REPORT

Advocacy Training Workshop on WHO FCTC Article

Lucknow, India

| 7 September 2013

For more information, please contact: Rahul Kumar Dwivedi Coordinator Advocacy Training Workshop on WHO FCTC Article 5.3
c/o Vote For Health campaign, Citizen News Service – CNS C-2211, C-block crossing, Indira Nagar, Lucknow-226016. India Email: rahul@citizen-news.org | Phone: +91-983-999-0966

REPORT: Advocacy Training Workshop on WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Lucknow, India | 7 September 2013

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Index
* Introduction……………………………………………………………………………. 4 * Session summaries…………………………………………………………………. 5
Introduction to Corporate Accountability International……………... 5 Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT)….. 6 WHO FCTC Article 5.3…………………………………………………………………….6 Indian Tobacco Control Legal Framework………………………………………8 Best Practices in implementing WHO FCTC Article 5.3………………….9 In India………………………………………………………………………………….9 In Philippines………………………………………………………………………..13 Way forward…………………………………………………………………………………….15

* Annexures:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Resources…………………………………………………………………………………….16 Agenda…………………………………………………………………………………………17 Faculty…………………………………………………………………………………………19 Participants’ list………………………………………………………………………….20 News/ media clippings/ coverage around this workshop.........22 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)……………………………………….30

“A landmark achievement of the third Conference of Parties to the WHO FCTC in Durban, South Africa, in November 2008, was the unanimous adoption of specific guidelines to safeguard public health policies against tobacco industry interference. The FCTC, in Article 5.3 obligates ratifying countries to "act to protect [public health] policies from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry in accordance with national law" ”
-

Kathy Mulvey,

formerly with Corporate Accountability International in a commentary published in “Tobacco Control” in 2010 (http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/19/2/95.extract)

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Introduction
A day-long Advocacy Training Workshop on WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) Article 5.3 was organized in Balrampur Hospital auditorium, Lucknow, India, on Saturday, 7th September 2013 by Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT), UP State and Lucknow District units of National Tobacco Control Programme of India, Vote For Health campaign (formerly Indian Society Against Smoking – ISAS), Citizen News Service – CNS, Health Justice Philippines, Asha Parivar and National Alliance of People’s Movements (NAPM). Several civil society and government representatives involved with implementing the domestic tobacco control law participated (participants’ list is attached as one of the annexures). This workshop was organized without any external financial support although some support was provided by Tobacco Control Cells of Lucknow District and UP State (such as venue, lunch, audio-visual equipment, etc). A memorandum of understanding (MoU) between Tobacco Control Cell and Vote For Health campaign was signed earlier in August 2013 (MoU is attached as one of the annexures).

This training culminated with a list of action points, one of which was to create a committee charged with passing and implementing a UP state policy in line with WHO FCTC Article 5.3.
Key resource faculty for this training workshop on WHO FCTC Article 5.3 included several NATT leaders such as: John Stewart, Director, Challenge Big Tobacco, Corporate Accountability International; Cloe Franko from Corporate Accountability International; Irene Patricia Nidea Reyes, Managing Director of Health Justice Philippines; Dr UN Rai, District Tobacco Control Cell; Satish Tripathi, UP State Tobacco Control Cell; Prof Surya Kant Tripathi, National Vice President of Indian Chest Society and Tobacco Cessation Clinic head at KGMU; Dr Madhu Pathak, Director, Samadhan; Manu Shresth Mishra, UP High Court Lawyer; WHO Director-General’s Awardee Prof Rama Kant, CNS Executive Director Shobha Shukla, Bobby Ramakant and Rahul Dwivedi from Vote For Health campaign and CNS among others. All participants were awarded certificates of participation by the organizers. Registration for this training workshop was complimentary. The training workshop was conducted in English and Hindi (with simultaneous translations). Rahul Dwivedi played a key role in organizing this workshop.

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Session summaries
Introduction to Corporate Accountability International
Source: www.stopcorporateabuse.org

“Born out of an audacious idea that
halting the deadly marketing practices of the world’s largest food corporation, Nestlé, could save the lives of millions of newborns, we (Corporate Accountability International) were then – and are still – at the forefront of the movement to challenge corporate abuse. For 35 years, we have been waging and winning bold campaigns that safeguard public health, human rights, and the environment from corporate abuse.

Corporate Accountability International is:
 

 

Powered by tens of thousands of members, volunteers, activists and allied organizations invested in a vision for a better world Highly regarded as a force for change among national decision makers and global governing bodies such as the United Nations An expert resource for media A recognized leader in the corporate accountability movement

PHOTO CAPTION: Cloe Franko, Senior

International Organizer, Challenge Big Tobacco campaign, Corporate Accountability International

"Corporations may have enormous political and economic clout and fleets of high-paid lobbyists at their disposal, but they're up against a much more powerful force: the people."
Kelle Louaillier, Executive Director

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Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT)
Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT) is a global grassroots network of more than 100 consumer, human rights, environmental, faith-based and corporate accountability NGOs in 50 countries. Corporate Accountability International was the founding member of NATT, which continues to work to ensure implementation of the Global Tobacco Treaty around the world.

