skills including Microsoft Word,
the steps that lead toward those goals. We offer computer-
Excel, e-mail and Internet
ized assessments of a person’s interests, values, personal-
• Job counseling
ity and other relevant factors. These are used to suggest
• Educational exploration
career fields that may be worthy of investigation. Our
assessments do not attempt to prescribe the “right job,” no The program is funded through a grant from the Florida
program can do that well. Instead they lead to information Agency for Workforce Innovation. To inquire about our ser-
about oneself and career possibilities to enable better- vices, schedule an appointment for an intake screening, or
informed and well-considered career decisions. Assistance for more information, please call (352) 395-5047 or visit our
in searching for colleges, scholarships, and potential Web site at www.sfcollege.edu.
employers is also available. The Career Resource Center is
open to community members as well as Santa Fe students,
faculty and staff. The CRC is located in the Office of Stu-
Student Development Instruction
dent Development Programs, Building I, room 40. The Student Development Instruction Department offers a
variety of elective credit courses designed to meet the ever
changing needs of a diverse student population. These
Counseling Center courses include: College Success, Life and Career Develop-
The Counseling Center provides career counseling, aca- ment, Living Effectively in Today’s World, Introduction to
demic counseling, personal counseling and crisis inter- Personal Leadership, Basic Leadership Skills, Leadership
vention. Academic and career counseling assist students Development Studies, Human Service Field Experience,
in selecting majors and career goals and developing the and Standards of Academic Progress. The focus of these
personal and academic skills helpful in achieving these courses centers on areas that contribute to student growth,
goals. Personal counseling assists students to identify and academic accomplishment, decision making, awareness of
manage personal issues and life circumstance that may the world around one, enlightened life and career choice, a
hinder as well those that may aid their academic progress. working knowledge of college systems, greater self un-
Counselors assist students to identify college and commu- derstanding, and service to the community. The Student
nity resources that may be helpful. The Counseling Center Development Instruction Department courses attempt
offers over 50 workshops yearly in addition to events such to meet students’ need to develop 21st century skills that
as Safe Spring Break, Alcohol Awareness and Counseling address personal and interpersonal skills, academic and
Awareness. For more information, visit our Web site at life skills, critical thinking skills, and leadership compe-
www.sfcollege.edu, stop by the center in Building S, room tencies. For more information contact the department
254, or call (352) 395-5508. coordinator at (352) 395-5528.

Disabilities Resource Center TRIO Programs
Students with disabilities are welcomed into the complete
process of learning at Santa Fe College. Students who are
disabled and wish reasonable accommodation must regis-
North Central Florida
ter with the Disabilities Resource Center (DRC) in Building Educational Talent Search
S, room 229, phone (352) 395-4400 (voice/ TDD). Docu- This federal TRIO program helps rural high school stu-
mentation diagnosing the disability and indicating its dents in grades 8-12 from 14 high schools and two middle
impact on daily life functions must be provided. The DRC schools in a nine county area of North Central Florida.
works with the individual student to provide reasonable Special consideration is given to students who are low
accommodation to access the college’s facilities and aca- income and potential first generation college students
demic programs. The DRC assists in arranging for special to complete their secondary education and enroll in a
equipment to meet the needs of students with disabilities. postsecondary program. Services include academic advis-
Handicapped parking permission may be obtained from ing and course selection; college entrance exam prepara-
42 the SFC Police Department. tion; and workshops on motivation, study skills and test
Student Affairs
anxiety. Students and their families are also helped with
applications for college and financial aid. Campus tours to
colleges and cultural events are provided. The program is
administered by SFC in cooperation with Central Florida
Community College (Ocala) and Lake City Community
College (Lake City). For more information call (352) 395-
5960 or, outside the Gainesville area, call (800) 399-5960
toll free.

Student Support Services
The Student Support Services Program provides opportu-
nities for academic development, helps college students
with college requirements, and serves to motivate students
toward the successful completion of their postsecond-
ary education. The goal of the program is to increase the
college retention and graduation rates of participants and
ease the transition process from one level of higher educa-
tion to the next. skills remediation and study skills instruction, as well as
Services include instruction in basic skills; tutorial ser- cultural and campus visits. CROP also offers a four-week
vices; academic, financial and personal counseling; help summer academic enrichment program located on the
in securing admission and financial aid for enrollment SFC campus. Rising ninth graders have the opportunity
in four-year institutions; and information about career to spend one of those weeks at the University of Florida
options, mentoring and special services for students with through a residency program. They live in a UF dormitory
limited English proficiency. and attend classes there. The program office is located
on SFC’s Northwest Campus in Building I, room 46B. Call
To receive assistance, students must be enrolled in a (352) 395-5268 for more information.
program of postsecondary education. Only first genera-
tion, low-income, and students with disabilities with an
academic need are eligible to participate in the program. Veterans Services
All veterans and other eligible persons are encouraged
Upward Bound to call or visit the SFC Veterans Affairs office located in
This is a TRIO program that prepares selected students Building R, room 110 on the Northwest Campus. Santa
Fe College is approved for the education and training of
from Newberry High School and Bradford High School to
veterans and other eligible persons under all public laws
compete successfully for postsecondary education oppor-
now in effect. Students who may be eligible for educational
tunities. Its focus is to generate strong academic skills and
benefits under any United States Veterans Affairs program
motivation in program participants through the following
are urged to contact the SFC office as soon as application is
services: supplemental instruction in college prep courses
made to the college. Students expecting to receive benefits
and study skills; college entrance exam preparation; col-
must also file an application for USVA benefits at the Santa
lege campus visits; cultural events exposure; academic,
Fe College Veterans Affairs office. The college’s Veterans
career and personal counseling; and the development of
Affairs office will certify the student veteran for education-
leadership and social skills through participation with
al benefits based on receipt of the student’s registration
other TRIO programs. Upward Bound also sponsors a
for class attendance each semester. The student veteran
six-week, non-residential summer enrichment program
or other eligible person must provide a registration slip
that focuses on students’ class prep for the next academic
and degree audit to the SFC Veterans Affairs office each
school year. Students must meet federal eligibility criteria
semester the student desires to be certified for educational
set by the U.S. Department of Education. The program
benefits. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs
office is located on the Northwest Campus. For more
determines eligibility for educational benefits based on
information call (352) 395-7357 or see the Upward Bound
documents provided by the SFC Veterans Affairs office.
portion of SFC’s Web site at www.sfcollege.edu.
The SFC Veterans Affairs office has been established to
help campus veterans and other eligible persons attain
College Reach-Out their educational goals and to help them in applying for
Program (CROP) educational benefits. The office will provide eligible per-
This program works to strengthen the educational motiva- sons with information on programs and offerings such as
tion and academic preparation of targeted low income and work study, tutorial assistance and solving USVA related
educationally disadvantaged students in grades 6-12 who eligibility issues.
desire and may benefit from postsecondary education.
CROP identifies students who want to better understand Standards of Conduct
the value of postsecondary education and who are moti- Conduct standards for veterans at SFC are the same as
vated to develop better basic learning skills. It counsels those for all students and are set forth in the Student
students and their parents on the benefits of postsecond- Handbook. If a veteran is suspended or dismissed from the
ary education and provides supplemental instruction. Ser- college, action will be taken by the college to terminate the
vices include after school programs offering tutoring, basic veteran’s VA educational allowance. 43
www.sfcollege.edu

Credit Awarded for Armed Services
Educational Experiences
Veterans and other eligible persons have all prior credit/
prior military credit evaluated and the equivalency credits
recorded in the student’s folder and permanent record.
Cumulative permanent academic records are kept on the
common transcript form showing all credits attempted
and earned to include grades earned and incompletes.
In recognition of the academic and technical content of
many military educational experiences, Santa Fe College
will grant credit for military education. Credit awarded
must be recommended as suitable for postsecondary
credit by the American Council on Education’s Guide to
the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed
Service (ACE Guide), and be applicable to the student’s
program objective. Credit will be awarded provided the
current catalog lists comparable courses and/or the
student has not already earned credit for the particular
course. After enrollment in the college, the student must
initiate the request for such credit by providing the appro-
priate documentation to the SFC Veterans Affairs office for
review. Recommendations in the ACE Guide are advisory
in nature and are not binding upon the college.

Deferred Tuition Payments II. Academic Progress The program participant’s rate
of progress toward his or her educational goal is as
Deferment of tuition for veterans and other eligible pro-
follows:
gram participants is set forth in Statute 240.345; 6A-14.054,
The program participant may be certified to repeat
Florida Administrative Code. The F.A.C. allows eligible
program participants one 60-day deferment for the pay- a course in which an unsatisfactory grade has been
ment of registration fees in each student academic year. received. USVA educational benefits will be termi-
This deferment may be extended or granted more than nated when the student’s GPA is below 2.0 for two
once an academic year due to educational benefit payment consecutive terms. The college’s Veterans Affairs
delays beyond the control of the eligible Santa Fe College office is available to assist program participants
student. Each eligible student who receives a deferment in reinstatement of educational benefits following
shall first sign a promissory note made payable to the successful completion of one semester attaining
college for the amount of the deferred fees. Such notes above a 2.0 GPA. Program participants are encour-
are exempt from the State of Florida documentary stamp aged to seek academic advisement, attend tutorial
requirements. labs or seek assistance from the college’s Veterans
Affairs office to avoid academic suspension of USVA
Students receiving a tuition deferment shall be required educational benefits.
to pay the amount due by the due date for EVERY class
deferred. Students may petition for late withdrawal if they
have stopped attending a class; however, the tuition for Reporting of Academic Progress
each deferred class must be paid first. The USVA prohibits payment of educational benefits for
auditing a course or for a course not used toward gradua-
Standards of Progress tion requirements, including any course from which the
student withdraws, unless there is a finding of mitigating
In compliance with the United States Department of Veter-
circumstances causing the withdrawal.
ans Affairs regarding veterans and other eligible persons’
attendance, progress and certification, the following pro- All W grades are considered to be punitive and will be
cedures are to be followed: reported as required to the USVA. The USVA may adjust the
I. Attendance The IHL program participant must amount paid to the program participant when W grades
notify the Santa Fe College Veterans Affairs office of change the student status to less time attended, such as
any change in student status. Student withdrawal from full time to three-quarter time. The payment of ad-
from a class will be reported to the USVA within 30 justments is retroactive to the first day of the term in which
days of the withdrawal. The NCD program partici- they are recorded, unless mitigating circumstances are
pant enrolled in a vocational certificate program submitted and accepted by the USVA.
who accumulates five (5) or more unexcused ab-
sences during any calendar month will be inter- All incomplete (I) grades must be completed in accordance
rupted for USVA benefits. The USVA will be notified with the department chairs. A student may not register for
by the college’s VA office to suspend benefits due to a course to make up an incomplete grade. The program
lack of attendance. Three unexcused tardinesses participant must complete the course requirements within
44 will count as one absence. one semester, changing the incomplete to a letter grade.
Student Affairs
Mitigating Circumstances
Mitigating circumstances are situations that directly
hinder a program participant’s pursuit of a course and are
judged to be beyond the student’s control. Students are
encouraged to contact the college’s Veterans Affairs office
to discuss mitigating circumstances and to file them with
the USVA. The following are some general categories of
mitigating circumstances (the list is not all-inclusive):
1. Serious illness of the program participant or in the
program participant’s immediate family
2. Financial obligations, which require a change in
terms, hours, or placement of employment preclud-
ing pursuit of a course
3. Discontinuance of a course by Santa Fe College
4. Active duty in military service, including active duty
for training
5. Actions by the program participant such as seeking
tutorial assistance, SFC Veterans Affairs counseling,
and/or Santa Fe College academic counseling in an
attempt to remedy the unsatisfactory work before
withdrawal or completion

General Information
The Montgomery GI Bill and other eligible programs
conducted by the United States Department of Veterans
Affairs offer many first generation college students a way to
pay for their college education. Generally, students should
not expect to receive educational payments for up to 90
days when applying for benefits for the first time, although
payment is made as of the first day of class. All program-
eligible students are encouraged to apply for student finan-
cial aid and all eligible military veterans are encouraged to
apply for the financial aid to enhance their GI Bill-earned
educational benefits.
All program-eligible participants have tutorial assistance
and work study available, provided by the USVA, and
are encouraged to learn more about these programs by
contacting the college’s Veterans Affairs office at (352) 395-
5505. Students are also encouraged to notify the college’s
VA office when there are any problems with educational
benefits.
Program participants are encouraged to monitor their
educational benefits by contacting the Atlanta Regional of-
fice of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs at
(888) 442-4551, (888) GI BILL1 or go online to use the WAVE
verification program each month. Student veterans should
also review annual changes to the GI BILL educational
programs at VA.GOV.

45
www.sfcollege.edu

46
Academic Affairs

Academic Objectives and Attendance ..................................48
Ombudsman ............................................................................50
College Preparatory Program ................................................50
Cooperative Education ...........................................................51
Degree Programs .....................................................................51
Graduation ...............................................................................52
Catalog Year..............................................................................52
Experiential Learning .............................................................52
Florida’s Statewide Course Numbering System...................52
Grades and Reports .................................................................54
Academic Honors List .............................................................54
Honors Program ......................................................................54
Individual Study ......................................................................54
Specialized Group Study ........................................................55
Military Science .......................................................................55
Fee Waivers ...............................................................................55
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) ........................56
Credit by Examination ............................................................56
Department Credit by Examination ....................................57
Tech Prep Acceleration Credit ...............................................58

47
www.sfcollege.edu

Example 2
Same student as example 1, but in second term:
Total
Grade Grade Attempted Grade
Points Hours Points
C 2 multiplied by 4 = 8
D 1 “ “ 3 = 3
F 0 “ “ 4 = 0
F 0 “ “ 4 = 0
15 = 11
This student earned 11 grade points in the second term.
Added to the 30 grade points from the first term, the stu-
dent has earned 41 grade points. For the 27 credit hours
attempted (12 + 15 = 27), the student would need 54 grade
points (27 times 2) to maintain a C average. Therefore, this
student has a 13 grade point deficit (54 -41 = 13) and will be
placed on academic probation.

Example 3
Academic Objectives
New student in first term:
and Attendance Total
Santa Fe College is responsible for providing its students Grade Grade Attempted Grade
with a learning-centered environment that includes edu- Points Hours Points
cationally sound, high-quality programs offered in an eco-
F 0 multiplied by 4 = 0
nomical and efficient format. The continuation of students
who lack the ability, preparation or maturity to succeed is F 0 “ “ 3 = 0
inconsistent with the college’s mission and its responsibil- D 1 “ “ 3 = 3
ity as a tax-supported institution. D 1 “ “ 3 = 3
A student’s standing at Santa Fe College will be determined 13 = 6
by the relationship of hours attempted to grade points In this example, the student earned six grade points on
earned. To be considered in good standing and continue 13 semester hours. Thus, 13 times 2 = 26 grade points are
successfully toward a degree, a student must earn the needed for a C average. Since only six grade points were
grade points necessary to maintain a 2.0 (C) cumulative earned, this student would have a 20 point grade point
grade point average while at Santa Fe. deficit and, therefore, would be suspended after just one
term.
Grade Point Deficit
A grade point deficit is the difference between the grade Academic Warning, Probation
points needed for a C average and the grade points earned
on hours attempted. The following example demonstrates and Suspension
this concept. It should be noted that a student could go To complete degree and certificate program requirements,
from a position of good standing to academic warning, students must meet SFC’s Standards of Academic Progress:
probation or suspension within one term. • Students with less than a 2.0 GPA shall be placed on
academic warning if they have a grade point deficit
Example 1 of 9 or less.
New student in first term: • Students with less than a 2.0 GPA shall be placed on
Total academic probation if they have a grade point deficit
Grade Grade Attempted Grade of 10 or more but less than 20.
Points Hours Points • Students with a grade point deficit of 20 or more
A 4 multiplied by 3 = 12 shall be suspended for one semester (15 weeks).
• See the description of the Standards of Academic
B 3 “ “ 3 = 9
Progress (SLS1531) course online in the classes
C 2 “ “ 3 = 6
section at Student Development Instruction. This
D 1 “ “ 3 = 3 course is intended to help suspended students
12 = 30 return to college successfully. Students readmitted
after their suspension term or those who receive
To remain in good standing, a C average, which is equal to
suspension overides should enroll in this course.
two grade points per credit hour, must be maintained. The
total credits attempted multiplied by two will establish the
minimum number of grade points needed. From the grade Academic Dismissal
record listed above on 12 credit hours, 12 times two (for a Students returning from suspension will be on probation.
C average) = 24 grade points. Since 30 grade points were If, at the end of the term they return, their grade point
48 earned, this student is in good standing. deficit is still 20 or more, they will be dismissed from the
Academic Affairs
college. Such a student is not eligible to be readmitted to drawal date each term/session. The withdrawal date for
the college for a minimum of one full calendar year. The each term/session is available in the online calendar and
student may then petition the college for possible read- via eSantaFe.
mission. Favorable action is dependent upon clear written
A student may have only three attempts per course includ-
evidence of factors that indicate promise of successful
ing original grade, repeat grades and withdrawals. An
performance.
attempt is defined as an enrollment in a course where any
Students returning after suspension or dismissal, who grade is assigned or the student withdraws and receives
earn a semester GPA of 2.5 or above, will not be suspended a W. Courses that are dropped prior to the drop with a
even though they may have an overall deficit of more than refund date will not be counted as an attempt.
20 grade points. Should this promising level of perfor-
The student will be permitted a maximum of two with-
mance continue, a status of good academic standing may
drawals per course. Upon the third attempt, the student
be restored. Under these circumstances, the student will
will not be permitted to withdraw and will receive a grade
continue on academic probation.
for that course.

Earning Credit While Suspended Florida Administrative Code (6A-14.0301) requires that on
A student while under suspension from another institu- a third attempt, a student must pay the full cost of in-
tion may not earn credit at Santa Fe College, and a student struction, which is equal to the non-Florida resident cost
while under suspension from Santa Fe may not earn cred- of tuition. Occasionally, a petition for fee reduction may
its toward a degree from this institution by taking courses be granted by the college registrar for documented cases
at another institution. In each case, it is the student’s of extreme hardship. A petition for waiver of the full fees
responsibility to work with the Registrar’s Office of each must be requested before the end of drop/add for the term
college or university to determine the policies governing or session in which the course is attempted for the third
credit earned while under suspension. time. No waivers are granted retroactively.

Standards of Academic Progress Summary Transient Status
Academic Warning 1-9 grade point deficit Santa Fe students wishing to attend another postsec-
Academic Probation 10-19 grade point deficit ondary institution and transfer credits back to Santa Fe
College must obtain permission from SFC before enrolling
Academic Suspension 20 or more grade point deficit
at the other institution. Students should fill out a tran-
sient form, seek advisement about courses they wish to
Returning after Suspension/Dismissal take, and have their status at SFC certified in the Office of
A student returning after suspension or dismissal will be Records before enrolling at another institution. Transient
on probation. If, at the end of the term he or she returns, forms are available online at www.facts.org.
the grade point deficit is still 20 or more, the student will be
dismissed from the college. Such a student is not eligible
to be readmitted to the college for a minimum of one full
Student Learning Outcomes Statements
Santa Fe College is committed to improved student learn-
calendar year. After that time has passed, the student may
ing and development with students becoming participants
petition the college for possible readmission. Favorable
in a dynamic learning experience. Santa Fe’s student
action is dependent upon clear written evidence of factors
learning outcomes statements identify actionable priori-
that indicate promise of successful performance.
ties in terms of eight (8) broad learning outcomes associ-
Exception to above rule: A student who earns a semester ated with observable skill changes in communication,
GPA of 2.5 or higher in the first semester after returning community, digital technology, information management,
from suspension or dismissal will not be suspended, even interpersonal, mathematical, personal, thinking and prob-
if that student’s overall deficit is more than 20 grade points. lem solving. A student’s growth in these cognitive, affec-
Should the student continue to earn a GPA of 2.5 or higher tive, and ethical capacities is assessed through measuring
each term, the student will remain enrolled on academic student learning and achievement based on the following
probation until good academic standing is achieved. student learning outcomes statements:
• Communication: The student will develop effective
Transferring to Santa Fe reading, writing, speaking, listening, and nonverbal
communication skills.
With Deficit Grade Points • Community: The student will develop an under-
All transfer students will be evaluated by Santa Fe’s Stan- standing of diversity/pluralism in the world com-
dards of Progress using the same criteria applied to non- munity, an awareness of civic and social participa-
transfer students. Transfer students entering with deficit tion, and ethical, informed decision-making.
grade points will be assigned to the appropriate category, • Digital Technology: The student will develop com-
that is, academic warning or probation. They will return puter and Internet skills, and the ability to retrieve,
to good standing when sufficient grade points have been manage, and evaluate digital information.
earned to achieve a C average. • Information Management: The student will develop
the skills necessary to collect, verify, document, and
Withdrawals organize information from a variety of sources.
Students who wish to withdraw from a course and receive • Interpersonal: The student will develop effective
a W may do so via eSantaFe (Web) or in the Office of Re- leadership, teamwork, relationship management,
cords (Building R, room 101) up until the official with- conflict resolution, and workplace skills. 49
www.sfcollege.edu

• Mathematical: The student will develop the skills Degree-seeking students whose college entry placement
necessary to understand and apply mathematical scores are below the state and institutional college level
concepts and reasoning and to analyze and inter- placement scores shall enroll in the appropriate college
pret various types of data. preparatory courses prior to enrolling in college level
• Personal: The student will develop an ability to courses. The college preparatory courses are:
understand and manage self, adapt to change, ENC0001 College Prep Writing 1
enhance wellness, and learn effectively, as well as a
ENC0020 College Prep Writing 2
framework for aesthetic responsiveness.
• Thinking and Problem Solving: The student will REA0001 College Prep Reading 1
develop the skills necessary for analysis, synthesis, REA0002 College Prep Reading 2
evaluation, decision-making, critical and creative MAT0002 Prep Pre-Algebra
thinking, and the creative process. MAT0020 Integrated Arithmetic & Algebra
MAT0024 Elementary Algebra
Ombudsman Students who fail to earn a grade of C or better are re-
Students having questions about obtaining access to a quired to re-register for the failed course the following
course or courses which, if not taken, could impede their semester.
progress toward a degree, should contact Assistant Vice
President for Student Affairs John Cowart, the college’s Students who complete REA0002 are required to register
ombudsman. The ombudsman works to provide an alter- for REA2205 the following semester. Students are strongly
nate communication channel that fosters continual dia- recommended to enroll in College Composition (ENC1101)
logue in resolving academic and personal issues to bring immediately after they complete college preparatory
about positive, productive changes within the classroom. reading and writing courses. Additionally, students are
The ombudsman’s office is located in Building R, room 211. recommended to enroll in MAT1033 after they complete
MAT0024 or MAT0020.
College Preparatory Program
Rule 6A-10.0315(14)
Chair, Academic Foundations: Carole Windsor Florida Administrative Code states that students enrolled
College Preparatory, Adult Ed, and ESL Faculty: in college preparatory courses may be permitted to take
R. Connelly, M. Dicks, A. DiRienzo, J. Falt, courses concurrently in other curriculum areas for which
J. Graney, D. Graziani, D. Henriksen, P. Kunkel, they are qualified. Students who test into college prep in-
B. Middleton, S. Murphy, M. Rinehart, struction must successfully complete the required college
L. Severino, C. Sulander, M. Swope, preparatory studies by the time they have accumulated 12
J. Warmke-Robitaille, A. Weigl hours of college credit course work or they must maintain
continuous enrollment in college preparatory course work
Academic Foundations Department each semester until the requirements are completed while
performing satisfactorily in the degree earning course
In support of academic achievement, Santa Fe provides
work.
learning labs that offer individualized academic support in
mathematics, reading and writing. This service is offered College preparatory students may not enroll in college
to students at all levels. Students may be referred to the credit courses that require skills that are beyond the skill
labs by instructors or may seek additional help indepen- level of the student. Restricted college level courses are
dently. Lab instruction is offered on a one-to-one basis flagged in the course schedule. Since students must main-
or in small group sessions and is free of charge to SFC tain continuous enrollment in required college prepara-
students. tory course work to maintain eligibility for enrollment
The ESL (EAP) program provides instruction in the spoken in college level courses, students may not drop a college
and written language for non-native English students. Stu- preparatory course and remain registered in a college level
dents participate in small-group instruction and individ- course.
ual practice to develop the English language skills needed The college prep advisors located in G-041 are available to
to succeed in academic and vocational classes. Listening, advise all college prep and ESL (EAP) students.
speaking, reading, writing and cultural adaptation are
emphasized. Students shall not enroll for more than three attempts
in each college preparatory course. Withdrawal from a
The learning labs provide pre-CLAST testing and review college preparatory course after the last day to drop and
of all CLAST skills for students preparing to take CLAST receive a refund counts as an attempt. Since the state will
for the first time and those remediating after failure of any fund only two college preparatory attempts, students
subtest. Students are required to complete remediation will pay the full tuition cost for the third attempt, which
in the CLAST Lab prior to retesting. A fee is charged for is equivalent to out-of-state tuition. Exemptions may be
CLAST retakes. granted for extenuating circumstances. Petitions may be
The Learning Labs are located at: submitted at the College Prep office, G-021.
ESL (EAP) Lab I-001 Grades earned in college prep courses will not count
Mathematics Lab G-014 toward graduation. These grades will be included in the
Reading Lab G-036 students’ GPAs and will be included in the calculation of
50 Writing Lab G-005 deficit points for the purpose of academic progress.
Academic Affairs
designated as occupational (O) are not transferable nor
English as a Second Language (ESL) will those hours count toward graduation requirements for
English for Academic Purposes (EAP) the A.A. degree or impact the student’s GPA.
Non-native speakers of English who place into college
preparatory reading and English are required to register
for the ESL (EAP) college preparatory courses. The courses
Degree Programs
in this program integrate reading, writing, listening and Santa Fe College grants four degrees: Associate of Arts
speaking activities to prepare non-native speakers of Eng- (A.A.), Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.), and Associate
lish for college level work. The ESL (EAP) program consists of Science (A.S.). Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) de-
of the following courses: gree programs in Clinical Laboratory Science and Health
Services Administration begin fall 2009.
EAP0200C ESL Communications for College 1
EAP0220C ESL Basic Reading
EAP0240C ESL Basic Writing
Associate of Arts Degree
The Associate of Arts degree is awarded to those students
EAP0300C ESL Communications for College 2
who successfully complete a program of study that is
EAP0320C ESL Intermediate Reading primarily designed to prepare them for transfer to a senior
EAP0340C ESL Intermediate Writing institution. Students wishing to transfer should obtain
EAP0400C Communications for College 3 additional academic advisement from the upper division
EAP0420C College Preparatory ESL Reading school to which they expect to apply.
EAP0440C College Preparatory ESL Writing Note: Beginning fall 2009 all incoming A.A. degree seek-
Grades earned in ESL (EAP) courses will not count toward ing students will be required to begin progress in meet-
graduation. These grades will be included in the students’ ing their mathematics requirement for graduation. This
GPAs and will be included in the calculation of deficit means that students must register for a math course their
points for the purpose of academic progress. first semester and continue to do so each subsequent se-
mester until they have satisfied the mathematics require-
Students enrolled in college preparatory ESL (EAP) courses ment for their respective degrees.
follow the same registration procedures as all college pre-
paratory students. Students shall not enroll for more than
three attempts in any Prep ESL (EAP) course. Withdrawal
Associate of Applied Science Degree
from one of these courses after the last day to withdraw The Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded to
and receive a refund counts as an attempt. students who successfully complete one of the Business,
Health Sciences, Construction and Technical, Public Safe-
ty, or Information Technology Education programs. These
Cooperative Education areas of study are primarily designed to prepare students
Courses offered by this program allow students to apply for immediate employment.
knowledge obtained in the classroom in a variety of actual
work settings. Students are able to gain valuable work Associate of Science Degree
experience and skills not obtainable in the classroom. Reg- The Associate of Science degree is awarded to students
istration for cooperative education classes is by Coopera- who complete programs of instruction consisting of col-
tive Education Department permission only (Building S, lege level courses to prepare for entry into employment
room 254). and including 15-18 hours of general education courses
Each cooperative education placement involves the transferable to the State University System. Some senior
student in the work site search, which often resembles a institutions have established programs to build on the
competitive job search. The work site may provide experi- Associate of Science degree. Students wishing to transfer
ence to the student as a paid job or as volunteer work ex- to such programs should check with the upper division
perience, depending upon the employer’s current staffing school to which they expect to apply.
needs and financial resources. Once a site is established,
the student will work a minimum of 10-20 hours per week Bachelor of Applied Science
and will receive financial compensation (if a paid site has The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) is the designated
been developed) and one to three semester hours of credit degree for flexible baccalaureate programs that are
for each co-op work assignment. The student working 10- designed to accommodate the unique demands for entry
14 hours per week will receive one semester hour of credit. and advancement within specific workforce sectors. BAS
The student working 15-19 hours per week will receive two programs provide degree completion opportunities for
semester hours of credit. The student working 20-35 hours students from a variety of educational backgrounds, but
per week will receive three semester hours of credit. A total primarily those with Associate of Science degrees or the
of up to nine hours per year may be earned. Supervisors equivalent. BAS degree programs conform to all articula-
at the students’ work sites evaluate students’ performance tion conventions (including common course prerequisites,
during their cooperative education experience. The coop- common course numbering, and faculty credentialing in
erative education coordinator utilizes experiential-type accordance with the Southern Association of Colleges and
reports and other assignments submitted by the student Schools). BAS degree programs typically include capstone
at the end of each term, combined with the performance experiences that provide opportunities for students to
evaluation submitted by the site supervisor, to determine demonstrate the application of acquired knowledge, skills,
an appropriate grade. Cooperative education course hours and competencies. 51
www.sfcollege.edu

learning credit to the appropriate academic program areas
following completion of the Previous Experience/Training
Credit form. The academic departments request the appro-
priate documentation from the registrar to determine that
another institution has not already credited the student for
experiential learning. Criteria for granting the experiential
credit are determined within each department. Experien-
tial credits based on work experience require a letter from
the student’s employer documenting time in position, job
title, duties, and employer contact information. Experien-
tial credit is usually granted only for internships. Credit
granted through this process is indicated on the student
transcript. The college keeps experiential learning forms
on file in order to respond to requests from other institu-
tions.

Florida’s Statewide Course
Numbering System (SCNS)
Courses in this catalog are identified by prefixes and
numbers that were assigned by Florida’s Statewide Course
Graduation Numbering System (SCNS). This numbering system is
Students who wish to graduate in a given semester are used by all public postsecondary institutions in Florida
expected to apply for graduation through eSanta Fe before and 23 participating non-public institutions. The ma-
the semester deadline. Graduation deadlines are noted in jor purpose of this system is to facilitate the transfer of
the SFC calendar in this catalog. Graduating students are courses between participating institutions. Students and
invited to attend the graduation ceremonies, which are administrators can use the online Statewide Course Num-
held in May and December. Students who will be graduat- bering System to obtain course descriptions and specific
ing in the summer semester may attend either the spring information about course transfer between participating
or fall graduation, but names of summer graduates are Florida institutions. This information is at the SCNS web-
printed only in the December commencement program. site at http://scns.fldoe.org.
Each participating institution controls the title, credit,
Catalog Year and content of its own courses and recommends the first
Catalog year determines the set of academic requirements digit of the course number to indicate the level at which
that must be fulfilled for graduation. Students gradu- students normally take the course. Course prefixes and
ate under the catalog in effect at the time of their initial the last three digits of the course numbers are assigned by
enrollment at Santa Fe provided they maintain continuous members of faculty discipline committees appointed for
enrollment (registration for and completion of at least one
that purpose by the Florida Department of Education in
course for one full term in an academic year).
Tallahassee. Individuals nominated to serve on these com-
Students who do not maintain continuous enrollment will mittees are selected to maintain a representative balance
be assigned the catalog in effect at the time they readmit as to type of institution and discipline field or specializa-
or resume enrollment. Students may choose to graduate tion.
under the requirements of a later catalog, but they must
fulfill all graduation requirements from that alternative The course prefix and each digit in the course number
catalog year. have a meaning in the Statewide Course Numbering Sys-
tem. The list of course prefixes and numbers, along with
A.A. degree students should consult with an academic
their generic titles, is referred to as the “SCNS taxonomy.”
advisor.
Descriptions of the content of courses are referred to as
The college will make every reasonable effort to honor the “statewide course profiles.”
curriculum requirements appropriate to each student’s
catalog year. However, courses and programs will some-
Example of course identifier:
times be discontinued and requirements may change as
a result of curricular review or actions by accrediting as- Prefix Level Century Decade Unit Lab
sociations and other agencies. Code Digit Digit Digit Code
(first (second (third (fourth
digit) digit) digit) digit)
Experiential Learning ENC 1 1 0 1
Santa Fe College recognizes and awards credit by experi- English Lower Freshman Freshman Freshman No
ence in some vocational/technical areas. Matriculated Composition (Freshman) Composition Composition Composition laboratory
students are required to send requests for experiential Level at this Skills Skills I component in
52 Institution this course
Academic Affairs
General Rule for Course system shall be awarded credit by the receiving institu-
tion for courses satisfactorily completed by the student at
Equivalencies
the previous institutions. Credit shall be awarded if the
Equivalent courses at different institutions are identi-
courses are judged by the appropriate statewide course
fied by the same prefixes and same last three digits of the
numbering system faculty committees representing school
course number and are guaranteed to be transferable be-
districts, public postsecondary educational institutions,
tween participating institutions that offer the course, with
and participating nonpublic postsecondary educational
a few exceptions. (Exceptions are listed below.)
institutions to be academically equivalent to courses of-
For example, a freshman composition skills course is fered at the receiving institution, including equivalency of
offered by 55 different postsecondary institutions. Each faculty credentials, regardless of the public or nonpublic
institution uses “ENC_101” to identify its freshman com- control of the previous institution. The Department of
position skills course. The level code is the first digit and Education shall ensure that credits to be accepted by a
represents the year in which students normally take the receiving institution are generated in courses for which the
course at a specific institution. In the SCNS taxonomy, faculty possess credentials that are comparable to those
“ENC” means “English Composition,” the century digit “1” required by the accrediting association of the receiving
represents “Freshman Composition,” the decade digit “0” institution. The award of credit may be limited to courses
represents “Freshman Composition Skills,” and the unit that are entered in the statewide course numbering sys-
digit “1” represents “Freshman Composition Skills I.” tem. Credits awarded pursuant to this subsection shall
In the sciences and certain other areas, a “C” or “L” after satisfy institutional requirements on the same basis as
the course number is known as a lab indicator. The “C” credits awarded to native students.
represents a combined lecture and laboratory course that
meets in the same place at the same time. The “L” repre- Exceptions to the General
sents a laboratory course or the laboratory part of a course,
having the same prefix and course number without a lab Rule for Equivalency
indicator, which meets at a different time or place. Since the initial implementation of the SCNS, specific dis-
ciplines or types of courses have been excepted from the
Transfer of any successfully completed course from one guarantee of transfer for equivalent courses. These include
participating institution to another is guaranteed in cases
varying topics courses that must be evaluated individually,
where the course to be transferred is equivalent to one
or applied courses in which the student must be evaluated
offered by the receiving institution. Equivalencies are
for mastery of skill and technique. The following courses
established by the same prefix and last three digits and
are exceptions to the general rule for course equivalencies
comparable faculty credentials at both institutions. For
and may not transfer. Transferability is at the discretion of
example, ENC 1101 is offered at a community college. The
same course is offered at a state university as ENC 2101. A the receiving institution.
student who has successfully completed ENC 1101 at the A. Courses not offered by the receiving institution.
community college is guaranteed to receive transfer credit B. For courses at non-regionally accredited institu-
for ENC 2101 at the state university if the student transfers. tions, courses offered prior to the established trans-
The student cannot be required to take ENC 2101 again fer date of the course in question.
since ENC 1101 is equivalent to ENC 2101. C. Courses in the _999-_999 series are not automati-
cally transferable, and must be evaluated individu-
Transfer credit must be awarded for successfully complet- ally. These include such courses as Special Topics,
ed equivalent courses and used by the receiving institu- Internships, Practica, Study Abroad, Thesis and
tion to determine satisfaction of requirements by transfer Dissertations.
students on the same basis as credit awarded to the native
D. College preparatory and vocational preparatory
students. It is the prerogative of the receiving institution,
courses.
however, to offer transfer credit for courses successfully
E. Graduate courses.
completed that have not been designated as equivalent.
F. Internships, practica, clinical experiences and study
abroad courses with numbers other than those
The Course Prefix ranging from _999-_999.
The course prefix is a three-letter designator for a major G. Applied courses in the performing arts (Art, Dance,
division of an academic discipline, subject matter area, Interior Design, Music, and Theatre) and skills
or sub-category of knowledge. The prefix is not intended courses in Criminal Justice are not guaranteed as
to identify the department in which a course is offered. transferable.
Rather, the content of a course determines the assigned
Questions about the Statewide Course Numbering Sys-
prefix to identify the course.
tem and appeals regarding course credit transfer deci-
sions should be directed to Martha Morton in the Office
Authority for Acceptance of of Curriculum and Scheduling, Robertson Administra-
Equivalent Courses tion Building, room 15, or to the Florida Department
Section 1007.24(7), Florida Statutes, states: Any student who of Education, Office of Articulation, 1401 Turlington
transfers among postsecondary institutions that are fully Building,Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400. Special reports
accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency and technical information may be requested by calling the
recognized by the United States Department of Education Statewide Course Numbering System office at (850) 245-
and that participate in the statewide course numbering 0427, or via the Internet at http://scns.fldoe.org. 53
www.sfcollege.edu

Academic Honors List
Students in Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree
programs are eligible for the Academic Honors List in the
fall and spring terms. Eligible students must be enrolled
in at least 12 credit hours per term, in courses other than
supplementary or college preparatory, and earn a mini-
mum grade point average of 3.5.

Honors Program
The Honors Program offers the challenges and benefits
of an enriched academic experience to highly motivated
students with outstanding records. The program provides
Honors sections of general education or business programs
classes as well as special elective offerings. There are also
Honors Option Contracts available for selected courses.
Qualified students are invited to participate in the Honors
Program each term. Every Honors course is specially noted
on the official SFC transcript. Upon completion of the pro-
gram requirements, students receive an Honors designa-
tion on the Associate of Arts degree, special recognition at
graduation, and an Honors certificate. In order to graduate
from the program with a certificate, students must:
• complete at least 15 hours of Honors course work
Grades and Reports • maintain an overall 3.5 GPA
1. At the end of the term, a final grade for each term is
recorded and preserved. Grades and grade point values
include:
Admission Requirements
Superior Achievement A 4.0 Current students are invited to join the program after
Good Achievement B+ 3.5 meeting the following criteria:
B 3.0 1. a 3.5 academic GPA and a minimum of 12 credit
Satisfactory Achievement C+ 2.5 hours in A.A. degree or A.S. degree course work at
C 2.0 SFC, and
Minimum Achievement D+ 1.5 2. two faculty recommendations and completion of
D 1.0 application;
Failure F 0.0 OR
Incomplete (I) Changed to F if not com- 3. special approval by the Honors Program coordina-
pleted by conclusion of tor
next major term
Audit X Incoming students with strong high school records and
Withdrawal W test scores are also accepted. Dual Enrollment and transfer
students interested in Honors courses are encouraged to
2. At the end of the term, final grades are available on contact the Honors Department at (352) 381-3646.
eSantaFe at the SFC Web site, www.sfcollege.edu.
3. Forgiveness Policy: Courses in which a grade of D or
F was earned may be repeated for credit. All courses
attempted will appear on the transcript. Attempts
Individual Study
marked with a T are not included with calculating the Individual Study credit may satisfy general education
cumulative grade point average; attempts marked with requirements for the Associate of Applied Science degree
an R are included when calculating the cumulative provided that no more than three semester hours of credit
grade point average. The student will be allowed only are applied to any one specific area. For the Associate of
two repeat attempts per course. Students should be Arts degree, Individual Study credits may not be used to
aware that some colleges or universities may not ac- meet the general education requirements although it may
cept a grade of a repeated course, or may compute the be used as elective credit.
grade originally assigned. Students receiving financial No more than three semester hours of credit can be ap-
aid of any type are cautioned to check with the Finan- plied to any one Individual Study request. An Individual
cial Aid office to ensure that the repeat course will Study may not duplicate any preexisting course in the col-
count toward their financial aid award. lege curriculum. Forms are available in the offices of the
4. Grade point averages are determined by computing the academic chairpersons and academic directors.
ratio of grade points earned to semester hours attempt-
ed. Grades of W and X are not included in total grade The Individual Study outline must be typed. The outline
point averages. must include objectives, texts and/or materials, meet-
ing times with the designated instructor, and methods
54 of evaluation (exam, term paper, etc.). It is the student’s
Academic Affairs
responsibility rather than the instructor’s to prepare the eligible to compete for two- and three-year scholarships.
outline. Individual Study forms must be completed and These scholarships can be used at any four-year institution
submitted with the typed outline to the appropriate chair- that offers Army ROTC. The scholarships pay all tuition,
person or academic director by the first day of the term in textbook, laboratory fees and other purely educational
which credit is to be awarded. Students must then submit expenses.
the form to the Curriculum and Scheduling Office, located
in the Robertson Administration Building, room 15, to Students who successfully complete two years of college
have the course created. Students will register for Individ- and the basic course will be given a certificate of training
ual Study courses with their copy of the form on or before allowing them, upon transfer, to enroll in the Army ROTC
the last day to add classes for the term that credit is to be Advanced Course. This leads to a reserve or regular com-
awarded. Individual Study credit is awarded and applied to mission as a second lieutenant in the Active Army, Army
the transcript at the end of the term Reserve or National Guard. Students who do not transfer
to an upper division college and who desire to enlist in the
Army may be able to do so at a higher pay level.
Specialized Group Study To learn more or to enroll in the General Military Course,
Specialized Group Study credits may satisfy general contact the Army ROTC Detachment at UF, (352) 392-1395.
education requirements for the Associate of Applied Sci-
ence (A.A.S.) degree in the areas of Communications/Hu-
manities, Math/Science and Social/Behavioral Sciences, Fee Waivers
provided that no more than three semester hours of such
credit are applied to any one specific area. For the Associ- Sixty Plus Fee Waivers
ate of Arts (A.A.) degree and the Associate of Science (A.S.)
Santa Fe College will waive registration fees (excluding
degrees, however, Specialized Group Study credits may
lab fees, materials or access fees) for residents of Alachua
not be used to meet the general education requirements,
and Bradford counties who are 60 years of age or older for
although they may be used as elective credits.
all credit courses they enroll in at the college on a space
available basis. “Space available” is defined as the last day
Military Science of drop/add for the term/session. Waivers will not be pro-
cessed in cases where the initial registration for the course
Air Force ROTC was prior to that date. No waivers are available for any con-
tinuing education courses offered through the Center for
The Air Force Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC)
Business. For Community Education, registration waivers
was established to select and prepare students to serve as
are available after the pre-registration period ends, and if
officers in the United States Air Force. The Air Force ROTC
a class has space available and has covered 125 percent of
program is divided into two phases: the first two years
its operating costs. Some Community Education classes do
constitute the General Military Course and the last two
not offer Sixty Plus waivers. Verification of age and address
the Professional Officer Course. Full-time Santa Fe Col-
by driver’s license, birth certificate or voter’s registration
lege students are eligible to enroll in the General Military
card must be provided when applying for the waiver.
Course taught at the University of Florida. Transferring at a
later date to one of the more than 140 colleges and univer-
sities offering Air Force ROTC can lead, upon completion of State Employee Tuition Fee Waivers
that course, to a commission as a second lieutenant in the In accordance with Section 1009.265, Florida Statutes, San-
United States Air Force. ta Fe College will waive tuition and fees (excluding lab fees,
or access fees) for state employees to enroll for up to six
The General Military Course examines the role of U.S.
credit hours of courses per term on a space available basis
military forces in the contemporary world with particular
(defined as the last date of drop/add). Please note that Sec-
attention to the United States Air Force, its organization
tion 1009.265(5), F.S. defines state employees as employees
and mission. The functions of strategic offensive and
of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of state
defensive forces, general purpose and aerospace support
government and specifically excludes university employ-
forces are covered. The development of air power over the
ees. Also, proviso language in the General Appropriations
last 200 years is examined by tracing the various concepts
Act specifies that state employees must be “full-time” em-
of employment of air power and by focusing on factors
which prompted research and technological change. A ployees. Waivers will not be granted for courses where the
variety of events and elements in the history of air power initial registration was prior to the last date of drop/add.
are stressed, especially where these provide significant Eligible employees should bring documentation from their
examples of the impact of air power on strategic thought. employer to the cashier’s office in the Robertson Adminis-
tration Building or fax it to 352-381-7020.
To learn more or to enroll in the General Military Course,
contact the Air Force ROTC Detachment at UF, (352) 392-
1355.

Army ROTC
Santa Fe College offers the Army Reserve Officer’s Train-
ing Corps (ROTC) Basic Course. Students incur no military
obligation by taking this course of instruction and are 55
www.sfcollege.edu

College Level Academic Credit by Examination
Skills Test (CLAST) Section 240.4015, Florida Statutes, requires the Articula-
tion Coordinating Committee (ACC) to establish passing
New CLAST Exemption Criteria (state approved scores and course and credit equivalents for Advanced
alternatives to CLAST as of June 19, 2009) Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exams.
Essay, English Language Skills (ELS), and Reading Public community colleges and universities in Florida are
(Communications) required to award credit for AP, IB, CLEP, DANTES, AICE,
You must have met at least one of the following criteria in and Excelsior College exams as designated. Credit awarded
order to exempt the Communications section of CLAST: by exam may not duplicate other credit. Institutions may
1) Cumulative 2.5 GPA (C+ average) in ENC1101 and not award credit for scores below those listed by the ACC.
either ENC1102, ENC2301, ENC2305, or ENC2210; SFC students may satisfy up to 45 semester hours of course
other courses with the prefixes AML, CRW, ENG, credit through one or more of the mechanisms listed be-
ENL, LIT may satisfy the exemption criteria. low; however, a maximum of 30 hours may be awarded for
2) CritRdg/Verbal SAT - 500 the IB diploma. Score minimums, credit hours awarded,
(April 1, 1995 and thereafter) and course equivalencies awarded are subject to change
Verbal SAT - 420 (if test date before April 1, 1995) for any examination without prior notice. Credit for all ex-
3) ACT Reading - 22 (to exempt Reading), ams is awarded based on the recommendation of the State
ACT English - 21 (to exempt ELS and Essay). of Florida Articulation Coordinating Committee as listed
on the chart found at: http://www.fldoe.org/articulation/.
Note: It is possible to exempt English but not
For further information please contact Selena Riess in
Reading and vice versa based on the above ACT
criteria. Building R, room 103.
4) CPT/Accuplacer Reading - 93 (to exempt Read- • Advanced Placement (AP)
ing), CPT/Accuplacer Sentence Skills - 105 (to • International Baccalaureate (IB) Program
exempt ELS and Essay) • College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
• Defense Activity of Non-Traditional Education
5) Credit by examination in Advanced Placement, Col-
Support (DANTES)
lege Level Examination (CLEP), and International
• Advanced International Certificate of Education
Baccalaureate programs where the examination
(AICE)
course is granted an equivalency to one of the
• Excelsior College Examinations
courses identified in item one of this section. For
• Department Credit by Examination
this purpose, a passing examination score shall be
equal to 2.5 grade points (C+).
Advanced Placement (AP)
Math (Quantitative) Contact Information:
You must have met at least one of the following criteria Advanced Placement Program – Order Services
in order to exempt the Math section of CLAST: P.O. Box 6670
1) Cumulative 2.5 GPA (C+ average) in any two Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6670
(2) of the following courses: MAC1102/1105 or (609) 771-7243
higher; MGF1113/1114/1118/1202; MGF1106/1107; http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/
STA1014/2023
Note: A grade of B in a 3-hour course plus a SFC cooperates fully with accredited high schools and col-
grade of C in a 4-hour course equals a 2.25 GPA leges in the Advanced Placement Program of the College
and does not meet the exemption requirement. Entrance Examination Board. Credit is given for exami-
MAT1033 and PHI1100 cannot be used to satisfy nations where a score of three or better has been earned.
the CLAST Alternative. Credit is awarded as listed on the chart found at: http://
2) SAT Math - 500 (April 1, 1995 and thereafter) (SAT www.fldoe.org/articulation/pdf/2007_ACC-CBE.pdf. For
Math score of 470 if test date before April 1, 1995) further information, please contact Selena Riess in Build-
ing R, room 103.
3) ACT Math - 21
4) CPT/Accuplacer Elementary Algebra - 91
5) Credit by examination in Advanced Placement, Articulation Agreement for the
College Level Examination (CLEP), and Interna-
tional Baccalaureate programs where the examina-
International Baccalaureate (IB) Program
tion course is granted an equivalency to one of the Contact information:
courses identified in item one of this section. For International Baccalaureate Program
this purpose, a passing examination score shall be North America and the Caribbean
equal to 2.5 grade points (C+). 475 Riverside Drive, 16th Floor
New York, New York 10115
Note: Students may review their academic records with the
Phone (212) 696-4464
Assessment Center staff in G-25. If you have questions about
Fax (212) 889-9242
the CLAST requirement and whether you satisfy the exemp-
www.ibo.org
tion criteria, contact the Assessment Center. Phone (352)
395-5791, e-mail test.center@sfcollege.edu, or talk to an Students who have not been awarded the IB diploma shall
56 academic advisor. be awarded a minimum of six semester credits in the
Academic Affairs
Credit for the general and subject examinations may be
earned in those areas where students have not already
earned academic credit. Credit for the examinations may
be earned as listed in the following table, provided the
student has not already earned credit for the particular
course(s) for which Santa Fe could give examination cred-
it. Credit is not awarded for a basic course in areas where
advanced course credit has been earned. No examination
may be repeated in an attempt to receive credit. Score
minimums, credit hours awarded, and course equivalen-
cies awarded are subject to change for any examination
without prior notice.

Defense Activity of Non-Traditional Education
Support (DANTES)
The DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs), unlike
Advanced Placement, are not built around curriculum.
Rather, they are designed to test students’ knowledge of a
variety of college level subjects, regardless of where they
may have learned the material. Transfer of credit is based
on the Articulation Coordinating Committee’s recom-
mended minimum scores and maximum amount of credit
guaranteed to transfer with no letter grades or grade
subject areas of each IB higher level examination on which points assigned. Contact the Office of Records (Building R,
they scored five points or above. room 101) for further information.

Students who have been awarded the IB diploma shall be Advanced International Certificate of
awarded up to 30 semester credits in the subject areas in
which they scored four or above on IB Diploma Program Education Program (AICE)
examinations. The credits shall be awarded as follows: The AICE program is an international, advanced second-
score minimums, credit hours awarded, and course equiv- ary curriculum and assessment program equivalent to the
alencies awarded are subject to change for any examina- British system of “A-Levels.” Transfer of credit is based on
tion without prior notice. the Articulation Coordinating Committee’s recommended
minimum scores and maximum amount of credit guar-
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) anteed to transfer with no letter grades or grade points
assigned. Contact the Office of Records (Building R, room
Contact information:
101) for further information.
CLEP Transcript Service
P.O. Box 6600
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6600
Excelsior College Examinations
Excelsior College Examinations (formerly known as the
(609) 771-7865, (800) 257-9558
Regents College Examinations or the Proficiency Exami-
http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ nation Program) are developed by Excelsior College using
clep/about.html
national committees of faculty consultants and national
The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) is a series studies to assess how well the tests measure the perfor-
of examinations developed by the Educational Testing mance of students in actual college courses. Excelsior Col-
Service that allows students to demonstrate competency in lege Examinations are approved by the American Council
certain subjects and earn college credit for those courses on Education, and Excelsior College itself is accredited
without attending classes. The required levels of perfor- by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.
mance on the examinations and the specific courses for Transfer of credit is based on the Articulation Coordinat-
which credit may be granted are subject to change accord- ing Committee’s recommended minimum scores and
ing to the decisions of a statewide committee. maximum amount of credit guaranteed to transfer with no
letter grades or grade points assigned. Contact the Office of
The CLEP examination may be taken at SFC, the University
Records (Building R, room 101) for further information.
of Florida or any center authorized by the College Entrance
Examination Board. The student is responsible for having
all scores submitted to the SFC Office of Records (Building Department Credit
R, room 101). The results are evaluated and recorded on the
student’s transcript if credit is earned. Transfer students
by Examination
Students wishing to earn course credit by passing a de-
must have all transcripts on file from their previous insti-
partmental examination should consult the department
tutions prior to having CLEP credit awarded. There is no
in which the course is taught. Students may not apply for
charge for posting credits. Semester hours toward gradu-
course credit through an SFC Credit Examination if a CLEP
ation are recorded as “credit by examination” with no
examination is available. Students should be aware that
grades or quality points given. These credits do not affect a
SFC Credit Examinations may not be offered for certain
student’s grade point average. 57
courses due to the nature of a particular course’s content.
www.sfcollege.edu

Students may not take an examination for credit in a
course if they have attempted the course at SFC (receiv-
ing either an A, B, C, D, F, I or W for work attempted) or if
they have earned credit for an advanced course in that
area. Decisions about the relevancy of particular advanced
courses will be made by instructors giving the examina-
tion. Credit by examination will not be counted in student
course loads, but will be averaged into student grade point
averages. Credit by examination will not be available dur-
ing the period between official college terms or on official
college holidays.

Procedure for SFC Department Credit by
Examination
1. Students complete a Credit by Examination applica-
tion available in the offices of academic chairper-
sons and directors.
2. Completed applications are presented to depart-
ment or discipline chair or director. If the applica-
tion is approved, the chair or director will explain
how the examination will be administered ac-
cording to current procedures. Depending on the
discipline or program area, either individual exami-
nation dates for each student or a common exami-
nation date for all students will be set each term.
3. Requests are presented to the appropriate chair or
director for approval (signature).
4. Approved forms are taken to the cashier’s window
in the Robertson Administration Building for pay-
ment of the $15 examination fee.
5. The application is returned by students to the dis-
cipline/program area examiner indicated in step 2
above.
6. Upon completion of the examination, the examiner
will forward the results (application) to the appro-
priate office and will also telephone that office to
verify the test grade. The completed examination
will be placed in the division’s Credit by Examina-
tion file for the discipline or program area.
7. Students must then return to the office where the
application was made, pick up a copy of the signed
form and take it to the Office of Records (Building R,
room 101) for final recording. Students must allow
one week after completion of the examination be-
fore picking up the copy from the appropriate office.
8. Credit by Examination may be attempted a second
time after the lapse of one full academic term be-
yond the term in which the first attempt was made.
Students may not attempt Credit by Examination
more than twice in the same course.

Tech Prep Acceleration Credit
Tech Prep credit is a mechanism of accelerated college
credit that may be employed during the high school years.
Students who have earned sufficiently high grades in Tech
Prep classes while in high school and who have passed an
exam formulated and administered by Santa Fe College
may receive college credit upon request after registering at
SFC. Santa Fe College will not accept Tech Prep credit that
is earned at a high school with whom the college has no
prior articulation agreement.

58
Programs of Study

Liberal Arts and Sciences .......................................................60
Career and Technical Education ...........................................65
Educator Preparation Institute ............................................112
Bachelor of Applied Science .................................................113

Course requirements in many programs at Santa Fe College are updated every year.
This catalog may not show the latest course requirements. Please contact your advisor
for current requirements and check the Web sites of individual programs.

59
www.sfcollege.edu

Liberal Arts and Sciences
Departments
English
Chairperson Susan Miller, P-146-A, (352) 395-5026
Administrative Assistant Raqual Crawford, P-146,
(352) 395-5372
Fine Arts
Chairperson Alora Haynes, E-128, (352) 395-5296
Administrative Assistant Kim Kleckner, E-127,
(352) 395-5310
High School Dual Enrollment
Director Linda Lanza-Kaduce, R-008, (352) 395-5493
Office Manager Brenda Evans, R-006, (352) 395-5483
Honors Program
Interim Provost and Vice President
for Academic Affairs Ed Bonahue, B-214,
(352) 381-3825
Administrative Assistant Danielle Paulsen, B-213,
(352) 381-3646
Humanities and Foreign Languages
Chairperson William Little, P-154, (352) 395-5075
Administrative Assistant Pat Quates, P-152,
(352) 395-5075
International Education Purpose
Coordinator Katie Aiken, B-217, (352) 395-5607 Liberal Arts and Sciences provides opportunities for
Administrative Assistant Danielle Paulsen, B-213, students to
(352) 381-3646 • attain a broad-based education through courses
in written and oral communication, mathematics,
Mathematics natural sciences, social sciences, history, humani-
Chairperson Steve Grosteffon, A-215, (352) 395-5297
ties and creative arts;
Administrative Assistant Janet Foster, A-214,
• complete programs of study that will lead to the As-
(352) 395-5297
sociate of Arts degree;
Natural Sciences • complete their general education courses, electives,
Chairperson Sture Edvardsson, X-201, (352) 395-5842 and prerequisites for the Associate of Science degree
Administrative Assistant Lynn Speer, X-201, and certificate programs;
(352) 395-5349 • pursue university-parallel programs of study lead-
ing toward a baccalaureate degree; and
Social and Behavioral Sciences
• become lifelong learners.
Chairperson Doug Diekow, P-155, (352) 381-3655
Administrative Assistant Dianne Wilkinson, P-149,
(352) 395-5300 Philosophy
Liberal Arts and Sciences believes all students deserve
Mission the opportunity to strive for academic excellence in an
environment that both respects and supports diverse
The Liberal Arts and Sciences further the college’s mission
learners. The division provides a multidisciplinary breadth
by
of knowledge from the perspectives of a wide range of
• providing a strong liberal arts education leading to
academic subjects. This foundation prepares students for
the Associate of Arts degree;
success in higher education, career and personal goals.
• preparing students with diverse backgrounds and
goals for careers, further academic study, and life-
long learning;
Associate of Arts (A.A.) Degree
• creating intellectual independence by teaching The college offers the Associate of Arts degree to students
creative thinking, critical reasoning, and problem- wishing to transfer to a four-year college upon graduation
solving skills; from Santa Fe College.
• building an awareness of self, diverse opinions and In keeping with the articulation agreement between state
cultures, and one’s responsibility within the global universities and public community colleges in Florida,
community; each institution granting the Associate of Arts degree sets
• promoting the attainment of a balanced core of its own general education requirements and stipulates the
knowledge drawn from various discipline areas; and additional elective hours required for the degree. By law,
• providing a personalized, supportive learning en- the articulation agreement provides that every Associate
vironment that challenges students to achieve high of Arts graduate of a Florida community college be granted
60 levels of academic performance.
Programs of Study
admission to the upper division of a state university except General Education
to a limited access or teacher certification program or a General education is the core preparation for lifelong
major program requiring an audition. Students earning learning. It fosters a disciplined curiosity that leads to
the Associate of Arts degree and transferring to one of exploring the foundations and ranges of knowledge in the
Florida’s public universities will not be required by the arts and sciences. The general education program at Santa
university to take additional general education courses. Fe College develops the student’s professional, intellectual
and social skills, thereby facilitating understanding of, and
Although the Associate of Arts degree does not require the
involvement in, cultural, political and natural environ-
choice of a major or area of concentration, students are
ments. General education provides critical competencies
advised early in their academic careers to be aware of the students need in today’s society, to succeed in the work-
upper division requirements in specific fields of study. As place, and to transfer education.
a result, they may be able to choose courses within the re-
quired general education core that meet the prerequisites Specifically, the student will
for their chosen field of study. In addition, the Associate of • experience the perspectives of various disciplines
Arts degree requires 24 hours of electives, which should be that comprise the arts and sciences and understand
carefully chosen to meet the future needs of each student their interconnection;
• gain the necessary foundation and depth and
upon transfer to upper division.
breadth of knowledge to become an independent,
Although the college will make every attempt to advise creative, lifelong learner;
students concerning upper division requirements for the • develop effective writing, speaking, reading, listen-
various majors, students are urged to become familiar ing and interpersonal skills;
with the requirements of the upper division universi- • learn how to acquire, organize, evaluate, verify,
ties to which they plan to transfer. Students must select a present, interpret and use information from various
program major by the time they complete 24 college credit programs of study;
hours. With the help of their advisors, students should • sharpen problem-solving skills through deductive
choose electives that will be most advantageous in the and inductive reasoning, analysis, synthesis, and
collaboration;
pursuit of their intended bachelor’s degrees. Each upper
• develop the skills necessary to evaluate social, po-
division university annually publishes counseling manu-
litical, cultural and scientific bodies of knowledge,
als for every major offered at that institution. Each state
their historical development and their continuing
university has a designated articulation officer to facilitate influence;
the transfer of community college graduates to the State • gain an appreciation for diversity in the world com-
University System. munity; and
Although there are not degree programs in the Fine Arts • understand the importance of civic and social par-
at this time, we recommend that those students work- ticipation and informed decision making.
ing on an A.A. degree with a Fine Art program emphasis The general education requirements at Santa Fe College
check with the discipline coordinators of their program are met by a minimum of 36 credit hours representing
for proper academic advisement: Dance, Tari Kendall, communication and mathematical skills and introduc-
395-5916; Music/Vocal, Lynn Sandefur, 381-3639; Music/ tions to, or surveys of, the academic areas of history,
Instrumental, Chris Sharp, 395-5313; Theatre, Terry Klenk, humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and creative
395-5092; Theatre/Technical, Owen Reynolds, 395-5985; arts. A focus on the diversity of the human condition can
Visual Art, Matthew Newell, 395-5810; Visual Art/Sculp- be accomplished from the perspective of any one of these
ture, Matt Shaffer, 395-5810. areas.

Requirements for the Associate of Arts Degree Gordon Rule (6A-10.030)
• Complete the basic 36-hour requirement of the gen- 1. In addition to assessments that may be adopted by
eral education program. the State Board of Education or Board of Governors to
• Complete at least 60 semester hours of credit in a measure student achievement in college-level com-
prescribed course of study with a minimum 2.0 munication and computation skills, other assessment
requirements shall be met by successful completion
grade point average. Select courses from those with
of course work in English and mathematics. For the
an assigned ID code of P (Parallel). Courses des- purposes of this rule, a grade of C or higher shall be
ignated O (Occupational) are not guaranteed for considered successful completion.
acceptance by upper division institutions. 2. Prior to receipt of an Associate of Arts degree from a
• Meet Rule 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule). Courses marked public community college or university, or prior to
with an asterisk (*) will meet a portion of this rule. entry into the upper division of a public university or
• Pass or earn exemptions from all subtests of the college, a student shall complete successfully the fol-
lowing:
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
a. Six (6) semester hours of English course work and
• Pay all fees and discharge all other financial obliga-
six (6) semester hours of additional course work
tions to the college.
in which the student is required to demonstrate
• File an application for graduation with the Office of college-level writing skills through multiple assign-
Records. ments. Each institution shall designate the courses
that fulfill the writing requirements of this section. 61
www.sfcollege.edu

These course designations shall be submitted to the Required General Education
Statewide Course Numbering System. An institution
Core Courses for the Associate
to which a student transfers shall accept courses so
designated by the sending institution as meeting of Arts Degree
the writing requirements outlined in this section.
b. Six (6) semester hours of mathematics course work Humanities
at the level of college algebra or higher. For the pur- Required: A minimum of eight semester hours. This re-
poses of this rule, applied logic, statistics and other quirement is met by successfully completing one course
such computation course work, which may not be from Category A, one course from Category B, and a mini-
placed within a mathematics department, may be mum of two semester hours in Category C.
used to fulfill three (3) hours of the six (6) hours
required by this section. Category A – Fine Arts Hours
c. Students awarded college credit in English based ARH1000 Art Appreciation 3
on their demonstration of writing skills through ART1001C Art Fundamentals 3
dual enrollment, advanced placement, or interna- DAA1000 Dance Fundamentals 3
tional baccalaureate instruction pursuant to Rule MUH2019 American Popular Music 3
6A-10.024, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), MUL1010 Music Appreciation 3
and students awarded college credit based on their MUT1001 Music Fundamentals 3
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
demonstration of mathematics skills at the level of
THE1000 Introduction to Theatre 3
college algebra or higher through one (1) or more
TPA1200 Introduction to Stagecraft 3
of the acceleration mechanisms in Rule 6A-10.024,
TPP1100 Acting Fundamentals 3
F.A.C., shall be considered to have satisfied the re-
quirements in subsection 6A-10.030(2), F.A.C., to the Category B – Core Humanities Hours
extent of the college credit awarded. ARH2050 Art History 1* 3
3. Exemptions and Waivers. Any public community col- ARH2051 Art History 2* 3
lege or university desiring to exempt its students from HUM2210 Humanities: Ancient to Renaissance* 3
the requirements of subsection 6A-10.030(2), F.A.C., HUM2230 Humanities: Renaissance 3
shall submit an alternative plan to the Department of through Enlightenment*
Education. Upon approval of the plan by the Depart- HUM2250 Humanities: 18th Century 3
ment, the plan shall be submitted to the State Board through Present*
of Education or the Board of Governors as appropri- PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy* 3
ate. Upon approval by the State Board of Education PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics* 3
or the Board of Governors, said plan shall be deemed
effective in lieu of the requirements of subsection 6A- Category C – Multicultural Studies Hours
10.030(2), F.A.C. AMH2091 Survey of African-American History 3
ANT2301 Human Sexuality and Culture* 3
Specific Authority 1001.02(1) and (2)(n) FS. Law Imple- ANT2410 Cultural Anthropology* 3
mented 1001.02 FS. Section 15, Chapter 87-212, Laws of ARH2500 Non-Western Art History 3
Florida. History – New 1-11-82, Formerly 6A-10.30, Amend- BSC1030 Biology and Human Values 3
ed 6-8-88, 12-18-2005. CPO2030 Politics of the Developing World* 3
DAN1120 World Dance 3
Gordon Rule Writing Courses ECO2710 International Economics 3
Santa Fe College has established the following rationale for GEO2420 Cultural Geography 3
HUM2410 Asian Humanities 3
identifying writing intensive courses that may be used to
HUM2420 African Humanities 3
satisfy the college level writing portion of the Gordon Rule
HUM2450 American Humanities 3
(2a above):
HUM2461 Humanities of Latin America 3
A writing intensive course is a content specific course ISS2270 Multicultural Communications 2
that has as major instructional, learning and assessment LAH2020 Intro to Latin American History 3
objectives, a substantial discipline-based writing compo- LIT2110 World Cultures in Literature 1* 3
nent that consists of teacher-assessed college level writing LIT2120 World Cultures in Literature 2* 3
assignments. College level writing exhibits critical and LIT2195 Introduction to Literature of the 3
analytical skills to discuss a topic; presents paragraphs African Peoples*
that are focused, developed, organized, coherent, and MUH2501 Introduction to World Music 3
unified; expresses ideas in complete, clear, well-structured REL2121 Religion in American 3
sentences; and enhances ideas through discipline-appro- REL2300 Contemporary World Religions 3
priate diction, conventions, and rhetorical strategies. SYG2010 Social Problems 3
SYG2430 Marriage and the Family 3
In a writing intensive course, students are expected to WOH2012 World History to 1500* 3
produce a substantial amount of disciplined-based writing WOH2022 World History since 1500* 3
of which the majority is assessed by faculty toward refining * Denotes Gordon Rule courses students must pass with a
college level writing skills in a specific discipline. grade of C or better.
62
Programs of Study
Communications Category A – Physical Sciences Hours
PSC2121 General Physical Science w/lab** 4
Required: A minimum of nine semester hours. Successful CHM1030 Elements of Chemistry 1 w/lab 4
completion requires a grade of C or better in both Category CHM2045 College Chemistry 1 w/lab 4
A and B courses, as indicated below. PHY2004 Applied Physics 1 w/lab 4
PHY2048 General Physics w/Calculus 1 w/lab 4
Category A – Composition Hours PHY2053 General Physics 1 w/lab 4
ENC 1101 College Composition* 3 AST1002 Introduction to Astronomy 3
ENC 1102 Writing about Literature* 3 AST1002L Introduction to Astronomy lab 1
CHM1083 Consumer Chemistry 3
Category B – Inquiry and Discourse Hours
ESC1000 Earth & Space Science 3
AMH2035 America in the Modern World 3
GLY2010 Physical Geology 3
since 1945*
GLY2010L Physical Geology Lab 1
ANT2511 Human Origins * 3
PSC1341 Fundamentals of Physical Science 3
ENC 2210 Technical Communication* 3
MET2010 Introduction to Meteorology 3
ENC 2301 Advanced Composition* 3
OCE1001 Introduction to Oceanography 3
ENC 2305 Topics in Composition* 3
GEO2220C Physical Geography 3 ** Recommended lab courses for non-science majors
INR2002 International Relations* 3
Category B – Biological Sciences Hours
PHI1100 Introduction to Informal Logic* 3
BSC2005 General Biology w/lab** 4
POS2112 State and Local Government* 3
BOT2010 General Botany w/lab 4
SOP2002 Psychology of Social Behavior 3
BOT2011 Botany: Plant Diversity w/lab 4
SYG2323 Introduction to Criminology 3
BSC2010 General Core Biology 1 w/lab 4
THE2300 Introduction to Dramatic Literature* 3 BSC2086 Anatomy & Physiology 2 w/lab 4
WOH2040 Contemporary World History 3 MCB2000 Microbiology w/lab 4
* Denotes Gordon Rule courses students must pass with a ZOO2010 General Zoology w/lab 4
grade of C or better. BSC1001 Introduction to Biology 3
BSC2050 Energy and Ecology 3
Mathematics BSC2250
EVS1001
Florida Flora & Fauna
Intro to Environmental Science
3
3
Required: Six hours from Category A or three hours from PCB1030L Introductory Ecology Lab 1
Category A and three hours from Category B as listed be- PCB2610 General Genetics & Evolution 3
low successfully completed with a grade of C or better. ZOO1503C Animal Behavior & Ecology 3
• Mandatory prerequisite for all math courses is
MAT1033 (an elective credit) or appropriate place-
ment score on the CLM
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Required: A minimum of 6 semester hours (3 hours from
• MAC1105 and STA2023 require a C or better in Category A and 3 hours from Category B).
MAT1033
• Minimum of 3 credit hours from Category A Every class in Category A satisfies the writing intensive
portion of the Gordon Rule. Students must achieve a grade
Category A Hours of C or better in these courses.
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
Category A – History and Political Science Hours
MAC1114 Trigonometry 3
AMH2010 US History to 1877* 3
MAC1140 Precalculus Algebra 3 AMH2020 US History since 1877* 3
MAC2233 Survey of Calculus w/lab 4 CPO2001 Comparative Politics* 3
MAC2311 Calculus 1/Analytic Geometry w/lab 4 EUH2000 Western Civilization 1* 3
MAC2312 Calculus 2/Analytic Geometry w/lab 4 EUH2001 Western Civilization 2* 3
MAC2313 Calculus 3/Analytic Geometry w/lab 4 EUH2002 Western Civilization 3* 3
MAP2302 Elementary Differential Equations 3 INR2002 International Relations* 3
MGF1107 Contemporary Mathematics 3 POS2041 American National Government* 3
POT2002 Introduction to Political Theory* 3
Category B Hours
MGF1106 Topics in Mathematics 3 Category B – Social and Behavioral Sciences
MGF1121 Introduction to Formal Logic 3 Hours
STA2023 Introduction to Statistics 3 ANT2000 General Anthropology* 3
GEA2000 World Regional Geography 3
Natural Sciences PSY2012 General Psychology 3
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology* 3
Required: A minimum of seven semester hours including
at least three hours each from the Biological Sciences and *Denotes Gordon Rule courses students must pass with a
the Physical Sciences. This requirement may be met by grade of C or better.
the combination of a 3-hour and a 4-hour course, or two
3-hour courses and a 1-hour lab, or three 3-hour courses. Electives (24 hours)
Students should also be aware of specific prerequisite In selecting electives visit the Advisement Center to talk to
requirements for their intended major; many upper divi- an advisor about your options, or check your online degree
sion programs require additional hours and one or more audit for preprofessional course requirements for your
laboratory courses. major/program of study. 63
www.sfcollege.edu

Foreign Language
All students must meet a foreign language requirement to
enter the State University System. This requirement may be
met in one of the following ways:
• Completion of two credits of secondary (high school)
instruction in one foreign language
• Eight to 10 semester hours of credit in one foreign
language at a postsecondary level
• Demonstration of competence on the CLEP test to
earn up to eight credits from the College Entrance
Examination Board
Currently, Santa Fe offers classes in American Sign Language,
French, Italian, and Spanish. Through an agreement between
Santa Fe College and the University of Florida, SFC students
may also be able to register for foreign languages not offered
at Santa Fe, on a space available basis. For more information
about languages offered at UF, please contact the Depart-
ment of Humanities and Foreign Languages, Building P,
room 152, or call (352) 395-5075.

64
Programs of Study
Career and Technical
Education
Career and Technical Education prepares students for suc-
cessful employment in high skill/high wage careers. Many
Career and Technical Education programs also provide
academic and technical preparation for completion of bac-
calaureate degrees at four-year colleges and universities.
Local employers advise Career and Technical Education
program administrators and instructors about trends in
business and industry for which students must be pre-
pared. The curriculum is continuously upgraded to meet
employer specifications.
Course requirements for each Career and Technical
Education program at the college are updated each year.
To obtain the latest copy of course requirements, contact
the appropriate program advisor. Directors and program
advisors for Career and Technical Education programs are
listed in the section below.

Career and Technical
Education Programs
Career counseling for students in each technology pro-
gram is provided by program advisors. They furnish
information about program requirements, course content,
prerequisites, and help students to plan and register for
classes each semester. Program advisors monitor the prog-
ress of each student to assure the student’s efficient and
successful completion of his or her program. Dental Programs
Biotechnology Program Director: Karen Autrey
Director: Dr. Kelly Gridley Nursing Programs
Program Advisor: Denise Remer Director: Lois Ellis
Faculty: Dr. K. Gridley, Ms. E. Monck, Dr. R. Guico, Radiologic Programs
Mr. R. Tinckham Director: Bobbie Konter
Business Programs Respiratory Care
Director: James Geason Director: Paul Stephan
Program Advisor: Doug Robertson, C-102, Sonography
(352) 395-5139 Director: Reeda Fullington and Bobbie Konter
Child Development and Education Surgical Technology
Director: Doug Diekow Director: Paul Stephan
Program Advisor: Doug Diekow, P-155, Director of Counseling
(352) 395-3655 Sheila Baker, W-002E, (352) 395-5734
Construction and Technical Programs Program Advisor
Scott Fortner, W-002B, (352) 395-5733
Director: Jane Parkin
Program Advisor: Tom Mason, I-050, Program Advisor
(352) 395-5361 Sari Sanborn, W-002, (352) 381-3813 ext.5651

Educator Preparation Institute Institute of Public Safety Programs
Director: Ed Bonahue Director: Daryl Johnston
Program Advisor: Carol Edwards, B-215, Program Advisor: Louis Kalivoda, Kirkpatrick
(352) 395-5159 Criminal Justice Training Center, (352) 271-2925
Health Sciences Programs Information Technology Education and
Sciences for Health Programs Graphic Design Technology
Director: Linda Nichols Director: Eugene Jones
Cardiac Electrophysiology (EP) Program Advisor: Denise Remer, N-213,
Director: Reeda Fullington (352) 395-5839
Cardiovascular Technology (CVT) Zoo Animal Technology Program
Director: Reeda Fullington Director: Sture Edvardsson
Computed Tomography (CT) Program Advisor: Linda Asbell, Zoo,
Director: Bobbie Konter 65
www.sfcollege.edu

Associate of Science (A.S.) Associate of Science (A.S. Degree)
Degree Programs 3622 Biomedical Engineering Tech (Electronics)
These are programs of instruction that consist of college 3621 Biotechnology Lab Technology
level courses to prepare for entry into employment. They 3220 Business Administration
include 15-18 hours of general education courses transfer- ◊ 3309 Cardiovascular Technology
able to the State University System. 3702 Criminal Justice Technology
◊ 3311 Dental Hygiene
Requirements for the Associate of Science Degree are: ◊ 3321 Dental Hygiene Bridge, Assistant to Hygienist
1. Complete an approved program of study of at least 60 ◊ 3401 Early Childhood Education
semester hours in accordance with Florida standard ◊ 3306 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Specialist
credit hour length that includes a basic core of 15 se- 3620 Digital Media Technology
mester hours of general education courses that transfer 3401 Early Childhood Education
to the State University System. ◊ 3397 Emergency Services Technology
2. The general education core must include at least one 3701 Fire Science Technology
course from each of the following areas: ◊ 3520 Health Information Technology and
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 hours Management
Mathematics/Natural Sciences 3 hours 3330 Health Services Management
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 hours 3623 Internet Service Technology
3. Graduates must demonstrate competency in reading, 3707 Legal Assistant
writing, oral communication, fundamental math- 3518 Medical Office Specialist
ematical skills and the basic use of computers. The re- 3632 Networking Services Technology
maining six hours will be determined by the program ◊ 3315 Nuclear Medicine Technology
of study. Some senior institutions have established ◊ 3303 Nursing - RN
programs to build on the Associate of Science degree. ◊ 3313 Nursing Bridge LPN/Paramedic to RN
The general education courses for the Associate of 3508 Office Administration-Office Software
Science degree must be selected from Associate of Arts Applications
courses that are designated transferable to upper divi- 3704 Professional Pilot Technology
sion institutions. Students wishing to transfer to senior ◊ 3305 Radiography
institutions should check with the upper division ◊ 3310 Respiratory Care
school which they expect to attend. See the appropri- ◊ 3106 Zoo Animal Technology
ate advisor for assistance in making general education
course choices for the Associate of Science degree. Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree
4. Complete at least the last 15 semester hours at Santa Fe 2604 Automotive Service Management Technology
College. 2621 Biomedical Engineering Technology
5. Complete an adequate number of semester hours with (Electronics)
appropriate prerequisites in courses above the elemen- 2610 Building Construction Technology
tary level. (Management)
2220 Business Administration
Associate of Applied Science 2702 Criminal Justice Technology
2401 Early Childhood Education
(A.A.S.) Degree Programs ◊ 2397 Emergency Medical Services
These are programs of instruction consisting of college 2701 Fire Science Technology
level courses to prepare for entry into employment. Some 2707 Legal Assisting
programs are transferable due to existing articulation 2518 Office Administration Medical Office
agreements. Specialist
2508 Office Administration-Office Software
Requirements for the Associate of Applied Science Degree
are: ◊ Program is limited access. Please see the program advi-
1. Complete an approved program of at least 60 semester sor for more information. A separate application may be
hours in accordance with Florida standard credit hour required.
length that must include a basic core of 15 semester
hours of general education courses. Career and Technical Certificate
2. The general education core must include at least one (College Credit) Programs
course from each of following areas: In addition to the Associate of Science and Associate of
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 hours Applied Science degrees, the college offers Technical
Mathematics/Natural Sciences 3 hours Certificate programs to meet the occupational needs of
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 hours the community further. These programs of instruction
The remaining six hours will be determined by the are less than 60 credit hours of college level courses and
program of study. are a part of an Associate of Science or Associate of Ap-
3. Graduates must demonstrate competency in reading, plied Science degree. Technical Certificate programs are
writing, oral communication, fundamental mathemat- intended to prepare students for entry into employment. A
ical skills, and the basic use of computers. minimum grade point average of 2.0 is required. For more
4. Complete at least the last 15 semester hours at Santa Fe information about these programs contact the appropriate
66 College. program advisor.
Programs of Study
Certificate Programs Postsecondary Adult Education Programs
6621 Biotechnology Manufacturing Technician Ç 7601 Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and
6508 Business Management Heating Technology
6550 Business Management Entrepreneur & Ç 7623 Applied Welding Technology
Small Bus Mgt Ç 7603 Automotive Service Technology
6558 Business Management Human Resources ◊ 7705 Correctional Officer
6568 Business Management Marketing ◊ 7725 Crossover Correction Officer to
6538 Business Management Real Estate Law Enforcement
6548 Business Management Retail Management ◊ 7722 Crossover Law Enforcement to
6519 Business Operations Accounting Correction Officer
6540 Business Operations eBusiness ◊ 7301 Dental Assisting
6543 Business Operations Entrepreneur & ◊ 7702 Law Enforcement (Police Academy)
Small Bus Mgt ׂ 7333 Nursing Assistant (CNA)
6541 Business Operations Human Resources ׂ 7335 Patient Care Assistant
6542 Business Operations Management ◊ 7303 Practical Nursing (LPN)
6530 Business Specialist ◊ 7338 Surgical Technology
◊ 6308 Cardiac Electrophysiology ATC
◊ 6403 Child Development Early Intervention Career and Technical Certificate Apprenticeship Programs
6622 CISCO Networking Academy Ç 7674 Carpentry Apprenticeship
◊ 6307 Computed Tomography ATC Ç 7692 Electrical Construction Apprenticeship
6640 Computer Crime Scene Technician Ç 7631 Heating and Air Conditioning Installer/
◊ 6306 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Specialist Servicer
6100 Educator Preparation Institute Ç 7654 Plumbing Apprenticeship
◊ 6907 Emergency Medical Technician ◊ Program is limited access. Please see the program advi-
6595 Health Care Services sor for more information. A separate application may be
6630 Information Technical Analysis required.
6620 Information Technical Support Ç Program does not require high school graduation or a
6562 Information Technology Management GED.
6560 Information Technology Technician
6619 Interactive Media Production Course Offerings for State Licensure
6597 Legal Office Management
The Business Programs department offers a course for
6592 Medical Coder/Biller
students who need to meet state licensure requirements in
6591 Medical Record Transcribing ATD
real estate. For more information call the program direc-
6587 Office Management
tor’s office at (352) 395-5135 or the program advisor at (352)
6577 Office Specialist
395-5139.
◊ 6900 Paramedic
◊ Program is limited access. Please see the program advi- For information about state insurance pre-licensing call
sor for more information. A separate application may be Santa Fe’s Center for Business at (352) 395-5896.
required.
Adult Education Programs
Career and Technical Certificate The Adult Education Program is designed to help students
gain the necessary skills to enter or advance in college
(Contact Hour) Programs
and/or the workplace. Services offered by the SFC Adult
The college offers non-credit Career and Technical Cer-
Education Program include preparation for the tests of
tificate programs in the areas of health sciences, public
General Educational Development (GED) to earn a state
safety, and construction and technical programs. The
of Florida high school diploma, Adult Basic Education
Career and Technical Certificate is a program of instruc-
classes, Computerized Placement Test (CPT) preparation,
tion consisting of postsecondary adult vocational (PSAV)
Basic Computer classes, Family Literacy Program, Adults
courses to prepare for entry into employment. Students
with Disabilities Program, English for Speakers of Other
must meet specific basic skills requirements in English,
Languages (ESOL) and a U.S. Citizenship program.
mathematics and writing. Students who successfully finish
the required sequential courses are awarded a certifi- The SFC Adult Education Program is an open-entry/
cate of completion. The Career and Technical Certificate open-exit program, which means students can begin the
(PSAV) programs listed below admit students on a selected program at any time and complete the program when their
basis only. Admission to the Basic Police and Basic Correc- goals are met. Instruction is provided in classes, small
tions Recruit programs is by agency sponsorship. Admis- groups, and individually. Learning labs with trained lab
sion to the college does not necessarily guarantee admis- assistants are available for individual programs and for
sion to these programs. Application should be made to the computer and skill practice to support what students are
program as well as to the college. For more information doing in their course work.
about these programs contact the program advisors.
Day and evening programs are offered at various sites:
the SFC Northwest Campus, Building G, room 32, (352)
395-5760; the Blount Center, Building DC, room 7, (352)
395-4496; and the Davis Center, (352) 381-3707. 67
www.sfcollege.edu

Intake and transition counseling and assistance are avail- High School Dual Enrollment Program
able to help students successfully enter the program and,
in Technology and Applied Sciences
upon adult education goal completion, move into careers,
certificate, A.A. degree, and A.S. programs. Students take (Career and Technical Education)
a diagnostic test upon entry into the Adult Education Director Linda Lanza-Kaduce, R-008, (352) 395-5493
Program. They then meet individually with the intake
In cooperation with the School Board of Alachua County,
specialist to assess their test scores, set learning goals, and
dual enrollment opportunities in the college’s Technol-
make their schedule. Students begin their course of study
ogy and Applied Sciences Programs (Career and Technical
and are reassessed periodically to make sure they are
Education) are provided for qualified eleventh and twelfth
completing their instructional goals. The intake/transi-
grade students. The purpose of this educational program is
tion specialist is available to help students determine their
to provide high school students an opportunity to acquire
next step in the academic process and negotiate barriers to
a technical education at Santa Fe College while in high
program completion
school. Students can earn both high school and college
credit while attending SFC’s High School Dual Enrollment
Perkins Initiatives Program. Once accepted, students register for college tech-
Program Coordinator Angela Clifford, DB-106, nology, high school, and/or college academic course work
Blount Center, (352) 395-5260 to fulfill high school graduation requirements. Students
Technical students, including special populations at Santa whose college placement test scores and academic history
Fe College and in Alachua and Bradford counties’ school are competitive with those of college students may enroll
districts, receive academic support, assessment and in college level academic courses that count as both high
counseling, retention services, employment resources and school and college credit. Students in the High School
limited financial support through the Perkins grants. In Dual Enrollment Program graduate from their home high
addition, technical projects and programs are initiated, schools. Students may participate in extracurricular activi-
improved, expanded and evaluated. ties offered at their home high schools. College tuition
is free to dual enrollment students. Required textbooks
The program also emphasizes the expanded use of tech- are provided free of charge for public school students
nology, all aspects of industry, and professional devel- and home school students affiliated with a public school.
opment. Links are established between secondary and Transportation is available through the county school bus
postsecondary programs and business partners. system, and free and reduced cost meals are provided for
The Perkins Initiatives are Workforce Development, Tech eligible students. For further information about this pro-
Prep, Bradford-Union Area Vocational Technical Center, gram call (352) 395-5490.
Rural and Sparsely Populated, Health Sciences Counsel-
ing Pilot for Success, Success Services Program, and the
Vocational Success Program. Visit the Perkins Initiatives
Web site at www.sfcollege.edu.

Tech Prep Program
The Alachua/Bradford/Santa Fe College Tech Prep Pro-
gram provides career awareness, academics, and technical
preparation. The purpose of the program is to broaden
the educational, career, and economic opportunities of all
students. This approach combines academic learning in
the classroom with hands-on learning at a work site or in a
simulated work setting.
The Tech Prep program also promotes a system of con-
necting activities that link Santa Fe College, the school
districts of Alachua and Bradford counties, Bradford-
Union Area Career and Technical Center, and business
and civic partners. The University of Florida, St. Leo Uni-
versity, and other private colleges and universities are also
partners in Tech Prep education. Students benefit from
Tech Prep educational programs by acquiring knowledge
and skills that prepare them for opportunities to earn ac-
celerated placement through credit by exam in Career and
Technical Education programs. Visit the Web site at www.
sfcollege.edu.

68
Programs of Study
Biotechnology Programs transcripts from high school, as well as official transcripts
Director: Dr. Kelly Gridley from any postsecondary institution attended, to be sent to
Program Advisor: Denise Remer the Office of Records. Unofficial transcripts may be used
Faculty: Dr. K. Gridley, Ms. E. Monck, Dr. R. Guico, for initial advisement purposes only and will not be used
Mr. R. Tinckham for program admission consideration.
Biotechnology
Biotechnology (BTN) – General Education Requirements Hours
Associate of Science 3621 Communications 6
The Biotechnology Laboratory Technology Program at ENC1101 College Composition 3
ENC2210 Technical Communications 3
Santa Fe College provides for new career opportunities
OR
through enhanced science and technical education. In
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
addition to meeting the need of the emerging regional bio-
technology industry for entry-level laboratory technicians, Humanities/Fine Arts 3
the program provides a sound basis for further education (Choose one from the following)
in the sciences by giving students hands-on biotechnol- ARH2050, ARH2500, PHI2010, PHI2600, HUM2210, 3
HUM2230, HUM2250, HUM2450, HUM2472
ogy laboratory experience. The program is sustained by a
formal partnership between SFC, the University of Florida, Mathematics/Science 14
and industries related to biotechnology. The curriculum, MAC1105 College Algebra 3
faculty and facilities were established with guidance from STA2023 Intro to Statistics 3
local employers to meet student needs. CHM1030 Elements of Chemistry 1/Lab 4
CHM1031 Physiological Chemistry/Lab 4
The goal of the Biotechnology Laboratory Technology Pro- Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
gram is to develop competent and professional laboratory (Choose one from the following)
technicians proficient in entry-level techniques that have ANT2000, PSY2012, DEP2002, SOP2002, DEP2004, 3
a high degree of adaptability. A further aim is to develop SYG2000, GEA2000, SYG2010, PPE2001
the qualities of leadership and scholarship that will allow Total General Education Hours 26
qualified graduates to pursue baccalaureate educational
Professional Core Requirements 27
opportunities. The program is administered in compli-
BSC1404C Intro to Biotechnology Methods 3
ance with the curriculum frameworks as governed by the
BSC1421 Intro to Biotechnology 1
state of Florida Department of Education.
BSC2426C Biotechnology Methods 1 3
Admission to the program requires a 2.0 overall GPA on BSC2427C Biotechnology Methods 2 3
college transcripts, and successful completion of two se- BSC2423C Protein Biotechnology/Cell Culture 3
mesters of a chemistry sequence, basic mathematics, core BSC2943 Biotechnology Industry Internship 6
biology, and microbiology. Students interested in the A.S. BSC2010 General Core Biology 1/Lab 4
degree in Biotechnology Laboratory Technology should MCB2000 Intro to Microbiology/Lab 4
apply after their first academic year, and should complete Choose 8 credits of Natural Science/Sciences 8
the program in three semesters. Students may apply to for Health from the following:
the program for admission during the semester they take BOT2010 General Botany/Lab 4
BSC1404C, and students who have completed a techni- AND
cal certificate in biotechnology at their high school may BOT2011 General Botany: Plant Diversity/Lab 4
qualify for advanced placement. BSC2084 Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab 4
BSC2085 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1/Lab 4
Upon completion of the core program, students earn an BSC2086 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2/Lab 4
Associate of Science degree from Santa Fe College. Gradu- CHM2210 Organic Chemistry 1/Lab 4
ates are prepared to seek entry-level employment as labo- CHM2211 Organic Chemistry 2/Lab 4
ratory technicians competent in preparing solutions and ETI2411 Introduction to Manufacturing/Lab 4
reagents, operating scientific instrumentation, preparing ETI2160 Principles Biotechnology Metrology 4
samples for analysis, using recombinant DNA techniques, ETI2170 Quality Assurance and Reg Affairs 4
culturing mammalian cells, purifying and/or character- MLT2191 Histology Techniques/Lab 4
izing DNA and proteins, and collecting and assessing data. PHY2048 Physics 1 w/Calculus/Lab 4
These competencies are fundamental to the development PHY2049 Physics 2 w/Calculus/Lab 4
of products from biological systems and basic research. PHY2053 General Physics 1/Lab 4
In addition, with proper course selection and additional PHY2054 General Physics 2/Lab 4
course work, students can earn an Associate of Arts (A.A.) ZOO2010 Intro to Zoology/Lab 4
degree and be prepared to apply to various upper divi- Total Professional Hours 35
sion programs for further education. Students who have Total Program Hours 61
previously completed a degree program and have the
prerequisite course work in mathematics, chemistry and
biology can complete an Advanced Technical Certificate in
Biotechnology Manufacturing.
Students interested in the Biotechnology Laboratory Tech-
nology Program should complete an application for admis-
sion to SFC. This requires that students arrange for official
69
www.sfcollege.edu

Biomedical Engineering Technology – Biomedical Engineering Technology –
Associate of Applied Science 2621 Associate of Science 3622
The A.A.S. degree program in Biomedical Engineering The A.S. degree program in Biomedical Engineering Tech-
Technology prepares students for employment in the nology prepares students for employment in the biomedi-
biomedical electronic equipment field. Students will learn cal electronic equipment field with the option of transfer-
skills in areas of biomedical research, development, manu- ring to a four-year institution. Students will learn skills in
facturing and maintenance. areas of biomedical research, development, manufacturing
and maintenance.
Through classroom and laboratory environments, stu-
dents acquire knowledge to design, manufacture, evaluate, Through classroom and laboratory environments, stu-
troubleshoot, repair and test various types of biomedical dents acquire knowledge to design, manufacture, evaluate,
equipment. Additionally, students will learn to function troubleshoot, repair and test various types of biomedical
in a hospital or manufacturing environment through a equipment. Additionally, students will learn to function
one-semester internship at a local biomedical department. in a hospital or manufacturing environment through a
During the internship, students will be assigned routine one-semester internship at a local biomedical department.
duties as biomedical equipment technicians. During the internship, students will be assigned routine
General Education Requirements Hours duties as biomedical equipment technicians.
Communications 6
ENC1101 College Composition 3
Biomedical Engineering Technology
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3 General Education Requirements Hours
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 Communications 3
(Choose one from the following) ENC1101 College Composition 3
HUM2450 American Humanities 3 Humanities/Fine Arts 3
HUM2250 18th Century through Present 3 (Choose one from the following)
PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3 HUM2250 18th Century through Present 3
Mathematics 3 HUM2450 American Humanities 3
(Choose one from the following) PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3
MAC1105 College Algebra 3 Mathematics/Science 10
MAT1033 Intermediate Algebra 3 MAC1105 College Algebra 3
MGF1107 Contemporary Math 3 MAC1114 Trigonometry 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 PHY2053 General Physics 1/Lab 4
(Choose one from the following) Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
INP2390 Human Relations in Life and Work 3 (Choose one from the following)
SYG2430 Marriage and Family 3 INP2390 Human Relations in Life and Work 3
Total General Education Hours 15 SYG2430 Marriage and the Family
Professional Core Requirements Hours Total General Education Hours 19
CET1114C Digital Circuits 4 Professional Core Requirements Hours
CET2123C Microprocessors 1 4 CET1114C Digital Circuits 4
CET2127C Microprocessors 2 4 CET2123C Microprocessors 1 4
EET1015C DC Circuit Analysis 4 CET2127C Microprocessors 2 4
EET1141C Introduction to Semiconductors 4 EET1015C DC Circuit Analysis 4
EET2025C AC Circuit Analysis 4 EET1141C Introduction to Semiconductors 4
EET2124C Linear Circuits 4 EET2025C AC Circuit Analysis 4
EST1940 BMET Field Experience 6 EET2124C Linear Semiconductor Circuits 4
EST2436C Biomedical Instrumentation 4 EST1940 BMET Field Experience 6
EST2438C Biomedical Instrumentation 2 4 EST2436C Biomedical Instrumentation 1 4
EST2503C Electro-Mechanical 4 EST2438C Biomedical Instrumentation 2 4
Total Professional Hours 46 Total Professional Hours 42
Total Program Hours 61 Total Program Hours 61
Note: Program requirements are subject to change. For more Note: Program requirements are subject to change. For more
information, contact program advisor Tom Mason in Build- information, contact program advisor Tom Mason in Build-
ing O, room 127, or call (352) 395-5361. College Algebra and ing O, room 127, or call (352) 395-5361. All classes must be
all electronics classes must be passed with a grade of C or passed with a grade of C or higher.
higher.

70
Programs of Study
Business Programs A.A.S. and A.S. Degrees, ATD, and
Program Director: Dr. James Geason Certificate Programs
Program Advisor: Mr. Doug Robertson
Faculty: Ms. D. Adams, Ms. A. Anschultz,
Dr. K. Bakuzonis,* Ms. S. Crosson,*
Business Administration –
Ms. J. Cunningham, Mr. B. Fox, Dr. J. Geason, Associate of Applied Science 2220
Mr. R. Gilbert, Mr. H. Hartman, Mr. H. Hooper, The Associate of Applied Science in Business Administra-
Ms. N. Huber,* Mr. D. O’Gorman, Ms. D. Paige, tion is a 64 credit hour program designed for students to
Ms. J. Shay, Dr. C. Stephenson,* Mr. R. Strickland,* secure employment in business upon graduation. This
and Mr. P. Woodward program provides students with a variety of course work
*Academic Lead Faculty in many areas of business, preparing them for positions in
Accounting Technology: Ms. S. Crosson management and supervision, marketing, bookkeeping,
Business Administration and Management: and others. Specialization within this program is available
Dr. C. Stephenson and encouraged; we strongly suggest specialization in ac-
Economics: Mr. R. Strickland counting, marketing, or general. Students completing this
Health Information Technology & Management: degree are also eligible to receive the Business Manage-
Dr. K. Bakuzonis ment certificate.
Legal Assisting: Ms. N. Huber
Office Systems Technology: Ms. N. Huber Business Administration
General Education Requirements Hours
Business Programs offers preparation for a wide range of
Communications 3
careers in government, business, legal, medical, and ac- ENC1200 Business Communication 3
counting. Opportunities for employment, advancement
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
and responsibility exist in almost every business organi-
PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3
zation. Graduates are prepared to enter the workforce at
various levels to include management, operations, and Mathematics/Science 3
administrative support. MTB1103 Business Math 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 6
Degrees in business are structured to include a broad IDS2930 International Study Abroad 3
general education, plus additional courses directed spe- OR approved substitute from list below:
cifically toward areas of interest. These programs provide AMH2010, AMH2020, AMH2035, ANT2410, 3
students with the specialized skills necessary for particu- CLP2140, CPO2001, DEP2002, EUH2000, EUH2001,
lar occupations. GEA2000, GEO2420, INR2002, POS2041, POS2112,
PPE2001, PSY2012, SOP2002, SYG2000, SYG2010
Students planning to complete their formal education in a
Elective–Any Social Science Course 3
two-year period are advised to pursue the Associate of Sci-
ence or Associate of Applied Science degree. These degrees Total General Education Hours 15
prepare students for a variety of business positions. The Professional Core Requirements Hours
programs offered and course requirements are detailed (See program advisor)
later in this section. Course selection should be made with ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
the help of Doug Robertson, Business Programs academic BUL2137 Employment Law for Business 3
advisor. CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
ECO2013 Macroeconomics 3
Students planning to transfer to a state university upon FIN2104 Principles of Finance 3
graduation from SFC are best advised to comply with the GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
course requirements for the Associate of Science degree GEB2350 International Business 3
in Business Administration, or enroll in the Associate of GEB2949 Business Internship 3
Arts degree program. (Please see the catalog description.) IDS2941 Internship and Career Building 4
There are additional areas in the Business Programs de- MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
partment that have articulation agreements with specific MAN2300 Human Resource Management 3
colleges. These may include Legal Assistant and Health MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3
Information Technology & Management. Students should MKA2021 Salesmanship 3
also read carefully the section on requirements for the MNA2100 Human Relations in Business 3
Associate of Arts degree listed under Liberal Arts and Sci- MNA2345 Management & Supervision 3
ences. SBM2000 Entrepreneurship & Small Business 3
Management
Students who are planning to attend college for specific
Total Professional Hours 49
training but are not interested in a degree program may
pursue one of the certificate or applied technology di- Total Program Hours 64
ploma (ATD) programs. Certificate and ATD programs
are designed to be completed in one year or less. Help and
advisement for students seeking A.S./A.A.S. degrees or
certificates are available by calling (352) 395-5139, visiting
C-102, or e-mailing douglas.robertson@sfcollege.edu.
Students may also visit the department’s Web page at
www.sfcollege.edu to view degree, course information,
and online advisement materials. 71
www.sfcollege.edu

tings throughout the health care industry. Students need-
Business Administration – Management ing additional information should check the program Web
Associate of Science 3220 site or contact the program advisor in C-102.
The Associate of Science in Business Administration is a 64
Health Information Technology & Management
credit hour program designed for students to secure em-
ployment in business upon graduation as well as preparing General Education Requirements Hours
them for transfer to the colleges of business at the state’s Communications 6
universities. This program provides students with a variety ENC1101 College Composition 3
of course work in many areas of business, preparing them SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
for positions in management and supervision, marketing, Humanities/Fine Arts 3
accounting, and others. Students completing this degree PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3
are also eligible to receive the Business Management cer- OR
tificate. PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3
Mathematics/Science 3
Business Administration (Choose one from the following)
General Education Requirements Hours MAC1105 College Algebra 3
Communications/Humanities 9 MGF1106 Topics in Mathematics 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3 (Choose one from the following)
ENC1102 Writing About Literature 3 DEP2004 Developmental Psychology: Lifespan 3
OR PSY2012 General Psychology 3
ENC2210 Technical Communication 3 Total General Education Hours 15
Humanities/Fine Arts 6 Professional Core Requirements Hours
HUM2410 Introduction to Asian Humanities 3 HIM1000 Introduction to HIM 2
PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3 HIM1253C CPT 4 Basic Coding 3
Mathematics/Science 10 HIM1254C CPT 4 Intermediate Coding 3
MAC1105 College Algebra 3 HIM1433 HIM Pathophysiology 3
STA2023 Introduction to Statistics 3 HIM1442 Pharmacotherapy 3
MAC2233 Survey of Calculus/Lab 4 HIM1800C PPE: Intro to HIM Basic Principles 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 HIM2012 Legal Aspects of Healthcare 2
CPO2001 Comparative Politics 3 HIM2211 Health Information Technology 2
Total General Education Hours 28 HIM2214 Healthcare Statistics 2
HIM2222C Basic ICD-9 Coding 3
Professional Core Requirements Hours HIM2232C Intermediate ICD-9-CM Coding 3
ACG2021 Intro to Financial Accounting** 3 HIM2273C Health Insurance Claims Processing 3
ACG2071 Managerial Accounting 3 & Reimbursement
BUL2241 Business Law 1 3 HIM2472 Medical Terminology 3
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3 HIM2453 HIM Anatomy and Physiology 3
ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 OR
ECO2023 Principles of Microeconomics 3 BSC2084 Human Anatomy and Physiology 3
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3 AND
IDS2930 International Study Abroad 3 BSC2084L Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab 1
OR approved substitute HIM2500 Continuous Quality Improvement 3
IDS2941 Internship and Career Building 3 and Related Basic Management and
INR2002 International Relations 3 Supervisor Principles
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3 HIM2652 Electronic Health Record/Technology 3
MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3 HIM2810C PPE: Health Information in Non Acute 2
Total Professional Hours 36 Traditional Inpatient Settings
Total Program Hours 64 HIM2820C PPE: Administrative & Technical 2
**It is strongly suggested that the student consider taking HIM2934 HIM Certification Exam Preparation 1
ACG2001 and ACG2011 (see the program advisor). MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
Total Professional Hours 52
Health Information Technology & Total Program Hours 67
Management – Associate of Science 3520 Note: CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications is a prerequi-
site for the Health Information Technology & Management
The Health Information Technology & Management As-
program.
sociate of Science degree is an AHIMA/CAHIIM accredited
67 credit hour program. HIM professionals play a critical
role in maintaining, collecting and analyzing the data that
doctors, nurses, and other health care providers rely on to
deliver quality health care. They are experts in managing
patient health information and health records, admin-
istering computer information systems, and coding the
diagnosis and procedures for health care services provided
to patients. HIM professionals work in a multitude of set-
72
Programs of Study
Legal Assistant – Legal Assistant – Associate of Science 3707
Associate of Applied Science 2707 The Associate of Science in Legal Assisting is a 64 credit
hour program designed to prepare students for employ-
The Associate of Applied Science in Legal Assisting is a
ment as legal assistants (also known as paralegals) in a
64 credit hour program designed to prepare students for
variety of settings: law offices, courthouses, state agencies,
employment as legal assistants (also known as paralegals)
etc. Students receive education in many areas of law, as
in a variety of settings: law offices, courthouses, state
well as legal research and general office skills. Graduates of
agencies, etc. Students receive education in many areas
the program are eligible to take the Certified Legal Assis-
of law, as well as legal research and general office skills.
tant Exam sponsored by the National Association of Legal
Graduates of the program are eligible to take the Certified
Assistants (NALA, June 1996 criteria) without additional
Legal Assistant Exam sponsored by the National Associa-
minimum employment history requirements. SFC is a
tion of Legal Assistants (NALA, June 1996 criteria) without
member of the American Association for Paralegal Educa-
additional minimum employment history requirements.
tion, an organization whose primary mission is to promote
Legal Assistant high standards in paralegal education.
General Education Requirements Hours
Legal Assistant
Communications 6
General Education Requirements Hours
OST2335C Business English 3
ENC1200 Business Communication 3 Communications 6
ENC1101 College Composition 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
ENC2210 Technical Communications 3
(Choose one from the following)
PHI1623, PHI2600, HUM2210, HUM2230, 3 Humanities/Fine Arts 3
HUM2250, HUM2450, REL2300 (Choose one from the following)
PHI1623, PHI2600, HUM2210, 3
Mathematics/Science 3
HUM2230, HUM2250, HUM2450, REL2300
MTB1103 Business Math 3
Mathematics/Science 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following)
(Choose one from the following)
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
AMH2010 U.S. History to 1877 3
MGF1106 Topics in Mathematics 3
AMH2020 U.S. History since 1877 3
AMH2091 African-American History 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
POS2041 American National Government 3 (Choose one from the following):
POS2112 State and Local Government 3 AMH2010 U.S. History to 1877 3
AMH2020 U.S. History since 1877 3
Total General Education Hours 15 AMH2091 African-American History 3
College Open Elective 1 POS2041 American National Government 3
Professional Core Requirements Hours P0S2112 State and Local Government 3
BUL2137 Employment Law for Business 3
Total General Education Hours 15
BUL2241 Business Law 1 3
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3 College Open Elective 1
MNA1020 Prof Development Strategies 3 Professional Core Requirements Hours
OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3 BUL2137 Employment Law for Business 3
OST2712 Word Processing/Keyboarding 2 3 BUL2241 Business Law 1 3
OST2713 Apps in Desktop Publishing 3 CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
OR MNA1020 Prof Development Strategies 3
OST2930 New Emerging Business Tech 1-3 OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
OST2853 Spreadsheets/Database Management 3 OST2712 Word Processing/Keyboarding 2 3
OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3 OST2713 Desktop Publishing 3
PLA1003 Introduction to Legal Technology* 3 OR
PLA1104 Legal Writing & Research 3 OST2930 New Emerging Business Tech 1-3
PLA2201 Litigation Procedures 3 OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3
PLA2273 Torts 3 OST2853 Spreadsheets/Database Management 3
PLA2600 Wills Trusts & Probate Admin 3 PLA1003 Introduction to Legal Technology* 3
PLA2610 Real Estate Law 3 PLA1104 Legal Writing & Research 3
PLA2940 Legal Assisting Internship 3 PLA2201 Litigation Procedures 3
Total Professional Hours 48 PLA2273 Torts 3
PLA2600 Wills Trusts & Probate Administration 3
Total Program Hours 64 PLA2610 Real Estate Law 3
*PLA 1003 Introduction to Legal Technology is a prerequisite PLA2940 Legal Assistant Internship 3
for all other legal assistant classes. Total Professional Hours 48
Total Program Hours 64
*PLA 1003 Introduction to Legal Technology is a prerequisite
for all other legal assistant classes.

73
www.sfcollege.edu

Office Administration – Office Software Office Administration – Office Software
Applications – Associate of Applied Applications – Associate of Science 3508
Science 2508 The Associate of Science degree in Office Administration
is a 63 credit hour program structured for the student who
The Associate of Applied Science degree in Office Admin-
has had previous extensive college course work with a
istration is a 63 credit hour program designed to prepare
high grade point average or a degree. This degree requires
the student for administrative assistant duties in the office
higher level general education courses. Students com-
setting. Developing high level office skills, effective human
pleting this degree are also eligible to receive the Office
relations skills and contemporary office practices are a
Management certificate.
part of this popular program. Students completing this de-
gree are also eligible to receive the Office Management, the Office Administration
Office Specialist, and/or the Business Specialist certificate. General Education Requirements Hours
Office Administration Communications 6
General Education Requirements Hours ENC1101 College Composition 3
ENC2210 Technical Communication 3
Communications 6
OST2335C Business English 3 Humanities/Fine Arts 3
ENC1200 Business Communications 3 PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 Mathematics/Science 3
PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3 MGF1106 Topics in Mathematics 3
OR
Mathematics/Science 3
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
MTB1103 Business Math 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following)
(Choose one from the following)
DEP2004, PSY2012, SYG2000, SYG2010 3
DEP2004, PSY2012, SYG2000, SYG2010 3
Total General Education Hours 15
Total General Education Hours 15
Professional Core Requirements Hours
Professional Core Requirements Hours
(A grade of C or higher is required for all
(A grade of C or higher is required for all
Professional Core courses)
Professional Core courses)
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
ACG2450 Introduction to Accounting Software 3
ACG2450 Introduction to Accounting Software 3
CGS1101 MS Office Applications 3
CGS1101 MS Office Applications 3
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
GEB2949 Internship 3
GEB2949 Internship 3
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
MAN2300 Human Resource Management 3
OST2335C Business English 3
OR
OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3
OST2930 New Emerging Business Tech 1-3
OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
OST2712 Word Processing/Keyboarding 2 3
OST2853 Spreadsheets/Database Management 3
OST2401 Office Administration 3
OST2401 Office Administration 3
OST2713 Desktop Publishing 3
OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
OST2823 Web Publishing 3
OST2712 Word Processing/Keyboarding 2 3
OST2853 Spreadsheets/Database Management 3
OST2713 Desktop Publishing 3
Business Elective* 3
OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3
OST2852 Spreadsheets 3 Total Professional Hours 48
Business Elective 3 Total Program Hours 63
Total Professional Hours 48 *Choose from the following: PLA1003 Introduction to Legal
Total Program Hours 63 Technology, OST2930 New and Emerging Business Technol-
ogy, or ACG2011 Principles of Accounting 2.

74
Programs of Study
Office Administration – Medical Office Administration – Medical Office
Office Specialization – Associate of Specialization – Associate of Science 3518
Applied Science 2518 The Associate of Applied Science degree in Office Admin-
istration - Medical Office Specialization is a 63 credit hour
The Associate of Applied Science degree in Office Admin-
program structured for the student who has had previous
istration - Medical Office Specialization is a 63 credit hour
extensive college course work with a high grade point aver-
program designed for the student pursuing an administra-
age, or a degree. This degree requires higher level general
tive career in the medical profession. The program com-
education courses. Students completing this degree are
bines preparation in general office skills and specialized
also eligible to receive the Medical Record Transcribing
course work unique to the medical profession. Beginning
ATD Certificate or the Office Management certificate.
students and employed medical personnel will find this
program invaluable for career advancement. Students Office Administration – Medical Office Specialization
completing this degree are also eligible to complete the General Education Requirements Hours
Medical Records Transcribing (ATD) certificate as well.
Communications 6
Office Administration – Medical Office Specialization ENC1101 College Composition 3
ENC2210 Technical Communications 3
General Education Requirements Hours
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
Communications 3
PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3
OST2335C Business English 3
Mathematics/Science 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
MGF1106 Topics in Mathematics 3
PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3
OR
Mathematics/Science 6 MAC1105 College Algebra 3
CGS1101 MS Office Applications 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
MTB1103 Business Math 3
(Choose one from the following)
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 PSY2012, SYG2000, SYG2010 3
(Choose one from the following)
Total General Education Hours 15
PSY2012, SYG2000, SYG2010 3
Professional Core Requirements Hours
Total General Education Hours 15
(Course Requirements - a grade of C or
Professional Core Requirements Hours better is required for all courses)
(Course Requirements - a grade of C or ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
better is required for all courses) CGS1101 MS Office Applications 3
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 HIM1253C CPT Coding* 3
HIM1253C Basic CPT Coding* 3 HIM2222C Basic ICD-9 Coding* 3
HIM2222C Basic ICD-9 Coding* 3 LIS1002 Electronic Access 1
LIS1002 Electronic Access 1 OST1793 Internet Research 1
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3 OST2257 Medical Terminology 3
OST1793 Internet Research 1 OST2335C Business English 3
OST2257 Medical Terminology 3 OST2401 Office Administration 3
OST2401 Office Administration 3 OST2464 Medical Manager 3
OST2464 Medical Manager 3 OST2467 Body Systems for OST 4
OST2467 Body Systems for OST 4 OST2471 Medical Office Career Preparation 4
OST2471 Medical Office Career Preparation 4 OST2611 Medical Transcription 1 4
OST2611 Medical Transcription 1 4 OST2612 Medical Transcription 2 4
OST2612 Medical Transcription 2 4 OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3 OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3
OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3
Total Professional Hours 48
OST2853 Spreadsheets/Database Management 3
Total Program Hours 63
Total Professional Hours 48
Total Program Hours 63 *OST2613 Medical Transcription Specialties, OST2713
Desktop Publishing, or OST2930 New and Emerging
*OST2613 Medical Transcription Specialties, OST2713 Business Technology, may substitute for HIM1253C or
Desktop Publishing, or OST2930 New and Emerging HIM2222C. Whichever course is taken, a minimum
Business Technology, may substitute for HIM1253C or grade of C is required.
HIM2222C. Whichever course is taken, a minimum
grade of C is required.

75
www.sfcollege.edu

Business Management –
Human Resources Certificate 6558
The certificate in Business Management - Human Re-
sources is a 24 credit hour program that provides students
business curriculum emphasizing human resource man-
agement and includes course work in accounting, manage-
ment/supervision, and business computing. Students may
choose to leave SFC after completion of their certificate or
they may choose to enroll in SFC’s Associate of Applied Sci-
ence degree program in Business Administration.

Business Management – Human Resources Hours
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
OR
MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
MAN2300 Human Resource Management 3
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
MNA2100 Human Relations in Business 3
MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3
Total Program Hours 24
Business Management – Certificate 6508 Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
The certificate in Business Management is a 24 credit a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program.
hour program that provides students business curriculum
emphasizing Management and Marketing which includes Business Management –
course work in accounting, marketing, and business com-
puting. Students may choose to leave SFC after completion
Marketing Certificate 6568
of their certificate or they may choose to enroll in SFC’s The certificate in Business Management - Marketing is a
Associate of Applied Science degree program in Business 24 credit hour program that provides students with busi-
Administration. ness curriculum emphasizing marketing, advertising and
sales and includes course work in accounting, manage-
Business Management Hours ment, and business computing. Students may choose to
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 leave SFC after completion of their certificate or they may
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3 choose to enroll in SFC’s Associate of Applied Science de-
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3 gree program in Business Administration.
GEB2350 International Business 3
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3 Business Management – Marketing Hours
MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3 CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3 GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3 MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
Total Program Hours 24 MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3
MKA2021 Salesmanship 3
Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is MKA2511 Advertising 3
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program. MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3
Total Program Hours 24
Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program.

76
Programs of Study
Business Management – Business Operations –
Retail Management Certificate 6548 E-Business Certificate 6540
The certificate in Business Management – Retail Manage- The certificate in Business Operations – E-Business is an
ment is a 24 credit hour program that provides students 18 credit hour program that provides students with an
with a business curriculum emphasizing retail manage- introduction to business, e-business and the Internet.
ment, including course work in accounting, marketing, Students may choose to leave SFC after completion of their
and business computing. Students may choose to leave certificate or they may choose to enroll in SFC’s Business
SFC after completion of their certificate or they may Management certificate or the Associate of Applied Science
choose to enroll in SFC’s Associate of Applied Science de- degree program in Business Administration.
gree program in Business Administration. Note: GEB1011 Introduction to Business and CGS1101 Mi-
crosoft Office or CGS1000 Intro to College Computing, and
Business Management – Retail Management Hours
OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals are prerequisites
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3 for this program.
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3 Business Operations – E-Business Hours
MKA2021 Salesmanship 3 GEB1136 E-Business 3
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3 GEB2350 Intro to International Business 3
MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3 MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3 MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3
MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3 OST2930 Special Topics: Office Systems 3
Total Program Hours 24 OST2823 Web Publishing 3
Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is Total Program Hours 18
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program. Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program.
Business Management – Entrepreneurship &
Small Business Management Certificate 6550 Business Operations – Entrepreneurship &
The certificate in Business Management – Entrepreneur- Small Business Management Certificate 6543
ship & Small Business Management is a 24 credit hour The certificate in Business Operations – Entrepreneur-
program that provides students with a business curricu- ship & Small Business Management is an 18 credit hour
lum emphasizing entrepreneurship and management and program that provides students with an introduction to
includes course work in accounting, finance and market- the field of business management and entrepreneurship
ing. Students may choose to leave SFC after completion and includes course work in accounting and management.
of their certificate or they may choose to enroll in the Students may choose to leave SFC after completion of their
Associate of Applied Science degree program in Business certificate or they may choose to enroll in one of SFC’s
Administration. other Business Management certificate or the Associate of
Business Management – Entrepreneurship & SBM Hours Applied Science degree program in Business Administra-
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 tion.
FIN2001 Principles of Finance 3
Business Operations – Entrepreneurship & SBM Hours
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
ACG2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
GEB2350 International Business 3
FIN2001 Principles of Finance 3
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
MAN2300 Human Resource Management 3
MAN2300 Human Resource Management* 3
MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3
MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3
SBM2000 Small Business Management 3
SBM2000 Small Business Management 3
Total Program Hours 24
Total Program Hours 18
Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program.
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program.

77
www.sfcollege.edu

Business Operations – Business Operations –
Human Resources Certificate 6541 Accounting Certificate 6519
The certificate in Business Operations – Human Resources The certificate in Business Operations – Accounting is an
is an 18 credit hour program that provides students with 18 credit hour program which provides students with an
an introduction to business, human resource management introduction to business management and accounting.
and human relations. Students may choose to leave SFC Students may choose to leave SFC after completion of their
after completion of their certificate or they may choose to certificate or they may choose to enroll in SFC’s Business
enroll in SFC’s other Business Management certificate or Management certificate or the Associate of Applied Science
the Associate of Applied Science degree program in Busi- degree program in Business Administration.
ness Administration. All students are strongly encouraged
to achieve a minimum of 35 CWPM typing speed before Business Operations – Accounting Hours
graduation in order to meet the needs of local employers. ACG2021 Introduction to Financial Accounting 3
ACG2071 Managerial Accounting 3
Business Operations – Human Resources Hours GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3 CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3 MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
MAN2300 Human Resource Management 3 MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3
MNA2100 Human Relations for Business 3 Total Program Hours 18
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3 Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program.
Total Program Hours 18 Business Specialist Certificate 6530
Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program. Business Specialist Certificate 6530
The Business Specialist certificate is a 12 credit hour pro-
Business Operations – gram that provides students with an introduction to the
Management Certificate 6542 field of business. Students may choose to leave SFC after
completion of their certificate or they may choose to enroll
The certificate in Business Operations – Management is
in one of SFC’s other Business Management certificates or
an 18 credit hour program that provides students with an
the Associate of Applied Science degree program in Busi-
introduction to business management and operations.
ness Administration.
Students may choose to leave SFC after completion of their
certificate or they may choose to enroll in SFC’s Business Business Specialist Hours
Management certificate or the Associate of Applied Science CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
degree program in Business Administration. GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
Business Operations – Management Hours MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3
GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
BUL2137 Employment Law 3 Total Program Hours 12
OR The College Placement Test is NOT required for this program.
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
OR Legal Office Management Certificate 6597
MNA2100 Human Relations in Business 3
The Legal Office Management certificate is a 27 credit
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
hour program that provides students with an introduc-
MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
MAR2011 Marketing 3 tion to general office operations and procedures for a legal
MTB1103 Business Mathematics 3 environment. All courses in this certificate program apply
towards an Associate of Applied Science degree in Office
Total Program Hours 18
Management.
Note: Successful completion of the College Placement Test is
a prerequisite for some courses in this certificate program. Legal Office Management Hours
BUL2241 Business Law 1 3
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
MTB1103 Business Math 3
OST2335C Business English 3
OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
OST2712 Word Processing/Keyboarding 2 3
OST2853 Spreadsheets/Database Mgt. 3
PLA1003 Introduction to Legal Technology 3
Total Program Hours 27

78
Programs of Study
Medical Coder/Biller – Certificate 6592 Office Specialist – Certificate 6577
The Medical Coder/Biller certificate is a 34 credit hour The Office Specialist certificate is an 18 credit hour pro-
program. Medical coding professionals provide reliable gram in general office operations and procedures. Posi-
and valid information for reimbursement and research. tions available to program graduates might include word
This requires a unique blend of skills. A coder is a health processor, clerk, and general office worker. All courses
information specialist who is equally at home with a com- in this certificate program apply toward a certificate in
puter or with medical reference books. You are a member Office Management or a degree in Office Administration.
of a highly respected profession. To fit your schedule, SFC’s The College Placement Test (CPT) is NOT required for this
34 hour certificate program offers a full-time and a part- program, but is required for a degree.
time option. The SFC comprehensive Medical Coder/Biller
program includes classes in anatomy, diseases, and com- Office Specialist Hours
puters as well as instruction in two disease classification CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
systems (ICD-9 and CPT-4). All courses in this certificate OST2335C Business English 3
program may apply toward the Associate degree in Health OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
Information Technology & Management. Students need- OST2712 Word Processing/Keyboarding 2 3
ing additional information should check the program Web OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3
site or contact the program advisor in C-102. MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
OR
Medical Coder/Biller Hours OST2401 Office Administration 3
(Course Requirements - a grade of C or
better is required for all courses) Total Program Hours 18
HIM1000 Intro to Healthcare Delivery Systems 2
HIM1253C CPT-4 Basic Coding 3 Office Management – Certificate 6587
HIM1254C CPT 4 Intermediate Coding 3 The certificate in Office Management is a 27 credit hour
HIM1433 Pathophysiology 3 program that provides students with an introduction to
HIM1442 Pharmacotherapy 3 business education emphasizing increased office manage-
HIM2012 Legal Aspects of Healthcare 2 ment skills. After completion of their certificate students
HIM2211 Health Information Technology 2 are prepared to enter the work force or they may choose
HIM2222C ICD-9-CM Basic Coding 3
to enroll in Santa Fe College’s A.A.S. or the A.S. degree
HIM2232C ICD-9-CM Intermediate Coding 3
program in Office Administration.
HIM2273C Health Insurance Processing & 3
Reimbursement Office Management Hours
HIM2453 Anatomy & Physiology 3 CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
HIM2472 Medical Terminology 3 MNA1020 Professional Development Strategies 3
HIM2941 Coding PPE 1 MTB1103 Business Math 3
Total Program Hours 34 OST2335C Business English 3
Note: CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications (or equivalent) OST2401 Office Administration 3
is a prerequisite to this program. Satisfactory College Place- OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
ment Test scores are also required. OST2712 Word Processing/Keyboarding 2 3
OST2792 Internet for Office Professionals 3
OST2853 Spreadsheets/Database Mgt 3
Medical Record Transcribing – ATD 6591 Total Program Hours 27
The Medical Record Transcribing Applied Technology
Diploma (ATD) is a 33 credit hour program that utilizes the
latest computer and Internet technology. Medical tran-
scriptionists provide an important service by transcribing
(typing) dictated medical reports that document a patient’s
medical care and conditions. Program graduates may tran-
scribe/edit at home for a medical transcription service, or
in a medical office, hospital, or other medical facility.

Medical Record Transcribing Hours
(Course Requirements - a grade of C or
higher is required for all courses)
CGS1101 Microsoft Office Applications 3
OST1793 Introduction to the Internet and 1
Web Research
OST2257 Medical Terminology 3
OST2464 Medical Manager 3
OST2467 Body Systems for OST 4
OST2471 Medical Office Career Preparation 4
OST2611 Medical Transcription 1 4
OST2612 Medical Transcription 2 4
OST2613 Medical Transcription Specialties 4
OST2711 Word Processing/Keyboarding 1 3
Total Program Hours 33 79
www.sfcollege.edu

Child Development Programs Early Childhood Education –
Program Coordinator: Mr. Doug Diekow
Faculty: Ms. J. Campbell, Ms. M. Jamerson, Associate of Science 3401
Dr. C. Greenberg General Education Requirements Hours
Santa Fe College offers an Associate of Science degree in Communications 3
Early Childhood Education. Four areas of specialization ENC1101 College Composition 3
are available: Infant/Toddler, Preschool, Children with Humanities/Fine Arts 3
Disabling Conditions, and Child Care Center Management. HUM2250 18th Century through Present 3
The Early Intervention Certificate is a 36 credit program for OR
persons who wish to work in centers serving children with any course from Humanities/Fine Arts 3
disabling conditions. A Florida Child Care Professional Mathematics/Science 3
Credential (FCCPC) training program is available for stu- BSC1001 Intro Biology 3
dents who wish to apply for the national CDA credential OR
or earn an equivalency certificate. Credits earned in the MAC1105 College Algebra 3
FCCPC and certificate programs may be applied toward OR
the Associate of Science degree. Students who complete MGF1107 Contemporary Mathematics 3
either college program will meet the standards for the Social/Behavioral Sciences 9
Florida FCCPC Equivalency program. Graduates of the AMH2020 United States History since 1877 3
Child Development Program are employed in child devel- PSY2012 General Psychology 3
opment centers, Head Start, Early Start and pre-kindergar- SYG2430 Marriage & Family 3
ten programs, child care centers, and programs serving Total General Education Hours 18
children with disabling conditions. Professional Core Requirements 36
EDF1006 Educational Field Experience 6
The Santa Fe College Little School, a parent-child develop- EEC1000 Introduction to Child Development 3
mental laboratory center serving toddlers and preschool EEC1601 Observing & Recording Behavior 3
children, is a unique, well-equipped facility that provides EEC1602 Education for the Young Child 3
opportunities for supervised observational field experi- EEC1907 Directed Observation and 3
ence. The Child Development Program is designed to Participation: Early Childhood
serve a variety of students. For those already working with EEC2200 Curriculum in Early Childhood 3
young children, it provides an opportunity to refresh and Education
increase knowledge and competencies. Others who wish EEC2401 Home & Community in Early 3
to explore and/or gain entry into the expanding child care Childhood Education
and early education field can acquire practical experience EEC2931 Seminar in Early Childhood Education 3
as well as a basic pre-professional education. Parents can EEX1600 Classroom Management 3
build knowledge and skills through parenting classes of- EEX2010 Survey of Disabling Conditions in 3
fered as part of this program. Young Children
HUN1410 Nutrition for Children 3
Note: In addition to the required courses, participants will be
required to have a current certificate in first aid and infant, Areas of Specialization 9
child and adult CPR. This certification must be earned no (Choose one from the following)
earlier than one term prior to graduation. Infants/Toddler
CHD1120 Caring for Infants and Toddlers 3
CHD1220 Child Development for Teachers of 3
Early Childhood Education
Young Children
Early Childhood Education offers an opportunity to re- RED2010 Reading & Language Arts 3
fresh and increase knowledge and competencies. Others
Preschool
who wish to explore and/or gain entry into the expanding CHD1220 Child Development for Teachers of 3
child care and early education field can acquire practical Young Children
experience as well as a basic pre-professional education. CHD2381 Educating the Young Thinker 3
Parents can build knowledge and skills through parenting RED2010 Reading & Language Arts 3
classes offered as part of this program. Children with Disabling Conditions
Note: In addition to the required courses, participants will be CHD1120 Caring for Infants & Toddlers 3
required to have a current certificate in first aid and infant, CHD1220 Child Development for Teachers of 3
child and adult CPR. This certification must be earned no Young Children
earlier than one term prior to graduation. EEX2930 Special Topics: The Law, Assistive 3
Technology & Modifying
Environments
Child Care Center Management
EEC2520 Foundations of Child Care and 3
Education Administration
EEC2521 Child Care Administration Leadership 3
and Management
EEC2527 Child Care and Education Financial 3
and Legal Issues
Total Professional Hours 45
80 Total Program Hours 63
Programs of Study
Early Childhood Education – Child Development Early Intervention –
Associate of Applied Science 2401 Vocational Certificate Program 6403
General Education Requirements Hours The Child Development Program offers a planned se-
Communications 3 quence of courses leading to the Early Intervention Cer-
OST2335C Business English 3 tificate. This 36 credit certificate is for persons interested
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 in working as paraprofessionals with infants and pre-
HUM2250 18th Century through Present 3 kindergarten children with disabling conditions and their
OR families. These courses may be applied toward the A.S. or
any course from Humanities/Fine Arts 3 A.A.S. degree in Early Childhood Education.
Mathematics/Science 6 Students who plan to transfer to the university system
MTB1103 Business Math 3 should consult the Child Development Program faculty or
CGS1101 Intro Microsoft Office 3 program advisor.
OR Note: In addition to the required courses, participants will be
CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
required to have a current certificate in first aid and infant,
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 child and adult CPR. This certification must be earned no
SYG2430 Marriage & Family 3 earlier than one term prior to graduation.
OR
Course Requirements Hours
PSY2012 General Psychology 3
EEC2401 Home and Community in Early 3
Total General Education Hours 15 Childhood Education
Professional Core Requirements 36 CHD1220 Child Development for Teachers of 3
EDF1006 Educational Field Experience 1-3 Young Children
EEC1000 Introduction to Child Development 3 EEC1000 Introduction to Child Development 3
EEC1602 Education for the Young Child 3 and Education
EEC1601 Observing & Recording Behavior 3 EEC1602 Education for the Young Child 3
EEC1907 Directed Observation & 3 EEC1601 Observing & Recording Behavior 3
Participation: Early Childhood EEC1907 Directed Observation and 3
EEC2200 Curriculum in Early Childhood 3 Participation: Early Childhood
Education EEC2200 Curriculum in Child Education 3
EEC2401 Home & Community in Early 3 EDF1006 Educational Field Experience 3
Childhood Education EEX1600 Behavior Management 3
EEC2931 Seminar in Early Childhood 3 EEX2010 Survey of Disabling Conditions in 3
Education Young Children
EEX1600 Classroom Management 3 EEX2930 Special Topics: The Law, Assistive 3
EEX2010 Survey of Disabling Conditions in 3 Technology & Modifying
Young Children Environments
HUN1410 Nutrition for Children 3 HUN1410 Nutrition for Children 3
Areas of Specialization 12 Total Program Hours 36
Choose four courses:
EEC2520 Foundations of Childcare and 3 Florida Child Care Professional
Education Administration
EEX2930 Special Topics: The Law, Assistive 3 Credential Training Program
Technology and Modifying The Santa Fe College Child Development Associate
Environments (FCCPC) Training Program is designed to meet the re-
CHD1220 Child Development for Teachers of 3 quirements for training and assessment that have been
Young Children instituted by the Council for Professional Recognition in
CHD1120 Caring for Infants and Toddlers 3 early childhood. The FCCPC credential is awarded after
RED2010 Reading & Language Arts 3 training, the preparation of a professional resource file,
CHD2381 Educating the Young Thinker 3 the accumulation of 480 hours of direct work with children
and the successful completion of the advisor observation
Total Professional Hours 48
and verification meeting. The FCCPC credential meets the
Total Program Hours 63 State of Florida requirements for child care personnel.
Note: In addition to the required courses, participants will be
required to have a current certificate in first aid and infant,
child and adult CPR. This certification must be earned no
earlier than one term prior to graduation.
Course Requirements Hours
CHD1220 Child Development for Teachers of 3
Young Children
EDF1006 Educational Field Experience 3
EEC1602 Education for the Young Child 3
EEC2200 Curriculum in Childhood Education 3
Total Program Hours 12
Credits earned in the FCCPC training program may be
applied toward the Early Intervention Certificate and the 81
www.sfcollege.edu

Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science degree
in Early Childhood Education.

FCCPC Exemption Program
The FCCPC Exemption Program is designed for individu-
als who have college degrees and are seeking to meet the
requirements for state certification of training for working
with young children. The basic components of the pro-
gram are:
1. Six college credits in Early Childhood Education/Child
Growth and Development.
2. Documentation of 480 hours of direct work with chil-
dren ages birth through eight years.
3. Submit Form 5211 to the Department of Children &
Families (www.myflorida.com/childcare/training).

Child Development Associate (FCCPC
and FCCPC-E) Program
The Child Development Program offers 3-credit courses
that meet the renewal requirement. Persons who need to
renew their FCCPC or FCCPC-E credentials should contact
a Child Development program advisor for assistance in
assessing their renewal requirements and planning their
renewal program.
Some of the eligible courses include:
CHD1200 Infant/Toddler Development
CHD2381 Educating the Young Thinker
EEC1000 Intro to Child Development Construction and
EEC1601 Observing & Recording Behavior
EEC2200 Curriculum for Young Children
Technical Programs
Program Director: Ms. Jane Parkin
EEC2520 Foundations of Child Care and Education
Program Advisor: Mr. Tom Mason
Administration
EEX1600 Classroom Management Faculty: Mr. J. Daudelin, Mr. N. F. Hart,
EEX2010 Survey of Disabling Conditions in Mr. J. Mahoney, Mr. R. McDonald,
Young Children Mr. L. Nellinger, Jr., Mr. T. Pavai, Mr. M. Schwarz
HUN1410 Nutrition for Children The purpose of the Construction and Technical Programs
RED2010 Reading & Language Arts is to prepare individuals for initial employment and up-
grading or retraining in a wide range of industrial occupa-
Child Development tions. Individuals completing Construction and Technical
Programs are qualified to function as skilled or semi-
High School Dual Enrollment skilled workers. Instruction is provided in a classroom
The Child Development program at Santa Fe College offers setting for technical-related theory, safety, mathematics,
two options for high school students in the Dual Enroll- and science; and in a laboratory and shop setting for ma-
ment Program: the Child Development Associate and the nipulative skill development and on-the-job experience.
Early Intervention Certificate. All credits transfer to the The college also utilizes apprenticeship and cooperative
A.S. or A.A.S. degree in Early Childhood Education. methods of instruction.
1. Apply to the High School Dual Enrollment Program,
indicating that you are interested in Child Develop- The programs provide a wide range of opportunities to
ment. enhance current employment and to provide a career lad-
2. Once that application is complete, the Dual Enroll- der for advancement. Students who choose to change their
ment office will send you the Child Development majors at SFC may have their transcripts evaluated for
application to fill out. Additional requirements are a credit toward our degrees. It is possible for students who
personal interview with Child Development personnel have partially completed general education requirements
and three letters of reference. toward an A.A. degree to transfer these credits toward the
A.S. or A.A.S. degree.
A program advisor is available in the Construction and
Technical Program director’s office to provide information
about the programs as well as admission, advisement and
registration assistance to prospective, currently enrolled
and returning students. For an appointment call (352)
395-5361, e-mail tom.mason@sfcollege.edu or come by the
office on the Northwest Campus, Building O, room 127.
82
Programs of Study
Automotive Service Management Technology Automotive Service Management Technology
General Education Requirements Hours
– Associate of Applied Science 2604 Communications 3
The Santa Fe College A.A.S. degree in Automotive Service (Choose one from the following)
Management Technology is a two-year program designed ENC1101 College Composition OR 3
to upgrade the technical competence and the professional ENC1200 Business Communication 3
level of the incoming technician. The curriculum is de- Humanities/Fine Arts 3
signed by the college in cooperation with local dealership (Choose one from the following)
personnel and independent repair facility owners. HUM2210 Ancient World-Renaiss. 3
The program involves not only classroom lectures and lab- HUM2230 Renaissance through Enlight. 3
oratory experiences on modern vehicles and components HUM2250 18th Century through Present 3
at the college, but also requires the student to work at a lo- Mathematics/Science 6
cal dealership or independent repair facility. The program MAT1033 Intermediate Algebra 3
is unique in design and is divided between specific periods PSC1341 Fundamentals of Physical Science 3
of on-campus study and training followed by an equal Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
amount of work experience at the sponsoring agency. For (Choose one from the following)
example, the first semester involves eight weeks of class- INP2390 Human Relations in Life and Work 3
room and lab time on campus followed by eight weeks of SYG2430 Marriage and the Family 3
work experience time. Then the student returns to SFC for Total General Education Hours 15
eight weeks of study in another specialized area followed Professional Core Requirements
by eight weeks of related work experience. This rotation AER1070 Automotive Parts and Service 2
continues until the two-year program is completed. The AER1081C Automotive Fundamentals and 3
cooperative work experience is a paid experience and the Minor Service
work time can be credited toward the ASE certification AER1198 Automotive Engines 4
work experience requirement. AER1298 Automatic Transmissions 3
and Transaxles
The automotive industry has become an exciting and AER1498 Automotive Steering and 4
challenging field with the advent of advanced electronic Suspension Systems
control systems. This program is designed to raise the skill AER1598 Automotive Brake Systems 3
level of the potential automotive technician to beyond that AER1695C Automotive Electronics 3
of general automotive training programs. Although the AER1698C Automotive Electrical Systems 3
program requires much effort and dedication on the part AER1798C Automotive Heating and Air 3
of the student, the rewards awaiting the program complet- Conditioning
er are well worth the time and effort. AER1949 Industrial Co-op (1st year) 6
AER2398 Automotive Manual Transmissions/ 3
Santa Fe College’s Automotive Program is “Master Certi- Drive Trains
fied” by the National Automotive Technicians Education AER2698C Automotive Engine Performance 3
Foundation (NATEF) to meet the National Institute for AER2840C Automotive Drivability Diagnosis 4
Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) standards of quality. AER2949 Industrial Co-op (2nd year) 9
The program has received state and national awards from Total Professional Hours 53
the Automotive Industry Planning Council (AIPC), com- Total Program Hours 68
posed of members of the National Association for Career
and Technical Education (ACTE), representatives of the au- Note: Program requirements are subject to change. For more
tomobile manufacturing industry (AAM) and the National information, contact program advisor Tom Mason in Build-
Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. ing O, room 127, or call (352) 395-5361.

Scholarships will be awarded annually to provide financial
assistance to eligible graduating seniors from Alachua and
Bradford counties who attend Santa Fe College.

83
www.sfcollege.edu

General Education Requirements Hours
Building Construction Technology – Communications 6
Associate of Applied Science 2610 ENC1101 College Composition 3
The mission of the Building Construction Program at ENC2210 Technical Communications 3
Santa Fe College is to promote and improve construction OR
education in our geographic area by providing construc- SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
tion management training for entry-level practitioners in Humanities/Fine Arts 3
residential and light commercial construction. (Choose one from the following)
HUM2210 Ancient World through Renaiss. 3
Growth in the state of Florida and changes in the construc- HUM2230 Renaiss. Through Enlightenment 3
tion industry mandate that builders and their supervisory HUM2250 18th Century through Present 3
employees have business and management skills in addi- Mathematics/Science 6
tion to being knowledgeable in the construction trades and MAC1105 College Algebra 3
the construction process. Associate of Applied Science de- PSC1341 Fundamentals of Physical Science 3
gree graduates from the Building Construction Program at Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
Santa Fe understand basic principles of business and have
(Choose one from the following)
knowledge of the technical aspects of the construction in-
ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
dustry. Graduates are able to function in the construction ECO2023 Principles of Microeconomics 3
office environment and on the job site.
Total General Education Hours 18
The Building Construction Program at Santa Fe offers Professional Core Requirements Hours
building construction courses for three different types BCN1210 Building Construction Materials 3
of students. The Associate of Applied Science degree in BCN1220 Construction Methods 3
Building Construction Technology gives graduates techni- BCN1221C Construction Techniques 1 (fall only)* 5
cal skills required in the industry and blends business BCN1251C Light Construction Drafting 3
management training for light construction in a two-year BCN1760 Construction Codes and Regulations 3
degree program. The Associate of Arts degree with con- BCN2222C Construction Tech 2 (spring only)* 4
struction emphasis is designed to prepare the graduate to BCN2272 Blueprint Reading 3
transfer to a four-year university and to pursue a bachelor’s BCN2450 Structural Design (spring only) 3
degree in building construction. Several courses taught in BCN2560 Related Specialty Trades 3
the Associate of Applied Science degree program transfer BCT2705 Construction Management 1 (fall only)* 3
to four-year institutions as either electives or as required BCT2750 Construction Management 2 3
upper division courses with the graduate’s A.A. degree. (spring only)*
BCT2770 Construction Estimating (fall only) 3
Please check degree requirements and transfer courses ac-
CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
cepted by BCN programs at upper level universities.
ETD1320 Introduction to CAD 3
Many courses in the A.A.S. degree program are taught at SUR2001C Construction Surveying 3
the entry level and are open to the public and to industry Elective 3
members for continuing education or update training. (Choose one from the following)
AGC2001 Principles of Accounting 1 3
Santa Fe’s Associate of Applied Science degree program
AGC2021 Introduction to Financial Accounting 3
in Building Construction Technology is accredited by the
BUL2241 Business Law 1 3
American Council for Construction Education (ACCE). GEB1011 Introduction to Business 3
The ACCE is the accrediting body for two- and four-year MAN2300 Human Resource Management 3
construction management programs in the United States. MAR2011 Principles of Marketing 3
The college’s A.A.S. degree program in Building Construc- MNA2100 Human Relations in Business 3
tion Technology is the only accredited two-year program REE2040 Real Estate Principles 4
in Florida and one of only 10 in the country accredited by
Total Professional Hours 49
the ACCE.
Total Program Hours 67
* BCN1221C and BCN2222C is a fall/spring sequence.
BCT2705 and BCT2750 is a fall/spring sequence. Since each
of these classes is offered once per year, it’s important that
BCN students plan their sequence of courses carefully.
All courses substituted for general education and profession-
al core must be passed with a C grade or higher.
All courses required as prerequisite to any other course must
be passed with a C grade or higher.
Note: Program requirements are subject to change. For more
information contact program advisor Tom Mason in Build-
ing O, room 127, (352) 395-5361;or BCN coordinator/instruc-
tor Fred Hart, (352) 395-5252.

84
Programs of Study
Building Construction
Associate of Arts Degree
Please consult the Associate of Arts degree section of this
catalog as a well as the catalog of the university that you
plan to attend.

School of Construction:
High School Dual Enrollment
Enroll in the School of Construction at SFC and learn the
skills necessary for a career in construction while still in
high school. Choose from carpentry, electrical, plumbing,
masonry, and heating and air conditioning. Attend Santa
Fe College full time or part time as a High School Dual
Enrollment student. Start at the School of Construction as
a junior or senior, and at graduation be eligible for Santa
Fe’s Apprenticeship Program. Tuition is free in the Appren-
ticeship Program. Make excellent wages while perfect-
ing skills. This program can give a head start toward the
higher pay of a professional construction career and the
independence of being self-employed or owning a busi-
ness. Don’t miss this great opportunity.
For more information, call Tony Pavai at (352) 395-5048 or
e-mail tony.pavai@sfcollege.edu. For information on High
School Dual Enrollment, call the Dual Enrollment office at Course Requirements Contact Hours
(352) 395-5490 or e-mail brenda.evans@sfcollege.edu. ACR0012 Fundamentals of Air Conditioning 180
This program is an educational partnership between SFC, ACR0051C Principles of Refrigeration 252
the School Board of Alachua County, and the Builders As- ACR0074 Employability Skills, Job Search & 180
Early Placement
sociation of North Central Florida.
ACR0125 Advanced Air Conditioning 180
ACR0548C Advanced Refrigeration 108
Special Training Offerings ACR0855 Advanced Mechanical Repair 102
The college also offers specialized supplemental courses Electives:
for employed persons wishing to upgrade their skills. See ACR0306C Commercial Electricity Controls & 90
the Construction and Technical Programs advisor for more Accessories
information. AER0759 Auto Heating and A/C 135
ACR0744C Commercial Refrigeration 90
Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and ACR0747C Light Commercial A/C Systems 90
Total Program Hours 1350
Heating Technology Certificate 7601
Heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics
and installers held about 292,000 jobs in 2006; about 55
percent worked for plumbing, heating, and air-condition-
ing contractors. The rest were employed in a variety of
industries throughout the country, reflecting a widespread
dependence on climate-control systems. Some worked for
fuel oil dealers, refrigeration and air-conditioning service
and repair shops, schools, and stores that sell heating and
air-conditioning systems. Local governments, the federal
government, hospitals, office buildings, and other organi-
zations that operate large air-conditioning, refrigeration,
or heating systems also employed these workers. About 13
percent of these workers were self-employed. With average
job growth and numerous expected retirements, heating,
air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and install-
ers should have excellent employment opportunities.
To meet this demand for skilled mechanics, SFC offers a
one-year certificate in Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and
Heating. This program is designed to enable persons to
acquire the knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level
employment.
85
www.sfcollege.edu

Automotive Service Applied Welding
Technology Certificate 7603 Technologies Certificate 7623
The automotive industry has seen vast changes in system Welding plays a vital role in American industry. Some
controls since the advent of tighter emission and mileage method of welding is utilized in over 50 percent of the
standards set by the federal government. These changes products that make up the gross national product of the
have created a drastic need for technicians able to adapt United States. Skilled pipe welders are among the highest
rapidly to changes in design and technology. paid craftspeople in the world.
The job market for automotive mechanics and technicians Santa Fe College offers a one and one-half year, 1170 con-
has been recognized by Santa Fe College. In response to tact hour program that consists of shielded metal arc weld-
industry requests, a training program has been developed ing, gas metal arc welding (often called MIG), flux core
to meet the needs of all industry and provide the best pos-
arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding (often called TIG or
sible training for future automotive technicians.
Heliarc), gas welding, brazing and cutting, blueprint read-
A student now entering the program should plan on ing, and power tool and equipment operation. The train-
progressing through 1800 hours of training. This training ing helps prepare a student to pass nationally recognized
provides hands-on experience on all systems of the vehicle welding certification tests.
along with computer-enhanced learning experiences to
emphasize theory and diagnostic procedures. Students in the Applied Welding Program are required to
take one American Welding Society (AWS) Certification
Completion of all classes will lead to a certificate of test (during PMT 0131) as a requirement for graduation.
completion in Automotive Service Technology and should The test will be administered and evaluated by a certified
enable the student to enter the workforce as a general line AWS tester at Santa Fe’s test facility. Successful completion
mechanic or a specialty technician. of the test would allow a student to carry the title of “certi-
The instruction, course of study, facilities and equipment fied welder.”
of the Automotive Program have been evaluated and certi-
Scholarships will be awarded annually to provide financial
fied by the National Automotive Technicians Education
assistance to eligible graduating high school seniors from
Foundation (NATEF). They meet the National Institute for
Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) standards of quality Alachua and Bradford counties who attend Santa Fe Col-
for the training of automobile technicians in the following lege. Call (352) 395-5361 for more details on scholarships.
areas: Sequence and Course Requirements Contact Hours
• Electrical Systems, Manual Transmissions (Please note new course sequence)
and Drive Trains PMT0106 Introduction to Welding 90
• Engine Performance, Automatic Transmissions/ PMT0121 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) 1 90
Transaxles PMT0122 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) 2 90
• Engine Repair, Brakes, Heating and Air Conditioning, PMT0182 Vertical Structural Welding 90
Suspension and Steering
Certification
The program has received state and national awards PMT0183 Overhead Structural Welding 90
from the Automotive Industry Planning Council (AIPC), Certification
composed of members of the National Association for
PMT0139 Introduction to Inert Gas 90
Career and Technical Education (ACTE), representatives of
PMT0140 Gas Metal Arc Welding 90
the automobile manufacturing industry and the National
Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. PMT0141 Flux Cored Arc Welding 90
PMT0154 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) 90
Scholarships will be awarded annually to provide financial PMT0101 Blueprint Reading/Employability 90
assistance to eligible graduating seniors from Alachua and Skills
Bradford counties who attend Santa Fe College. PMT0161 Introduction to Pipe Welding 90
FIRST YEAR Contact Hours PMT0185 Pipe Welding Certification 90
AER0010 Automotive Fundamentals 225 PMT0131 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-Pipe 90
AER0021C Basic Automotive Service 1 135 Total Program Hours 1170
AER0022 Basic Automotive Service 2 60
AER0691C Fundamentals of Electrical and 63 Program requirements are subject to change. For more infor-
Electronics mation, contact program advisor Tom Mason in Building O,
AER0590 Automotive Brake Systems 1 237 room 127, or call (352) 395-5361.
AER0591 Automotive Brake Systems 2 69
AER0498 Steering and Suspension 1 111
Total Hours First Year 900
SECOND YEAR Contact Hours
AER0759 Automotive Heating and A/C 135
AER0390 Manual Drive Trains 1 66
AER0391 Manual Drive Trains 2 69
AER0299 Automatic Transmissions and 186
Transaxles
AER0440 Steering and Suspension 2 24
AER0190C Automotive Engines 1 135
AER0892C Engine Performance 1 105
AER0893C Engine Performance 2 180
Total Hours Second Year 900
86 Total Program Hours 1800
Programs of Study
Apprenticeship Program THIRD YEAR LEVEL THREE
“Earn while you learn” is the philosophy of SFC’s Appren- • Planned Maintenance
ticeship Program. The construction industry needs electri- • Troubleshooting Gas, Oil and Electric Heating
cians, carpenters, plumbers, and A/C and heating techni- • Troubleshooting Cooling
cians. Because of this demand, worlds of opportunity open • Troubleshooting Heat Pumps
• Troubleshooting Accessories
to those who learn a valuable trade through one of these
• Troubleshooting Electronic Controls
apprenticeships. Expect to earn a good salary while work-
• Hydronic Heating and Cooling Systems
ing up to the level of contractor.
• Airside Systems
Apprenticeships provide the individual who is working in • Air Properties and Air System Balancing
the field an opportunity to learn the technical aspects of a FOURTH YEAR LEVEL FOUR
trade in the classroom while applying this knowledge on • Construction Drawings & Specifications
the job. The combination of these two aspects prepares the • Indoor Air Quality
apprentice to advance through the trade at an accelerated • Energy Conservation Equipment
rate. Apprentices earn a guaranteed wage throughout the • Building Management Systems
training with incremental steps at various stages in the • Water Treatment
program. • System Startup and Shutdown
• Heating and Cooling System Design
Students attend class two nights a week during the fall and • Commercial & Industrial Refrigeration
spring terms. The length of most of the programs is four
years with the exception of carpentry which is two years.
Classroom activities in conjunction with on-the-job train-
Electrical Apprenticeship 7692
ing prepare the students to perform as tradesmen upon FIRST YEAR LEVEL ONE
completion. Students not currently employed in the field • Electrical Safety
will be helped in seeking employment with sponsoring • Hand Bending
contractors. The program is sponsored by the Builders As- • Fasteners and Anchors
sociation of North Central Florida. For more information, • Electrical Theory One
• Electrical Theory Two
call Justin MacDougall at (352) 395-5251 or e-mail justin.
• Electrical Test Equipment
macdougall@sfcollege.edu.
• Intro to the National Electrical Code
New trainees for all apprenticeship programs must first • Raceways, Boxes & Fittings
complete the core curriculum, which provides a basic • Conductors
introduction to construction skills and covers the follow-
• Introduction to Electrical Blueprints
ing:
• Wiring: Commercial & Industrial
• Basic Safety
• Wiring: Residential
• Introduction to Construction Mathematics
• Introduction to Hand Tools SECOND YEAR LEVEL TWO
• Introduction to Power Tools • Alternating Current
• Introduction to Blueprints • Motors: Theory & Application
• Basic Riggings • Grounding
• Conduit Bending
HVAC Apprenticeship 7631 • Boxes and Fittings
• Conductor Installations
FIRST YEAR LEVEL ONE • Cable Tray
• Introduction to HVAC • Conductor Terminations and Splices
• Trade Mathematics • Installation of Electric Services
• Tools of the Trade • Circuit Breakers & Fuses
• Copper and Plastic Piping Practices • Contactors and Relays
• Soldering & Brazing • Electric Lighting
• Ferrous Metal Piping Practices
• Basic Electricity THIRD YEAR LEVEL THREE
• Introduction to Cooling • Load Calculations-Branch Circuits
• Introduction to Heating • Conductor Selection & Calculations
• Overcurrent Protection
SECOND YEAR LEVEL TWO • Raceway, Box & Fitting Fill Requirements
• Air Distribution Systems • Wiring Devices
• Chimneys, Vents & Flues • Distribution Equipment
• Maintenance Skills for the Service Technician • Distribution System Transformers
• Alternating Current • Lamps, Ballasts & Components
• Basic Electronics • Motor Calculations
• Electric Heating • Motor Maintenance Part 1
• Introduction to Control Circuit Troubleshooting • Motor Controls
• Accessories/Optional Equipment • Hazardous Locations
• Metering Devices
• Compressors FOURTH YEAR LEVEL FOUR
• Heat Pumps • Load Calculations-Feeders and Services
• Leak Detection, Evacuation, Recovery & Charging • Practical Applications of Lighting
• Standby & Emergency Systems
87
www.sfcollege.edu

THIRD YEAR LEVEL THREE
• Applied Math
• Codes
• Types of Venting
• Indirect & Special Waste
• Sewage Pumps & Sump Pumps
• Sizing Water Supply Piping
• Backflow Preventers
• Water Pressure Boosters & Recirculating Systems
• Servicing Piping Systems, Fixtures & Appliances
FOURTH YEAR LEVEL FOUR
• Business Math for Plumbers
• Sizing DWV & Storm Systems
• Private Water Supply & Waste Disposal Systems
• Locating Buried Water & Sewer Lines
• Hydronic & Solar Heating Systems
• Water Supply Treatment
• Swimming Pools & Hot Tubs
• Compressed Air
• Corrosive-Resistant Waste Piping
• Plumbing for Mobile Homes & Mobile Home Parks

Carpentry Apprenticeship 7674
FIRST YEAR LEVEL ONE
• Orientation to the Trade
• Building Materials, Fasteners & Adhesives
• Hand and Power Tools
• Intro to Reading Plans & Elevations
• Floor Systems
• Wall and Ceiling Framing
• Basic Electronic Theory • Roof Framing
• Fire Alarm Systems • Intro to Concrete & Reinforcing Materials
• Specialty Transformers • Windows & Exterior Doors
• Advanced Motor Controls • Basic Stair Layout
• HVAC Controls
SECOND YEAR LEVEL TWO
• Heat Tracing and Freeze Protection
• Reading Plans & Elevations
• Motor Maintenance Part 2 • Site Layout: Distance Measurement & Leveling
• High Voltage Terminations and Splices • Exterior Finishing
• Roofing Applications
Plumbing Apprenticeship 7654 • Thermal/Moisture Protection
• Stairs
FIRST YEAR LEVEL ONE
• Framing with Metal Studs
• Intro to the Plumbing Profession
• Drywall One: Installation
• Plumbing Safety
• Interior Finish: Doors
• Plumbing Tools
• Interior Finish: Door, Floor, Window & Ceiling Trim
• Intro to Plumbing Math
• Intro to Light Equipment
• Intro to Plumbing Drawings
• Concrete & Reinforcing Materials
• Plastic, Copper, Cast-Iron &
• Foundations & Flatwork
Carbon Steel Pipe & Fittings
• Concrete Forms
• Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing
• Reinforcing Concrete
• Fixtures and Faucets
• Handling & Placing Concrete
• Intro to Drain, Waste & Vent (DWV) Systems
• Manufactured Forms
• Intro to Water Distribution Systems
SECOND YEAR LEVEL TWO
• Plumbing Math Two
• Reading Commercial Drawings
• Hangers, Supports, Struct Penetrations & Fire Stop
• Installing & Testing DWV Piping
• Installing Roof, Floor & Area Drains
• Types of Valves
• Installing & Testing Water Supply Piping
• Installing & Servicing Fixtures, Valves & Faucets
• Intro to Electricity
• Installing Water Heaters
• Fuel Gas Systems
88
Programs of Study
Health Sciences Programs A background screening is conducted on all students ac-
cepted to a health sciences program. Contact the Health
Directors: Ms. Karen Autrey, Dental Programs
Sciences Counseling office for information about the
Ms. Sheila Baker, Health Sciences Counseling Office screening process.
Ms. Reeda Fullington, Cardiovascular Technology
and Diagnostic Medical Sonography Information packets for all programs are available on
the Health Sciences Counseling office Web page at
Ms. Bobbie Konter, Radiologic Programs and
www.sfcollege.edu.
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Ms. Linda Nichols, Department Chair, Health Sciences Student
Sciences for Health Programs
Mr. Paul Stephan, Respiratory Care and
Support Programs
Surgical Technology
Ms. Lois Ellis, Nursing Programs
Pilot for Success
Coordinator: Ms. Cecelia Mitchell
Program Advisors: Mr. Scott Fortner and
The Pilot for Success program offers retention services as
Ms. Sari Sanborn
well as time and stress management skills development
The Health Sciences Programs prepare students for a wide to qualified students of Health Sciences Programs and the
variety of employment opportunities. Challenging careers
Sciences for Health Programs. Contact Pilot for Success at
exist for those individuals who receive satisfaction from
(352) 395-5689 for more information.
working directly with patients, as well as for those who
desire involvement in the technical aspects of the health
care process. Teaching and Learning Center
The Teaching and Learning Center is designed to support
The Associate of Science degree programs in ASN Nursing,
instructional activities for Health Sciences Programs.
ASN Nursing Bridge LPN to RN, ASN Nursing Bridge Para-
Computers, Internet access, study areas, software and
medic to RN, Cardiovascular Technology, Dental Hygiene,
other materials are available to students with a valid Santa
Dental Hygiene Bridge, Nuclear Medicine Technology,
Radiography, and Respiratory Care include preparation Fe ID card. The TLC is located in Building W, room 233.
in general education as well as appropriate offerings from Student ID cards may be obtained in Building S, room 147.
Health Sciences and professional specialization. The
Health Sciences Programs also include a prerequisite unit,
Sciences for Health Programs, which offers courses in
Sciences for Health Programs
science and health. Graduates of Santa Fe health sciences Faculty: Dr. E. Amerman, Ms. K. Chancey,
A.S. degree programs are prepared to move directly into Dr. I. Herrmann, Ms. J. Long, Ms. L. Nichols,
professional positions. Associate of Arts degree students Ms. D. Simon, Dr. S. Stone, Ms. C. Thomas,
preparing to articulate to upper division may also take Dr. S. Williams
various health sciences courses. The Sciences for Health Programs consist of a variety of
courses in the biological, medical, and physical sciences
Non-degree (certificate) programs available at Santa Fe
that are common to allied health professions. Students
include Dental Assisting, Nursing Assistant, Home Health
from various programs take the basic sciences as prereq-
Aide, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing and Surgi-
cal Technology. The Diagnostic Medical Sonography uisite courses during their early training. This knowledge
program is offered as an advanced certificate for graduates builds the foundation for their chosen health profession.
of an accredited radiography, cardiovascular technology The courses offered in Sciences for Health Programs
or nuclear medicine technology program, or graduates of provide students with scientific experiences that can be di-
an accredited registered nursing or respiratory program rectly related to various health occupations. Many courses
with required imaging course work. Baccalaureate degree transfer to upper division Health Sciences departments.
graduates may be eligible for the Diagnostic Medical So-
Check with a program advisor for more information.
nography program upon completion of required prereq-
BSC2084 Human Anatomy & Physiology 3
uisite imaging, medical terminology, and anatomy and
BSC2084L Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab 1
physiology course work. Additional advanced certificate
BSC2085 Anatomy & Physiology 1 3
programs in Computed Tomography and Electrophysiol-
BSC2085L Anatomy & Physiology 1 Lab 1
ogy are offered to graduates of an accredited radiography,
BSC2086 Anatomy & Physiology 2 3
nuclear medicine, or radiation therapy program with
BSC2086L Anatomy & Physiology 2 Lab 1
AART or NMTCB certification (CT) and to graduates of an
CHM1030 Elements of Chemistry 1 3
accredited cardiovascular technology, respiratory care or
CHM1030L Elements of Chemistry 1 Lab 1
nursing program with RCIS certification (EP).
CHM1037 Physiological Chemistry 3
The college offers supplemental education courses in CHM1037L Physiological Chemistry Lab 1
health sciences areas. These courses are primarily for CHM1920 Group Study 2
health care practitioners who must maintain or improve HSC1000 Introduction to Health Care 3
skills in their professions. HSC1920 Group Study 2
HSC2531 Medical Terminology for Health Sci 3
The Health Sciences Programs require a separate appli- HUN1201 Human Nutrition 3
cation beyond initial acceptance to Santa Fe College. An MCB1920 Group Study 2
important first step in applying to Health Sciences Pro- MCB2010 Introduction to Microbiology 3
grams is to attend a group advisement session. Interested MCB2010L Microbiology Lab 1
individuals should contact the Health Sciences Counseling MTB1371 Math for Health Related Students 3
office at (352) 395-5650. 89
www.sfcollege.edu

Cardiovascular Technology Cardiovascular Technology –
Director: Ms. Reeda Fullington
Faculty: Ms. S. Chapman, Mr. S. DeCubellis,
Associate of Science 3309
Mr. E. Hushelpeck, Ms. C. Jordan, Ms. J. Waldron General Education Prerequisites Hours
Cardiovascular Technology is a medical specialty dealing Communications 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3
with the clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients with
three of the most serious health problems in the United Humanities/Fine Arts 3
States today—heart, lung, and vascular diseases. (Choose one from the following)
ARH1000, HUM2250, MUL1010, PHI2600, REL2121 3
The Cardiovascular Technology Program is five semesters Biological/Natural Sciences 8
of classroom, laboratory, and clinical instruction. The final
BSC2084/L Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab 4
two semesters are spent in clinical specialization rotations
CHM1030/L Elements of Chemistry 1/Lab* 4
in cardiovascular and pulmonary laboratories throughout
the Southeast. Students who complete the program are Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
awarded an Associate of Science degree in Cardiovascular (Choose one from the following)
Technology. Excellent career opportunities await gradu- AMH2020, ANT2000, DEP2004, POS2041 3
ates. PSY2012, SYG2000
The Cardiovascular Technology Program is one of the old- Total General Education Hours 17
est and most established programs of its type in the United Professional Core Requirements Hours
States. It is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on CVT1120 Cardiopulmonary Patient Care 1
Education in Cardiovascular Technology and the Florida CVT1200 Pharmacology 3
Department of Health. Program instruction is consis- CVT1261 Cardiovascular Anatomy and Physiology 4
tent with curriculum frameworks as administered by the CVT1430 Pulmonary Function Testing 1 2
Florida Department of Education. Graduates are eligible to CVT1500 Electrocardiography 1
take national certification examinations. CVT1610 Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation 1
CVT2320 Vascular Ultrasound 1 2
The Cardiovascular Technology Program consists of four CVT2320L Vascular Ultrasound 1 Lab 1
specialty areas: CVT2321 Vascular Ultrasound 2 3
CVT2321L Vascular Ultrasound 2 Lab 1
Invasive Cardiology CVT2420 Invasive Cardiology 1 3
Working in the cardiac catheterization laboratory, the CVT2420L Invasive Cardiology 1 Lab 1
technologist helps the physician perform invasive diag- CVT2421 Invasive Cardiology 2 3
nostic tests to assess the condition of a patient’s cardio- CVT2421L Invasive Cardiology 2 Lab 1
vascular system. Additionally, the technologist helps the CVT2431 Pulmonary Function Testing 2 3
physician with interventional techniques such as balloon CVT2431L Pulmonary Function Testing 2 Lab 1
angioplasty and pacemaker implantation procedures de- CVTT2510 Blood Gas Analysis 2
signed to help alleviate existing cardiac problems. CVT2510L Blood Gas Analysis Lab 1
CVT2620 Cardiac Ultrasound 1 3
Pulmonary Functions Testing CVT2620L Cardiac Ultrasound 1 Lab 1
The technologist working in the pulmonary functions CVT2621 Cardiac Ultrasound 2 3
testing laboratory uses computer supported equipment CVT2621L Cardiac Ultrasound 2 Lab 1
in performing diagnostic tests to detect the presence and CVT 2800 Cardiopulmonary Pre-Practicum 1
severity of pulmonary diseases. Tests performed include CVT2840 Cardiopulmonary Practicum 1 11
spirometry, lung volume testing, diffusion studies, arte- CVT2841 Cardiopulmonary Practicum 2 12
rial blood gas analysis, bronchoscopy, polysomnography Total Professional Hours 66
(sleep studies), and exercise metabolic studies. Total Program Hours 83
Cardiac Ultrasound *Requires math prerequisite
In the non-invasive cardiology laboratory, the technologist NOTE: All general education requirements are prerequisite to
uses ultrasound technology to produce an image of the entry into the program.
heart. The cardiac ultrasound study or echocardiogram
can help identify normal heart structure and function
and cardiac abnormalities such as valvular problems, flow
Cardiac Electrophysiology
irregularities, and decreased cardiac function. Associated Certificate (ATC) – 6308
tests include electrocardiography (ECG), Holter monitor- The mission of the Cardiac Electrophysiology Program is
ing, exercise stress testing, stress echocardiography, and to prepare students for career opportunities in the electro-
transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). physiology field. Focusing on those who currently work in
the field of invasive cardiology, the EP program is a two-
Peripheral Vascular Studies semester online certificate program. The student will be
The technologist performs diagnostic studies using ultra- required to participate in laboratory training and assess-
sound imaging, Doppler sonography, spectral analysis and ment two to three times per semester at the SFC Northwest
a variety of physiologic testing procedures to image and Campus in Gainesville, Florida. Clinical training in a
evaluate blood flow in the veins and arteries throughout specialized electrophysiology lab will be performed at one
the body. These diagnostic modalities are particularly of eight clinical affiliate sites. The student will be required
useful in evaluating patients who are at risk for strokes to obtain 10 hours of clinical training per week for the first
and peripheral vascular diseases. Recent advancements in and second semester. Final written and practical exams
vascular ultrasound include transcranial Doppler, dialysis will be performed the last two weeks of the second semes-
access site evaluation, renal ultrasound, and abdominal ter for 40 hours per week at the SFC Northwest Campus
90 vascular ultrasound. and designated EP laboratory.
Programs of Study
Dental Programs Dental Hygiene – Associate of Science 3311*
Director: Ms. Karen Autrey General Education Requirements Hours
Faculty: Ms. C. Godwin,
Communications 6
Ms. R. Hoskins, Ms. R. Craig,
ENC1101 College Composition 3
Dr. T. Zellmer, Ms. M. Orobitg SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
Dental Hygiene/Traditional/Bridge HUM 2230 Renaissance to Enlightenment 3
The role of the dental hygienist is a challenging and de- OR
manding one requiring developed critical thinking skills. approved Fine Arts/Humanities course
While the primary focus of the dental hygienist is main- Mathematics/Natural Science 15
tenance of oral health, the hygienist may also participate CHM1030 Elements of Chemistry 1/Lab** 4
in supportive and expanded functions as delegated by the OR
State Dental Practice Act. Preventive and maintenance CHM1040 General Chemistry 1/Lab 4
services include scaling and polishing, sealants, X-rays, BSC2084 Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab 4
fluoride treatment, patient education, and specialized HUN1201 Human Nutrition 3
therapies of root planing and curettage. MCB2010 Microbiology/Lab 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 6
The Associate of Science degree program in Dental Hy-
DEP2004 Developmental Psychology 3
giene offers two opportunities to complete the program.
OR
The Dental Hygiene Traditional program is a two-year
PSY2012 General Psychology 3
program with class and clinic commitments of 35-40 hours SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3
per week with some evening clinics and classes. The Den- OR
tal Hygiene Bridge program is a 15-month program with SYG2010 Social Problems 3
class and clinic commitments of 35-40 hours per week
Total General Education Hours 30
with some clinics and classes in the evening. The Bridge
Professional Core Requirements
program is designed for graduates of American Dental As-
DEH1003 Instrumentation/Lab 2
sociation accredited dental assisting programs who have
DEH1400 General and Oral Pathology 2
a minimum of one year chair-side dental assisting work
DEH1800 Dental Hygiene Theory 1 3
experience after graduation from the program and who are DEH1800L Dental Hygiene Clinic 1 3
currently certified by the Dental Assisting National Board DEH1802C Dental Hygiene Theory 2 1
(DANB). Each Bridge student must demonstrate compe- DEH1802L Dental Hygiene Clinic 2 3
tency in all dental assisting skills. DEH1810 Introduction to Professional 1
The Dental Hygiene program is designed to educate the Development
dental hygiene student to work in private practice, re- DEH2300 Pharmacology 2
search, institutional, or public health settings. Course DEH2504 Dental Specialties 2
DEH2530/L Expanded Functions/Lab 2
work includes knowledge of the dental health care system,
DEH2602C Periodontology 2
anatomic, biological and applied sciences, and dental
DEH2702/L Community & Public Health 3
public health. The program offers clinical experiences in
Dentistry/Lab
settings such as the Veterans Administration health care DEH2804C Dental Hygiene Theory 3 1
facility, the University of Florida College of Dentistry and DEH2804L Dental Hygiene Clinic 3 3
the ACORN Clinic in addition to the SFC Dental Clinic. DEH2806 Dental Hygiene Theory 4 1
Graduates of the Traditional Dental Hygiene program earn DEH2806L Dental Hygiene Clinic 4 4
an A.S. degree, a Florida Expanded Functions Certificate, DEH2932 Oral Medicine 2
and are eligible to take the Dental Assisting National Board DEH2934 Professional Development 1
Examination. Upon completion of the Dental Hygiene DES1000C Oral and Dental Anatomy 2
program students are eligible to sit for Dental Hygiene DES1010 Head & Neck Anatomy 2
National Boards and state licensure examinations. DES1030 Histology & Embryology 2
DES1100/L Dental Materials/Lab 3
Applicants should contact the Health Sciences Counseling DES1200/L Dental Radiography/Lab 3
office (W-002) or call (352) 395-5650. Approximate enroll- DES1502 Dental Practice Management 2
ment and expense information are included in the materi- DES1800/L Preclinical Procedures/Lab 3
als available from the counseling office or on the Web site DES1820 Dental Office Emergencies 1
at www.sfcollege.edu. DES1840 Preventive Dentistry and Nutrition 2
Total Professional Hours 58
Total Program Hours 88
*With 20 transfer credits from the certificate in Dental Assist-
ing
**Requires math prerequisite
NOTE: All general education requirements are prerequisite to
entry into the program.

91
www.sfcollege.edu

Consistently, one hundred percent of the students who
complete the program are employed in the profession.
An educationally qualified dental assistant is responsible
for working directly with a dentist during the provision of
treatment to the patient. Tasks include seating patients,
operatory maintenance, four-handed dentistry with the
dentist during dental procedures, taking impressions of
teeth for study models, polishing clinical crowns, expos-
ing and developing X-rays, office management skills like
scheduling patients, ordering supplies, and more. There
are many specialized roles available as a business assis-
tant, patient coordinator, chair-side assistant, expanded
functions assistant and surgical or infection control as-
sistant.
The Dental Assisting Program admits students each fall
semester. The program is three semesters (10 months) of
classroom, laboratory, and clinical instruction. The final
semester includes classroom learning and a dental assist-
ing internship. The program is based on a 35-40 hour week
schedule.
Information and applications are available from the
Health Sciences Counseling office (W-002) or by phoning
(352) 395-5650. Admissions occur in August.

Dental Assistant –
Postsecondary Adult Program 7301
Dental Hygiene Bridge – Course Requirements
DEA0002 Introduction to Professional
Contact Hours
18
Associate of Science 3321* Development
DEH1000 Preclinical Dental Hygiene Theory 1 DEA0027 Preclinical Procedures 33
DEH1003 Instrumentation 1 DEA0027L Preclinical Procedures Lab 60
DEH1003L Instrumentation Lab 1 DEA0029 Dental Specialties 33
DEH1400 General and Oral Pathology 2 DEA0300 Preventive Dentistry and Nutrition 33
DEH1800 Dental Hygiene Theory 1 3 DEA0800 Dental Clinic Seminar 1 18
DEH1800L Dental Hygiene Clinic 1 Lab 3 DEA0800L Dental Clinic 1 Lab 108
DEH1802C Dental Hygiene Theory 2 1 DEA0801 Dental Clinic Seminar 2 30
DEH1802L Dental Hygiene Clinic 2 Lab 3 DEA0801L Dental Clinic 2 Lab 240
DEH2300 Pharmacology 2 DEA0850C Dental Clinic Seminar 3 30
DEH2602C Periodontology 2 DEA0850L Dental Clinic 3 Lab 168
DEH2702 Community & Public Health Dentistry 2 DEA0931 Dental Office Emergencies 15
DEH2702L Community Dentistry Lab 1 DES0020 Oral and Dental Anatomy 33
DEH2804C Dental Hygiene Theory 3 1 DES0103 Dental Materials 33
DEH2804L Dental Hygiene Clinic 3 Lab 3 DES0103L Dental Materials Lab 45
DEH2806 Dental Hygiene Theory 4 1 DES0130 Related Dental Theory 18
DEH2806L Dental Hygiene Clinic 4 Lab 4 DES0200/L Dental Radiography/Lab 93
DEH2932 Oral Medicine 2 DES0300 Interpersonal Communications 15
DEH2934 Professional Development 1 DES0400 Dental Sciences 1 30
DES1010 Head and Neck Anatomy 2 DES0401 Dental Sciences 2 39
DES1030 Histology & Embryology 2 DES0500 Dental Practice Management 33
* With 20 transfer credits from the certificate in Dental As- DES0831/L Expanded Functions/Lab 60
sisting DES0840/L Dental Health Education/Lab 45
Total Program Hours 1,230
Dental Assisting
The Dental Assisting Program is an ADA Commission on
Dental Accreditation program. Curriculum includes basic
dental sciences and didactic theory in current concepts
of dentistry. Students gain required clinical experience
in the SFC Dental Clinic, the University of Florida College
of Dentistry, and other institutional and private facilities.
Program graduates are eligible to sit for the National Cer-
tification Examination sponsored by the Dental Assisting
National Board (DANB). Upon completion of the program,
graduates are certified in all legally delegable expanded
92 functions permitted by the Florida Board of Dentistry.
Programs of Study
Georgia Veterans Health System, Shands at the University
of Florida, Shands at Alachua General Hospital, North
Florida Regional Medical Center, clinics, rehabilitation
centers, and nursing homes.
These programs are in compliance with the curriculum
framework as administered by the state of Florida Depart-
ment of Education. The ASN and ASN Bridge Programs are
accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting
Commission (NLNAC) and approved by the Florida Board
of Nursing.
General Education Requirements Hours
Communications 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
See advisors in W-002 for recommendations.
Mathematics/Science 11
BSC2085 Anatomy & Physiology 1 w/Lab 4
MCB2010 Microbiology w/Lab 4
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
OR
STA2023 Statistics 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
PSY2012 General Psychology 3
Total General Education Hours 20
Academic Cognates* Hours
Nursing Programs Required Nursing Courses 42
Director: Ms. Lois M. R. Ellis NUR1020C Nursing Process 1 8
Faculty: Ms. P. Aylward, Ms. K. Bennett, NUR1213C Nursing Process 2 10
Ms. S. Beverung, Ms. C. Boucher, NUR1260C Nursing Process 3 5
Ms. N. Brainard, Dr. L. Crain,* Ms. L. Davis, NUR2460C Nursing Process 4 9
* Ms. E. Dehouske, Mr. J. Griswold, Ms. C. Hamilton, NUR2731C Nursing Process 5 10
Ms. J. Hatker, Ms. E. Hulslander, Ms. J. Hutton,* Prerequisites to NUR1213C (Process 2) 7
Ms. T. Jordan, Ms. S. Kamhoot, Ms. M. Kayhani, BSC2086 Anatomy & Physiology 2* 3
Ms. D. King, Ms. J. MacDonald, Ms. T. Martineau, BSC2086L Anatomy & Physiology 2 Lab 1
Ms. J. McBride, Ms. D. Miller, Ms. N. Richards, HUN1201 Human Nutrition* 3
Ms. R. Revak-Lutz, Ms. R. Rompre, Ms. B. Turner Prerequisites to NUR2731C (Process 5) 3
*Nursing coordinators DEP2004 Developmental Psychology* 3
Total Cognates 52
Nursing RN – Associate of Science 3303 Total Program Hours 72
The Associate of Science in Nursing Programs (ASN and *Academic Cognates (10 hours). Academic Cognates taken
ASN Bridge) prepares students to practice nursing as regis- concurrently with the required nursing courses are prereq-
tered nurses. Upon graduation, the students are prepared uisite to the next Nursing Process. These courses may also be
to sit for the NCLEX® Examination, according to Florida taken prior to admission into the Nursing program.
Rules 64B9 and Statutes Chapter 464, and upon successful
completion of NCLEX® to be licensed as registered nurses. Nursing Bridge LPN/Paramedic to RN –
The mission of the Nursing Programs at Santa Fe College Associate of Science 3313
is to be responsive to current and evolving health care The ASN Bridge Program at Santa Fe College is designed to
needs of the community by providing nursing education. facilitate career mobility for the licensed practical nurse
Our mission is in keeping with currently accepted social, and/or licensed paramedic. The student entering this
educational and nursing standards, and is consistent with program must meet specific admission criteria. The ASN
the vision, values, and mission of Santa Fe College. We add Bridge Program is a yearlong accelerated program that
value to our students’ lives by offering a student-oriented builds on skills covered in a practical nursing program
philosophy, which is affordable and accessible to a diverse and/or paramedic program. Paramedic Bridge students
population. We recognize that our students are members must complete Introduction to Nursing, NUR1006C,
of the community in which they are receiving their educa- (spring A term) prior to NUR2002C, Nursing Process 1A
(spring B term) and NUR2003C, Nursing Process 1B (sum-
tion and, as such, they are stakeholders in the health and
mer A term). Competency in selected basic nursing skills
welfare of this community.
must be demonstrated within the first three weeks of
Nursing students spend approximately 50 percent of their NUR2002C in order to continue in the ASN Bridge Pro-
nursing educational experience in clinical facilities and 50 gram. There is also a requirement to pass a medication cal-
percent in lab and classroom settings. Various health care culation test successfully by the end of the Bridge Nursing
facilities are utilized including the North Florida South Process 1 in order to progress to Bridge Nursing Process
2. This distinctive program is available to all licensed 93
www.sfcollege.edu

practical nurses and/or licensed paramedics who meet the students are members of the community in which they are
entrance criteria. This course is offered once a year, begin- receiving their education and, as such, they are stakehold-
ning in spring B term. PN academic and licensed work ers in the health and welfare of this community.
experience (10 credit hours) or paramedic academic and
licensed work experience (8 credit hours) will be awarded This is a ten and one-half month over twelve months
after successful completion of the Bridge sequence. certificate program offered to those interested in becom-
General Education Requirements Hours ing members of a health team comprised of physicians,
nurses, physical therapists, pharmacists and others. The
Communications 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3 practical nurse is prepared to care for patients under the
direction of registered professional nurses. This program
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
deals with the skills and knowledge necessary to give safe
See advisors in W-002 for recommendations.
and effective nursing care. Courses in the curriculum in-
Mathematics/Science 11 clude Introduction to Health Care, with units in Nutrition,
BSC2085 Anatomy & Physiology 1 w/Lab 4
Medication and Communication Skills, Human Anatomy
MCB2010 Microbiology w/Lab 4
and Physiology, Medical-Surgical Nursing, and Obstetric
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
and Pediatric Nursing.
OR
STA2023 Statistics 3 The students spend approximately 50 percent of their pro-
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 gram in clinical experiences and 50 percent in classroom
PSY2012 General Psychology 3 and lab instruction. Shands at the University of Florida,
Total General Education Hours 20 North Florida Regional Medical Center, North Florida
Academic Cognates* Hours South Georgia Veterans Health System, clinics and long-
Required Nursing Courses 32-34 term care facilities are utilized for clinical experiences.
NUR1006C Introduction to Nursing 2 The Practical Nursing Program is a contact hour program
(Paramedic Bridge students only) and is in compliance with the curriculum framework as
NUR2002C Bridge Nursing Process 1A 7 administered by the state of Florida Department of Educa-
NUR2003C Bridge Nursing Process 1B 6 tion. The program is accredited by the National League for
NUR2203C Bridge Nursing Process 2 9
Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) and approved
NUR2802C Bridge Nursing Process 3 10
by the Florida Board of Nursing.
Prerequisites to NUR2003C (Bridge Process 1B) 4
BSC2086 Anatomy & Physiology 2* 3
BSC2086L Anatomy & Physiology 2 Lab 1 Course Requirements Contact Hours
BSC0070 Human Anatomy-Structure & 73
Prerequisite to NUR2203C (Bridge Process 2) 3
Function
HUN1201 Human Nutrition* 3
PRN0001C Practical Nursing Process 1 240
Prerequisite to NUR2801C (Bridge Process 3) 3 PRN0380C Practical Nursing Process 2 490
DEP2004 Developmental Psychology* 3 PRN0120C Practical Nursing Process 3 547
Total Cognates 42 Total Program Hours 1350
Total Program Hours 72+ Students must achieve a grade of C or higher in all courses
*Academic Cognates (10 hours). Academic Cognates taken leading to the certificate of completion for the Practical
concurrently with the required clinical nursing courses are Nursing Program.
prerequisite to the next Nursing Process. These courses may
also be taken prior to admission into the Nursing program.
Assistive Nursing Programs (NA, PCA)
The philosophy of the Assistive Programs (NA, PCA) is
Nursing Postsecondary to provide a supportive and meaningful adult-centered
Adult Programs learning environment. We value cultural and ethnic di-
versity and serve all persons. We help the individual gain
economic security through gainful employment in our
Practical Nursing PN – Certificate 7303 local health care settings.
The Practical Nursing Program prepares students to
practice as licensed practical nurses. Upon graduation, the Residents of Alachua and Bradford counties benefit from
students are prepared to sit for the NCLEX® Examination, our variable and comprehensive Assistive Programs, which
according to Florida Rules 64B9 and Statutes Chapter 464, foster honesty, integrity, social responsibility and personal
and upon successful completion of NCLEX® to be licensed accountability. We believe all persons are lifelong learn-
as practical nurses. ers, and we provide quality programs that enable them to
obtain responsible positions in society. We aspire to foster
The mission of the Nursing Programs at Santa Fe College is critical thinking skills that students will use in all aspects
to be responsive to current and evolving health care needs of their lives.
of the community by providing nursing education. The
mission/vision is in keeping with currently accepted so- The Nursing Assistive Programs (NA, PCA) are contact
cial, educational and nursing standards, and is consistent hour programs and are in compliance with the curriculum
with the mission/vision and values of Santa Fe College. frameworks as administered by the state of Florida De-
We add value to our students’ lives by offering a student- partment of Education and approved by the Florida Board
oriented philosophy, which is affordable and accessible of Nursing.

94 to a diverse student population. We recognize that our
Radiologic Programs

Programs of Study
Patient Care Assistant (PCA) Certificate 7335
This is a 290 contact hour course. This course prepares the Director: Ms. Barbara Konter
student for basic nursing assistant skills. The clinical por- Faculty: Mr. S. Marchionno, Ms. B. Konter,
tion of this course is done in local nursing homes, a local Mr. M. Fugate, Mr. K. Krahn, Mr. B. Goring,
hospital and home health agencies. This allows students to Ms. M. Hammond, Ms. S. Jones, Ms. J. Love,
have more options regarding their employability. A passing Ms. K. Fort, Ms. A. Conti
grade of 75 percent must be achieved in order to be issued NMT Coordinator: Mr. Stelio Marchionno
a Nursing Assistant certificate. Upon completion of this
course with a passing grade of 75 percent, the student is is- Nuclear Medicine Technology
sued a Patient Care Assistant certificate and is eligible to sit Nuclear medicine technology (NMT) is a medical specialty
for the State Certified Nursing Assistant Examination. in which low-level radioactive materials (radiopharma-
Course Requirements Contact Hours ceuticals) are used for diagnosis and treatment of disease.
HCP0600 Patient Care Assistant 290 Nuclear medicine technologists work in three major areas:
Total Program Hours 290 organ imaging, radionuclide analysis of biological speci-
mens, and radionuclide therapy.

Nursing Assistant (NA) Certificate 7333 The program is accredited by the Joint Review Commit-
This is a 165 contact hour course. This course prepares the tee on Education in Nuclear Medicine Technology and the
student for employment in a nursing home or extended state of Florida Department of Education, and is conducted
care facility. The clinical portion of this course is done at in cooperation with Shands at AGH, Shands at UF, North
local nursing homes. A passing grade of 75 percent must be Florida Regional Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Medical
achieved in order to be issued a Nursing Assistant cer- Center, Munroe Regional Medical Center, Ocala Regional
tificate. Upon successful completion of this course, the Medical Center, and several outpatient cardiac practices.
student is eligible to sit for the State Certified Nursing As- The NMT Program’s mission statement is: To provide a
sistant Examination. comprehensive, competency based, accredited nuclear
Course Requirements Contact Hours medicine technology curriculum to prepare a diverse
HCP0100 Nursing Assistant 165 group of students with entry-level skills needed to perform
Total Program Hours 165 quality nuclear medicine procedures while helping to
For all nursing degree and certificate programs, applications provide all patients with the best possible care. Thus a goal
indicating an arrest record by the candidates are individually of the NMT Program is to develop competent and profes-
reviewed by the compliance section at the Board of Nursing sional nuclear medicine technologists who, by virtue of
office. It may be necessary for the applicant to appear before theory and practice, are proficient in contemporary facets
the board at a regularly scheduled meeting. Determination of nuclear medicine technology, are capable of passing the
of applicants permitted to sit for the state licensure exam certification examination, and have a high degree of adapt-
is made by the Florida Board of Nursing for ASN and PN ability in a changing technology. A further aim is to develop
Programs. All applications are checked by state and national qualities of leadership necessary for teaching and health
background screening. care administration.

For more information, write or call: Students are admitted in fall term each year and complete
Florida Department of Health 22 months of combined academic and clinical education.
Florida Board of Nursing Based upon a 40 hour per week schedule, students spend an
4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin C02 average of 40 percent of their time in professional and gen-
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3252 eral education courses at the college. The remaining time is
(850) 245-4125 spent in the college laboratory or in hospitals, obtaining a
www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/nursing complete range of supervised clinical experience.
Upon completion of the program, students receive an As-
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission
sociate of Science degree and a program certificate from
3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 500 Santa Fe College. Graduates are eligible to take the national
Atlanta, Georgia 30326 certification examinations administered by the Ameri-
Phone (404) 975-5000 can Registry of Radiologic Technologists and the Nuclear
Fax (404) 975-5020 Medicine Technology Certification Board. Persons passing
www.nlnac.org the national examination(s) qualify for a Certified Nuclear
Medicine Technologist License from the state of Florida
without additional testing.

95
www.sfcollege.edu

Nuclear Medicine Technology – Radiography
Radiographers exercise initiative and independent judg-
Associate of Science 3315 ment in the performance of X-ray examinations for diag-
General Education Requirements Hours nosis of disease and injury. They also assist radiologists in
Communications 3 fluoroscopic and special vascular procedures. Radiogra-
ENC1101 College Composition 3 phers are in demand in nearly every community—in hos-
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 pitals, physicians’ offices, clinics, government, education,
(Choose one from the following) industry and research.
ARH1000 Art Appreciation 3
HUM2230 Renaissance through the 3 Radiographers operate X-ray equipment, provide patient
Enlightenment care, provide radiation protection, position patients for
MUL1010 Music Appreciation 3 examination, select technical factors for optimum radio-
PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3 graphic quality, produce and process radiographs, main-
REL2121 Religion in America 3 tain quality control and maintain patients’ records. Other
Mathematics/Science 8 duties include use of mobile X-ray equipment in the emer-
BSC2084 Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab 4 gency room, operating room and at the patient’s bedside.
CHM1030 Elements of Chemistry 1/Lab 4 Radiographers also use other imaging modalities such as
OR ultrasound, CT scanning, mammography, and magnetic
CHM1040 General Chemistry 1/Lab 4 resonance imaging.
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following) The Radiography Program’s mission statement is: To
AMH2010, ANT2000, DEP2004, 3 provide a comprehensive, competency-based radiologic
INR2002, PSY2012, SYG2000 curriculum to prepare a diverse group of graduates with
entry-level skills needed to perform quality radiologic
Total General Education Hours 17
procedures and provide the patient with the best possible
Professional Core Requirements Hours
care.
Radiologic Core 6
RTE2202 Administrative & 3 The goal of the program is to develop competent, entry-
Professional Concerns level radiographers who have the necessary knowledge to
RTE2573 Special Imaging Modalities 3 pass the certification examination and who can adapt to
Nuclear Medicine Technology Courses 52 changing technology. The Radiography Program also aims
NMT1111 Patient Care 3 to develop leadership qualities necessary for teaching and
NMT1310C NMT Radiation Safety, Health 3 health care administration.
Physics, and Radiopharmacy Lab
NMT1430 Radiation Biology 3 The program is conducted in cooperation with Shands
NMT1534C Nuclear Instrumentation 1 3 at AGH, Shands at UF, North Florida Regional Medical
NMT1535C Nuclear Instrumentation 2 4 Center, Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Gainesville
NMT1713 NM Methodology 1 4 and Lake City, and several hospital-affiliated outpatient
NMT1723 NM Methodology 2 4 imaging facilities. The Radiography Program is accredited
NMT1733 NM Methodology 3 3 by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic
NMT1804 NM Clinical Education 1 3 Technology (JRCERT) and by the state of Florida Depart-
NMT1814 NM Clinical Education 2 2 ment of Education.
NMT1824 NM Clinical Education 3 1
Students are admitted in fall term each year and complete
NMT1834 NM Clinical Education 4 3
NMT2061 NM Seminar 3 22 months of combined academic and clinical education.
NMT2743 NM Methodology 4 4 Based upon a 40 hour per week schedule, students spend
NMT2844 NM Clinical Education 5 3 an average of 40 percent of their time in professional and
NMT2854 NM Clinical Education 6 3 general education courses at the college. The remaining
NMT2864 NM Clinical Education 7 2 time is spent in the college laboratory or in hospitals, ob-
NMT2910 Directed Research 1 taining a complete range of supervised clinical experience
Total Professional Hours 58 including the latest imaging modalities.
Total Program Hours 75 Upon completion of the program, students receive an
Associate of Science degree and are eligible to take the
national certification examination administered by the
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).
ARRT certified radiographers qualify to obtain a Certified
General Radiographer License from the state of Florida
without additional testing.

96
Programs of Study
Radiography – Associate of Science 3305
General Education Requirements Hours
Communications 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
ARH1000 Art Appreciation 3
HUM2230 Renaissance through Enlightenment 3
MUL1010 Music Appreciation 3
PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3
REL2121 Religion in America 3
Mathematics/Science 7
BSC2084 Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab 4
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
OR
MGF1106 Topics in Mathematics 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following):
AMH2010, ANT2410, ANT2511, DEP2004, INR2002, 3
PSY2012, SYG2000, SYG2430
Total General Education Hours 16
Professional Core Requirements Hours
Radiologic Core 6
RTE2202 Administrative & Professional 3
Concerns
RTE2573 Special Imaging Modalities 3 Respiratory Care
Program Director: Mr. Paul Stephan
Radiography Courses 55
Clinical Coordinator: Ms. Leah Carlson
RTE1000 Introduction to Radiologic Technology 3
RTE1613 Radiologic Physics 4
RTE1418C Radiographic Technique 1 4 Respiratory Care – Associate of Science 3310
RTE1457C Radiographic Technique 2 4 Respiratory care is a specialty that is instrumental in the
RTE1503C Radiographic Procedures 1 4 diagnosis, treatment, management and preventive care of
RTE1513C Radiographic Procedures 2 4 patients with cardiopulmonary problems. These patients
RTE1804 Radiologic Clinical Education 1 3 may suffer from a variety of acute and chronic respiratory
RTE1814 Radiologic Clinical Education 2 2 conditions which may be life threatening or disabling,
RTE1824 Radiologic Clinical Education 3 1 such as cardiac failure, asthma, pulmonary edema,
RTE1834 Radiologic Clinical Education 4 3 emphysema, congenital defects, drowning, hemorrhage,
RTE2061 Radiography Seminar 3 shock, and trauma. Through proper respiratory care and
RTE2385C Radiation Biology 3 management, many patients who might not have survived
RTE2473C Radiographic Technique 3 4 can now return to active lives.
RTE2563 Radiologic Procedures 3 3
The respiratory therapist is a life-support specialist. Dur-
RTE2782 Radiologic Pathology 1
ing emergency calls, which often are life or death situa-
RTE2844 Advanced Radiologic Clinical 3
tions, respiratory therapists are responsible for life support
Education 5
RTE2854 Advanced Radiologic Clinical 3 of the patient through airway management, artificial
Education 6 ventilation, external cardiac massage, and additional
RTE2864 Advanced Radiologic Clinical 2 sophisticated emergency support measures. Respiratory
Education 7 therapists manage mechanical ventilators (machines that
RTE2910 Directed Research 1 can provide all of the breathing for patients who can’t
breathe on their own). Respiratory therapists must be
Total Professional Hours 61
proficient in many areas, including the administration
Total Program Hours 77 of oxygen and therapeutic aerosols, intermittent positive
pressure breathing (IPPB), cardiopulmonary resuscitation,
mechanical ventilation, airway management, pulmonary
function studies, blood gas retrieval and analysis, and
physiologic monitoring.
The SFC Respiratory Care Program is accredited by the
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education
Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation
of the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care
(www.coarc.org). The program prepares its graduates to
take virtually all of the credentialing examinations offered
by the National Board for Respiratory Care, and also pro-
vides a sound technical and theoretical base from which
the student can have the educational advantage of lateral
and upward mobility. An advanced standing policy is 97
www.sfcollege.edu

available for those applicants and students with previous Surgical Technology
respiratory therapy experience and/or education. Program Director: Mr. Paul Stephan
General Education Requirements Hours Program Coordinator: Ms. Diane May
Communications 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3 Surgical Technology – Certificate 7338
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
The certified surgical technologist (CST) is a key mem-
(Choose one from the following)
ber of the surgical team who anticipates the needs of the
ARH1000 Art Appreciation 3
HUM2230 Renaissance through Enlightenment 3 surgeon and passes instruments, sutures, and sponges in
MUL1010 Music Appreciation 3 an efficient manner during surgery. Under the supervision
PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3 of the surgeon, a CST may be involved in holding retrac-
REL2121 Survey of Religion in America 3 tors or instruments, sponging or suctioning the operative
PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3 site, or cutting suture material. The surgical technologist
Mathematics/Science 10 must perform under pressure in stressful and emergency
BSC2084 Human Anatomy & Physiology 3 situations, have a strong sense of responsibility, consider-
BSC2084L Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab 1 able patience, manual dexterity, and physical stamina.
HSC2531 Human Medical Science 3 CSTs ensure that the operating room environment is safe,
MAC1105 College Algebra or higher 3 that equipment functions properly, and that the operative
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 procedure is conducted under sterile conditions that maxi-
(Choose one from the following) mize patient safety. With additional specialized training
ANT2000, ANT2410, DEP2002, GEA2000, PSY2012, 3 or education, a CST may act in the role of surgical first
SYG2000, SYG2010, SYG2430 assistant, providing aid in exposure of the wound, suturing
and other technical functions.
Total General Education Hours 19
Although CSTs primarily work in the hospital as the sterile
Professional Core Requirements Hours member of the surgical team, other job opportunities
RET1025 Principles of Respiratory Care 4 include work in delivery rooms, emergency departments,
RET1025L Principles of Respiratory Care Lab 1 and ambulatory care centers. There are also jobs in medi-
RET1291 Clinical Respiratory Medicine 1 2 cal sales, product development, and management roles
RET1292 Clinical Respiratory Medicine 2 4 in surgical services and research. In addition, CSTs are
RET1350 Pharmacology 4 employed directly by surgeons as “private scrubs” and/
RET1484 Pathophysiology 4 or surgical first assistants. They have served in the Peace
RET1485 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & 4 Corps as well as in all branches of the military. A number
Physiology of them are instructors and directors of surgical technol-
RET2264 Mechanical Ventilators 3 ogy programs.
RET2264L Mechanical Ventilators Lab 1
RET2283 Intensive Respiratory Care 1 4 The program is fully accredited by the Accreditation
RET2283L Intensive Respiratory Care 1 Lab 1 Review Committee on Surgical Technology Education.
RET2284 Intensive Respiratory Care 2 3 Graduates are qualified to take the NBSTSA National
RET2293 Clinical Respiratory Medicine 3 4 Certification Examination. Achieving the CST credential is
RET2295 Clinical Respiratory Medicine 4 6 crucial for professional recognition and advancement.
RET2434C Respiratory Care Chemical Analysis 3 Course Requirements Contact Hours
RET2714 Pediatric/Neonatal Respiratory Care 3 BSC0070 Human Anatomy-Structure 75
RET2934 Respiratory Case Management Seminar 2 and Function
RET2936 Respiratory Registry Preparation 4 HSC0530 Medical Terminology 63
Total Professional Hours 57 HSC0003 Intro to Health Sciences 48
Total Program Hours 76 STS0155C Surgical Techniques and Procedures 1 90
STS0120L Surgical Specialties 1 90
STS0156C Surgical Techniques and Procedures 2 90
STS0121L Surgical Specialties 2 90
STS0003 Surgical Technology 1 36
STS0804 Microbiology and Biomedical Sciences 36
STS0255L Introduction to Clinical Practicum 132
STS0803 Pharmacology and Anesthesia 66
STS0256L Clinical Practicum 1 132
STS0005 Pathophysiology for the Surgical 36
Technologist
STS0257L Clinical Practicum 2 144
STS0258L Clinical Practicum 3 204
Total Program Hours 1332

98
Programs of Study
Medical Sonography Specialist –
Certificate 6306
Course Requirements Hours
SON1000 Basic Sonography 2
SON2061 Seminar in Sonography 6
SON2111 Abdominal Sonography 1 3
SON2112 Abdominal Sonography 2 3
SON2113 Sonography Cross Section Anatomy 2
SON2121 OB/GYN Sonography 1 3
SON2122 OB/GYN Sonography 2 3
SON2141 Superficial Sonography 3
SON2211C Ultrasound Physics and 4
Instrumentation
SON2804 Sonography Clinical Practicum 1 3
SON2814 Sonography Clinical Practicum 2 4
SON2824 Sonography Clinical Practicum 3 6
Total Program Hours 42

Sonography
Co-directors: Ms. Reeda Fullington,
Ms. Barbara Konter
Faculty: Ms. L.yn Reed, Ms. S. Rollyson, Ms. T. Ashley
Sonography, better known as diagnostic medical sonog-
raphy (DMS) at Santa Fe College, is a 12-month certificate
program conducted in cooperation with imaging centers
and hospitals in surrounding urban and rural settings.
The program correlates classroom theory and laboratory
experiences to provide a balance of courses to set the stage
for students’ clinical competencies. Students’ clinical
competency performance expectations increase with
their tenure in the program. The program was designed
to accept those individuals already certified in an imag-
ing science (cardiovascular technology, nuclear medicine
technology, and radiography). However, it has expanded
to include nurses, physicians, respiratory therapists, and
persons possessing baccalaureate degrees. This expanded
group must complete required prerequisite course work.
Graduates are eligible to take the national certification
examinations offered by the American Registry of Diag-
nostic Medical Sonographers and the American Registry of
Radiologic Technologists.
Diagnostic medical sonography is a dynamic entity of the
imaging sciences, which has grown rapidly over the past
few years. The growth of sonography is projected to con-
tinue, which will lead to many employment opportunities
nationwide. Salaries are very competitive when compared
to other professions requiring similar levels of education.
Typically, sonographers are employed in clinics, hospitals,
imaging centers, and physicians’ offices. Following ad-
ditional academic preparation, other career opportunities
may become available in areas such as education, manage-
ment, research and technical advisement.

99
www.sfcollege.edu

Information Technology courses as a Vocational Certificate degree after completing
the Graphic Design track, for a more thorough preparation
Education Programs for today’s evolving job market. Admission is competitive.
Program Director: Mr. Eugene Jones The Digital Media Technology program requires a separate
Program Advisor: Ms. Denise Remer application beyond initial acceptance to Santa Fe College.
Course Curriculum Coordinator: Mr. Jorge Ibanez,
Admission is based on faculty rankings of the departmen-
Graphic Design
tal applications. Potential students must take the College
Faculty: Mr. W. Lindberg, Ms. Z. Gale, Ms. E. Drake, Placement Test and complete all required prep classes
Ms. C. Krauth, Dr. M. Lazin, Ms. D. Reid, before applying for admission to Digital Media Technol-
Mr. J. Marks, Mr. B. Russell, Mr. C. Schultz, ogy. Because the Digital Media Technology department
Ms. B. Dewiliby, Mr. M. Shaboz, Ms. R. Peyton offers classes only in the fall and the spring terms (no
summer classes) it is recommended that students plan to
The Information Technology Education programs pre-
take their general education courses during the summer
pare students to enter careers in the field of computer and
terms. For this reason it is not a requirement that students
information systems as Internet programmers, network
complete their general education requirements before ap-
technologists, Web site developers, and graphic designers.
plying for admission to Digital Media Technology. How-
All programs are performance based and include extensive
ever, we strongly recommend that applicants take classes
hands-on training using state-of-the-art technology.
in the Fine Arts Department before being admitted to
The Information Technology Education A.S. degree pro- Digital Media. Some of these classes may also cover some
grams offer students practical training in computer skills of their general education requirements (please contact
and applications products commonly used in the commer- our department for more information about classes we rec-
cial computer and graphic design environments, in-depth ommend). Once admitted to Digital Media, students take
knowledge of current systems technology, experience with classes full time in a specific, or lockstep, sequence.
current software development techniques, skills in related
The program emphasizes creative thinking and problem
business activities, and a firm foundation in communica-
solving in combination with hands-on instruction on in-
tions and general education areas.
dustry standard computer hardware and software.
The lab facilities at Santa Fe College include dedicated
The students in the Graphic Design Specialization track
computer science instructional labs and an open lab with
learn illustration, computer graphics, desktop publish-
state-of-the-art networked microcomputer workstations.
ing, Web page design, electronic imaging, presentation
The college is connected to the Internet, and all students
techniques, photography and design, and magazine and
have e-mail accounts for added communications with
newspaper advertising layout. Students learn about logos,
instructors, administrators and peers.
brochures, newsletters, packaging, direct mail design,
A college-sponsored organization, the Graphic Design outdoor advertising, point-of-purchase display, printing
Student Association, is open to all students interested in methods, and electronic prepress production techniques.
graphic design. Members participate in many professional Students completing this degree will be prepared for
development and public service activities throughout the employment in advertising agencies, reproduction firms,
year. The club provides opportunities for students to use Web-related enterprises and publishing firms as graphic
their design skills to work on community projects. It also designers, illustrators and desktop publishers.
sponsors guest speakers, field trips, and professional net-
The Interactive Media Design track also teaches the basic
working. Contact the Graphic Design Technology office in
skills needed to author, design, organize, and deliver mul-
N-309, (352) 395-5579, for information.
timedia presentations including all forms of media that
The ITE Department has student advisors to provide infor- rely on a sequence of imagery and sound. Students will
mation about the programs, courses, program admission learn how to create and develop media and applications
and registration. Students interested in Internet Services from concept to production. Such applications include
Technology or Networking should call (352) 395-5839 for DVD authoring, 2-D and 3-D modeling and animation,
an appointment. computer-based training and audio production. Students
will learn to deliver this media content via DVD, CD-ROM,
Digital Media Technology – broadcast, digital video and the Internet.

Associate of Science 3620 Graduates work for profit and non-profit agencies in a
The Associate of Science degree program in Digital Media variety of professional settings including entertainment,
Technology offers instruction in the theory and practice of advertising, marketing, merchandising, management,
digital media to prepare graduates for entry-level jobs in education, science, technology, and sales. Designers may
this expanding career field. choose to specialize in desktop publishing and computer
graphics, Web page design, digital photo manipulation,
Students in the Digital Media Technology program choose illustration, or electronic prepress as well as digital video
between a Graphic Design specialization or an Interac- and dynamic content for the Internet.
tive Media Design specialization. Both specializations are
admitted into the program twice a year. Students also have
the option to take the Interactive Media Design group of

100
Programs of Study
Digital Media Technology Internet Services Technology –
(Course Requirements) Hours
General Education Requirements:
Associate of Science 3623
This program is designed to prepare students for entry-
Communications 6 level positions in Internet/Intranet related fields. Students
ENC1101 College Composition 3 will be prepared to enter careers such as Web master, Web
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3 server administration, Web technician, HTML author, site
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 designer, and management and Internet programmer.
(Choose one from the following) General Education Requirements: Hours
HUM2210 Ancient World to Renaissance 3
Communications 6
HUM2230 Renaissance through the Enlightenment 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3
HUM2250 18th Century through the Present 3
(Choose one from the following)
Mathematics 3
ENC1102 Writing about Literature 3
Choose One: ENC1200 Business Communications 3
MAC1105 College Algebra 3 SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
MGF1107 Contemporary Mathematics 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following)
(Choose one from the following) ARH2050 Art History 3
PSY2012 General Psychology 3 ART1001C Art Fundamentals 3
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3 MUL1010 Music Appreciation 3
ANT2000 General Anthropology 3 HUM2210 Ancient World to Renaissance 3
Total General Education Hours 15 HUM2250 18th Century through the Present 3
Professional Core Requirements 24 THE1000 Introduction to Theater 3
ADV1210 Introduction to Advertising Mathematics 3
Design & Graphics 3 (Choose one from the following)
ARH2722C History of Graphic Design 3 MAC1105 College Algebra 3
CGS2820 Web Authoring 1 3 MGF1106 Topics in Math 3
GRA2100C Computer Graphics for Artists and MGF1107 Contemporary Math 3
Designers 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
GRA2135C Electronic Imaging & Presentation
(Choose one from the following)
Techniques 3
ANT2000 General Anthropology 3
GRA2143C Advanced Web Design 3
PSY2012 General Psychology 3
GRA2151C Illustration Methods 1 3
SYG2430 Marriage & Family 3
PGY2801C Electronic Still Photography 3
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3
Print Media Specialization 25
ADV1212 Advertising Graphics & Production 3 Total General Education Hours 15
ADV2211 Advanced Ad Design & Graphics 3 Professional Core Requirements: 42
ADV2803 Professional Practicum 3 CTS1131 Microcomputer Architecture 1 3
GRA2124 Graphic Design for Desktop Publishing 3 CTS1132 Microcomputer Architecture 2 3
GRA2157C Computer Illustration Methods 3 CTS2134 Introduction to Networking 3
GRA2203 Prepress and Printing Methods 3 CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
GRA2930 Special Topics: Graphics 3 CGS2527 Graphics Applications 3
GRA2940 Internship 4 CGS2540 Database Management Systems 3
Interactive Media Production Specialization 25 CGS2820 Web Authoring 1 3
CGS2822C HTML & CSS for Designers 3 CGS2821 Web Authoring 2 3
GRA2140C Multimedia Production 1 3 CIS1948 ITE Internship 3
GRA2141C Multimedia Production 2 3 CIS2254 Professional Development for IT Majors 3
GRA2162C 3D Modeling and Animation for COP1000 Introduction to Programming 3
Graphic Design 1 3 COP1002C IT Logic 3
GRA2168C 3D Modeling and Animation for CTS2445 SQL Programming 3
Graphic Design 2 3 COP2806 Internet Programming 1 3
GRA2583 Web and Digital Media Project 3 Choose two classes from Internet Specialties: 6
GRA2710C Survey of Digital Video 3 CET2880 Data Forensics 1 3
GRA2834 Multimedia Interface Graphics 3 CET2881 Data Forensics 2 3
GRA2941 IMP Internship 1 COP2551 Object Oriented Programming 1 3
Total Program Hours 64 COP2552 Object Oriented Programming 2 3
CGS2872 Multimedia Authoring 3
Program Notes
CTS2321 Linux Administration 3
1. Students must pass the Computer Placement Exam
(CPE) and record the results at Santa Fe College before Total Professional Hours 48
applying for admission to the Graphic Design program. Total Program Hours 63
2. A minimum grade of C is required for all specialization Program Notes
and required courses. 1. An overall grade point average of 2.5 or higher is required
3. This program requires a separate application. For more for all students seeking an A.S. degree in this program.
information see the program Web site at www.sfcollege. 2. All requirements must be passed with a minimum grade
edu, phone the program advisor Denise Remer at (352) of C.
395-5839, or e-mail denise.remer@sfcollege.edu. 3. Typing proficiency is recommended for this program. 101
www.sfcollege.edu

Network Services Technology
General Education Requirements: Hours
Communications 6
ENC1101 College Composition 3
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
(Choose one from the following)
ARH2050 Art History 3
ART1001C Art Fundamentals 3
HUM2210 Ancient World to Renaissance 3
HUM2250 18th Century through the Present 3
MUL1010 Music Appreciation 3
THE1000 Intro to Theater 3
Mathematics 3
(Choose one from the following)
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
MGF1106 Topics in Math 3
MGF1107 Contemporary Math 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following)
ANT2000 General Anthropology 3
PSY2012 General Psychology 3
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3
SYG2430 Marriage & Family 3
Total General Education Hours 15
Professional Core Requirements: 48
CTS1131 Microcomputer Architecture 1 3
CTS1132 Microcomputer Architecture 2 3
CTS1327 Microsoft Windows Professional 3
CTS1328 Microsoft Windows Server 3
Network Services Technology – CTS2134
CTS2355
Introduction to Networking
Network Administration
3
3
Associate of Science 3632 CTS2356 Advanced Network Administration 3
The Networking Services Technology program is designed CET1600 Cisco Networking Fundamentals 3
to prepare students for careers in computer networking CET1610 Cisco Router Theory 3
CET2615 Cisco Advanced Routing and Switching 3
as cabling specialists, information technology specialists,
CET2620 Cisco Project Based Learning 3
network control operators, data communications analysts, CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
help desk specialists, network technicians, computer se- CIS1948 ITE Internship 3
curity specialists, network specialists, network managers, CTS2321 Linux Administration 3
network systems analysts, network systems technicians, Choose One: 3
network support specialists, network administrators, CTS2155 PC Shop 3
microcomputer technicians, network troubleshooters, CIS2254 Professional Development for IT Majors 3
WAN/LAN managers, systems administrators or to provide One Computer Elective: 3
supplemental training for persons previously or currently CET2880 Data Forensics 1 3
employed in these occupations. It offers hands-on training CGS2820 Web Authoring 1 3
and extensive experience in a wide variety of networking COP1000 Introduction to Programming 3
technologies including client/server operating systems, COP1002C IT Logic 3
workstation management, cabling, routing, switching, and Total Professional Hours 48
hardware maintenance. The program prepares individu- Total Program Hours 63
als to plan, install, configure, monitor, troubleshoot, and
Program Notes
manage computer networks in a LAN/WAN environment.
1. An overall grade point average of 2.5 or higher is required
Included in the curriculum are the concepts and core com-
for all students seeking an A.S. degree in this program.
petencies covered in the Novell Certified NetWare Admin-
2. All requirements must be passed with a minimum grade
istrator (CNA), the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP),
of C.
the CompTIA A+PC Technician, the CompTIA Network+,
3. Typing proficiency is recommended for this program.
and the Cisco Certified Network Administrator (CCNA)
exams.

102
Programs of Study
Information Technology Cisco Networking Academy – Certificate 6622
Management – Certificate 6562 This program provides students with a basic foundation
in networking. Students who successfully complete this
In addition to skills taught in the IT Technician certificate,
portion of the program are eligible to earn Cisco Certified
this program will prepare students for employment as
Network Associate (CCNA™) certification.
network specialists or administrators. Students will learn
to manage network operating systems, local and Internet Professional Core Requirements: Hours
services, and server hardware. The curriculum includes CET1600 Cisco Networking Fundamentals 3
the objectives of CompTIA’s Network+ and A+, Cisco’s CET1610 Cisco Router Theory 3
CCNA, and Microsoft’s MCP. CET2615 Cisco Advanced Routing & Switching 3
Professional Core Requirements: 24 CET2620 Cisco Project Based Learning 3
CTS1131 Microcomputer Architecture 1 3 Total Program Hours 12
CTS1132 Microcomputer Architecture 2 3 Program Notes
CTS2134 Introduction to Networking 3 1. Students must pass the CPT and complete any remedial
CET1600 Cisco Networking Fundamentals 3
requirement prior to full admission.
CET1610 Cisco Router Theory 3
2. The CPE must be taken and passed prior to enrollment in
CET2615 Cisco Advanced Routing & Switching 3
CET2620 Cisco Project Based Learning 3 CGS1000.
CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3 3. All courses including CGS1000 and ENC1200 must be
passed with a minimum grade of C.
Choose Two of the Following: 6
CTS1327 Microsoft Windows Professional 3 4. Prerequisites for the Cisco Networking certificate are:
CTS1328 Microsoft Windows Server 3 (CGS1000, CTS1131 and CTS2134) OR two years of net-
CTS2355 Network Administration 3 working industry experience.
CTS2356 Advanced Network Administration 3
CTS2321 Linux Administration 3 Information Technology Analysis –
Total Program Hours 30
Certificate 6630
Program Notes The purpose of this program is to prepare the students
1. Students must take the Computerized Placement Test and for employment as software support analysts, network
have completed any required college preparatory math support analysts, PC support specialists, customer service
courses prior to enrollment in CTS1131 and CTS2134. representatives, computer technicians or entry-level Web
2. A passing score in the Computer Placement Exam is designers.
required before beginning the program. Professional Core Requirements: Hours
3. All requirements must be passed with a minimum grade
First Semester 12
of C. CTS1131 Microcomputer Architecture 1 3
4. See the program Web site at www.sfcollege.edu for more CGS2527 Graphics Applications 3
information. COP1000 Introduction to Programming 3
COP1002C IT Logic 3
Information Technology Second Semester 12
CTS1132 Microcomputer Architecture 2 3
Support – Certificate 6620 CTS2134 Introduction to Networking 3
The purpose of this program is to prepare the students for CGS2540 Database Management Systems 3
employment as software support analysts, PC support spe- CGS2820 Web Authoring 1 3
cialists, customer service representatives, and computer Third Semester 3
technicians. CIS2254 Professional Development for IT 3
Course Requirements Hours Majors Internship
CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3 Total Program Hours 27
ENC1200 Business Communications 3
Program Notes
Professional Core Requirements: Hours
1. Students must pass the CPT and complete any remedial
First Semester 9 requirement prior to full admission.
CTS1131 Microcomputer Architecture 1 3 2. CGS1000 and ENC1200 are prerequisites for this program.
COP1000 Intro to Programming 3 The CPE must be taken and passed prior to enrollment
COP1002C IT Logic 3 in CGS1000.
Second Semester 9 3. All courses including CGS1000 and ENC1200 must be
CTS1132 Microcomputer Architecture 2 3 passed with a minimum grade of C.
CTS2134 Intro to Networking 3
CGS2540 Database Management Systems 3
Total Program Hours 18

103
www.sfcollege.edu

Computer Crime Scene Technician – Interactive Media Production –
Certificate 6640 Certificate 6619
This certificate is designed to prepare students for employ- The 24 credit hour vocational certificate in Interactive
ment in occupations in e-business security. Typical posi- Media Production at Santa Fe College is a cutting-edge
tions include computer specialist, security specialists, Web program that teaches the basic skills needed to author,
design, organize, and deliver multimedia presentations.
security specialists, Internet technical support specialists,
The certificate enhances job skills and is designed to build
Internet and Network security specialists or technicians,
upon a solid A.S. or A.A. foundation of core study.
and database security technicians. This certificate also
Professional Core Requirements: Hours
provides supplemental training for persons currently or
CGS2822C HTML & CSS for Designers 3
previously employed in these occupations.
GRA2140C Multimedia Production 1 3
24 Hours GRA2141C Multimedia Production 2 3
CET2880 Data Forensics 1 3 GRA2162C 3D Modeling and Animation for 3
CTS1131 Microcomputer Architecture 3 Graphic Design 1
CTS2134 Networking 3 GRA2168 3D Modeling and Animation for 3
CET2881 Data Forensics 2 3 Graphic Design 2
CTS1132 Microcomputer Architecture 2 3 GRA2710C Survey of Digital Video 3
CNT2401 Network Security 3 GRA2583 Web and Digital Media Project 3
CTS2322 Linux/Unix 3 GRA2834 Multimedia Interface Graphics 3
CIS1948 Internship 3 Total Program Hours 24
Total Program Hours 24 Program Notes
Program Notes 1. Students must have at least an A.A. or A.S. degree or two
1. Students must take the CPT and have completed any years of significant work-related experience to apply.
required college preparatory math courses prior to 2. An overall grade point average of 2.5 or higher is required
enrollment in CDA1302 and CEN2503. for all students seeking this certificate.
2. A passing score in the CPE is required before beginning 3. The CPE must be taken and passed prior to enrollment in
the program. Interactive Media Production classes.
3. Successful completion of CGS1000, Introduction to 4. All requirements must be passed with a minimum grade
College Computing, is required before beginning the of C.
program. 5. Computer proficiency is recommended for this program.
6. Typing proficiency is recommended for this program.
7. This program requires a separate application. For more
information call the Graphic Design Technology Pro-
gram Advisor Denise Remer at (352) 395-5839 or e-mail
denise.remer@sfcollege.edu.

104
Programs of Study
Institute of Public Safety at Professional Pilot Technology – Aviation Science
Kirkpatrick Criminal Justice General Education Requirements Hours
Communications 3
Training Center ENC1101 College Composition 3
Center Program Director: Daryl Johnston, MEd Humanities/Fine Arts 3
Center Program Associate Director: SPC1608 Public Speaking 3
Major Tom L. Terry Mathematics/Science 17
Associate Director: Louis B. Mallory, M.B.A., REMT-P MAC1105 College Algebra 3
Coordinators: Chris Wagoner, Nancy Nipper MAC1114 Trigonometry 3
Program Advisor: Louis Kalivoda MAC2233 Survey of Calculus/Lab 4
Aviation Faculty: U.S.A.F. Colonel (Retired) George CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
Mazzeo, M.A., M.S. PHY2053 General Physics/Lab 4
CJSTC Basic Recruit Academy: Social/Behavioral Sciences 9
Commander Chris Wagoner PSY2012 General Psychology 3
CJSTC Advanced and Specialized Training: POS2112 State and Local Government 3
Nancy Nipper, Coordinator ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
Criminal Justice Technology Faculty: Total General Education Hours 32
Robert Mitchell, MS
Professional Core Requirements Hours
Criminal Justice Selection Center: ASC1210 Meteorology 3
Major Tom L. Terry ASC1550 Aerodynamics 3
EMS and Fire Science Faculty: ASC1640 Engine, Structures and Systems 3
Louis B. Mallory, M.B.A., REMT-P ASC2320 Aviation Law and Regulations 3
Brittany Martinelli, BSRT, MHSc, NREMT-P ASC1100 Basic Aeronautical Navigation 4
Lead Paramedic Instructor: ASC2870 Aviation Safety 3
Todd Brooks, NREMT-P, Lab Coordinator ATF1100 Introduction to Pilot Training 3
The Kirkpatrick Criminal Justice Training Center provides ATF1120 ASEL Flight Training 1 1
pre-service, in-service, advanced and specialized train- ATF1104 ASEL Flight Training 2 1
ing for personnel of the corrections, law enforcement, ATF2400 Multi-engine Flight Training 1
emergency medical services and fire rescue agencies in the ATF2300 Introduction to Instrumented Flight 3
region. Persons interested in training to become a correc- ATF2150 Instrument Flight Training 1
tional or law enforcement officer should contact the Crimi- MAN2021 Principles of Management 3
nal Justice Selection Center at the Kirkpatrick Center or Total Professional Hours 32
call (352) 271-2945. Those interested in training to become Total Program Hours 64
an EMT and/or paramedic should call (352) 271-2902 for Note: The FBO Partner is responsible for all flight experi-
more information. Fire Science Technology is offered on ence courses and activities and assumes all liability for these
a schedule compatible with local fire rescue agency work courses and activities. These courses are eligible for credit by
schedules. Certification as a firefighter may be required for experience (up to four college credit hours) for those students
the Fire Science program. The Fire Science program does already having achieved the license and/or ratings.
not lead to certification as a firefighter.
ATF1120 awards one semester credit hour for the successful
The Professional Pilot Technology-Aviation Science Pro- demonstration of proficiency under the FAA Flight Syllabus
gram is also offered by the Institute of Public Safety. This culminating in solo flight.
program is primarily for those students who wish to be- ATF1104 awards one semester credit hour for the successful
come professional pilots, and will articulate directly into demonstration of proficiency under the FAA Flight Syllabus
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, resulting in the achievement of the Private Pilot license.
Florida.
ATF2400 awards one semester credit hour for the achieve-
ment of the FAA Multi-Engine Rating.
Professional Pilot Technology – ATF2150 awards one semester credit hour for the achieve-
Aviation Science Associate of Science 3704 ment of the FAA Instrument Pilot Rating.
The Aviation Sciences program at SFC is designed to train
students to become professional pilots for careers in the
airline industry, with the military, in police departments,
and charter services. The curriculum integrates the flight
program prescribed by the FAA and then goes far beyond
to a broader, more comprehensive program covering all
aspects of aviation sciences. The aviation program is one
of Santa Fe’s newest. With our partnership with the pres-
tigious Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, aviation
students may transfer and complete a bachelor’s degree
in aeronautical sciences and commercial pilot training.
Upon completion of this program, graduates will receive
an A.S. degree in Professional Pilot Technology and FAA
Certificates for Private Pilot, Instrument Rating, and Multi-
Engine Rating. 105
www.sfcollege.edu

Criminal Justice Technology – Criminal Justice Technology –
Associate of Science 3702 Associate of Applied Science 2702
This program is offered at the Northwest Campus. The This program is offered at the Northwest Campus. The
two-year Associate of Science degree in Criminal Justice two-year Associate of Applied Science degree in Criminal
Technology is designed for high school graduates who Justice Technology is designed for high school graduates
seek a career in law enforcement, corrections, criminal- who seek a career in law enforcement, corrections, crimi-
istics or community-based control functions. It is also nalistics or community-based control functions. It is also
designed for people who are currently employed in those designed for people who are currently employed in those
fields and want to improve their skills for career develop- fields and want to improve their skills for career develop-
ment. This program does not lead to basic certification or ment. This program does not lead to basic certification or
employability as a law enforcement or correctional officer. employability as a law enforcement or correctional officer.
Completion of the Criminal Justice Standards and Train- Completion of the Criminal Justice Standards and Train-
ing Commission Basic Recruit class is required for entry to ing Commission Basic Recruit class is required for entry to
those occupations. Courses are offered on demand from those occupations. Courses are offered on demand from
the criminal justice community. Students may not be able the criminal justice community. Students may not be able
to complete this program within two years. to complete this program within two years.
General Education Requirements Hours General Education Requirements Hours
Communications 3 Communications 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3 ENC1101 College Composition 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 OR
(Choose one from the following) ENC1200 Business Communication 3
ARH1000 Art Appreciation 3 Humanities/Fine Arts 3
HUM2450 American Humanities 3 (Choose one from the following)
REL2121 Religion in America 3 ARH1000 Art Appreciation 3
Mathematics/Science 7 HUM2450 American Humanities 3
MAC1105 College Algebra 3 REL2121 Religion in America 3
(Choose one from the following) Mathematics/Science 7
BSC2005 General Biology w/Lab (Choose one from the following)
OR 4 MAT1033 Intermediate Algebra 3
PSC2121 General Physical Science w/ Lab 4 MTB1103 Business Math 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 STA2023 Introduction to Statistics 3
INP2390 Human Relations in Life and Work 3 (Choose one from the following)
CLP2140 Abnormal Psychology 3 BSC2005 General Biology w/Lab 4
OR PSC2121 General Physical Science w/Lab 4
POS2112 State & Local Government 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences 6
Total General Education Hours 19 INP2390 Human Relations in Life and Work 3
College Open Elective 3 CLP2140 Abnormal Psychology 3
OR
(Must have ID of P, parallel) POS2112 State & Local Government 3
Professional Core Requirements Hours
Total General Education Hours 19
CCJ1020 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3 College Open Elective 3
CJE1300 The Patrol Function 3 (Must have ID of P, parallel)
CJE1331 Police Ethics & Accountability 3 Professional Core Requirements Hours
CJE1400 Community Policing 3 CCJ1020 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJE2600 Criminal Investigation 3 CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
CJE2640 Introduction to Criminalistics 3 CJE1300 The Patrol Function 3
CJL2062 Constitutional Law 3 CJE1331 Police Ethics & Accountability 3
CJL2100 Criminal Law 3 CJE1400 Community Policing 3
CJL2130 Criminal Evidence 3 CJE2600 Criminal Investigation 3
ENC2210 Technical Communication 3 CJE2640 Introduction to Criminalistics 3
PSY2012 General Psychology 3 CJL2062 Constitutional Law 3
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3 CJL2100 Criminal Law 3
SYG2010 Social Problems 3 CJL2130 Criminal Evidence 3
Total Professional Hours 42 ENC2210 Technical Communication 3
PSY2012 General Psychology 3
Total Program Hours 64
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3
SYG2010 Social Problems 3
Total Professional Hours 42
Total Program Hours 64

106
Programs of Study
The Kirkpatrick Criminal Justice Center is certified by the
Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commis-
sion and offers the commission approved basic training
programs for law enforcement and corrections. Students
wishing to achieve certification in either of these fields
must satisfactorily complete the appropriate academy in
order to sit for the licensure examination administered
by the state of Florida. Graduation from the academy and
successful completion of the licensure exam are required
components for state recognized certification.
Students are advised that these academies have spe-
cific entry requirements, including a discipline-specific
entrance exam. Further information is available from the
Criminal Justice Selection Center at (352) 271-2945 or on-
line at sfcollege.edu or www.policecareers.org.

Law Enforcement – PSAV Certificate 7702
Law Enforcement Basic Academy Hours
First Semester 514
CJK0007 Introduction 11
CJK0008 Legal 69
CJK0011 Human Issues 40
CJK0017 Communications 76
CJK0031 First Aid for CJ Officers 40
CJK0040C Firearms 80
CJK0051 Defensive Tactics 80
CJK0061 Patrol 1 58
CJK0096 Physical Fitness 60 Emergency Medical
Second Semester 256
CJK0020C Vehicle Operations 48 Services Programs
CJK0422 Dart Firing Stun Gun 8 The Emergency Medical Services Programs at Santa Fe
CJK0062 Patrol 2 40 College consist of a First Responder course, First Aid, the
CJK0071 Criminal Investigations 56 Emergency Medical Technician Certificate Program, the
CJK0076 Crime Scene Investigations 24 Paramedic Certificate Program and Emergency Medical
CJK0082 Traffic Stops 24 Services A.S./A.A.S. degree. These programs prepare in-
CJK0083 DUI Traffic Stops 24 dividuals to deliver patient care at the scene of an emer-
CJK0086 Traffic Crash Investigations 32 gency, in an ambulance, with fire rescue, in an emergency
Total Program Hours 770 department, in the military and in many other areas of
health care.

Correctional Officer – PSAV Certificate 7705 The A.S./A.A.S. degree in EMS is also applicable for people
Corrections Basic Academy Hours who are currently employed in these fields and who want
CJD0741 Emergency Preparedness 26 to improve their skills for career development. Students
CJD0750 Interpersonal 2 50 must demonstrate competency in reading, writing, oral
communication, and fundamental mathematical and
CJD0752 Correctional Operations 64
computer skills. The program advisor will provide details
CJD0770 Legal 1 46
when the student enters the degree track.
CJD0771 Legal 2 22
CJD0772 Communications 42 The emergency medical technician (EMT) is a professional
CJK0283 Interpersonal 1 62 who delivers basic life support care. The EMT certificate
CJK0031 First Aid for CJ Officers 40 is a one-semester college credit program consisting of
CJK0040C Firearms 80 classroom, lab, hospital emergency department, and am-
CJK0051 Defensive Tactics 80 bulance clinical components. Although this is considered
CJK0280 CJO Physical Fitness Training 40 a part-time program, at least 25 hours per week and a flex-
ible schedule are required. Upon successful completion of
Total Program Hours 552 all components of the EMT program, the student may be
eligible to take the National Registry and/or the state of
Florida EMT Certification Examination.
The Paramedic Program is a college credit certificate pro-
gram, which is a minimum of 1100 clock hours in length
(one year). The student will learn advanced life support
patient care and procedures. The program consists of
classroom, lab, hospital clinical and ambulance clinical
components. This program, like EMT, requires a strong
desire and commitment to the profession. Upon successful
completion of all components of the Paramedic Program,
the student may be eligible to take the National Regis- 107
www.sfcollege.edu

try and/or the state of Florida Paramedic Certification
Examination. The Paramedic Program is accredited by the Paramedic – Certificate Program 6900
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Professional Required Courses Hours
Programs (CAAHEP) and the Committee on Accredita- EMS2620 Paramedic Phase 1 8
tion of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical EMS2620L Paramedic Phase 1 Lab 3
Services Professions (CoAEMSP). EMS2621 Paramedic Phase 2 8
EMS2621L Paramedic Phase 2 Lab 3
Emergency Medical Services – EMS2458
EMS2464
Paramedic Field Internship
Paramedic Clinical Experience 1
6
6
Associate of Science 3397 EMS2465 Paramedic Clinical Experience 2 6
General Education Requirements Hours EMS2920 EMS Seminar 3
Communications 3 Total Professional Hours 43
ENC1101 College Composition 3 Total Program Hours 73
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
Note: Emergency Vehicle Driving (EMS1335) is not a require-
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
ment to graduate from the Emergency Medical Services A.S.
Mathematics/Science 7 program. However, EMS1335 is a requirement for employ-
BSC2084/L Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab* 4
ment as an emergency medical technician for fire rescue and
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
ambulance services in the state of Florida.
OR
MTB1371 MTB Mathematics for Health Related 3 Students who have completed EMT and paramedic course
Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 work from a Joint Review Committee (JRC) accredited
Choose two: paramedic program and who have current certification may
DEP2004 Developmental Psychology 3 receive credit for the professional core requirements. Students
PSY2012 General Psychology** 3 must achieve a grade of C or higher in all courses leading
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3 to the Associate of Science degree in emergency medical
SOP2002 Theory of Social Behavior 3 services.
POS2112 State and Local Government 3 Additional information for students wishing to transfer to
Total General Education Hours 19 the University of Florida: All applicants must have complet-
*Students anticipating transfer to a four-year baccalaure- ed two sequential courses of foreign languages in secondary
ate institution should substitute the two-semester Anatomy/ school or eight-10 semester hours at the postsecondary level,
Physiology sequence (BSC2085/L and BSC2086/L). or document an equivalent level of proficiency.
**Preferred electives professional core requirements Students must achieve a passing score on the College Level
Academic Skills Test after completion of all of their general
education requirements.
Emergency Medical Technician –
Certificate 6907 Emergency Medical Services –
Professional Required Courses Hours
EMS1119 EMT Basic: Lecture 6 Associate of Applied Science 2397
EMS1119L EMT Basic: Lab 3 General Education Requirements Hours
EMS1411 EMT Basic: Clinical/Hospital 1 Communications 3
EMS1421 EMT Basic: Clinical/Rescue 1 (Choose one from the following)
Total Hours 11 ENC1101 College Composition* 3
ENC1200 Business Communication 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
Mathematics/Science 10
BSC2084 Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab** 4
HSC2531 Human Medical Science 3
(Choose one from the following)
STA2023 Intro to Statistics 3
MAT1033 Intermediate Algebra 3
MTB1371 Mathematics for Health Related 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following)
DEP2004 Developmental Psychology 3
PSY2012 General Psychology* 3
SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3
SOP2002 Theory of Social Behavior 3
POS2112 State and Local Government 3
Total General Education Hours 19
*Preferred electives professional core requirements
**Students anticipating transfer to a four-year baccalaure-
ate institution should substitute the two-semester Anatomy/
108 Physiology sequence (BSC2085/L and BSC2086/L).
Programs of Study
Emergency Medical Technician –
Certificate 6907
Professional Required Courses Hours
EMS1119 EMT Basic: Lecture 6
EMS1119L EMT Basic: Lab 4
EMS1411 EMT Basic: Clinical/Hospital 1
EMS1421 EMT Basic: Clinical/Rescue 1
Total Hours 12

Paramedic – Certificate Program 6900
Professional Required Courses Hours
EMS2620 Paramedic Phase 1 8
EMS2620L Paramedic Phase 1 Lab 3
EMS2621 Paramedic Phase 2 8
EMS2621L Paramedic Phase 2 Lab 3
EMS2458 Paramedic Field Internship 6
EMS2464 Paramedic Clinical Experience 1 6
EMS2465 Paramedic Clinical Experience 2 6
EMS2920 EMS Seminar 3
Total Professional Hours 43
Total Program Hours 73
Note: Emergency Vehicle Driving (EMS1335) is not a require-
ment to graduate from the Emergency Medical Services
A.A.S. program. However, EMS1335 is a requirement for em-
ployment as an emergency medical technician for fire rescue
and ambulance services in the state of Florida.
Students who have completed EMT and paramedic course
work from a Joint Review Committee (JRC) accredited tional Registry Examination. Prerequisites to the program
paramedic program and who have current certification may are: current Florida EMT Certification, Anatomy and
receive credit for the professional core requirements. Students Physiology* course (as either BSC2084/L OR BSC2085/L
must achieve a grade of C or higher in all courses leading to and 2086/L), and American Heart Association health care
the Associate of Applied Science degree in emergency medical provider CPR, or its equivalent.
services.
*Students anticipating transfer to a four-year baccalaureate
institution should take the two-semester Anatomy/Physiol-
Paramedic Program ogy sequence (BSC2085/L and BSC2086/L).
The Paramedic Program is a one-year college credit pro-
gram that is a minimum of 1100 clock hours in length and Paramedic – Certificate 6900
takes three full semesters to complete. Current Florida cer- Professional Required Courses Hours
tification as an emergency medical technician is required EMS2620 Paramedic Phase 1 8
prior to applying for entry into the Paramedic Program. EMS2620L Paramedic Phase 1 Lab 3
The program begins in August of each year and requires a EMS2621 Paramedic Phase 2 8
special application and acceptance process. Paramedics EMS2621L Paramedic Phase 2 Lab 3
utilize advanced medical skills combined with the skills EMS2458 Paramedic Field Internship 6
learned in EMT to render care in a variety of situations EMS2464 Paramedic Clinical Experience 1 6
and settings. A paramedic is a member of the health care EMS2465 Paramedic Clinical Experience 2 6
team that provides advanced life support to save lives EMS2920 EMS Seminar 3
jeopardized by trauma, cardiac events or other illnesses. Total Program Hours 43
Paramedics often make critical patient care decisions
in situations where seconds and minutes can mean the
difference between life and death. Paramedics are often
called upon to intervene in situations requiring the ability
to reason, rapidly make decisions, defuse anxiety, lead
groups of people, and function under tremendous stress.
It is essential for an EMT entering the Paramedic Program
to have a strong foundation of basic skills upon which to
build. Santa Fe College’s Paramedic Program is fully ac-
credited by the Joint Review Committee for the Accredita-
tion of EMT-Paramedic Programs.
Upon successful completion of all components of the
Paramedic Program, students may be eligible to take the
state of Florida Paramedic Certification and/or the Na-
109
www.sfcollege.edu

Fire Science Technology – Associate Fire Science – Associate of
of Science Degree 3701 Applied Science Degree 2701
Students considering transferring to a four-year bachelor’s General Education Required Courses Hours
degree program must take into consideration the require- Communications 6
ments of their intended institution. Discussing course se- ENC1101 College Composition 3
lection with the program advisor is highly recommended. OR
ENC1200 Business Communication 3
General Education Requirements Hours SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
Communications 6 Humanities/Fine Arts 3
ENC1101 College Composition 3 PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
Mathematics/Science 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3 (Choose one from the following)
PHI1623 Workplace Ethics 3 STA2023 Intro to Statistics 3
Mathematics/Science 3 MAT1033 Intermediate Algebra 3
MAC1105 College Algebra 3 MTB1371 Mathematics for Health Related 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
(Choose one from the following) (Choose one from the following)
POS2112 State and Local Government 3 POS2112 State and Local Government 3
SYG2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 SYG2000 Introduction to Sociology 3
Total General Education Hours 15 OR
another course approved by advisor
Professional Fire Courses Hours
FFP1505 Fire Prevention Practices 3 Total General Education Hours 15
FFP1510 Codes and Standards 3 Professional Core Requirements Hours
FFP1540 Private Fire Protection Systems 1 3 FFP1505 Fire Prevention Practices 3
FFP1833 Terrorism & Incident Management 3 FFP1510 Codes and Standards 3
FFP2120 Building Construction for Fire Services 3 FFP1540 Private Fire Protection Systems 1 3
FFP2521 Blueprint Reading and Plans Review 3 FFP1833 Terrorism & Incident Management 3
FFP2720 Company Officer 3 FFP2120 Building Construction for
FFP2740 Instructor Course Delivery 3 Fire Services 3
FFP2810 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 1 3 FFP2521 Blueprint Reading and Plans
FFP2811 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 2 3 Examination 3
FFP2720 Company Officer 3
Total Professional Hours 30 FFP2740 Fire Service Course Delivery 3
Additional Courses FFP2810 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 1 3
Students must take 15 additional credit hours. Profes- FFP2811 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 2 3
sional courses or Liberal Arts and Sciences courses may be Total Professional Hours 30
selected as listed below. Alternate courses may be substi- Additional Courses
tuted with approval of the advisor. Students must take 15 additional credit hours. Profes-
Liberal Arts and Sciences Hours sional courses or Liberal Arts and Sciences courses may be
ECO2013 Macro Economics 3 selected as listed below. Alternate courses may be substi-
BSC2005 General Biology/Lab 4 tuted with approval of the advisor.
CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
Choose: Hours
PSY2012 General Psychology 3
Liberal Arts and Sciences
PSC1341 Fundamentals of Physical Science 3
ECO2013 Macro Economics 3
Professional Courses Hours BSC2005 General Biology/Lab 4
FFP2780 Fire Department Administration 3 CGS1000 Introduction to College Computing 3
FFP2706 Public Information Officer 3 PSY2012 General Psychology 3
FFP2111 Fire Service Management 3 PSC1341 Fundamentals of Physical Science 3
FFP2111 Fire Chemistry 3 Professional Courses
FFP1793 Fire and Safety Educator 1 3 FFP2780 Fire Department Administration 3
FFP2604 Fire Origin and Cause 3 FFP2706 Public Information Officer 3
Total Additional Hours 15 FFP2111 Fire Service Management 3
Total Program Hours 60 FFP2111 Fire Chemistry 3
FFP1793 Fire and Safety Educator 1 3
Additional information for students wishing to transfer to FFP2604 Fire Origin and Cause 3
the University of Florida: All applicants must have complet-
Total Additional Hours 15
ed two sequential courses of foreign languages in secondary
Total Program Hours 60
school or eight-10 semester hours at the postsecondary level,
or document an equivalent level of proficiency. Additional information for students wishing to transfer to
the University of Florida: All applicants must have complet-
Students must achieve a passing score on the College Level ed two sequential courses of foreign languages in secondary
Academic Skills Test after completion of all of their general school or eight-10 semester hours at the postsecondary level,
education requirements. or document an equivalent level of proficiency.
Students must achieve a passing score on the College Level
Academic Skills Test after completion of all of their general
110 education requirements.
Programs of Study
Zoo Animal Technology
General Education Requirements Hours
Communications 6
ENC1101 College Composition 3
SPC2300 Interpersonal Communications 3
OR
SPC2608 Public Speaking 3
Humanities/Fine Arts 3
PHI2600 Introduction to Ethics 3
OR
ART1000C Art Fundamentals 3
OR
HUM2210 Ancient World to Renaissance 3
OR
MUL1010 Music Appreciation 3
Mathematics/Science 7
MAC1105 College Algebra 3
OR
MGF1106 Topics in Math 3
OR
STA2023 Introduction to Statistics 3
BSC2005 General Biology 3
BSC2005L General Biology Lab 1
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3
Zoo Animal Technology PSY2012 General Psychology 3
OR
Zoo Animal Technology – SYG2000 Introductory Sociology 3
Total General Education Hours 19
Associate of Science 3106
Program Coordinator & Faculty: Mr. Jack Brown Professional Core Requirements*
General Curator: Ms. Kathy Russell PAZ1002 Introduction to Zoos and Aquariums 3
Program Advisor: Ms. Linda Asbell PAZ1310 Basic Keeper Technology 3
The Associate of Science degree is awarded to students PAZ1310L Basic Keeper Technology Lab 2
who successfully complete the Zoo Animal Technology PAZ1331 Animal Management Lab 1 4
training program. The program is designed to meet the PAZ1332 Animal Management Lab 2 4
needs of those students who wish immediate employ- PAZ2317 Related Zoo Topics 3
ment in zoos and other animal facilities. The Zoo Animal PAZ2320 Herpeculture 3
Technology Program at Santa Fe College is unique in its PAZ2322 Aviculture 4
purpose to train students for the vocations of zookeeper PAZ2325 Mammal Culture 4
and animal technician, as well as other animal husbandry PAZ2328 Aquarium Culture 3
fields. PAZ2333 Animal Management Lab 3 4
PAZ2334 Animal Management Lab 4 4
The Zoo Animal Technology Program is a vocational pro- PAZ2540 Animal Nutrition 3
gram offering students a wide range of practical instruc- PAZ2551 Animal Breeding 3
tion and clinical experience. For this purpose, the college Total Professional Core Hours 19
has set aside a natural wooded area of 10 acres on campus.
Total Program Hours 66
This area has been developed into an active and function-
ing biological and zoological facility, which is known as *All PAZ courses must be taken in the sequence determined
the Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo. by the Zoo Animal Technology Program. All PAZ courses
must be successfully completed before continuing in the
This training curriculum is a series of sequential courses sequence because each PAZ course acts as the prerequisite for
based on required professional competencies. Students subsequent courses in the sequence.
are expected to participate in mandatory daily, weekend,
and holiday experiences as part of their training in the
program.
Graduates currently occupy positions in zoos, aquariums,
and animal facilities around the United States. Program
graduates are contributing to the field through their lead-
ership, dedication, and professional training.

111
www.sfcollege.edu

Educator Preparation
Institute
Director: Ed Bonahue
The Educator Preparation Institute is an alternative
teacher certification program that trains nontraditional
students as K-12 teachers. EPI enrollees must have at least
a bachelor’s degree and Florida Department of Education
approval to teach in their subject area. Classes meet at
night and on weekends to accommodate those who work
full time. The program, which is short but intense, can
be completed in a year or less. The college lends course
textbooks to EPI students, which saves them money. EPI
instructors work or have worked for the local school board,
so they know the school system and what the community
needs. They also understand the realities of today’s class-
room situation and pass on the skills they have learned.
More educators are needed to offset the state’s projected
teacher shortage. Santa Fe’s EPI seeks people who are
qualified to teach in high-need subject areas like reading,
mathematics and science. The program also seeks minori-
ties underrepresented in the teaching profession. For more
information, visit www.sfcollege.edu/epi.
Course Requirements Hours
EPI0001 Classroom Management 3
EPI0002 Instructional Strategies 3
EPI0003 Technology 3
EPI0004 The Teaching and Learning Process 3
EPI0010 Research-Based Practices in Reading 3
EPI0020 Professional Foundations 2
EPI0030 Diversity in the Classroom 2
EPI0940 Module 3/Seg B: Field Experience 1
EPI0945 Module 4/Seg B: Field Experience 1
Total Program Hours 21
112
Programs of Study
Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS, also referred to as Medi-
cal Technology) applies basic science to medical diagnos-
tics. It is a profession of highly knowledgeable and skilled
individuals who perform clinical laboratory tests on blood,
body fluids, or tissue samples. This is a critical part of
health care, as the results provided by these laboratory
professionals are a vital tool for physicians in their diagno-
sis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
Many clinical laboratory scientists (or medical technolo-
gists) work in hospitals, clinics, and medical centers, but
positions are also available in industrial settings, public
health, reference and research laboratories. These indi-
viduals may practice as generalists, typically covering the
areas of serology, microbiology, clinical chemistry, hema-
tology, and immunohematology, or they may specialize in
one scientific area. After experience within the field, there
are opportunities for advancement into management or
teaching positions. Industry also offers opportunity in the
area of sales, public relations, research and development.
There are channels for continued academic specialization
and advanced degrees which in turn bring further employ-
ment opportunities and benefits.
Admission to the BAS in Clinical Laboratory Science pro-
gram requires a 2.5 overall GPA on all college coursework;
the completion of the CLS program course prerequisites
with a minimum grade of C (STA 2023, BSC 2010/L, CHM
2211/L, MCB 2010/L); the completion of an associate’s de-
gree (AA, AS or AAS); the completion of all program course
Bachelor of prerequisites; and the completion of the College Level
Academic Skills Testing exam with passing scores (un-
Applied Science less otherwise appropriately exempted). Applicants must
The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) is the designated complete an SFC application for admission or readmission,
degree for flexible baccalaureate programs that are a separate application to the CLS program, and submit a
designed to accommodate the unique demands for entry 500 word personal statement essay addressing their profes-
and advancement within specific workforce sectors. BAS sional and personal goals. It is not necessary to complete
programs provide degree completion opportunities for all of the Common Degree Program Prerequisite Require-
students from a variety of educational backgrounds, but ments before admission (these courses are designated with
primarily those with Associate of Science degrees or the an asterisk.)
equivalent. BAS degree programs conform to all articula- This limited access program is work-intensive and courses
tion conventions (including common course prerequisites, include clinical practice in a variety of settings. Due to
common course numbering, and faculty credentialing in this, it is strongly recommended that students be at least
accordance with the Southern Association of Colleges and one-year post high school and complete their foreign
Schools). BAS degree programs typically include capstone language requirement prior to applying to the program. An
experiences that provide opportunities for students to FDLE background check and Board of Clinical Lab Person-
demonstrate the application of acquired knowledge, skills, nel trainee license are required to complete clinical intern-
and competencies. ship courses. Students with concerns or questions should
seek advisement from program advisor Denise Remer at
(352) 395-5839 or program faculty at (352) 381-3750.
Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLS) – Applications, forms and procedures, and contact informa-
Bachelor of Applied Science 5200 tion can be found online at www.sfcollege.edu in the Index
Program Director: Dr. Kelly Gridley under Clinical Laboratory Science.
Program Advisor: Denise Remer
Faculty: Dr. Kelly Gridley
Degree Requirements
The courses designated in sections 1, 2, and 3 below may
be transferred from other community colleges, colleges,
The Clinical Laboratory Science Program at Santa Fe Col- and universities, and most of the coursework shown in 1
lege is located in the Department of Laboratory Tech- and 2 should usually be completed in the first 60 hours.
nology at the Charles R. and Nancy V. Perry Center for
Emerging Technologies in Alachua, Florida, and offers a 1. General Education (36 hrs required, total = 37 hrs)
Bachelor’s of Applied Science in Clinical Laboratory Sci- (Natural Sciences = 8 credits as shown, exceeds 7 credits
ence. required for general education)
113
www.sfcollege.edu

General Education Courses Credit Hours 2. Program Electives (23 hrs) Credit Hours
English/Communications: 9 Lower Division Courses/*denotes Common
ENC 1101 College Composition 3 Degree Program Prerequisite Courses 23
ENC 1102 Writing about Literature 3 *CHM 2046 College Chemistry II 3
Inquiry and Discourse Choices (choose one) *CHM 2046L College Chemistry II Lab 1
INR 2002 International Relations 3 *CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 3
ANT 2511 Human Origins 3 *CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1
ENC 2310 Technical Communications 3 *CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II 3
Humanities: (choose one each from lists A, B, C) 8 *CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1
*MCB 2010 Microbiology 3
List A
*MCB 2010L Microbiology Lab 1
SPC 2600 Public Speaking 3
List B (Gordon Rule Courses) BSC 1421 Introduction to Biotechnology 1
ARH 2050 Art History 1 3 BSC 1404C Introduction to Biotech Methods 3
ARH 2051 Art History 2 3 BSC 2423C Protein and Cell Culture 3
PHI 2010 Introduction to Philosophy 3
PHI 2600 Introduction to Ethics 3 3. BAS Program Courses (65 hrs) Credit Hours
HUM2210 Humanities: Ancient to Renaissance 3 Clinical Laboratory Science Courses: 65
HUM2230 Humanities: BSC 2426C Biotechnology Methods 1 3
Renaissance – Enlightenment 3 BSC 2427C Biotechnology Methods 2 3
HUM2250 Humanities: 18th Century BSC 2943 Biotechnology Internship 3
through Present 3 *PCB 3703C Physiology and Functional Genomics 4
List C (Multicultural Studies) *PCB 3134C Molecular Biology 4
ARH 2500 Non Western Art History 3 MLS 4150 Clinical Correlations 1
MUH 2501 Introduction to World Music 3 MLS 3705C Clinical Laboratory Management 2
HUM 2410 Asian Humanities 3 MLS 4462C Medical Microbiology 2
HUM 2410 African Humanities 3 MLS 4191C Molecular Diagnostics 3
HUM 2450 American Humanities 3 PCB 4233 Immunology 3
HUM 2472 Humanities: China and Japan 3 PCB 4233L Immunology Lab 1
ECO 2710 International Economics 3 MLS 3308 Hematology 3
ANT 2301 Human Sexuality and Culture 3 MLS 3308L Hematology Lab 1
SYG2430 Marriage and the Family 3 MLS 4460 Diagnostic Microbiology 3
ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology 3 MLS 4460L Diagnostic Microbiology Lab 1
BSC1030 Biology and Human Values 3 MLS 4625 Clinical Chemistry 3
ISS 2270 Multicultural Communications 2 MLS 4625L Clinical Chemistry Lab 1
Social/Behavioral Science: MLS 4550 Immunohematology 3
(choose one from each list) 6 MLS 4550L Immunohematology Lab 1
MLS 4823L Immunohematology Internship 4
List A
MLS 4822L Hematology Internship 4
AMH 2010 US History to 1877 3
MLS 4820L Clinical Chemistry Internship 4
AMH 2020 US History since 1877 3
MLS 2821L Microbiology Clinical Internship 4
SYG 2000 Introductory Sociology 3
MLS 4824L Serology/Immunology Internship 4
EUH2001 Western Civiliazation after 1648 3
INR 2002 International Relations 3
POS2041 American National Government 3
CPO 2001 Comparative Politics 3
POT 2002 Introduction to Political Theory 3
List B
ANT 2000 General Anthropology 3
PSY 2012 General Psychology 3
GEA 2000 World Regional Geography 3
Mathematics: 6
*MAC 1105 College Algebra (or higher) 3
*STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics I 3
Biological Sciences: 4
*BSC 2010 Core Biology 3
*BSC 2010L Core Biology Lab 1

Physical Sciences: 4
*CHM 2045 College Chemistry I 3
*CHM 2045L College Chemistry I Lab 1

114
Programs of Study
stone course will serve as a summative evaluation point at
which the students must demonstrate attainment of the
program’s learning outcomes.
All BAS degree seeking students must complete the same
basic requirements as traditional baccalaureate students,
including 36 hours of General Education, College Level
Academic Skills Testing (CLAST), and demonstration of
foreign language competence. Due to the specialized
nature of the BAS in Health Services Administration pro-
gram, students are strongly encouraged to consult with an
academic advisor when applying for admission. This pro-
gram is taught primarily in an online environment. Some
campus attendance may be necessary.

Getting Started
Santa Fe College expects all students to acquire or have
access to the computer hardware and software necessary
for the program.
• Complete an SFC application for admission or read-
mission online at www.sfcollege.edu.
• Arrange for official transcripts from high school to
be sent to the Office of Records and Admissions.
• Arrange for official transcripts from each postsec-
ondary institution attended to be sent to the Office
of Records and Admissions at least one month prior
to the start of the term. Unofficial transcripts may
be used for initial advisement purposes.

Health Services Administration – Qualifying for Admission
Bachelor of Applied Science 5100 In order to qualify for admission to the Bachelor of Applied
Program Director: Dr. James Geason Sciences in Health Services
Program Coordinator: Dr. Kezia Awadzi Administration, you must:
Program Advisors: Ms. Sheila Baker, • Have a 2.5 overall GPA.
Mr. Doug Robertson • Have earned a minimum of an Associate of Science,
Faculty: K. Awadzi, S. Crosson, C. Stephenson, Associate of Arts, or an AAS degree from a regionally
accredited educational institution.*
R. Strickland • Have completed the College Level Academics Skill
Test (CLAST), unless exempt. See Testing section
The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Health Services below for more information.
Administration is designed to accommodate the unique • Have successfully completed the following prereq-
demands for entry and advancement within specific work- uisite courses with a grade of C or higher:
force sectors. The program provides degree completion ACG 2021 Financial Accounting
opportunities for students from a variety of educational ACG 2071 Managerial Accounting
backgrounds, but primarily those with Associate of Sci- CGS 1000 or 1101 Microcomputer Applications
ence (A.S). degrees or the equivalent. The online program ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics
is designed to provide skills and competencies that enable * Degrees and coursework must meet SFC accreditation
graduates to function as supervisors and managers in standards in order to be applied toward program admission
health care settings. A health care administrator is a well criteria.
trained and skilled professional who serves in a man-
agement capacity within a hospital, health care facility,
agency, or other organization that offers health care and
Testing: College Level
related services. Academic Skills Test (CLAST)
All students applying to the Bachelor of Applied Sciences
Santa Fe College’s Bachelor of Applied Science in Health
in Health Services Administration program must take the
Services Administration adheres to the state’s common
CLAST unless exempt. Call or visit the Assessment Center
course prerequisites and curriculum framework. Most
at (352) 395‐5791, room G‐36, for information.
students will enter the program after completing an A.S.in
a health‐related area, but provisions have been made for
enrollment by students who have completed an associate Foreign Language Competency
degree in other areas. Health Services Administration bac- and General Education
calaureate students will select electives to create a spe-
Individuals who have not completed their foreign language
cialty within their major and will complete an internship/
requirement prior to enrolling at SFC must complete two
capstone course in their final year. The internship/cap- 115
semesters of college‐level sequential foreign language
www.sfcollege.edu

study before finishing the BAS program. Students may
select their General Education classes from any eligible
Program Internship/Capstone
courses within SFC’s approved General Education pack- Course and Exit Requirements
age. The BAS program requires 36 credit hours of General Students will complete an internship/capstone course as
Education in order to meet graduation standards. part of the exit requirements for the program. This course
may include on-campus attendance as well as placement
Health-Related Sciences and Terminology at an internship site approved by the program adminis-
The BAS in Health Services Administration is a degree trator, or a supervised project. The BAS degree in Health
program which focuses on issues pertinent to the man- Services Administration will be awarded upon satisfactory
agement of health care systems and organizations. While completion of the college’s curriculum totaling 120 credit
not required for admission, the following health‐related hours. Students must have a 2.0 average overall and a grade
sciences and terminology courses are recommended as of C or better in all 3000 and 4000 level courses.
electives contributing to student success in the program: Also, remember these points:
Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology (BSC • Students will only be admitted to the BAS program
2084/L); Human Medical Science (HSC 2531 or HIM 2472); after verification of prerequisites, previous degree,
Introduction to Health Care (HSC 1000). minimum GPA and testing requirements. Applica-
tion to the program does not guarantee admission.
BAS in Health Services Administration • All transcripts must be received and verified by the
SFC Office of Records and Admissions.
Overview of Credits Required
Please note: Information is subject to change. Please see
AS or AAS degree transferred credits either a Health Sciences or Business Programs advisor for
General Education 15 credit hours additional help.
Program Core 45 credit hours Applications, forms and procedures, and contact informa-
OR tion can be found online at www.sfcollege.edu in the Index
AA degree transferred credits Up to 60 credit hours under Health Services Administration.

BAS program
Additional General Education
(AS or AAS degree holders only) 36 credit hours
Core Courses 33 credit hours
Electives 6 credit hours
Total required for program: 120 credit hours

Health Services Administration Core Courses
Core Courses Credit Hours
HSA 4700 Fundamentals Health
Research Methods 3
HSA 3117 Introduction Health Administration 3
HSA 3111 U.S. Health Care Systems 3
FIN 3400 Financial Management 3
HSC 4500 Epidemiology 3
HSA 3191 Health Care Automation
and Technology 3
ECP 3703 Managerial Economics 3
PLA 4522 Health Law 3
HSA 3182 Health Care Administrative
Management 3
NUR 3833 Fundamentals of Quality
Management 3
HSA 4850 Internship/Capstone Course 3
Subtotal BAS Core Courses 33
Electives (select 2 for specialization)
MAN 3240 Applied Organizational Behavior 3
MAN 4102 Managing Cultural Diversity 3
EDG 3343 Instructional Strategies 3
HSC 4624 Foundations of Global Health 3
Subtotal BAS Electives 6
Total health Services Administration
Discipline Required Courses 39

116
Course Descriptions

Liberal Arts and Sciences ..................................................... 118
Career and Technical Education ......................................... 118
Educator Preparation Institute ............................................ 118
Bachelor of Applied Science .................................................186

117
www.sfcollege.edu

ACG2001 P 3 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 1 accounting information. The course focuses on small busi-
This course is the first in the two-course Principles of Ac- ness applications. It is strongly recommended that students
counting sequence. Students will study technology to pre- complete CGS1000 or CGS1101 or have equivalent skills.
pare and communicate financial information. Specifically,
students will understand the accounting cycle including ACG2500 O 3 FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING
the measurement of business transactions and income; This course uses technology to study the problems and
accounting system principles and internal controls; the methods encountered when applying accounting prin-
preparation and analysis of financial statements; and the ciples and practices to governmental and not-for-profit
measurement and reporting of transactions concerning organizations. It is strongly recommended that students
cash, accounts receivable, and inventories. The course complete CGS1000 or CGS1101 or have equivalent skills.
focuses on service and merchandising businesses operat- Prerequisites: ACG2001 and ACG2011, or ACG2021 with a
ing as corporations. A comprehensive outside assignment grade of C or better.
is required in this course. No course prerequisites, al-
though it is strongly recommended that students complete ACR0012 V 6 FUNDAMENTALS OF AIR CONDITIONING
CGS1000 or CGS1101 or have equivalent skills. This course is designed to train the student in the funda-
mental principles of air conditioning. The student studies
ACG2011 P 3 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 2 electrical components and controls as they relate to cen-
This course is the second in the two-course Principles tral air conditioning and heat pump systems. Hands-on
of Accounting sequence. Students will use technology to skills, such as the installation, evacuation and charging of
prepare and communicate financial information. Specifi- central air conditioning and heat pump systems, are devel-
cally, students will analyze and interpret transactions oped. Prerequisites: ACR0051C and ACR0548C.
concerning fixed assets, current and long-term liabilities,
shareholders equity; prepare the case flow statement; and ACR0051C V 8.4 PRINCIPLES OF REFRIGERATION
articulate accounting knowledge when analyzing financial This course is designed to train the student in the funda-
statements. The course focuses on service and merchan- mental principles of refrigeration, electricity and safety as
dising businesses operating as corporations. A compre- it applies to the air conditioning and refrigeration indus-
hensive outside assignment is required in this course. try. The student studies the refrigeration cycle, controls,
It is STRONGLY recommended that students complete Ohm’s Law and wiring diagrams. Hands-on skills are
CGS1000 or CGS1101 or have equivalent skills. Prerequisite: taught for cutting, bending, swaging, flaring and the braz-
ACG2001 with a grade of C or better. ing of copper tubing. The proper use of specialized tools
and meters such as refrigerant recovery machines, mani-
ACG2021 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING fold gauges, vacuum pumps, digital scales and charging
This course is an accelerated conceptual introduction to cylinders is taught.
financial accounting. Using technology, students will pre-
pare, use, and interpret financial information. Course is ACR0074 V 6 EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS, JOB SEARCH
comparable to ACG2001 and ACG2011 combined. Students AND EARLY PLACEMENT
may enroll in this course or the ACG2001 and ACG2011 This course is designed to train the student in the funda-
sequence, but not all three courses. The ACG2021 alterna- mental aspects of applying for a job. The completing of em-
tive is recommended for students planning to major in ployment applications, successful interviewing techniques
accounting; it is recommended that all other students take and searching out job opportunities are topics presented.
ACG2001 and ACG2011. There is no prerequisite for this The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certification
course; however, students should have strong math skills in proper refrigerant handling exam is administered dur-
including those in algebra. It is strongly recommended ing the class. Students are required to conduct a job search
that students complete CGS1000 or CGS1101 or have with prospective heating and air conditioning employers.
equivalent skills. During the job search process, if a student gains employ-
ment, he or she may complete the course through on-the-
ACG2071 P 3 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING job training.
Designed for non-accounting majors, this course focuses
on how managers use quantitative and qualitative ac- ACR0125 V 6 ADVANCED AIR CONDITIONING
counting information for decision making individually
This course is designed to train the student in advanced
and as members of a management team. Students will
applications of air conditioning technology. The student
study management accounting fundamentals including
studies heat gain and heat loss of buildings; performs
cost concepts and cost allocation; understand cost-based
a heat load calculation using Manual J and studies the
and activity-based information systems; use information
design of an air distribution system. Hands-on lab activi-
for planning purposes including cost behavior analysis
ties will include heat pump troubleshooting. Prerequisites:
and the budgeting process; measure and evaluate per-
ACR0051C, ACR0548C, and ACR0012.
formance using financial and non-financial metrics and
reports; and synthesize course knowledge to make price,
quality, short-run and long-run decisions. The course ACR0548C V 3.6 ADVANCED REFRIGERATION
employs technology tools typically used by managers, e.g., This course is designed to train the student to understand
spreadsheet software and the Internet. Students will apply the relationship between the component parts in a refrig-
and link course knowledge in a comprehensive outside eration system and its electrical controls. Compressor and
assignment as a requirement of this course. It is strongly electric motor testing and troubleshooting techniques are
recommended that students complete CGS1000 or CGS1101 taught. Electro-mechanical and solid state controls will
or have equivalent skills. Prerequisites: ACG2001 and be studied. The student will have the opportunity to apply
ACG2011, or ACG2021 with a grade of C or better. this knowledge to practical troubleshooting experiences in
the lab. Prerequisite: ACR0051C.
ACG2450 O 3 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE
This course applies accounting principles using popular ACR0855 V 3.4 ADVANCED MECHANICAL REPAIR
accounting software such as QuickBooks, Office Account- This course is designed to train the student to understand
118 ing, Peachtree, or Dynamics GP to prepare and interpret the relationship between the component parts in a refrig-
Course Descriptions
eration system and its electrical controls. Compressor and AER0021C V 4.5 BASIC AUTO SERVICE 1
electric motor testing and troubleshooting techniques are This course covers basic minor automotive repairs that a
taught. Electro-mechanical and solid state controls will beginning technician would be expected to accomplish.
be studied. The student will have the opportunity to apply Some electrical training is accomplished that would
this knowledge to practical troubleshooting experiences in prepare the student to do minor diagnosis using a digital
the lab. Prerequisite: ACR0051C. multimeter. The student will obtain experience in replace-
ment of various parts. Prerequisite: AER0010.
ADV1210 O 3 INTRODUCTION TO ADVERTISING
DESIGN AND GRAPHICS AER0022 V 2 BASIC AUTO SERVICE 2
An introduction to visual communication theory and This course is a continuation of Basic Auto Service 1,
methodology, and principles of design. Lectures include AER0021C. The student will obtain additional experi-
such topics as symbolism, visual perception, conceptual- ence in minor problem diagnosis and parts replacement.
ization and layout stages, design principles, typography, Minor engine repairs and exhaust system service will also
illustration and imaging, and color. This course will focus be covered. With the completion of AER0010, Automotive
on expanding the student’s knowledge of basic design Fundamentals; AER0021C, Basic Auto Service 1; and this
principles. It will introduce the student to visual com- course, AER0022, the student will be at the level of an au-
munication theory and devices including their use in the tomotive services assistor or a technician helper. Prerequi-
creation of graphics. Composition, typography, and color site: AER0010.
application will form their foundation for learning to com-
municate to target audiences. This is a hands-on course AER0190C V 4.5 AUTO ENGINES 1
that enables students to develop their skills through the This course covers engine classification and design. Lu-
creation of various projects throughout the semester. brication, cooling and induction systems are discussed.
Much emphasis is given to in-car repairs and upper engine
ADV1212 O 3 ADVERTISING GRAPHICS & PRODUCTION overhaul. Students gain experience in making measure-
Designed to acquaint students with print production ments, assembly, adjustment and minor machine opera-
techniques. Emphasis is placed on techniques related to tions.
the advertising business. Lectures review specific uses of
design, typography, and print production with sessions AER0299 V 6.2 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS
dedicated to practicing computer layout and production AND TRANSAXLES
techniques. Prerequisite: GRA2124. This course covers basic principles of operation of au-
tomatic transmissions and transaxles. In-vehicle minor
ADV2211 O 3 ADVANCED ADVERTISING repairs and adjustments are covered as well as complete
DESIGN &GRAPHICS overhaul of various units. General diagnostic and repair
Advanced design projects in visual communications. Con- procedures are covered in detail. Prerequisites: AER0010,
centration will be on analysis and application of design AER0021C, and AER0022.
principles for logos and trademarks, brochures and flyers,
and newsletters. Other topics include psychology of color, AER0390 V 2.2 MANUAL DRIVETRAINS 1
typography, color and black-and-white visuals. The focus This course covers diagnosis and repair of automotive
of this class will be to combine the knowledge acquired clutches, manual transmissions, universal joints, drive-
in Photoshop and InDesign with Illustrator and to apply shafts, differentials and axle bearings. Proper diagno-
this knowledge to real-life situations. In some cases the sis and unit repair is covered in detail. Prerequisites:
student may be dealing directly with outside clients. Pre- AER0010, AER0021C, AER0022.
requisites: GRA2135C, GRA2100C, GRA2124.
AER0391 V 2.3 MANUAL DRIVETRAINS 2
ADV2803 O 3 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM This course is a continuation of Manual Drivetrains 1
An advanced advertising course requiring the student (AER0390) and covers more detail on service and repair of
to prepare and produce a variety of general advertising automotive manual transaxles and front axle assemblies.
campaigns, working individually as well as within a group. Front axle C/V joint replacement and repair is covered in
Emphasis is placed on accurately identifying the targeted detail. Prerequisites: AER0010, AER0021C, AER0022, and
audience, campaign design, production methods, media AER0390.
analysis and research. This class is a combination of work-
ing with real clients on real projects and will also cover the AER0450 V 3.7 STEERING & SUSPENSION 1
practical aspects of working as a graphic designer. We will This course covers principles and repair of automotive
discuss billable hours and design a form to keep track of suspension and steering systems. Steering geometry
the time spent on design work for each client. The focus of will be covered in detail as well as service and replace-
this class will be to synthesize all of the knowledge gained ment of all related components. Prerequisites: AER0010,
in this program to apply in real-life situations. Projects AER0021C, AER0022.
will be strictly client-based and will be covered at a profes-
sional pace. Discussions will include topics relevant to AER0452 V 0.8 STEERING/SUSPENSION 2
current business practices in the industry. Prerequisites: This course is a continuation of Suspension and Steering
GRA2135C, GRA2100C, GRA2124, and ADV2211. 1 (AER0450) and emphasizes electronic controls and total
four-wheel alignment. Prerequisites: AER0010, AER0021C,
AER0010 V 7.5 AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS AER0022, AER0498.
This course covers the basic fundamentals of automotive
repair and sets the stage for more advanced training by AER0590 V 2.1 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS 1
covering appropriate math, science, and communication This course covers principles of automotive brake systems
skills. Shop safety and proper use of hand and power tools and repair of drum and disc brake units. Overhaul and re-
are well emphasized. This course prepares the student to a placement procedures will be covered as well as machin-
level of skill appropriate to a lube technician. ing of brake drums and rotors. Prerequisite: AER0022. 119
www.sfcollege.edu

AER0591 V 2.3 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS 2 AER1298 O 3 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS
This course is a continuation of Automotive Brake Sys- AND TRANSAXLES
tems 1 (AER0590) and covers more advanced diagnosis This course covers the operation of automatic transmis-
and repairs of various power brake boosters and antilock sions and transaxle units. Overhaul, testing, diagnosis and
brake systems (ABS). Prerequisites: AER0010, AER0021C, repair procedures are studied in detail.
AER0022, AER0590.
AER1498 O 4 AUTOMOTIVE STEERING AND
AER0691C V 7.9 FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRICAL SUSPENSION SYSTEMS
& ELECTRONICS The student will be studying the component operation and
This course covers principles of electricity, service and function of automotive steering and suspension systems.
Alignment, testing, diagnosis and repair of vehicle systems
repair of automotive starting, charging and electrical
are emphasized.
systems. Ohm’s Law will be applied to series, parallel and
combination circuits and the proper use of digital multi-
AER1598 O 3 BRAKE SYSTEMS
meters and dual-trace oscilloscopes will be covered. Basic
electronic theory will be covered in detail and applied to A study of the theory and operation of automotive brake
systems. All aspects of the diagnosis, repair and testing
all automotive systems and accessories. Prerequisites:
of brake systems, drum and disc brakes and power brake
AER0010, AER0022. operation and repair, and an introduction to electronically
controlled braking systems are included in this course.
AER0759 V 4.5 AUTOMOTIVE HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING AER1695C O 3 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS
This course covers principles and repair of automotive The student will study basic electronic theory, solid state
heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems. The components, integrated circuits and their application in
student will learn leak detection, refrigerant recovery/re- automotive systems. Fundamentals of computer opera-
cycling and charging of air conditioning systems. Diag- tion and logic will be explored. The student will become
nosis and component replacement will be covered as well familiar with the operation and use of dual-trace oscil-
as environmental regulations and issues. Prerequisites: loscopes and logic probes. This course covers both chassis
AER0010, AER0021C, and AER0022. and engine systems.

AER0892C V 3.5 ENGINE PERFORMANCE 1 AER1698C O 3 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
This course covers computer-controlled fuel and ignition The student will be introduced to basic electrical theory,
systems in detail. Principles of operation and diagnostic test equipment usage, schematic and wiring diagrams as
procedures using the latest test equipment are covered. used in the diagnosis and repair of automotive vehicles.
Prerequisites: AER0010, AER0021C, and AER0022. The student will also study various systems and the use
of basic electrical skills in troubleshooting and repairing
electrical systems.
AER0893C V 6 ENGINE PERFORMANCE 2
This course is a continuation of Engine Performance AER1798C O 3 AUTOMOTIVE HEATING
1 (AER0892C). The latest equipment is used to provide AND AIR CONDITIONING
hands-on experience using late-model vehicles. The stu- Theory and operation of modern automotive heating and
dent will be able to apply skills learned in previous elec- air conditioning systems. Included are proper diagnostic
tronics and performance courses. Prerequisites: AER0010, and repair procedures.
AER0021C, AER0022, and AER0892C.
AER1949 O 3 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION: AUTOMOTIVE
AER1070 O 2 AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND SERVICE Must be enrolled in Automotive Service Technology
The student will be introduced to automotive manage- courses at Santa Fe College and have permission prior to
ment policies and procedures as related to parts depart- registration from the supervising instructor. May be taken
ment operation and service department operation. five times for credit.

AER1081C O 3 AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS AER2398 O 3 AUTOMOTIVE MANUAL
AND MINOR SERVICE TRANSMISSIONS/DRIVETRAINS
This course will introduce the student to the various The course will cover the operation of manual transmis-
systems of the automotive vehicles and will acquaint the sions and drive train components. Overhaul, testing, diag-
student with shop practices, safety, service manuals, pay nosis and repair of front and rear wheel drive units will be
structures, tools, warranties and personal relations neces- studied in detail.
sary for success in the automotive business. The student
AER2840C O 4 DRIVEABILITY DIAGNOSIS
will be trained in minor repair procedures, including
Classroom and lab experiences related to approved tech-
lubrication, wheel and tire service, exhaust system service
niques for the diagnosis of drivability problems. Course
and new car pre-delivery services.
content will include, but not be limited to: brake, steering
and suspension; transmission and drive train; electrical,
AER1198 O 4 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES engine and engine performance diagnosis, including spe-
This course is a study of the principles of the internal cific applications of computer controlled systems.
combustion engine. The theory and operation of the vari-
ous engines in use in automotive vehicles is presented. AER2898C O 3 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE PERFORMANCE
Engines will be properly disassembled, parts identified, This course is designed for the second year student and
inspected, measured, and reassembled. Proper testing will emphasize theory of operation, diagnosis and repair
and break-in procedures along with approved diagnostic of automotive electronic ignition systems, emission con-
120 troubleshooting procedures will be stressed. trol systems, fuel systems and carburetion. The student
Course Descriptions
will work with state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment and ROTC cadets, and it complements this course by providing
will be introduced to the components used in electronic cadets with their first opportunity for applied leadership
engine control systems. experiences discussed in class. Corequisite: AFR2130L,
Leadership Laboratory-Fall.
AER2949 O 3 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION: AUTOMOTIVE
Must be enrolled in Automotive Service Technology cours- AFR2140L P 1 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY-SPRING TERM
es at Santa Fe College and must have permission prior to The first two years of the Leadership Laboratory include
registration from the supervising instructor. May be taken a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and
five times for credit. ceremonies, issuing military commands, instructing,
directing and evaluating the preceding skills, studying
AFR1101L P 1 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY-FALL TERM the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about
The first two years of the Leadership Laboratory include areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.
a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and Corequisite: AFR2140, The Air Force Today-Spring Term.
ceremonies, issuing military commands, instructing,
directing and evaluating the preceding skills, studying AFR2140 P 1 THE AIR FORCE WAY-SPRING TERM
the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about AFR2140 is a survey course designed to facilitate the
areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. transition from Air Force ROTC cadet to Air Force ROTC
Corequisite: AFR1101, The Air Force Today-Fall Term. candidate. Featured topics include: Air Force heritage, Air
Force leaders, quality Air Force, an introduction to ethics
AFR1101 P 1 THE AIR FORCE TODAY-FALL TERM and values, introduction to leadership, group leadership
AFR1101 is a survey course designed to introduce students problems, and continuing application of communication
to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force
Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and orga- ROTC cadets, and it complements this course by providing
nization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, cadets with their first opportunity for applied leadership
military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer oppor- experiences discussed in class. Corequisite: AFR2140L,
tunities, group leadership problems, and an introduction Leadership Laboratory-Spring Term.
to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is manda-
tory for Air Force ROTC cadets, and it complements this AMH2010 P 3 UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877
course by providing cadets with followership experiences. This course examines the major political, social, economic
Corequisite: AFR1101L, Leadership Laboratory-Fall Term. and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United States
from the first European contact with America to the Civil
AFR1120L P 1 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY-SPRING TERM War and Reconstruction. Special attention is given to the
experience of the nation’s diverse ethnic and cultural
The first two years of the Leadership Laboratory include
groups and America’s place in the global community. As a
a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and writing intensive course, AMH2010 will allow students the
ceremonies, issuing military commands, instructing, chance to explore the subject through a variety of college-
directing and evaluating the preceding skills, studying level writing exercises that may include essay exams, book
the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about reviews, reaction papers, and other discipline specific
areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. writing.
Corequisite: AFR1120, The Air Force Today-Spring Term.
AMH2020 P 3 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1877
AFR1120 P 1 THE AIR FORCE TODAY-SPRING TERM
This course examines the major political, social, eco-
AFR1120 is a survey course designed to introduce students nomic, and diplomatic trends that have shaped the United
to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Of- States from the end of Reconstruction to the present.
ficer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and Special attention is given to the experience of the nation’s
organization of the Air Force, officership and profession- diverse ethnic and cultural groups and America’s place
alism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer in the global community of regional and international
opportunities, group leadership problems, and an intro- relations. As a writing intensive course, AMH2020 will
duction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is allow students the chance to explore the subject through a
mandatory for Air Force ROTC cadets, and it complements variety of college-level writing exercises that may include
this course by providing cadets with followership experi- essay exams, book reviews, reaction papers, and other
ences. Corequisite: AFR1120L, Leadership Laboratory- discipline specific writing.
Spring Term.
AMH2035 P 3 US MODERN WORLD SINCE 1945
AFR2130L P 1 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY-FALL TERM This course will examine both the major role performed
The first two years of the Leadership Laboratory include by the United States in world affairs since the end of World
a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and War II and the profound changes the nation has experi-
ceremonies, issuing military commands, instructing, enced on the domestic scene. Among the major issues to
directing and evaluating the preceding skills, studying consider are affluence and poverty, civil rights and social
the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about justice, broader economic and social changes, as well as
areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. the political culture that both reflects and shapes these
Corequisite: AFR2130, The Air Force Today-Fall Term. larger historical currents. As a research and writing inten-
sive course, AMH 2035 will allow students the chance to
AFR2130 P 1 THE AIR FORCE WAY-FALL TERM explore the subject through a variety of college-level writ-
AFR2130 is a survey course designed to facilitate the ing exercises that will include an original research project
transition from Air Force ROTC cadet to Air Force ROTC and may also include essay exams, book reviews, reaction
candidate. Featured topics include: Air Force heritage, Air papers, and other discipline specific writing. Prerequi-
Force leaders, quality Air Force, an introduction to ethics sites: ENC1101 and ENC1102 with a grade of C or better.
and values, introduction to leadership, group leadership
problems, and continuing application of communication AMH2036 P 3 THE 1960S: DECADE OF PROTEST
skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force This Honors course will provide an in-depth examination
121
www.sfcollege.edu

of the four major social and political movements of the Franklin, Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and
1960s: the student protests and counter-culture move- Emily Dickinson. In order to pass AMH2010, students must
ment; the civil rights movement; the feminist movement demonstrate college-level writing skills through multiple
and women’s liberation; and the anti-war movement. assignments; therefore, the course meets the definition of
The major aims of the course will be twofold: to analyze a writing-intensive Gordon Rule course as per State BOE
the 1960s as a way of understanding the role of protest in Rule 6A-10.030. Prerequisites: ENC1101 and ENC1102 with
American history; and to explore the dynamics of protest a minimum grade of C.
movements, by their leaders, internal conflicts, rhetoric,
achievements and limitations. AML2020 P 3 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 2
This course is a chronological survey of American litera-
AMH2056 P 3 THE CIVIL WAR ture from the Civil War to the present with special empha-
This Honors course will examine the causes of the Ameri- sis on the literature of the 20th century. It includes a study
can Civil War, the conduct of the war in its political, social, of writers such as Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, Robert
military, economic, diplomatic, and geographical dimen- Frost, John Updike, and Anne Tyler, their styles and the
sions, and the consequences for the nation’s future. Much social environment which shaped them. Prerequisites:
attention will focus on the political and military leaders ENC1101 and ENC1102 with minimum grade of C.
of the era, and the course is designed to appeal to both
the scholar and the collector-military buff. Prerequisite: AML2260 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO SOUTHERN LITERATURE
AMH2010 recommended. A study of the literature of the American South and the
craft of the literature of the American South. This course is
AMH2058 P 3 WORLD WAR II designed for students who want to learn about the litera-
This Honors seminar is designed to appeal to both the ture, the history, and the culture of the American South.
scholar and the military buff. It will survey the forces, The style, form, and content of literary works produced
trends, and policies that led to the war (with emphasis by writers of the American South are examined in detail.
on leadership, strategies, and campaigns), and the world Students will learn to appreciate literature as an art form
changes brought about by the war. Considerable attention and to develop a critical sense of appropriate language as
will be given to controversial aspects of World War II, such employed by authors from the various historical periods
as personalities (Hitler, Stalin, Churchill, Roosevelt, of the American South. Students are required to write
MacArthur, Patton, Eisenhower, et al), battles, decisions, compositions based upon class discussions and upon their
equipment and technology. readings. This course meets the definition of a writing-
intensive Gordon Rule course (State BOE Rule 6A-10.030).
AMH2091 P 3 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY Prerequisites: ENC1101 and ENC1102 with a grade of C or
higher.
This course examines the major political, social, and
economic events in African-American history. The topics
to be treated in AMH2091 include: the African background; ANT2000 P 3 GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY
slavery; emancipation; the Civil War and Reconstruction; This is an introduction to general anthropology and its
blacks in the twentieth century; the civil rights movement; major subfields, including archaeology, linguistics, cul-
and social, cultural, and economic aspects of black history. tural anthropology, biological anthropology, and applied
anthropology. The history of anthropology will be dis-
AMH2931 P 1 WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY cussed as well as the contributions of major anthropolo-
gists and their approaches to the discipline. As a writing
This Honors colloquium offers an in-depth examination of
intensive course, ANT2000 will allow students to explore
women’s experiences in the United States. Special atten-
the subject through a variety of college-level writing exer-
tion is given to the development of women’s history as a cises that may include essay exams, book reviews, reaction
field of study and to the contributions of women to Ameri- papers, field notes, research papers, project proposals, oral
can society. The major aim of the colloquium is to enrich presentation critiques, and/or annotated bibliographies.
students’ understanding of both American history and
women’s history by studying women as an integral part of
ANT2100 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
the historical process.
This course highlights the basic concepts and fundamen-
AMH2933 P 1 THE LAND: AN INTRODUCTION TO tal principles of method and theory in modern archaeol-
AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY ogy. The history of archaeology is traced from its origins
to its emergence as a scientific discipline within anthro-
This Honors course will provide an overview of how pology. Students are familiarized with the concepts and
Americans have interacted with a thought about nature methods of modern archaeology, and with the scientific
and the land from the16th through the 20th centuries. It goals of archaeological research. A survey of the latest
will focus on natural resources and how different groups advances in the field such as remote sensing and non-
and genders used and perceived them. It will also focus on intrusive techniques is included. As a writing intensive
the way the modern environmental movement emerged course, ANT2100 will allow students to explore the subject
and evolved through the 20th century. . through a variety of college-level writing exercises that
may include essay exams, book reviews, research papers,
AML1600 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN- reaction papers, research proposals, research designs,
AMERICAN LITERATURE excavation logs, field notes, annotated bibliographies, and
This course introduces the student to a rich and varied other discipline specific writing.
body of literature created by black Americans. The works
under study are examined with attention to literary tradi- ANT2140 P 3 WORLD PREHISTORY
tions, conventions, terms, and commonly held themes. This course presents a global study of human culture
from its beginnings to the present through the recovery,
AML2010 P 3 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 1 description and analysis of archaeological remains. As a
This course is a chronological survey of American lit- writing intensive course, ANT2140 will allow students to
erature from its beginning to the Civil War. It includes explore the subject through a variety of college-level writ-
122 a study of writers such as Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin ing exercises that may include essay exams, book reviews,
Course Descriptions
research papers, reaction papers, research proposals, skills through multiple assignments; therefore, the course
research designs, excavation logs, field notes, annotated meets the definition of a writing-intensive Gordon Rule
bibliographies, and other discipline specific writing. course as per State BOE Rule 6A-10.030.

ANT2301 P 3 HUMAN SEXUALITY AND CULTURE ARH2051 P 3 ART HISTORY 2
Human Sexuality and Culture entails a study of human An introduction to art history which acquaints the student
sexuality with a multicultural, biosocial, anthropological with major works of art as they relate to the historical and
perspective. Emphasis is placed on the fact that human cultural development of artistic styles from the Renais-
sexuality is not only intimately related to human biol- sance to the present. Students will carry out introduc-
ogy but that it is embedded in the socio-cultural fabric of tory research methodologies appropriate to art history.
human societies. Central themes will be to understand di- Students will explore the medium through several college-
versity in human sexuality, critical thinking about sexual level writing exercises, including gallery reports, analyses
attitudes and beliefs, and issues concerning sexual health of art and architectural works, research papers and other
in our community, our nation, and worldwide. As a writing discipline specific writing. ARH2051 constitutes the sec-
intensive course, ANT2301 will allow students to explore ond half of the Art History sequence which is required by
the subject through a variety of college-level writing exer- art majors wishing to transfer as juniors to state of Florida
cises that may include essay exams, book reviews, reaction upper division institutions. In order to pass ARH2051,
papers, original research papers, and/or other discipline students must demonstrate college-level writing skills
specific writing. through multiple assignments; therefore, the course meets
the definition of a writing-intensive Gordon Rule course as
ANT2410 P 3 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY per State BOE Rule 6A-10.030.
This is an introduction to cultural anthropology which
seeks to understand why people throughout the world ARH2500 P 3 NON-WESTERN ART HISTORY
today and in the past differ in their customary ways of ARH2500 introduces students to the cultural and histori-
thinking and behaving. Students will learn how subsis- cal heritage of selected non-western societies from the
tence patterns, reproductive strategies, marriage customs, ancient world to the present day. The student will be in-
kinship organization, political and economic systems, troduced to examples of painting, sculpture, architecture,
religion, art, and music differ in contemporary kinship- and decorative arts using slides, videotapes and other
based, state-level, and global societies. Students will also materials reproducing art works from a variety of cultures
study why cultures develop and change. As a writing including those of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.
intensive course, ANT2410 will allow students to explore, Rather than following a chronological outline, the course
explain, critically analyze and convey their understanding will be organized on the basis of different types of cultural
of the subject through a variety of college-level writing ex- models including nomadic bands, village cultures, ranked
ercises that may include essay exams, book reviews, reac- societies and urban states.
tion papers, field notes, research papers, project proposals,
lecture/discussion summaries and /or critiques, and/or ARH2722C O 3 HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN
annotated bibliographies. This course will survey the history of graphic design.
Students will be introduced to influential designers and
ANT2511 P 3 HUMAN ORIGINS become familiar with various graphic styles throughout
This is an introduction to biological anthropology, which history. It will also examine typography’s 500 year history,
includes the study of human biological diversity, human introduce basic typographic principles, and help students
evolution, osteology, and the study of non-human pri- to implement these principles through projects. Prerequi-
mates. As a writing intensive course, ANT2511 will allow sites: GRA2135C and GRA2100C.
students to explore the subject through a variety of college-
level writing exercises that may include essay exams, book ART1001C P 3 ART FUNDAMENTALS
reviews, research papers, reaction papers, research pro- ART1001C introduces students to a guided investigation of
posals, research designs, excavation logs, field notes, anno- basic concepts and techniques of visual organization. Art
tated bibliographies, and other discipline specific writing. Fundamentals is designed principally for non-art majors
Prerequisites: Successful completion of or exemption from and focuses on the development of students as aware, edu-
ENC1101 and ENC1102 with a letter grade of C or better. cated members of the arts audience. Through a survey of
basic media in a studio environment, students will acquire
ARH1000 P 3 ART APPRECIATION a working knowledge of fundamental principles of visual
Art Appreciation introduces the student to the two and art and familiarize themselves with the basic vocabulary
three dimensional visual arts and the vocabulary used to necessary to communicate their creative process and
express an opinion on the quality, value and significance thinking. Art Fundamentals exposes students to a vari-
of the arts studied. ety of visual arts disciplines including design, drawing,
collage, and painting (sculpture is included when time
ARH2050 P 3 ART HISTORY 1 permits). There is no prerequisite required or previous
An introduction to art history which acquaints the student experience necessary in order to take this class. Students
with major works of art as they relate to the historical and are advised that, while ART1001C will fulfill 3 credit hours
cultural development of artistic styles from ancient times of the general education Humanities requirement, this is
to the beginning of the Renaissance. Students will carry not a pre-professional course and will not fulfill a studio
out introductory research methodologies appropriate to art requirement for those students majoring in the Visual
art history. Students will explore the medium through Arts. ART1001C is not a recommended course selection for
several college-level writing exercises, including gallery students declared as Visual Arts majors.
reports, analyses of art and architectural works, research
papers and other discipline specific writing. ARH2050 ART1150C P 3 JEWELRY FABRICATION
constitutes the first half of the Art History sequence which ART1150C introduces the students to techniques of met-
is required by art majors wishing to transfer as juniors to alworking and jewelry fabrication. Jewelry Fabrication em-
state of Florida upper division institutions. In order to pass phasizes the development of manual skills and personal
ARH2050, students must demonstrate college-level writing creativity through the application of basic design princi- 123
www.sfcollege.edu

ples in making jewelry. Students will become familiar with body of portfolio-quality drawings. Students are advised
the basic vocabulary associated with jewelry fabrication. that, while not a prerequisite, this course is of benefit prior
There is no prerequisite required or previous experience to enrolling in other studio courses with drawing com-
necessary in order to take this class. ponents such as painting and printmaking. There is no
prerequisite required or previous experience necessary in
ART1181C P 3 STAINED GLASS order to take this class. It is strongly recommended that all
ART1181C introduces the student to the basic methods of art majors enroll in ART1300C Beginning Drawing within
stained glass production with an emphasis on windows, their first year of studies.
including leaded and copper foil techniques. This course
introduces the student to the creative process, concept ART1301C P 3 DRAWING 2 (LIFE DRAWING)
development, and broadens and sensitizes the student ART1301C continues with the development of basic skills
to the materials and techniques involved in stained glass and elements of descriptive drawing from Beginning
processes. Students will become familiar with the basic Drawing while serving as an introduction to figure draw-
vocabulary associated with stained glass. Stained glass ing. In studying the human figure, Drawing 2 utilizes the
requires substantial time toward the completion of class live, nude model. Students will become further familiar-
projects, both in and outside of scheduled class time. ized with the basic vocabulary and conventions of objec-
There is no prerequisite required or previous experience tive drawing processes and media while emphasizing
necessary in order to take this class. an enhanced perceptual awareness and eye/hand mo-
tor skills. Drawing 2 provides the foundation to address
ART1201C P 3 TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN figural problems encountered in other studio courses
ART1201C is a guided investigation of basic concepts and involving the human figure such as Life Painting, and
techniques of visual organization in two dimensions. aids in preparing students to apply for entry to upper-
Students will develop an awareness of the formal elements division programs through the development of a body
of composition, a working knowledge of their fundamen- of portfolio-quality figure drawings. It is expected that
tal principles, and sensitivity toward the interrelation- students enrolled in Drawing 2 have successfully com-
ship between form and content. Students will familiar- pleted ART1300C Beginning Drawing (either at SFC or the
ize themselves with the basic vocabulary necessary to equivalent course at another institution). Other equiva-
verbalize their creative process and critical thinking. lent experience such as AP credit may be substituted. All
Two-Dimensional Design requires substantial time toward claims to prerequisite equivalency must be verified by the
the completion of class projects, both in and outside of Fine Arts Department prior to registration.
scheduled class time. Two-Dimensional Design prepares
students with the foundation to address compositional ART1400C P 3 PRINTMAKING 1
problems encountered in other two-dimensional studio ART1400C introduces students to intaglio and relief
courses such as those involving photography, drawing, printmaking processes. Students will learn the proper use
painting, and printmaking. There is no prerequisite re- of facilities and equipment unique to the printmaking
quired or previous experience necessary in order to take studio and become familiar with the basic vocabulary and
this class. It is strongly recommended that all art majors techniques of making and printing intaglio and relief im-
enroll in ART1201C Two-Dimensional Design in their first ages. Printmaking 1 requires substantial time toward the
semester of studies. completion of class projects, both in and outside of sched-
uled class time. Printmaking 1 serves as a prerequisite for
ART1203C P 3 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN and prepares students with the foundation necessary to
ART1203C introduces the student to the basic methods furthering their printmaking studies in ART2401C Print-
of Three-Dimensional Design with an emphasis on making 2. There is no prerequisite required or previous
dimensional form, scale, texture and tension. This course experience necessary in order to take this class.
introduces the student to the creative process, concept de-
velopment, and broadens and sensitizes the student to the ART1430C P 3 SILKSCREEN PRINTING
materials and techniques involved in three-dimensional ART1430C introduces students to basic techniques of silk-
design processes. Students will become familiar with the screen/serigraph printing. Students will learn the proper
basic vocabulary associated with three-dimensional de- use of facilities and equipment unique to the printmak-
sign. Three-Dimensional Design requires substantial time ing studio and become familiar with the basic vocabulary
toward the completion of class projects, both in and out- and techniques of making and printing silkscreen limited
side of scheduled class time. Three-Dimensional Design edition prints. Silkscreen Printing requires substantial
prepares students with the foundation to address compo- time toward the completion of class projects, both in and
sitional problems encountered in other three-dimensional outside of scheduled class time. There is no prerequisite
studio courses such as those involving ceramics, jewelry required or previous experience necessary in order to take
and sculpture. There is no prerequisite required or previ- this class.
ous experience necessary in order to take this class.
ART1500C P 3 PAINTING
ART1300C P 3 DRAWING 1 ART1500C introduces the student to the basic techniques
ART1300C introduces the student to the basic skills and of oil and/or acrylic painting. Painting exposes students to
elements of descriptive representational drawing. Stu- the associated vocabulary, historical context and practi-
dents will become familiar with the basic vocabulary and cal applications of painting and color theory. Students
conventions of objective drawing processes and media will investigate abstract compositions as well as develop
while emphasizing an enhanced perceptual awareness objective, observational painting skills through still life,
and eye/hand motor skills. Beginning Drawing requires landscape and portraiture. This course introduces stu-
substantial time toward the completion of class projects, dents to the creative process, concept development, and
both in and outside of scheduled class time. Beginning broadens and sensitizes the student to materials and tech-
Drawing is a prerequisite for and prepares students with niques involved in the painting process. Painting requires
the foundation necessary to furthering their drawing substantial time toward the completion of class projects,
studies in ART1301C Drawing 2 (also known as Life Draw- both in and outside of scheduled class time. Painting is a
ing) and aids in preparing students to apply for entry to prerequisite for and prepares students with the foundation
124 upper-division programs through the development of a necessary to furthering their painting studies in ART2501C
Course Descriptions
Life Painting, and aids in preparing students to apply for pleted one or more of the following courses: ART1750C
entry to upper-division programs through the develop- Ceramics 1, Hand building, and/or ART1752C Ceramics 2,
ment of a body of portfolio-quality paintings. There is no Wheel Throwing.
prerequisite required or previous experience necessary in
order to take this class. ART2006C P 3 TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES
ART2006C introduces the student to the basic terminol-
ART1540C P 3 WATERCOLOR ogy, tools and techniques of studio art with an emphasis
ART1540C introduces the student to the associated vo- on experimentation and investigation through various
cabulary, historical context and practical applications of hands-on projects using traditional and non-traditional
watercolors and water related media. Students will explore fine art processes. This course introduces the student to
the properties of colors and composition through a semes- the creative process, concept development, and broadens
ter-long investigation of still life, landscape, portrait and and sensitizes the student to the materials and techniques
landscape compositions. This course introduces students involved in the creative process.
to the creative process, concept development, and broad-
ens and sensitizes the student to materials and techniques ART2151C P 3 JEWELRY CASTING
involved in watercolor painting processes. Watercolor re- ART2151C introduces students to model making and cast-
quires an independent work ethic typical of studio course ing by the lost wax method. Jewelry Casting emphasizes
work and the commitment of substantial time toward the the development of manual skills and personal creativity
completion of projects, both in and outside of scheduled through the application of basic design principles in cast-
class time. There is no prerequisite required or previous ing. Students will become familiar with the basic tools,
experience necessary in order to take this class. equipment and vocabulary associated with jewelry cast-
ing. There is no prerequisite required or previous experi-
ART1701C P 3 SCULPTURE ence necessary in order to take this class.
ART1701C introduces students to the basic methods of
casting, carving and assemblage. This course introduces ART2302C P 3 MIXED MEDIA DRAWING
the student to the creative process, concept development, ART2302C introduces the student to the use of multiple
and broadens and sensitizes the student to the materials materials within the production of individual art works.
and techniques involved in the sculpture process. Students Mixed Media Drawing introduces the student to an
will become familiar with the basic vocabulary associated expanded creative process and concept development.
with sculpture. Sculpture 1 requires substantial time to- Through the development of individual written creative
ward the completion of class projects, both in and outside proposals, students concentrate on explorations of ma-
of scheduled class time. There is no prerequisite required terials and techniques involved in mixed media drawing
or previous experience necessary in order to take this class. processes. Mixed Media Drawing requires an independent
work ethic typical of advanced studies and the com-
ART1750C P 3 CERAMICS - HANDBUILDING 1 mitment of substantial time toward the completion of
projects, both in and outside of scheduled class time. It
ART1750C introduces the student to the basic techniques is expected that students enrolled in Mixed Media Draw-
of ceramics with an emphasis on hand building, decora- ing have successfully completed ART1300C Beginning
tive, and glazing techniques. This course introduces the Drawing either at SFC or the equivalent course at another
student to the creative process, concept development, and institution.
broadens and sensitizes the student to the materials and
techniques involved in ceramic processes. Students are ART2401C P 1 PRINTMAKING 2
advised that, while not a prerequisite, this course is of ben-
ART2401C provides students with the opportunity to fur-
efit prior to enrolling in other courses with ceramic com-
ther explore the processes and techniques used in various
ponents such as Ceramics 2 Wheel throwing. ART1750C
types of printmaking. Students will become further famil-
Ceramics 1 Hand building satisfies the prerequisite
iarized with the vocabulary and conventions of printmak-
requirement for students wishing to further their ceramic
ing processes and media. Through the development of
studies in ART1758C Ceramics 3 Intermediate level. There
individual written proposals, students concentrate on ad-
is no prerequisite required or previous experience neces-
vanced techniques of printmaking and individual explora-
sary in order to take this class. tions of printmaking mediums. Printmaking 2 requires an
independent work ethic typical of advanced studies and
ART1752C P 3 CERAMICS - WHEEL THROWING the commitment of substantial time towards the comple-
ART1752C introduces the student to the basic techniques tion of projects, both in and outside of scheduled class
of ceramics with an emphasis on wheel throwing, decora- time. It is expected that students enrolled in Printmaking
tive, and glazing techniques. This course introduces the 2 have successfully completed one or more of the following
student to the creative process, concept development, courses: ART1400C Printmaking 1, ART1430C Silkscreen
and broadens and sensitizes the student to the materials Printing and/or ART2432 Photo-silkscreen Printing. Other
and techniques involved in ceramic processes. Ceramics equivalent experience may be substituted. All claims to
2 Wheel Throwing satisfies the prerequisite requirement prerequisite equivalency must be verified by the Fine Arts
for students wishing to further their ceramic studies in Department prior to registration. Prerequisite: ART1400C.
ART1758C Ceramics 3, Intermediate Level. There is no
prerequisite required or previous experience necessary in ART2432C P 3 PHOTO SILKSCREEN PRINTING
order to take this class. ART2432C introduces the student to the basic techniques
of photo silkscreen/serigraph printing. Students will learn
ART1758C P 3 CERAMICS 3 - INTERMEDIATE LEVEL the proper use of facilities and equipment unique to the
ART1758C is an advanced course with an emphasis on skill printmaking studio and become familiar with the basic
refinement in either wheel throwing or hand building. In vocabulary and techniques of making and printing photo-
this course the student will develop idea formation and silkscreen prints. Photo Silkscreen requires an indepen-
design skills to create a cohesive group of artwork. The dent work ethic typical of studio course work and the
student will learn advanced conceptual development and commitment of substantial time toward the completion
finishing processes. It is expected that students enrolled in of projects, both in and outside of scheduled class time
Ceramics 3, Intermediate Level have successfully com- including extensive time in the darkroom outside of regu- 125
www.sfcollege.edu

larly scheduled class hours. This class is normally recom- lift and drag on common aircraft. Prerequisite: ATF1100.
mended as a studio elective only for second year Fine Arts
majors. Prerequisite: ART1430C Printmaking 1. ASC1640 O 3 ENGINES, STRUCTURES AND SYSTEMS
This is an introductory course covering the design and
ART2440C P 3 RELIEF PRINTING TECHNIQUES operation of aircraft structures and operating systems.
ART2440C introduces students to basic techniques of relief The first section of the course covers the basic structure to
printing. Students will learn the proper use of facilities include fuselage, empennage, and flight controls. The sec-
and equipment unique to the printmaking studio and ond section covers propulsion systems to include recipro-
become familiar with the basic vocabulary and techniques cating engines and turbines. The third section covers the
of making and printing relief prints. Relief Printing re- various operating systems to include electrical, hydraulic,
quires an independent work ethic typical of studio course pneumatic, fire protection, and environmental. ATF1100,
work and the commitment of substantial time toward the Introduction to Pilot Training, is a prerequisite for this
completion of projects, both in and outside of scheduled course. It may not be taken concurrently.
class time. This class is normally recommended as a stu-
dio elective only for second year Fine Arts majors. There is ASC2320 O 3 AVIATION LAW AND REGULATION
no prerequisite required or previous experience necessary This course will cover the following topics related to the
in order to take this class. law and its application to aviation: origins of law; basic
types of law; application of law to aviation; local, state and
ART2501C P 3 LIFE PAINTING federal regulations; rights, responsibilities and liabilities of
ART2501C introduces students to compositional, tonal and airmen; safety and regulatory issues; government and pri-
color relationships in painting the forms of the human vate proprietary legal issues; labor and employment; insur-
face and figure. Life Painting exposes students to the asso- ance and product liability, and current issues of interest.
ciated vocabulary, historical context and practical applica-
tions of direct, observational painting from the live, nude ASC2870 O 3 AVIATION SAFETY
model. This course introduces students to the creative This course is designed for students pursuing a career in
process, concept development, and broadens and sensitiz- any aviation related field. It examines the factors that con-
es the student to materials and techniques involved in the tribute to the safe operation of private, commercial and
painting process. Life Painting requires substantial time military aircraft. Among the topics covered are human
toward the completion of class projects, both in and out- factors such as judgment, physiology, optical illusions and
side of scheduled class time. Life Painting aids in prepar- spatial disorientation; operational factors such as train-
ing students to apply for entry to upper-division programs ing, supervision and air traffic control; weather factors;
through the development of a body of portfolio-quality and maintenance. The course is built around case studies,
figure and portrait paintings. Prerequisite: ART1300C Be- many of which were prominent news events such as TWA
ginning Drawing and/or ART1500C Painting with a grade Flight 800 and the John F. Kennedy, Jr. crash. We will also
of C or above, either at SFC or the equivalent course/s at examine, step by step, the NTSB accident investigation
another institution. process that officially determines the root cause of each
accident. The process is much like a CSI-type drama where
ART2955 P 3 PORTFOLIO AND RESUME DEVELOPMENT diverse clues must be pieced together to arrive at the truth.
ART2955 is designed to help Fine Arts students with a This course is also appropriate for any student who, while
significant body of work in one or more of the creative arts not pursuing a career in aviation, has an interest in air-
acquire the skills to effectively market themselves and planes, air travel, or safety in general.
their work. Assignments will include resumes, film and ASL1140 P 4 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1
digital portfolios designed to aid in gaining employment
or admission to upper division schools. The student must ASL1140 introduces students to the basic components of
have accumulated a significant body of portfolio-quality American Sign Language as used in the deaf community
artwork prior to registration. as well as to various manual communication systems and
philosophies. The course will give an overview of sign
ASC1100 O 4 BASIC AVIATION NAVIGATION language through general discussion of ASL structure and
its use in society today. Instruction will focus on building a
This is an introductory course for students who plan to basic vocabulary and the communicative skills necessary
pursue a career as a professional pilot. The objective of the for elementary interactions with deaf or hearing impaired
course is to include VFR and IFR flight planning, visual people who use ASL.
and electronic navigation techniques, basic aviation
physiology, chart interpretation, checklists and commu- ASL1150 P 4 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2
nication procedures, and airways navigation and ap-
ASL1150 continues the introduction to American Sign Lan-
proach procedures. Upon completion, the student will be
guage begun in ASL1140. The course will develop further
prepared for more in-depth study of each of the topics in ASL vocabulary, expose students to increasingly complex
subsequent courses, and will be fully prepared for naviga- grammatical constructions, teach inflectional usage, and
tion within the continental United States as a private pilot. continue the introduction to deaf culture. Instruction will
emphasize continued development of both expressive
ASC1210 O 3 METEOROLOGY and receptive skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in
This is a course in atmospheric science with an empha- ASL1140 or equivalent competency.
sis on applications to flight. The following topics will be
covered: atmospheric composition, thermal patterns, ASL2160 P 4 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3
pressure patterns, circulation, winds, stability, fronts, fog, ASL2160 continues the study of American Sign Language
storms, icing, jet streams, turbulence and aviation weather with emphasis on developing intermediate conversa-
services. tion skills and flexibility of communication. The course
provides an additional ASL vocabulary development and
ASC1550 O 3 AERODYNAMICS signing concepts, and complex elements of grammar are
This course covers the fundamentals of lift and drag. Stu- introduced. Idiomatic signs and continued development
dents will be given the basic governing equations of aero- of intermediate expressive and receptive skills are empha-
126 dynamics and how to apply these equations to determine sized. All students are expected to work within a voice-off
Course Descriptions
classroom environment. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better rating on his/her pilot certificate and to operate under
in ASL1150 or equivalent competency. FAA instrument flight rules. Completion of ATF1100 is
a prerequisite. ATF1100 & ATF2100 should not be taken
AST1002L P 1 INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY LAB concurrently in the same semester. The requirement for
This laboratory experience provides an exploration of our completion of ATF1100 may be waived by the instructor if
universe through exercises involving observations of celes- the student has logged at least 15 flight hours.
tial objects and analysis of observational data. Telescopes,
binoculars, and the naked eye are used to observe the ATF2400 O 1 MULTI-ENGINE FLIGHT
sun, the moon, planets, constellations, stars, star clusters, ATF2400 is flown with an FAA Certified Flight Instructor.
nebulae, and galaxies. Prerequisite or corequisite: AST1002. Credit is awarded when the student successfully passes a
practical inflight evaluation with an FAA evaluator. The
AST1002 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY multi-engine rating allows pilots to operate more sophisti-
This course is a survey of astronomy intended for the non- cated aircraft with multiple power plants.
science major. It is an exploration of our universe through
descriptive studies of our solar system, stars, constella- BCA0001 V 1.5 INTRODUCTION TO CONSTRUCTION
tions, black holes, galaxies, quasars, and cosmology. Other AND MAINTENANCE SKILLS
topics included are artificial satellites, the space program, The entry level CORE class is required for all trades before
energy problems, and the search for extraterrestrial life. first year curriculum in the specific trade. This course
Emphasis is placed on scientific reasoning and precision, covers Basic Safety, Introduction to Construction Math,
and on the importance of astronomy as an integral part of Introduction to Hand and Power Tools, Introduction to
the everyday life of the individual. Blueprints, Basic Rigging, Basic Communication Skills and
Basic Employability Skills.
ATF1100 O 3 INTRODUCTION TO PILOT TRAINING
This is the introductory course for students who plan to BCA0350 V 1.1 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 1
pursue a career as a professional pilot. Topics include This course is for Level 1 Electrical apprentices and covers
atmosphere and airspeed measurement, airfoils and aero- electrical safety, hand bending, fasteners and anchors, and
dynamic forces, lift and drag, aircraft flight performance, electrical theory.
takeoff and landing performance, maneuvering perfor-
mance, and stability and control. BCA0351 V 2.6 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 2
This course is for Level 1 Electrical apprentices and covers
ATF1104 O 1 ASEL FLIGHT TRAINING 2 test equipment, introduction to NEC, raceways, boxes and
ATF1104 is the second course in the flight sequence pre- fittings, conductors, introduction to blueprints, commer-
scribed in our internal articulation agreement and our cial, industrial and residential wiring.
articulation agreement with Embry Riddle Aeronautical
University. This course covers preliminary flight train- BCA0352 V 2.6 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 3
ing as provided by an FAA certified flight instructor under This course is for Level 2 Electrical apprentices and covers
contract to the program. Experience from the first solo alternating current, motors, grounding, conduit bending,
flight through to the successful completion of the private boxes and fittings, and conductor installations.
pilot checkride is incorporated in the course. Objectives in
this course are contained in the FAA Private Pilot Certifi- BCA0353 V 2.6 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 4
cation course. They meet the requirement of Title 14 CFR,
Part 141. This course is for Level 2 Electrical apprentices and covers
cable tray, terminations and splices, services, breakers and
ATF1120 O 1 ASEL FLIGHT TRAINING 1 fuses, contactors and relays, and lighting.
ATF1120 is the first course in the flight sequence prescribed BCA0354 V 2.6 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 5
in our internal articulation agreement and our articula-
tion agreement with Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. This course is for Level 3 Electrical apprentices and covers
This course covers preliminary flight training as provided load calculations for branch circuits, conductor calcula-
by an FAA Certified Flight Instructor under contract to tions, overcurrent protection, raceway, box and fitting fill,
the program. Experience from the beginning of flight wiring devices, and distribution equipment.
training through the completion of the first solo flight is
BCA0355 V 2.6 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 6
incorporated in the course. Objectives in this course are
contained in the FAA Private Pilot Certification Course. This course is for Level 3 Electrical apprentices and cov-
They meet the requirement of Title 14 CFR, Part 141. ers distribution transformers, lamps and ballasts, motor
calculations, motor maintenance part one, motor controls,
ATF2150 O 1 INSTRUMENT FLIGHT TRAINING and hazardous locations.
This course is the in-flight companion course to ATF2100,
Introduction to Instrument Flight, and is designed to BCA0356 V 2.6 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 7
provide the student with the in-flight instruction required This course is for Level 4 Electrical apprentices and covers
to qualify for an FAA Instrument rating for their private load calculations-feeders and services, lighting applica-
pilot’s certificate. The course includes instruction and tions, emergency systems and fire alarm.
demonstrated proficiency in in-flight instrument pro-
cedures, emergency procedures, and knowledge of FAA BCA0357 V 2.6 ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP 8
regulations. To receive credit for this course the student This course is for Level 4 Electrical apprentices and covers
must pass an in-flight checkride administered by an FAA specialty transformers, advanced motor controls, HVAC
sanctioned evaluator. controls, heat tracing and freeze protection, motor mainte-
nance part two, and high voltage terminations and splices.
ATF2300 O 3 INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUMENTED FLIGHT
This course will prepare the student to operate an aircraft BCA0358 V 22.7 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 1
solely by reference to the flight instruments. This will This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor-
greatly assist the student in qualifying for an instrument dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related 127
www.sfcollege.edu

experiences for Level 1 Electrical apprentices during the classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 4
first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and Electrical apprentices during the summer term in appren-
their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex- ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records objectives for the field experience. The student maintains
and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
job supervisor. praisal each month from the job supervisor.

BCA0359 V 22.3 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 2 BCA0450 V 1.1 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 1
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class This course is for Level 1 Plumbing apprentices and covers
scheduled when students are not taking related evening introduction to plumbing, safety, tools, plumbing math,
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 1 drawings, plastic pipe and fittings.
Electrical apprentices during the summer term in appren-
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the BCA0451 V 2.6 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 2
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains This course is for Level 1 Plumbing apprentices and cov-
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap- ers copper, cast iron and carbon steel pipe and fittings,
praisal each month from the job supervisor. corrugated stainless steel tubing, fixtures and faucets,
introduction to DWV systems and introduction to water
BCA0361 V 22.7 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 3 distribution systems.
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor-
BCA0452 V 2.6 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 3
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
experiences for Level 2 Electrical apprentices during the This course is for Level 2 Plumbing apprentices and cov-
first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and ers plumbing math two, reading commercial drawings,
their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex- hangers, supports, structural supports and fire stopping,
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records installing and testing DWV piping, installing roof, floor
and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the and area drains, and types of valves.
job supervisor.
BCA0453 V 2.6 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 4
BCA0362 V 22.3 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 4 This course is for Level 2 Plumbing apprentices and cov-
ers installing and testing water supply piping, installing
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class fixtures, valves and faucets, introduction to electricity,
scheduled when students are not taking related evening installing water heaters, fuel gas systems, and servicing
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 2 fixtures, valves and faucets.
Electrical apprentices during the summer term in appren-
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the BCA0454 V 2.6 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 5
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains
This course is for Level 3 Plumbing apprentices and covers
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
applied math, codes, and types of venting and indirect and
praisal each month from the job supervisor.
special waste.
BCA0364 V 22.7 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 5 BCA0455 V 2.6 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 6
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor- This course is for Level 3 Plumbing apprentices and covers
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related sewage pumps and sump pumps, sizing water supply pip-
experiences for Level 3 Electrical apprentices during the ing, backflow preventers, water pressure boosters and re-
first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and circulating systems, and servicing piping systems, fixtures
their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex- and appliances.
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records
and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the BCA0456 V 2.6 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 7
job supervisor. This course is for Level 4 Plumbing apprentices and covers
business math for plumbers, sizing DWV and storm sys-
BCA0365 V 22.3 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 6 tems, private water supply systems, private waste disposal
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class systems, and locating buried water and sewer lines.
scheduled when students are not taking related evening
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 3 BCA0457 V 2.6 PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP 8
Electrical apprentices during the summer term in appren- This course is for Level 4 Plumbing apprentices and covers
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the hydronic and solar heating systems, water supply treat-
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains ment, swimming pools and hot tubs, compressed air,
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap- corrosive-resistant waste pipe, plumbing for mobile homes
praisal each month from the job supervisor. and mobile home parks.

BCA0367 V 22.7 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 7 BCA0460 V 22.7 PLUMBING CO-OP 1
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor- This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor-
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
experiences for Level 4 Electrical apprentices during the experiences for Level 1 Plumbing apprentices during the
first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and
their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex- their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex-
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records
and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the
job supervisor. job supervisor.

BCA0368 V 22.3 ELECTRICAL CO-OP 8 BCA0461 V 22.3 PLUMBING CO-OP 2
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class
128 scheduled when students are not taking related evening scheduled when students are not taking related evening
Course Descriptions
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 1 BCA0551 V 2.6 CARPENTRY APPRENTICESHIP 2
Plumbing apprentices during the summer term in appren- This course is for Level 1 Carpentry apprentices and cov-
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the ers floor systems, wall and ceiling framing, roof framing,
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains windows and exterior doors.
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
praisal each month from the job supervisor. BCA0552 V 2.6 CARPENTRY APPRENTICESHIP 3
BCA0462 V 22.7 PLUMBING CO-OP 3 This course is for Level 2 Carpentry apprentices and covers
plans and elevations, site layout, introduction to concrete
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor- and reinforcing materials, foundations and flatwork, con-
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related crete forms, handling and placing concrete and manufac-
experiences for Level 2 Plumbing apprentices during the tured forms.
first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and
their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex-
BCA0553 V 2.6 CARPENTRY APPRENTICESHIP 4
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records
and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the This course is for Level 2 Carpentry apprentices and covers
job supervisor. exterior finishing, roofing applications, thermal and mois-
ture protection, stairs, framing with metal studs, drywall
BCA0463 V 11.7 PLUMBING CO-OP 4 installation, interior doors, windows, floor and ceiling
trim, and introduction to light equipment.
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class
scheduled when students are not taking related evening
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 2 BCA0560 V 22.7 CARPENTRY CO-OP 1
Plumbing apprentices during the summer term in appren- This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor-
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains experiences for Level 1 Carpentry apprentices during the
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap- first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and
praisal each month from the job supervisor. their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex-
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records
BCA0464 V 22.7 PLUMBING CO-OP 5 and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor- job supervisor.
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
experiences for Level 3 Plumbing apprentices during the BCA0561 V 22.3 CARPENTRY CO-OP 2
first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class
their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex- scheduled when students are not taking related evening
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 1
and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the Carpentry apprentices during the summer term in appren-
job supervisor. ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains
BCA0465 V 22.3 PLUMBING CO-OP 6 accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class praisal each month from the job supervisor.
scheduled when students are not taking related evening
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 3 BCA0562 V 22.7 CARPENTRY CO-OP 3
Plumbing apprentices during the summer term in appren- This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor-
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains experiences for Level 2 Carpentry apprentices during the
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap- first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and
praisal each month from the job supervisor. their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex-
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records
BCA0466 V 22.7 PLUMBING CO-OP 7 and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor- job supervisor.
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
experiences for Level 4 Plumbing apprentices during the BCA0563 V 11.7 CARPENTRY CO-OP 4
first and second term in apprenticeship. Students and This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class
their coordinator determine the objectives for the field ex- scheduled when students are not taking related evening
perience. The student maintains accurate hourly records classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 2
and obtains a performance appraisal each month from the Carpentry apprentices during the summer term in appren-
job supervisor. ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains
BCA0467 V 22.3 PLUMBING CO-OP 8 accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class praisal each month from the job supervisor.
scheduled when students are not taking related evening
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level 4 BCA0650 V 1.1 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 1
Plumbing apprentices during the summer term in appren- This course is for Level 1 HVAC apprentices and covers in-
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the troduction to HVAC, trade mathematics, tools of the trade,
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains copper and plastic piping practices, and soldering and
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap- brazing. It qualifies as 33 hours toward the required hours
praisal each month from the job supervisor. per year for apprentices.

BCA0550 V 1.1 CARPENTRY APPRENTICESHIP 1 BCA0651 V 2.6 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 2
This course is for Level 1 Carpentry apprentices and covers This course is for Level 1 HVAC apprentices and covers
orientation to the trade, wood building materials, fasten- ferrous metal piping practices, basic electricity, and intro-
ers and adhesives, hand and power tools. duction to cooling and introduction to heating. It qualifies 129
www.sfcollege.edu

as 78 hours toward the required hours per year for appren- BCA0663 V 22.3 HVAC CO-OP 4
tices. This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class
scheduled when students are not taking related evening
BCA0652 V 2.6 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 3 classes to provide the work-related experience for Level
This course is for Level 2 HVAC apprentices and covers air 2 HVAC apprentices during the summer term in appren-
properties and distribution, chimneys, vents and flues, ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the
introduction to mechanical maintenance, alternating cur- objectives for the field experience. The student maintains
rent, basic electronics, electronic furnaces, HVAC controls accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
and accessories, and optional equipment. It qualifies as 78 praisal each month from the job supervisor.
hours toward the hours required per year for apprentices.
BCA0664 V 22.7 HVAC CO-OP 5
BCA0653 V 2.6 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 4 This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor-
This course is for Level 2 HVAC apprentices and covers dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
metering devices, compressors, heat pumps, leak detec- experience for Level 3 HVAC apprentices during the first
tion, evacuation, recovery and charging, and refrigerant and second term in apprenticeship. Students and their
transition and recovery program. coordinator determine the objectives for the field experi-
ence. The student maintains accurate hourly records and
BCA0654 V 2.6 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 5 obtains a performance appraisal each month from the job
supervisor.
This course is for Level 3 apprentices and covers preven-
tive maintenance, introduction to electrical troubleshoot- BCA0665 V 22.3 HVAC CO-OP 6
ing, troubleshooting electronic controls, troubleshooting
gas heating, troubleshooting electric heating, trouble- This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class
shooting oil heat and troubleshooting cooling. scheduled when students are not taking related evening
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level
3 HVAC apprentices during the summer term in appren-
BCA0655 V 2.6 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 6 ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the
This course is for Level 3 HVAC apprentices and covers objectives for the field experience. The student maintains
troubleshooting heat pumps, troubleshooting accessories, accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
commercial heating and cooling systems, water and air praisal each month from the job supervisor.
balance, steam systems, and customer relations.
BCA0666 V 22.7 HVAC CO-OP 7
BCA0656 V 2.6 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 7 This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor-
This course is for Level 4 HVAC apprentices and covers dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related
advanced blueprint reading, indoor air quality, energy experience for Level 4 HVAC apprentices during the first
conservation equipment, energy management systems and second term in apprenticeship. Students and their
and water treatment. coordinator determine the objectives for the field experi-
ence. The student maintains accurate hourly records and
BCA0657 V 2.6 HVAC APPRENTICESHIP 8 obtains a performance appraisal each month from the job
This course is for Level 4 HVAC apprentices and covers sys- supervisor.
tem start-up and shutdown, heating and cooling systems
design, and commercial and industrial refrigeration. BCA0667 V 22.3 HVAC CO-OP 8
The trainee’s on-the-job training begins with prelimi-
BCA0660 V 22.7 HVAC CO-OP 1 nary type work using tools and equipment and involves
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor- brazing, installing copper and PVC lines, troubleshooting
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related electrical circuits/refrigerant systems/heating equip-
experiences for Level 1 HVAC apprentices during the first ment, installation of ductwork, insulation, air distribution
and second term in apprenticeship. Students and their equipment, air filtration, air quality systems and HVAC
coordinator determine the objectives for the field experi- equipment as well as system accessing, recovery, evacua-
ence. The student maintains accurate hourly records and tion, charging, and leak detection.
obtains a performance appraisal each month from the job
supervisor. BCN1210 P 3 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
Building Construction Materials is a study of materials
BCA0661 V 10 HVAC CO-OP 2 and supplies used in construction. Identification, uses,
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class manufacture and structure of wood, cement, masonry and
metal materials are discussed. The course focuses on the
scheduled when students are not taking related evening
advantages and disadvantages of materials as they relate
classes to provide the work-related experience for Level
to durability, permeability, aesthetic qualities, internal
1 HVAC apprentices during the summer term in appren-
stresses, heat and sound energy transfer, combustibility,
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the
fire ratings, and other physical characteristics.
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap-
BCN1220 O 3 CONSTRUCTION METHODS
praisal each month from the job supervisor.
Construction Methods is an introduction to systems,
methods, equipment, and construction practices avail-
BCA0662 V 22.7 HVAC CO-OP 3
able and commonly used to perform the major elements
This course is a cooperative on-the-job training class coor- of a light construction project. A typical project is fol-
dinated with class/lab courses to provide the work-related lowed from contract to occupancy in classroom discus-
experience during the first and second term in appren- sion and with field trips. Layout on the site, topography
ticeship. Students and their coordinator determine the and site plans are covered on numerous additional field
objectives for the field experience. The student maintains trips to current construction sites. Emphasis is placed on
accurate hourly records and obtains a performance ap- a sequence of activities and scheduling. Prerequisites:
130 praisal each month from the job supervisor. ENC1101, CGS1000, MAC1105.
Course Descriptions
BCN1221C O 5 CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES 1 Prerequisites: PHY2004 and PHY2004L. Prerequisite or
Construction Techniques 1 is a lecture/lab class which corequisite: MAC2311.
offers the student insights into the construction process
and practical experiences in the practices and principles BCN2450 O 3 STRUCTURAL DESIGN
of construction. Lecture portions of this course will in- An introduction to the physical science of applied me-
troduce the student to systems, methods and equipment chanics, with emphasis placed on the sizing of simple
available and commonly used on a light construction proj- members of wood and steel for light construction. Prereq-
ect. A construction project will be followed from site work uisites: BCN1220, CGS1000, ENC1101, MAC1105.
through dry-in during class discussions. Lab sessions,
field trips and/or practical exercises will allow students to BCN2560 O 3 RELATED SPECIALTY TRADES
use carpentry hand and power tools and to practice the Related Specialty Trades is an introduction to the require-
skills often required of the small contractor’s labor force. ments, design and construction of utilities and environ-
Students will perform building layout, wood floor framing, mental control systems which are an integral part of mod-
wall framing, roof framing, subfloor, sheathing, decking ern structures. Emphasis is placed on electrical; heating,
and dry-in activities. Particular emphasis is placed on car- ventilation and air conditioning; and plumbing systems.
pentry and the use of woodworking tools. Prerequisites: Basic theory, efficiency, applications and scheduling of
ENC1101, CGS1000, MAC1105. major subcontracts are included. A simple bar graph and
the critical path method of scheduling are included in this
BCN1251C P 3 LIGHT CONSTRUCTION DRAFTING course. Prerequisites: MAC1105, BCN1220, ENC1101, and
Application of basic drafting principles as they apply to CGS1000.
light construction in architecture.
BCT2705 O 3 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 1
BCN1760 O 3 CONSTRUCTION CODES AND REGULATIONS Construction Management 1 is an introduction to basic
A course of study in requirements by regulatory agencies legal skills and ethical knowledge needed to run a light
pertaining to the construction industry and job site safety. construction office. Emphasis is on the business organiza-
This course includes a complete study of the current edi- tion, Florida construction licensing law, the general and
tion of the Standard Building Code and other regulations special conditions of prime contracts and subcontracts,
applicable to light construction. Students will complete the Florida mechanics lien law, Workers Compensation
a company safety plan during discussions of construc- and Liability Insurance coverage and state and federal
tion safety and OSHA regulations. Prerequisites: ENC1101, tax reporting requirements. Direct and indirect costs of a
CGS1000, MAC1105. small business are identified and explored. Prerequisites:
CGS1000, ENC1101, MAC1105.
BCN2222C O 4 CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES 2
Construction Techniques 2 is a lecture/lab class which BCT2750 O 3 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 2
offers the student insights into the construction process. Construction Management 2 is a continuation of Con-
Students will gain practical experience in principles of struction Management 1. The businessman’s responsibili-
construction while wrapping the envelope of a building ties are introduced and practiced in a term-long project.
in a light construction project. Lecture portions of this Emphasis is placed on control of the contractor’s direct
course will introduce the student to systems, methods and indirect costs and the management of men, materials,
and equipment available and commonly used on a light machines and money. The student will become familiar
construction project. This is a continuation of Construc- with accounting methods used to control costs in the
tion Techniques 1. A construction project will be followed construction organization. The completer will understand
from the dry-in stage through completion during class costs, percentage of completion and accrual methods of
discussions. Lab sessions, field trips and/or practical accounting and will complete entries to the general ledger
exercises will allow students to use hand and power tools and various subsidiary ledgers. Students will prepare
for carpentry and to practice the skills often required of financial reports for the organization and maintain costs
the small contractor’s labor force. Students will perform records on a construction project. Prerequisites: BCT2705,
activities necessary to install wood siding, soffit, fascia, CGS1000, ENC1101, MAC1105.
aluminum windows, pre-hung doors, exterior and interior
trim materials and strip shingles on a wood roof deck. BCT2770 O 3 CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING
Particular emphasis is placed on carpentry and the use of Construction Estimating is a culmination of several
woodworking tools. Prerequisites: BCN1221C, CGS1000, courses taken previously. Students will prepare a com-
ENC1101, MAC1105. plete residential estimate from quantity take off to bid
proposal. They will understand the role of the estimator in
BCN2272 O 3 BLUEPRINT READING the construction organization, competitive bidding in the
Blueprint Reading is a study of the principles involved in marketplace, and subcontractor/vendor competition will
the use and interpretation of drawings and specifications be discussed. Prerequisites: BCN1210, BCN1220, BCN2272,
commonly used in light construction. Plan views, eleva- ENC1101, CGS1000, MAC1105.
tions, sections and schedules are examined in depth. Use
of various lines and symbols are explained. Students will BOT2010L P 1 GENERAL BOTANY LAB
practice visualizing the three-dimensional building from Corequisite: BOT2010.
two-dimensional drawings. Divisions 2-16 of the C.S.I.
standard format for construction specifications are cov- BOT2010 P 3 GENERAL BOTANY
ered. Prerequisites: CGS1000, ENC1101, MAC1105. This course is intended for science majors or pre-profes-
sional students and includes the anatomy, physiology, and
BCN2405 P 5 CONSTRUCTION MECHANICS development of higher plants and their importance. The
A vocabulary and working course to prepare the stu- laboratory is an integral part of the course and consists
dent for making structural decisions in architecture and of selected experiments which correlate with the lecture.
building construction. The student begins to develop a BOT2010 and BOT2011 are independent courses. They
structural sense of importance to structural design by do not represent a sequence. Prerequisites: Successful
use of basic principles of statics and strength of materials. completion of BSC2005/L or equivalent. A basic knowledge 131
www.sfcollege.edu

of atomic structure and bonding is also required. Success- ture, forensics, and the environment. The student is also
ful completion of the first term of the chemistry sequence introduced to bioprocessing and quality management, and
is strongly recommended. Corequisite: BOT2010L. ethical, legal, and social issues relevant to biotechnology.

BOT2011L P 1 GENERAL BOTANY LAB BSC2005L P 1 GENERAL BIOLOGY LAB
Corequisite: BOT2011. Corequisite: BSC2005.

BOT2011 P 3 GENERAL BOTANY: PLANT DIVERSITY BSC2005 P 3 GENERAL BIOLOGY
This course is intended for science or preprofessional This course is intended as a one-semester biology experi-
students and includes a detailed study of the divisions of ence for the student whose career emphasis is not focused
the plant kingdom with emphasis on morphology and tax- on the sciences. It is intended to help the student construct
onomy. Fieldwork will include identification of local flora a framework for the interpretation of interrelationships
and ecological relationships. The laboratory is an integral between all living systems. It includes the cell concept,
part of the course and consists of selected experiments multicellular organization and reproduction; the tax-
that correlate with the lecture. BOT2010 and BOT2011 are onomy, morphology and physiology of important groups
independent courses. They do not represent a sequence. of the animal and plant kingdoms; and the study of the
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BSC2005/L or organism-environmental relationships. The lab experi-
equivalent. Corequisite: BOT2011L. ence is an integral part of the course and will consist of
weekly experiences paralleling the topics covered in the
BSC0070 V 2.5 STRUCTURE & FUNCTION OF THE HUMAN lecture. Corequisite: BSC2005L.
BODY AND MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
This course will provide the student with an introduction BSC2010L P 1 CORE BIOLOGY 1 LAB
to anatomy and basic physiology. This course is designed Corequisite: BSC2010.
to provide the student with basic knowledge of normal hu-
man body structure and function. The student will learn BSC2010 P 3 CORE BIOLOGY 1
major systems, organs and terminology necessary for un-
derstanding the concepts of disease processes, providing a This course is part of a two-semester general biology
basis for beginning understanding of the nursing process course intended for students majoring in one of the life sci-
and to provide safe and effective patient care. To be taken ences or preprofessional majors. Topics include the origins
concurrently with PRN0001C. of life, cell chemistry, structure and functions, energy and
metabolism, genetics, and taxonomy. In addition to biol-
ogy, a background in chemistry is strongly recommended.
BSC1001 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY
Corequisite: BSC2010L.
This course is a one-semester introduction to the biologi-
cal sciences for the non-science major. It is intended to BSC2011L P 1 GENERAL CORE BIOLOGY 2 LAB
help the student construct a framework for the interpreta-
tion of interrelationships between all living systems and Prerequisite: BSC2010/L. Corequisite: BSC2011.
place events in biology in context with other developments
in mathematics, chemistry, and cultural history. Success- BSC2011 P 3 GENERAL CORE BIOLOGY 2
ful completion of the course will fulfill part of the Natural This course is part of a two-semester general biology
Sciences portion of the general education requirement for course intended for students majoring in one of the life
the Associate of Arts degree. There is no laboratory associ- sciences or pre-professional majors. Topics include plant
ated with this course. anatomy and physiology, embryology, evolutionary theory,
ecology, ethnology, and human evolution. Prerequi-
BSC1030 P 3 BIOLOGY AND HUMAN VALUES site: BSC2010 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite:
This course introduces some of the basic concepts of BSC2011L.
biology to the student and illustrates how these concepts
apply to various aspects of contemporary life in global, BSC2050 P 3 ENERGY AND ECOLOGY
national, and regionally diverse societies. The concepts A basic ecology course emphasizing energy systems of
covered are discussed in terms of the interrelatedness of interest to humanity and nature. Simulations with micro-
diverse cultures and include methods of science, technolo- computers are included.
gy, genetics, evolution, reproduction, development, health,
diseases and ecology as they relate to the global impacts BSC2084L P 1 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY LAB
of humans on the world as well as the unifying effects of A laboratory experience demonstrating human and mi-
biology on all humans. These topics address the outcome croscopic anatomy and physiological processes. Includes
of global problem solving as it relates to societies’ world exposure to human cadaver and fetal pig dissection. Safety
views, values, social institutions, economics and politics. equipment is required. Corequisite: BSC2084.
The importance of diversity in cultural belief systems as
they relate to the application of science and technology to BSC2084 P 3 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
current global issues is discussed. Intended for allied health students requiring a one-semes-
ter anatomy and physiology course. This course presents
BSC1404C P 3 INTRODUCTION TO an in-depth review of the body organization and structure.
BIOTECHNOLOGY METHODS It also introduces the student to basic physiologic concepts
Basic concepts and techniques necessary to work effec- as they relate to normal body function and maintenance
tively in a biotechnology laboratory setting, including of health. It is required for students in Dental Hygiene,
hazards and safety procedures, biotechnology laboratory Radiography, Cardiopulmonary Technology, Nuclear Med-
skills and instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHM1030/L or icine, Respiratory Care, and EMS programs. Prerequisite:
CHM1025/L or CHM2045/L with minimum grades of C. HSC2531 recommended. Corequisite: BSC2084L.

BSC1421 P 1 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY BSC2085L P 1 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1 LAB
An introduction to the biotechnology industry, with Laboratory topics include fetal pig dissection, human
132 emphasis on current applications in medicine, agricul- anatomy with cadaver, microscopic anatomy, measuring
Course Descriptions
physiological parameters, and various computer soft- ing nucleic acids. Prerequisite: BSC2426C with a minimum
ware programs. Safety equipment is required. Prerequi- grade of C.
site: HSC2531 or BSC2005L recommended. Corequisite:
BSC2085. BSC2943 P 6 BIOTECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP
A cooperative education work experience in a public or
BSC2085 P 3 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY 1 private laboratory with application of the principles and
Intended for nursing and allied health students requiring methods of biotechnology. Prerequisite: BSC2427C with
a two-semester anatomy and physiology sequence. This minimum grade of C.
integrated course presents cell morphology and func-
tion, biochemistry, histology of tissues and embryology. BUL2137 P 3 EMPLOYMENT LAW FOR BUSINESS
The organ systems covered are integumentary, skeletal, An introduction to legal issues related to human resource
muscular, and nervous systems. This sequence meets the management. The course will highlight federal legislation
needs of numerous students including all pre-nursing and case law related to a wide range of employment top-
students (bridge/generic ASN and BSN majors) and stu- ics. Current and developing trends in anti-discrimination
dents who intend to articulate to an upper division health law will be emphasized. Related topics include hiring and
science program such as Health and Human Performance firing, evaluation, family leave, and other forms of govern-
and Pharmacy majors. Prerequisite: HSC2531 or BSC2005. mental regulation of the employment environment.
Corequisite: BSC2085L.
BUL2241 P 3 BUSINESS LAW I
BSC2086L P 1 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 2 LAB Fundamental law relating to business transactions, con-
Laboratory experiences include: blood and cardiovascu- tracts, and negotiable instruments.
lar testing, spirometry, urinalysis, human anatomy with
cadaver and fetal pig dissection and various computer CCJ1020 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
software programs. Safety equipment is required. Prereq- Introduction to the historical and philosophical back-
uisite: BSC2085/L. Corequisite: BSC2086. ground of the agencies of the criminal justice system.
An examination of the relationships between the police,
BSC2086 P 3 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY 2 courts, and correctional institutions will be presented.
This is the second course in a two-semester sequence
intended for nursing and allied health students. It uses an CEP2450C O 6 CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY 1
integrated approach to discuss topics of the main organ This course combines both online classroom and on-
systems of the human body. These include: the endocrine, site laboratory training in the fundamentals of electro-
reproductive, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary and physiology. The course topics include an introduction to
digestive systems along with the topics of metabolism, electrophysiology, cardiac anatomy and physiology and
energy use and fluid and electrolyte balance. This se- an in-depth analysis of normal and abnormal cardiac
quence meets the needs of numerous students including rhythms. Protocols for pre-procedural, intra-procedural
all prenursing students (bridge/generic ASN and BSN ma- and post-procedural activities are explored and the associ-
jors) and students who intend to articulate to an upper di- ated technical skills are practiced during the scheduled
vision health science program such as Health and Human lab experiences.
Performance and Pharmacy majors. Prerequisite: BSC2085
with minimum grade of C. Corequisite: BSC2086L. CEP2451C O 6 CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY 2
This course combines both online classroom and onsite
BSC2250 P 3 FLORIDA FLORA AND FAUNA laboratory training in advanced concepts of electro-
This course will enable the student to recognize common physiology. Electrophysiological diagnostic studies such
species of local plants and animals in the field. The stu- as stimulation protocols, mapping systems, EGMS, and
dent will also acquire an understanding of basic morpho- ablations as well as therapeutic procedures including
logical characteristics of the organisms studied and will pacemaker and ICD implantation, and ablation therapy
be able to use keys and guides in the identification of local will be discussed. Preparation for the national registry
herbaceous and woody plants, birds, mammals, reptiles, examination is also included in this course. Prerequisite:
amphibians and insects. A general knowledge of biology is CEP2450C.
recommended.
CEP2845 O 6 CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY
BSC2423C P 3 PROTEIN BIOTECHNOLOGY PRACTICUM 1
AND CELL CULTURE Clinical instruction is provided in an electrophysiology
Introduction to protein biotechnology and methods of lab at the program’s clinical affiliate sites. The student will
protein purification and analyses. Includes instruction in experience fundamental hands-on training in pre-proce-
basic techniques of plant and animal cell culture. Prereq- dural, intra-procedural and post-procedural activities and
uisite: MCB2000/L or MCB2010/L and BSC1404C, with a rhythm analysis.
minimum grade of C.
CEP2846 O 6 EP PRACTICUM 2
BSC2426C P 3 INTRODUCTION TO The EP student continues clinical rotations in an advanced
BIOTECHNOLOGY METHODS 1 electrophysiology lab receiving hands-on experience in EP
Modern concepts of molecular biology, with a labora- diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The last two weeks
tory focus on basic methods for preparing and analyzing of this course will be utilized for practical check-offs and
nucleic acids. Program application must be completed examinations.
prior to registration. See admission requirements at www.
sfcollege.edu. Prerequisites: BSC1404C and MCB2010/L. CET1114C O 4 DIGITAL CIRCUITS
This course involves the study and application of digital
BSC2427C P 3 BIOTECHNOLOGY METHODS 2 logic circuits. Topics include binary, octal- and hexa-
Continued study of molecular biology, with a laboratory decimal number systems, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh
focus on advanced methods for manipulating and analyz- mapping, logic gates, flip-flops, counters, registers, and 133
www.sfcollege.edu

applications in both combinational and sequential logic CET2880 O 3 DATA FORENSICS 1
systems. Extensive laboratory practices are included. Pre- This course provides information on identifying inappro-
requisite: EET1141C. priate uses of corporate IT, gathering electronic evidence
of wrongdoing, securing corporate systems from further
CET1600 O 3 CISCO NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS misuse, and protecting electronic evidence from inten-
This is the first of a four part series in preparation for the tional or accidental modification. Hands-on exercises are
CISCO Certified Network Associate exam. Topics covered an integral part of the course.
in this class include computer fundamentals, OSI model
and industry standards, networking topologies, IP and CET2881 O 3 DATA FORENSICS 2
MAC addressing, including subnetting, and basic network This course provides information on advanced computer
design. Prerequisites: CGS1000 and CEN2503 with mini- forensics and how to prepare for and conduct a computer
mum grade of C. investigation. Use of computer forensics software includ-
ing Accessdata Forensic Toolkit (FTK) and Guidance Soft-
CET1610 O 3 CISCO ROUTER THEORY ware Encase will be covered. Use of computer forensics ac-
AND ROUTER TECHNOLOGIES quisition hardware including Forensic Recovery Evidence
This is the second of a four part series in preparation for Device (FRED), Ultimate Tool Kit Write Blocker suite,
the CISCO Certified Networking Associate exam. Topics Voom Hardcopy II, and advanced techniques in Windows
covered in this class include beginning router configura- Registry analysis utilizing the FTK Registry Analyzer will
be covered. Recovery of forensic data from handheld de-
tion, router and routing protocols, and introduction to
vices such as PDAs, pagers, and cell phones using Paraben
LAN switching. Prerequisite: CET1600 with minimum
Cell and PDA Seizure, password recovery tools, includ-
grade of C.
ing Access data PRTK, analysis of Windows XP operating
system, and forensic analysis of Vista, Microsoft’s newest
CET2123C O 4 MICROPROCESSORS 1 operating system, will be looked at. Hands-on exercises
The principles of microprocessors are developed in a com- are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: CET2880.
bination of lecture presentations and laboratory exercises.
The organization of a typical microprocessor is explored CGS1000 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE COMPUTING
and the way its internal resources may be organized with This course is for students to gain the computer skills
other ICs to perform tasks is examined. The control of needed to succeed in their academic careers and in today’s
these resources through machine and assembly language workplace. Major topics include Web CT, word process-
programming is a principal feature of the course. The em- ing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, the World Wide
phasis is on the use of the microprocessor as a controller. Web, electronic mail, file management, and computer
Prerequisite: CET1114C. hardware. Prerequisite: a passing score on the Computer
Placement Exam.
CET2127C O 4 MICROPROCESSORS 2
This course is a continuation of the material in CET2123C. CGS1030 P 1 PC BASICS
Internal processor operations are revisited. Software top- This is a word processing skills review course that of-
ics include advanced manipulation of interrupts and other fers an introduction to the fundamentals of computer
I/O operations. Hardware decoding and memory block use. Through lectures and hands-on lab experience, the
enabling, bus contention, RAM and ROM implementa- student will gain skills in word processing, graphics use,
file management, and Internet searching. This one-credit
tion, interrupt handling, and special I/O, such as A/D and
course is specifically for that student who did not obtain a
D/A conversion, are covered. These processes are further 70 percent score on the computer placement exam (CPE)
stressed in the laboratory component of the course where and must have remediation, but it may also prove useful
working microcomputers are constructed to explore both to students who feel the need for additional education in
the hardware and software. Prerequisite: CET2123C. computer use prior to taking the CPE. It is assumed that
the student has some familiarity with the computer key-
CET2172C O 3 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER board. There are no prerequisites for this course.
DIAGNOSTIC & REPAIR
This course is designed to provide the student with the CGS1101 P 3 MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS
necessary skills to troubleshoot microcomputers and per- A course designed to use components of the Microsoft Of-
form basic repairs. fice suite in common business applications. Students will
gain experience in using Word to create and edit docu-
CET2615 O 3 CISCO ADVANCED ROUTING AND SWITCHING ments; Excel to create, modify and chart spreadsheet data;
This is the third of a four part series in preparation for the Access to create, edit and manipulate data in databases;
CISCO Certified Network Associate exam. Topics covered and PowerPoint to create a professional slideshow pre-
sentation. Students will complete integration exercises.
in this class include LAN switching, advanced router con-
Windows functions such as file management, e-mail, and
figuration network management, and advanced network
Internet Explorer will be addressed briefly. Keyboarding
design and documentation. Advanced network design,
experience is strongly recommended. Students must know
management, and documentation are introduced by a
basic computer terminology and have experience using
case study. Prerequisites: CET1600 and CET1610 with a the microcomputer before taking this course.
minimum grade of C.
CGS1522 O 3 BUSINESS APPLICATIONS OF
CET2620 O 3 PROJECT BASED LEARNING COMPUTER GRAPHICS
This is the fourth of a four part series in preparation for the A hands-on approach to the creation and use of business
CISCO Certified Network Associate exam. Topics covered graphics using a popular software package. Topics include
in this class include WAN switching and routing, advanced layout for interactive design, importation and exportation
network management, and advanced network design of motion graphics for use in business presentations, and
and documentation. The case study begun in CEN2615 creation of graphics for business applications. Prereq-
is completed in this class. Prerequisite: CET2615 with a uisites: GRA2140C, GRA2141C, GRA2162C, GRA2583,
134 minimum grade of C. GRA2710C, and GRA2834. Corequisite: CGS2525.
Course Descriptions
CGS1563 O 3 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC CGS2821 O 3 WEB AUTHORING 2
DESIGN/MACINTOSH PLATFORM This course focuses on more advanced techniques of Web
Entry level commercial art and graphic design principles. page creation and Web site design. Students are expected
This course is an introduction to the Macintosh com- to be proficient in XHTML and have solid background
puter platform and layout software applications. Through knowledge of CSS. The course builds on the introduction
lectures and hands-on lab experience, the student will be- to tables covered in CGS2820. Students learn to create and
come acquainted with basic computer hardware, software, use forms using XHTML elements and CSS. Incorporating
file management and issues related to desktop publishing. multimedia and interactivity into Web pages through the
The student will also learn about copyright laws and in-
use of various techniques such as Java applets, DHTML,
dustry practices. Additional areas of study include presen-
Flash, and more is covered. The business aspect of Web
tation and beginning design projects.
site development and design is emphasized by covering
CGS2525 O 3 PRESENTATION TECHNOLOGY the following topics: Web site development, Web hosting,
e-Commerce, and Web promotion. There is also a brief
The use of technology for enhancement of presentations.
introduction to JavaScript. Prerequisite: CGS2820.
Includes selection and skills for using appropriate tech-
nology effectively in digital video, motion graphics, audio
editing and content development. Audio, video and other CGS2822C O 3 HTML AND CSS FOR DESIGNERS
current cutting-edge technologies will be explored. Course This course helps students to establish a solid background
topics will be: targeting your presentation; creating the of World Wide Web (Web) and Web page creation and
visual aid; tips for using audio and video equipment; and Web site basic components. A basic understanding of Web
desktop presentation software/hardware. Prerequisites: languages such as HTML, XML, XHML, CSS, Dynamic
GRA2140C, GRA2141C, GRA2162C, GRA2583, GRA2710C, HTML, and Javascript will be emphasized. This course will
and GRA2834. Corequisite: CGS1522. complement the Web authoring via Web design applica-
tion courses. Prerequisite: GRA2144C.
CGS2527 O 3 GRAPHICS APPLICATIONS
This course focuses on designing computer graphics for CGS2871 O 3 MULTIMEDIA CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS
both print and screen media. Students will be introduced This course introduces students to the history of multime-
to basic design concepts including symbolism, visual per-
dia, the major concepts of multimedia, and provides them
ception, conceptualization, design principles, and color
with hands-on experience in the use of multimedia appli-
theory. This course will cover all aspects of Fireworks and
have a brief introduction to Photoshop. Prerequisite: A cations. The curriculum includes an overview of current
passing grade on the Computer Placement Exam. technology, implementations of multimedia, and current
industry tools. Students will gain hands-on experience
CGS2540 O 3 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS through activities using graphics, animation, sound, and
Introduction to Database Management is an introductory video. Industry standard software such as Adobe Pre-
level, project-oriented database course. The emphasis miere, Macromedia Director, and Macromedia Flash will
will be on application development. Topics covered will be introduced. Prerequisite: CGS2523.
include: database theory of structure and data modeling;
creating and understanding Access objects; managing CGS2872 O 3 MULTIMEDIA AUTHORING
and manipulating data; relating tables; reporting; creating This course introduces students to the history of multime-
queries using the QBE; and producing a small, individual dia, the major concepts of multimedia, and provides them
working application. The most current version of Access with hands-on experience in the use of multimedia appli-
for MS Office will be used as our software. Prerequisites: cations. The curriculum includes an overview of current
CGS1000 and COP1000 with a minimum grade of C. technology, implementations of multimedia, and current
industry tools. Multimedia design concepts will be applied
CGS2542 O 3 PROGRAMMING FOR DATABASE to projects as students gain extensive hands-on experi-
Using a team approach to application development, the ence. Industry standard software such as Macromedia
student will participate in the organization, construc- Flash and Macromedia Director will be used to produce
tion, and demonstration of larger database applications. professional projects, incorporating graphics, animation,
Using popular, commercially available database software, sound, and video. Prerequisite: CGS1000 with grade of C or
programming constructs will be studied and applied to
better.
the application development. Database structure will
be emphasized through data modeling. The class will be
taught using lectures and demonstrations. Team projects CHD1120 P 3 CARING FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS
will offer extensive hands-on experience during computer The purpose of this course is to provide students an op-
lab time. Prerequisites: CGS2540 and COP2702, with mini- portunity to observe infant/toddler growth and devel-
mum grade of C. opment and to foster infant/toddler, emotional, social,
physical, cognitive, and language development through
CGS2820 O 3 WEB AUTHORING 1 curriculum development. The importance of positive
This course focuses on learning the basics of Web page adult-child relationships in the nurturing process will be
creation with XHTML and CSS. Students learn to hand- emphasized.
code Web pages with CSS for presentation and page layout
and learn to create lists and links, for example, internal, CHD1200 P 3 CHILD DEVELOPMENT: INFANTS & TODDLERS
external, links to images, and more with XHTML. Creat-
In this course, students will study prenatal development,
ing tables is introduced. Web site design is discussed with
an emphasis on recommended practices, ethical consid- the birth process, infancy and toddlerhood with a focus
erations, and accessibility. Students use the ITE server on both the typical and atypical aspects of development.
to post their pages live. Other topics include using the This course will include the study of the physical, emo-
technologies and resources of the Internet and a brief his- tional, intellectual, and social development of the infant
tory of the Internet and the World Wide Web. Prerequisite: and toddler and the role of the family and the caregiving
A passing grade on the Computer Placement Exam. environment. 135
www.sfcollege.edu

CHD1220 P 3 CHILD DEVELOPMENT FOR properties, using gas laws, determining molarity, and acid-
TEACHERS OF YOUNG CHILDREN base titration. Safety equipment is required. Corequisite:
In this course, students will study prenatal development, CHM1030.
the birth process, infancy through age six, with a focus on
both the typical and atypical aspects of development. This CHM1030 P 3 ELEMENTS OF CHEMISTRY 1
course will include the study of the physical, emotional, Elementary principles of modern chemistry, including
intellectual, language, cognitive and social development concepts of atomic and molecular structure, chemical
of the child and the role of the family and the caregiving bonding, and properties of solutions. Study of bonding for-
environment. mulas and balancing equations. Application principles of
pH, electrolytes, and buffers are investigated. Designed for
CHD2381 P 3 EDUCATING THE YOUNG THINKER Health Related students. Prerequisite: MAC1105, MAT1033,
This course will assist the student in developing an MTB1371 or higher level math with a C or better. Corequi-
understanding of the young child as a thinker and prob- site: CHM1030L.
lem solver. The student will learn how to foster cognitive
development and the importance of math, science and art CHM1031L P 1 PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY LAB
activities through hands-on experiences with children Laboratory topics include developing isotonic and buffer
either at Santa Fe College Little School, children at work, solutions; amino acid chromatography; salivary amylase;
ones you babysit for, younger siblings or cousins who live lipid and antigen/antibody testing. Safety equipment is
with or near you, neighbor’s children, etc. required. Corequisite: CHM1037.

CHI1120 P 4 CHINESE 1 CHM1031 P 3 PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY
CHI1120 introduces students to Mandarin Chinese lan- This course provides a study of the dynamics of body flu-
guage and culture. The course is designed for students ids including blood, urine, and cerebral spinal fluid. Topics
who have no knowledge or limited knowledge of the Chi- include electrolytes and acid/base balance, excitable
nese language. Instruction will be based on a communica- membranes, energy metabolism and organic compounds.
tive approach, with activities designed to develop speak- Physiological aspects of carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic
ing, listening, reading and writing skills. The purpose of acids, and lipids are examined. Required for biotechnology
the course is to teach students the fundamental skills of technician students. Prerequisites: CHM1025 or CHM1030
Chinese language within the context of contemporary with grade of C or better. Corequisite: CHM1031L.
Chinese culture.
CHM1083 P 3 CONSUMER CHEMISTRY
CHI1121 P 4 CHINESE 2 A course that serves as a qualitative introduction to chem-
CHI1121 continues the introduction of elementary Man- istry with an emphasis on consumer and environmental
darin Chinese begun in CHI1120. Chinese 2 is designed for topics intended for non-science majors required to have at
students who have had an introduction to Mandarin Chi- least one semester of a physical science.
nese, but have not completed their language requirement
or who want to increase their Chinese proficiency. The CHM2045L P 1 COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 1 LAB
content of this course is designed to complete the struc- Corequisite: CHM2045.
tural aspect of the language started in CHI1120, learn how
to write Chinese characters, and strengthen the student’s CHM2045 P 3 COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 1
ability to communicate in the language. Cultural readings,
class discussions, videos, Internet work, and a variety of This is the first course of a two-term survey of chemistry
pedagogical and cultural activities will be used to enable intended for science, engineering and pre-professional
the student to improve speaking, listening, reading, and majors. It includes the study of atomic structure, bonding,
writing skills. The Mandarin Chinese language will be molecular geometry, stoichiometry, nomenclature, states
presented within the context of contemporary Chinese of matter, thermodynamics, periodic trends in physical
culture. Prerequisite: CHI1120 or its equivalent. and chemical transformations, solution chemistry, and
chemical kinetics. The successful student will have prior
chemistry experience from high school or college. Prereq-
CHM1025L P 1 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
uisite: Placement Exam score or CHM1025/L with mini-
Corequisite: CHM1025. mum grade of C. Corequisite: CHM2045L.
CHM1025 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY CHM2046L P 1 COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 2 LAB
This course is intended to introduce students to the study Corequisite: CHM2046.
of chemistry by building concepts and skills related to
investigating the structure and nature of matter, and its
CHM2046 P 3 COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 2
potential for principles of chemical nomenclature and
stoichiometry, and begin to build a 3-dimensional visual- This is the second course of a two-semester survey of
ization of the molecular world. The laboratory experience chemistry intended for science, engineering and pre-pro-
is an integral part of the course and will provide students fessional majors. It includes the study of kinetics, chemi-
with the opportunity to develop their skills in making ob- cal equilibrium, acid/base chemistry, electrochemistry,
servations, taking measurements, designing experiments, properties of selected elements and their compounds,
and communicating their data, results and conclusions coordination compounds, qualitative analysis, nuclear
in oral, written and graphical form. The math reasoning chemistry, and introductions to organic chemistry and
skills and spatial visualization required in this course pre- spectroscopy.
sume prior experience with algebra and geometry.
CHM2210L P 1 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 LAB
CHM1030L P 1 ELEMENTS OF CHEMISTRY 1 LAB Corequisite: CHM2210.
Laboratory course to demonstrate the principles of
elementary chemistry. Experiences include: basic mea- CHM2210 P 3 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1
136 surement techniques, investigating physical and chemical This course is intended for science and pre-professional
Course Descriptions
majors. It is the first part of a two-term organic chemistry CJC1000 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS
sequence, CHM2210 and CHM2211, and provides an intro- This course deals with the societal reaction to crime and
duction to the structure, properties, reactions, synthesis, the correctional process. It is a survey course sampling
and occurrence of organic molecules with emphasis on this growing field of inquiry and expertise.
modern synthetic and spectrophotometric methods. The
laboratory is an integral part of the course and consists of CJD0741 V 0.9 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
selected experiments that correlate with the lecture top-
ics. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the general Skills needed for riot and disturbance control and fire-
chemistry sequence (CHM2045/L, CHM2046/L) or the fighting are studied and practiced. Lectures include meth-
ods of riot prevention, handling of unusual occurrences,
consent of the instructor. Corequisite: CHM2210L.
what to do if taken hostage, and emergency procedures.
Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal
CHM2211L P 1 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2 LAB
Justice Standards and Training Commission.
Corequisite: CHM2211.
CJD0750 V 1.7 INTERPERSONAL 2
CHM2211 P 3 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2
This is the second part of a two-term organic chemistry se- CJD0752 V 2.2 CORRECTIONAL OPERATIONS
quence, CHM2210 and CHM2211. This course is a continu-
ation of the study of the structure, properties, reactions, CJD0770 V 2.3 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT
synthesis and occurrence of organic compounds. The TRAINING 2008-LEGAL
laboratory experience is an integral part of the course and This course is the legal section of the Florida Department
consists of selected experiments to correlate with lecture of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Standards and
topics. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of CHM2210 Training Commission new basic law enforcement recruit
and CHM2210L. Corequisite: CHM2211L. training program. CMS BRT program, version 2008. This is
course two.
CIS1948 O 3 ITE INTERNSHIP
This course provides the student with real experience in CJD0771 V 0.7 LEGAL 2
the field of Information Technology. Students are required Legal 2: Corrections Basic Academy Program.
to secure their own placements. This includes preparing
a resume and interviewing for a position. Students then CJD0772 V 2.6 COMMUNICATIONS
work approximately 5-10 hours per week for their intern- This course is available only to students accepted into
ship employers. Experiences are varied but often include the Basic Law Enforcement Certificate program. Course
Web design, entry level programming, database work, includes criminal street gangs, responding to the elderly,
PC repair, network cabling, network monitoring, server note taking, report writing, interviewing, taking state-
installation, user support and much more. Prerequisites: ments, use of telecommunications, officer safety and
It is recommended that this course be completed during survival skills, and crisis intervention.
the final semester of the student’s A.S. Technology pro-
gram. Networking students are required to have com- CJE1000 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT
pleted CEN2503 and at least one of the following: CEN2514,
CEN1301, CET2620. Internet Services Technology students CJE1300 O 3 THE PATROL FUNCTION
are required to have completed COP2806, COP2702, and Principles of organization as applied to the operation of
CIS2254. patrol services.

CIS1949 O 3 I-NET INTERNSHIP CJE1301 O 3 POLICE ADMINISTRATION
This course provides the student with real experience in AND ORGANIZATION
the field of Information Technology and Internet Services Organization and administration of police services in light
Technologies. Students are required to secure their own of police and public relationships.
placements. This includes preparing a resume and inter-
viewing for a position. An internship requires 75 hours CJE1331 P 3 POLICE ETHICS AND ACCOUNTABILITY
of work at the placement site throughout the semester, This course will explore the administrative issues, prac-
to be completed in a manner acceptable to the student, tices, history, and policies in applied ethics and account-
the employer, and the CIS1949 instructor. This normally ability in a police agency.
translates to working approximately 6-10 hours per week.
Experiences are varied but often include: Web site design CJE1400 O 3 COMMUNITY POLICING
and Internet programming, programming in a language This course provides an examination of the growth
such as C++, and database work. Prerequisite: CIS2254 of community policing by reviewing and researching
with a grade of C or better. Permission of the ITE academic traditional police-community relations and commu-
advisor is also required. nity policing. Includes an overview of social, behavioral
and operational issues that are fundamental to effective
CIS2254 O 3 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR IT police-community relations.
This course is designed for IT majors and prepares stu-
dents for transition into employment by providing practi- CJE2304 O 3 SUPERVISION OF CRIMINAL
cal applications in today’s business environment. Through JUSTICE PERSONNEL
lectures, group collaboration, case studies, service An introductory course in supervision techniques includ-
projects and presentations, the student is equipped to ef- ing both practical and psychological theories of supervi-
fectively manage projects while exposed to best practices sion specifically related to law enforcement.
used in the industry. Included in the course will be resume
writing for the Internet, work ethics, team building, busi- CJE2600 P 3 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
ness communications, time management, and develop- Theory of investigation, specific techniques for selected
ing skills in training non-technical people. Prerequisites: offenses, interrogation, case preparation, and related
CGS1000 and CGS2820. problems in criminal investigation. 137
www.sfcollege.edu

CJE2640 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINALISTICS forcement recruit training program. CMS BRT program,
Introduction to basic scientific techniques of collection, version 2008. This is course 14.
identification, preservation, and transportation of physical
evidence; study-in-depth of techniques of examination of CJK0051 V 2.7 DEFENSIVE TACTICS
physical evidence within the resources of the investiga- This course is available only to students who are accepted
tor or crime scene technician; demonstration and work into the Basic Law Enforcement Certificate Program.
experiences of laboratory criminalistics will be conducted Course includes Module 5 of CJST Curriculum. High li-
to familiarize the student with laboratory capabilities and ability course involving defensive tactics with both lecture
limitations. and applied learning.

CJE2790 O 3 CJST CMS LE BRIDGE CJK0061 V 2 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT
This bridge course is designed to add independent study, TRAINING 2008-PATROL I
critical thinking, reflection, and analysis of course mate- This course is the Patrol I section of the Florida Depart-
rial presented in the CJST, CMS, LE Basic program and ment of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Standards and
such additional work as required by the faculty member to Training Commission new basic law enforcement recruit
add college level study of this criminal justice curriculum. training program. CMS BRT program, version 2008. This is
course five.
CJJ2001 O 3 INTRODUCTION TO JUVENILE PROCEDURE
Introduction to police juvenile work and specific laws and CJK0062 V 1.4 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT
court procedures related to the handling of juveniles and TRAINING 2008-PATROL 2
delinquency preventions. This course is the Patrol II section of the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Standards and
CJK0007 V 0.4 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT Training Commission new basic law enforcement recruit
TRAINING 2008-INTRODUCTION
training program. CMS BRT program, version 2008. This is
This course is the introduction to the Florida Depart- course six.
ment of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission new basic law enforcement recruit CJK0071 V 1.9 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT TRAINING
training program. CMS BRT program, version 2008. This is 2008-CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS
course one.
This course is the Criminal Investigations section of the
CJK0008 V 2.3 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice
TRAINING 2008-LEGAL Standards and Training Commission new basic law en-
This course is the legal section of the Florida Department forcement recruit training program. CMS BRT program,
of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Standards and version 2008. This is course eight.
Training Commission new basic law enforcement recruit
training program. CMS BRT program, version 2008. This is CJK0076 V 0.8 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT TRAINING
course two. 2008-CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATIONS
This course is the Crime Scene Investigations section of
CJK0011 V 1.4 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Criminal
TRAINING 2008-HUMAN ISSUES Justice Standards and Training Commission new basic law
This course is the Human Issues section of the Florida De- enforcement recruit training program. CMS BRT program,
partment of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Standards version 2008. This is course seven.
and Training Commission new basic law enforcement
recruit training program. CMS BRT program, version 2008. CJK0082 V 0.8 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT
This is course four. TRAINING 2008-TRAFFIC STOPS
This course is the Traffic Stops section of the Florida De-
CJK0017 V 2.6 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT partment of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Standards
TRAINING 2008-COMMUNICATIONS and Training Commission new basic law enforcement
This course is the Communications section of the Florida recruit training program. CMS BRT program, version 2008.
Department of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice Stan- This is course nine.
dards and Training Commission new basic law enforce-
ment recruit training program. CMS BRT program, version CJK0083 V 0.8 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT TRAINING
2008. This is course three. 2008-DUI TRAFFIC STOPS
This course is available only to students who are accepted
CJK0031 V 1.3 FIRST AID FOR CJ OFFICER into the Basic Law Enforcement Certificate program.
This course identifies the role of a law enforcement officer
in recognizing and responding appropriately to emer- CJK0086 V 1.1 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT TRAINING
gency situations. 2008-TRAFFIC CRASH INVESTIGATIONS
This course is the Traffic Crash Investigations section of
CJK0040C V 2.7 FIREARMS the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Criminal
This course is available only to students who are accepted Justice Standards and Training Commission new basic law
into the Basic Law Enforcement Certificate program. Mod- enforcement recruit training program. CMS BRT program,
ule 4 of CJST curriculum. High liability course involving version 2008. This is course 10.
firearms training with both lecture and applied learning.
CJK0090 V 1.8 TACTICAL APPLICATIONS
CJK0051C V 2.7 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT TRAINING This course is available only to students who are accepted
2008-CMS CJ DEFENSIVE TACTICS into the Basic Law Enforcement certificate program.
This course is the CJ Defensive Tactics section of the Course includes: Module 11 through 14 of CJST curricu-
Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice lum. Course on court process, rescue, bombs and WMD,
138 Standards and Training Commission new basic law en- and crowd control.
Course Descriptions
CJK0095 V 0.7 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SPECIAL TOPICS CJK0422 V 0.3 DART FIRING STUN GUN
Criminal Justice Special Topics is a course designed to This course is the Florida Department of Law Enforce-
introduce the student to physical conditioning, aerobic ca- ment, Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commis-
pacity, and wellness conditioning and training. It will help sion Dart Firing Stun Gun course.
the student to better understand the need for a police of-
ficer to maintain physical conditioning and how an officer CJL2062 P 3 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
needs to possess those basic skills to perform the physical A study of the history of the United States Supreme Court
tasks required of criminal justice officers. and its philosophy; a review of the appellate courts of the
United States and Florida; the history, scope, purpose, and
CJK0096 V 2 FL CMS BASIC LE RECRUIT TRAINING application of the Constitutions of the United States and
2008-CJ OFFICER PHYSICAL FITNESS Florida, as related primarily to the law enforcement officer.
This course is the Officer Physical Fitness section of the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice CJL2100 P 3 CRIMINAL LAW
Standards and Training Commission new basic law en- Study of the scope, purpose, definition, and classification
forcement recruit training program. CMS BRT program, of crimes. Consideration of criminal intent, acts of omis-
version 2008. This is course 16. sion and commission, and offenses against persons and
property. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law, CJL2062.
CJK0125C V 13.6 CORRECTIONS TO CMS LAW ENFORCEMENT
This course is a part of the Correctional to CMS Law En- CJL2130 P 3 CRIMINAL EVIDENCE AND PROCEDURES
forcement Crossover program and is established for the Criminal procedure particularly applied to search and
purpose of providing supplemental training for persons seizure and evaluation of evidence.
previously or currently employed in the occupation of cor-
rectional officer. The course provides job-related training CLP2001 P 3 PERSONAL GROWTH
for corrections officers who desire to become full-time
Personal Growth explores concepts and techniques in psy-
or part-time law enforcement officers and who require
chology that apply to personal growth and development.
entry level certification in accordance with Chapter 11B-3
Students develop skills and personal understandings
5, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) and Chapter 943,
through active learning and application of psychologi-
Florida Statues (F.S.)
cal principles to life. Emphasis is on the development of
self-awareness, critical thinking, and interpersonal skills
CJK0211 V 3.1 CROSS-OVER CORRECTIONS TO
through application of psychological knowledge in areas
LAW ENFORCEMENT INTRODUCTION such as motivation, social psychology, behavioral manage-
These courses include the basic knowledge and skills for ment, interpersonal communication, child development,
certified corrections officers to cross over to become law personality, human potential, cognitive development and
enforcement officers in: law, interpersonal communica- emotion, stress and health psychology.
tions, radio communications, note taking, report writing,
interviewing, ethics, professionalism, court structure, CLP2140 P 3 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
working with communities, diverse and special popula- The examination of the major types of psychological
tions, and information about the criminal justice system disturbances, terminology in use today, the diagnostic
in Florida and the Criminal Justice Standards and Train- categories and criteria, as well as a general introduction to
ing Commission. treatment methods. Prerequisite: PSY2012 with minimum
grade of C.
CJK0212 V 0.3 CROSS-OVER CORRECTIONS TO
LAW ENFORCEMENT-HIGH LIABILITY CNT2401 O 3 NETWORK SECURITY
This course is designed for the certified corrections officer This course will provide a fundamental understanding
to cross over to law enforcement. This course focuses on of network security principles and implementation. The
high liability areas contained in the following Law En- student will learn the technologies used and principles
forcement course material: CJK0031 prepares prospective involved in creating a secure computer networking envi-
officers to apply basic first aid knowledge and techniques ronment. The student will learn about the authentication,
to emergencies. CJK0040 includes firearms safety proce- the types of attacks and malicious code that may be used
dures; use of deadly force; and basic handling procedures against networks, the threats and countermeasure for
for the handgun (revolver and semiautomatic pistol), shot- e-mail, Web applications, remote access and file and print
gun, and semiautomatic rifle/carbine, including compo- services. A variety of security topologies are discussed
nent parts and their function. It also covers the common as well as technologies and concepts used for providing
types of ammunition used in law enforcement; ammuni- secure communications channels, secure internetworking
tion components; and the use of various types of ammu- devices, and network medium. Prerequisite: CEN2503 or
nition for handguns, shotguns, or rifles. The recruit will CET1600.
attain proficiency in marksmanship and in safely using,
handling, and maintaining certain designated firearms. COP1000 P 3 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING
This course is an introduction to software design using
CJK0213 V 1.3 CROSS-OVER CORRECTIONS TO LAW structured programming concepts. It includes techniques
ENFORCEMENT-TACTICAL APPLICATIONS for algorithm development, coding and testing using ac-
This course includes the basic knowledge and skills for tual programming language in a microcomputer environ-
certified corrections officers to cross over to become law ment, program constructs (sequence, selection, iteration),
enforcement officers in tactical applications. and variable types. Problem solving and debugging skills
and documentation will be emphasized. At least one
CJK0283 V 2 INTERPERSONAL 1 project will incorporate a team project, requiring interac-
Interpersonal Skills 1: Corrections Basic Academic Pro- tion skills. Prerequisite: A passing grade on the Computer
gram. Placement Exam.
139
www.sfcollege.edu

COP1002C P 3 IT LOGIC developing world by analyzing the historical, cultural,
This course is intended to introduce students to the con- economic and political institutional structures that char-
cepts of computer logic and programming. Problem solv- acterize Africa, Asia and Latin America. Students will be
ing skills using logical thinking are emphasized. Topics asked to understand and question different definitions of
include but are not limited to a brief history of computers development, as well as consider how multiple theoretical
and programming languages; data representation such as approaches try to account for this process. The course also
binary/decimal/hexadecimal conversions, integer, float- will analyze how different factors such as religion, ethnic
ing point, and character representation; how to develop conflict, and the legacy of colonialism have affected politi-
a program, including modeling, flowcharts, pseudocode, cal development in less developed countries. The course
and documentation; the three basic programming control will explore the challenges and complexities associated
structures i.e., sequence, selection, and repetition; arrays, with development by comparing and contrasting the
data files, program modules and submodules, functions, political evolution of countries that are considered to be
and procedural vs. object-oriented programming languag- both economic and political success stories to those that
es. Students use a free software program in the hands-on have either failed or had a more difficult time achieving
component to create working programs, including some political stability and economic growth. This comparative
elementary games. The student is expected to use some exploration will enable students to develop a better under-
math skills. Prerequisite: A passing grade on the Computer standing and appreciation of the developing world as well
Placement Exam. as the challenges associated with development. This is an
introductory course to comparative politics. No prerequi-
COP2340 O 3 OPERATING SYSTEMS sites are required to enroll in it.
This course is a survey course introducing students to
operating systems concepts and techniques. Content CRW2100 P 3 FICTION WRITING
focuses on command line interface using DOS and Linux. A study of the art and practice of writing fiction, this
The course compares and contrasts operating systems course is designed for students who want to learn more
functionality and emphasizes particular advantages and about fiction writing, its craft, and its skills. Students will
limitations specific to each operating system. Prerequisite: read, present, and discuss short stories in a small group
CGS1000 with minimum grade of C. environment. The course emphasizes creativity and
craftsmanship. This course may be repeated for a total of
COP2551 O 3 OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING 1 six credit hours. Prerequisite: ENC1101, with minimum
This course covers the fundamentals of data structures us- grade of C.
ing the Microsoft Visual Studio.NET platform. The student
is introduced to object-oriented programming using en- CRW2300 P 3 POETRY WRITING
capsulation, inheritance and polymorphism. Fundamental An investigation into the art and practice of writing po-
Windows GUI programming will be introduced using an etry, this course is designed for students who want to learn
application-driven approach. Students will learn concepts more about the craft of poetry, master its skills, learn to
such as visual programming, GUI components, multime- develop their own creativity, discover their own unique
dia, file processing, database processing, and exception voices, and learn how to market their poems for publica-
handling. Prerequisite: COP1000 with a grade of C or better. tion. In a small workshop format, students will, among
other requirements, draft and revise poems, present and
COP2552 O 3 OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING 2 discuss some of their own poems, complete exercises
This is a project-based course that teaches advanced which tap into creative techniques, and explore modern
object-oriented programming concepts using the C# pro- trends and views about poetry. The course emphasizes
gramming language. Projects include, but are not limited free form as well as craftsmanship of various traditional
to developing and deploying database-driven Windows techniques, individual creativity and discipline, and the
applications using Visual Studio.NET and developing Web importance of audience. Prerequisite: ENC1101, with
Applications using ASP.NET. Prerequisite: COP2551. minimum grade of C.

COP2806 O 3 INTERNET PROGRAMMING 1 CTS1131 O 3 MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 1
This course will provide training in introductory to This course is designed for the applications user or
intermediate client-side scripting using JavaScript, and a software specialist who has no previous experience or
brief introduction to server-side scripting using PHP. The knowledge of hardware architecture. The objectives of
emphasis of this course will be on syntax and debugging, this course are to provide students with knowledge and
webform processing and data validation, using common skills to learn the basics of how microcomputer hardware
programming structures, dynamic content using Java- works; how hardware interacts with software to perform
Script and DHTML, and working with objects and cook- instructions; how to describe, in basic terms, most modern
ies. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of PC equipment, and basic troubleshooting and computer
XHTML, CSS, and introductory programming concepts maintenance via hands-on lab work and simulations
(variables, operators, decision structures, repetition struc- enabling students to perform simple repairs and upgrades;
tures, and methods). The course will consist of a mixture basic knowledge and skills to prepare student for the A+
of lectures and hands-on assignments. Prerequisites: Certification. Prerequisite: CGS1000 with minimum grade
COP1000 and CGS2820. of C.

CPO2001 P 3 COMPARATIVE POLITICS CTS1132 O 3 MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 2
A comparative study of the world’s political systems and This course is designed for the applications user or soft-
institutions, the role of ideologies, and problems of mod- ware specialist with little previous knowledge or experi-
ernization in transitional societies. Emphasis is on the ence with software architecture. The broad objective of
major governments of the world, authoritarian systems, this course is for students to become proficient at manag-
and developing countries. ing PC software, with special emphasis on the Windows
operating system but including an introduction to the
CPO2030 P 3 POLITICS OF THE DEVELOPING WORLD Linux operating system. Topics include functions of the
140 This course will introduce students to the politics of the operating system; installing, configuring and optimizing
Course Descriptions
software; advanced file and disk management; system CTS2322 O 3 LINUX INTERNET SERVICES
utilities, system security, evaluating system performance, Students learn to utilize many of Linux’s Internet services.
and troubleshooting tools. This course is aligned with Topics include installing, troubleshooting, and maintain-
CompTIA’s A+ Essentials and ITTechnician exams. Prereq- ing DNS, DHCP, FTP, HTTP, POP3, S MTP, MySQL, and
uisite: CGS1000 with minimum grade of C. PHP server software. Prerequisite: CTS2321.
CTS1327 O 3 MICROSOFT WINDOWS PROFESSIONAL CTS2355 O 3 NETWORK ADMINISTRATION
This course will cover the Microsoft Windows XP Profes- This course introduces the student to the basics of Linux
sional desktop operating system. It is designed to prepare server administration. Hands-on labs will guide students
students to manage Microsoft Windows XP Professional in the management of users, file systems, software, system
on a network environment. Students will learn to install, administration, and processes. Students will view the con-
configure, customize, optimize, and troubleshoot Micro- figuration and maintenance of various network services
soft Windows XP Professional. This course is intended for used on local and remote networks. SUSE Linux Enterprise
those who support or administer Microsoft Windows XP server and VMWare for hands-on exercises will be used.
Professional or who are in the Microsoft Certified Profes- Warning: Do not take CTS1327 and CTS2355 in the same
sional (MCP) program. Do not take CTS1327 and CTS2355 term.
in the same semester. Prerequisite: CTS2134.
CTS2356 O 3 ADVANCED NETWORK ADMINISTRATION
CTS1328 O 3 MICROSOFT WINDOWS SERVER Students will learn how to perform advanced adminis-
This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary tration tasks on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server including:
to install, configure, customize and troubleshoot Micro- installation and manual configuration, performance
soft Windows Server in an enterprise-wide Microsoft- tuning, backup and recovery services, health checks and
based network. This course is intended for those who sup- performance tuning, shell scripts, hardware and compo-
port or administer Microsoft Windows Server or who are nent changes, and much more. This course will prepare
on the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) program. the students for the Novell CLP Practicum.
Prerequisite: CTS1327 with minimum grade of C.
CTS2445 O 3 SQL PROGRAMMING
CTS2134 O 3 INTRODUCTION TO NETWORKING SQL Programming is a basic introduction to the structures
The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to of Structured Query Language as used in professional
networking technologies. Students will also be introduced database creation and management. The emphasis will
to the objectives of both CompTIA’s Network+ and CIW’s be on learning the basic structures including all forms of
Foundations exams. This course covers a wide range of the Select Clause, creating tables, manipulating table data
material about networking, from careers in networking to through SQL queries, managing data in tables, querying
local area networks, wide area networks, protocols, topolo- joined tables, and subqueries. The student will also be in-
gies, transmission media, and security. It not only intro- troduced to programming with Transact SQL and creating
duces a variety of concepts, but also discusses in depth the batches and stored procedures. Prerequisites: CGS1000,
most significant aspects of networking such as the TCP/ COP1000, CGS2540 with minimum grade of C and the CPE.
IP Protocol Suite. In addition to explaining concepts, the
course uses a multitude of real world examples of net- CVT1120 O 1 CARDIOPULMONARY PATIENT CARE
working issues from a professional’s standpoint, making Concerned with an orientation to the Cardiovascular
it a practical preparation for the real world. Prerequisite: Technology Program; HIV and hepatitis information and
CGS1000 with minimum grade of C. basic patient care skills including communication tech-
niques, vital sign assessment, infection control; ethical
CTS2155 O 3 PC SHOP and legal considerations, body mechanics, patient trans-
This course is a cooperative program. The students will portation and medical terminology.
participate in both the technical support and management
of running a personal computer repair center. Students CVT1200 O 3 PHARMACOLOGY
will be involved in all aspects of the center from perform- Concerned with the concepts and principles of pharma-
ing computer repairs to training, developing information cokinetics and drug administration. Cardiovascular and
technology solutions for customers, managing customer pulmonary pharmacological agents are emphasized.
requests, and customer billing. Prerequisites: CGS1000 Prerequisites: BSC2084, BSC2084L, MTB1371.
and CTS1131.
CVT1261 O 4 CARDIOVASCULAR ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
CTS2311 O 3 LINUX SYSTEM SECURITY This course is divided into four units: normal cardiovas-
This course builds on CTS2322. Students will learn about cular anatomy and physiology, embryology, congenital
Web site and Web server vulnerabilities through access heart disease, and acquired cardiac and vascular diseases.
controls, system configuration, firewalls, VPNs, and en- The essentials of diagnosis and treatment are incorporat-
cryption. Students learn to keep up with the latest security ed in these units. Prerequisite: BSC2084, BSC2084L.
information. Topics include security through audits and
monitoring. Prerequisite: CTS2321. CVT1430 O 2 PULMONARY FUNCTIONS TESTING
This course provides an anatomical and physiological
CTS2321 O 3 LINUX ADMINISTRATION understanding of the human lungs in health and disease.
This course introduces students to the Linux operating Prerequisites: BSC2084, BSC2084L.
system. Topics covered include installation of several
distributions, the installation and configuration of ap- CVT1500 O 1 CARDIOPULMONARY
plications, how hardware is managed, command line use, ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY
process management, shell scripting, networking, how the Concerned with the performance and interpretation of
X Window system works, installing software via packages the 12 lead ECG. The cardiac cycle, electrical conduction,
or source code, and compiling, packaging, and installing a normal rhythms, common dysrhythmias, exercise elec-
custom kernel. Prerequisite: CEN2503. trocardiography and ambulatory electrocardiography are 141
www.sfcollege.edu

introduced. Prerequisites: BSC2084, BSC2084L. Corequi- rhythmias and infarction/ischemia is also included in this
site: CVT1261. course. Prerequisites: CVT2420, CVT2420L. Corequisite:
CVT2421L.
CVT1610 O 1 ULTRASOUND PHYSICS
AND INSTRUMENTATION CVT2431L O 1 PULMONARY FUNCTIONS TESTING 2 LAB
This course defines the principles of ultrasound physics This course provides laboratory instruction and prac-
and relates them to their practical use in diagnostic ultra- tice in performing pulmonary function testing includ-
sound. Additionally, hemodynamic concerns of blood flow ing spirometry, lung volumes, diffusion studies, exercise
will be considered. Prerequisites: BSC2084, BSC2084L, metabolic studies and polysomnography. Corequisite:
MTB1371. CVT2431.

CVT2320L O 1 VASCULAR ULTRASOUND 1 LAB CVT2431 O 3 PULMONARY FUNCTIONS TESTING 2
During this laboratory training, the student gains skills This course provides the student with the theoretical and
in the use of fundamental ultrasonic equipment designed clinical skills necessary to operate pulmonary function
to detect blood flow in the carotid artery. Corequisite: testing, exercise metabolic and polysomnography equip-
CVT2320. ment as well as preparing the student for the national
board exam in this area. Prerequisite: CVT1430. Corequi-
CVT2320 O 2 VASCULAR ULTRASOUND 1 site: CVT2431L.
Introduction to the assessment of the flow to the periph-
eral vascular system, neck and head. The student develops CVT2510L O 1 BLOOD GAS ANALYSIS LAB
the skills necessary to perform diagnostic ultrasound Laboratory experience in performing the collection and
studies for presentation to the physician. The student analysis of blood gas samples. Corequisite: CVT2510.
reviews the physics and instrumentation of Doppler
ultrasound; learns normal hemodynamics and hemo- CVT2510 O 2 BLOOD GAS ANALYSIS
dynamics present in disease states; and learns protocols This course prepares the student for the collection and
and diagnostic criteria related to cerebrovascular testing. analysis of arterial blood samples as utilized in the car-
Prerequisites: CVT1261, CVT1500 and CVT1610. Corequi- diopulmonary field. Content includes arterial puncture
site: CVT2320L. and sample collection, gas laws, blood gas physiology,
interpretation of analysis results and quality control mea-
CVT2321L O 1 VASCULAR ULTRASOUND 2 LAB sures. Prerequisites: CHM1030, CHM1030L. Corequisite:
Provides a laboratory environment for the student to work CVT2510L.
with vascular ultrasound equipment in order to develop
the skills necessary to perform vascular ultrasound stud- CVT2620L O 1 CARDIAC ULTRASOUND 1 LAB
ies. Corequisite: CVT2321. This laboratory course introduces the student to non-in-
vasive cardiology by hands-on experience with modalities
CVT2321 O 3 VASCULAR ULTRASOUND 2 discussed in CVT2620. Corequisite: CVT2620.
This course introduces the characteristics of abnormalities
in blood flow. Disease states, etiologies and treatments are CVT2620 O 3 CARDIAC ULTRASOUND 1
explored. Testing modalities used to diagnose vascular dis- This first course in non-invasive cardiology highlights the
eases in the extremities and abdomen are presented. Pre- theory, rationale, application, performance and interpre-
requisites: CVT2320, CVT2320L. Corequisite: CVT2321L. tation of the following modalities: auscultation, normal
and abnormal heart sounds, exercise treadmill testing,
CVT2420L O 1 INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY 1 LAB two-dimensional echocardiography, M-mode, colorflow
This lab course provides an introduction to the cardiac imaging and spectral doppler. Prerequisites: CVT1261,
catheterization laboratory with an emphasis on basic cath CVT1500 and CVT 1610. Corequisite: CVT2620L.
lab protocols, theory and application of angiographic pro-
cedures, and sterile technique. Corequisite: CVT2420. CVT2621L O 1 CARDIAC ULTRASOUND 2 LAB
This laboratory course allows the student to apply the
C