WHO FCTC Article 5.3
Guiding principle of the WHO FCTC Article 5.3 is that there is a fundamental and irreconcilable conflict between the tobacco industry’s interests and public health policy. Other principles of WHO FCTC Article 5.3 advocate that Governments should be transparent, tobacco industry should be transparent and tobacco industry should not be given preferential treatment. These guidelines apply to all government officials, “employees of any national, state, provincial, municipal, local or other public or semi/quasi-public institution.”

RECOMMENDATIONS
 Raise awareness  Limit interactions and ensure transparency  Reject partnerships  Protect against conflicts of interest  Transparency of information  De-normalize corporate social responsibility schemes  Don’t give the industry preferential treatment  Treat state-owned tobacco corporations like any others

“Tobacco industry,” according to the FCTC means tobacco manufacturers, wholesale distributors and importers of tobacco products. Article 5.3 also covers other entities working to further the interests of tobacco industry such as public relations firms, lobbying firms, law firms, trade associations, front groups, free market think-tanks, the US Chamber of Commerce, tobacco-friendly spokespeople and politicians, academics paid by the tobacco industry, among others.

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WHO FCTC Article 5.3 recommendations
Raise Awareness: Organising workshops with different ministries of trade, finance, agriculture, among others on WHO FCTC Article 5.3 will enable environment for better enforcement of Article 5.3. Institutionalising these trainings in different ministries and governance mechanisms will further ensure sustainability. Limit interactions and ensure PHOTO CAPTION: Irene Patricia Reyes, NATT leader and transparency: governments should Managing Director, Health Justice, Philippines try to limit interactions with tobacco industry and whenever an interaction is necessary it should be very well documented, recorded and proceedings made public. There should be no photograph clicked of tobacco industry with government because then the industry can create a perception of partnering with the government. Reject Partnerships: All agreements with the industry and front groups should be regulatory agreements and should be legally binding. This can be enshrined in a code of conduct for employees and agencies with penalties for violations. Other forms of partnerships in the guise of 'corporate social responsibility' (CSR) offered by tobacco industry should be rejected. Tobacco industry should not be allowed to market its CSR activities. Protect Against Conflicts of Interest: all direct or indirect association of government employees with tobacco industry should be made public, such as their or their family members' shares or investments or current or past employment in tobacco industry or its allies. Similarly no tobacco industry representative should be allowed on any government body or delegation such as those going for WHO FCTC negotiations. Transparency: Governments must make it necessary for the tobacco industry to share all current and anticipated marketing expenditures, lobbying expenses, and levy deterrent penalties on tobacco industry for providing false information like statistics on illicit trade. Don’t give the industry preferential treatment: Governments should not give the industry any tax breaks, tax incentives, tariff reductions, subsidies to promote tobacco farming, or protections in trade agreements. Governments should not invest in the tobacco industry and State-owned tobacco corporations should be treated like others.

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Indian tobacco control legal framework
India became a Party to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control on February 5, 2004. Before signing and ratifying FCTC, India had formed its domestic tobacco control law on 31 May 2003 which was broadly in line with major FCTC provisions, though it lacks a strong corporate accountability provision such as FCTC Article 5.3. Since India has ratified FCTC so it is obligated to enforce Article 5.3 too. This domestic tobacco control law is formally called "The Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products (Prohibition of Advertisement and Regulation of Trade and Commerce, Production, Supply and Distribution) Act, 2003" (COTPA). Smoke Free Places: In India, ban on smoking in public places came into effect on 2nd October 2008 PHOTO CAPTION: Manu Shresth Mishra, Senior Advocate, UP High onwards. Definition of Court and Legal Advisor to Vote For Health campaign public places includes public transport, public offices, private offices and workplaces, among others. Tobacco Advertising, Promotion and Sponsorship: Tobacco advertising is prohibited in media, except point-of-sale at tobacco retail outlets for which there are clearly laid down specific norms to regulate size, content, warning display, etc. Tobacco Packaging and Labelling: Pictorial health warning labels are pictorial and text, covering 40 per cent of the front panel of the package of all forms of tobacco, and must be rotated every 12 months. There is ban on the use of misleading descriptors (including, among others, “light,” “ultra-light” and “low-tar”) and associated graphics or product design features. Other laws: Apart from COTPA and WHO FCTC Article 5.3 there are a number of other domestic laws that are purported to support tobacco control as well. These include: Right To Information (RTI) Act, 2005; laws banning child labour; Right To Education (RTE) Act, Motor Vehicle Act, among others.

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Best Practices in Implementing Article 5.3
INDIA
There are a growing number of examples of tobacco industry interference in health policy in India. Even government of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare had said to Central Information Commission in November 2008, in reply to why it is not enforcing tobacco control laws effectively, that tobacco industry's pressure is not allowing it to effectively enforce this public health law. Recently a news item published in August 2013 cited Supreme Court to have told the government that it is "conniving" with tobacco industry.

KARNATAKA HIGH COURT DIRECTED GOVERNMENT NOT TO PARTNER WITH TOBACCO INDUSTRY:
In 2010, Dr Upendra Bhojani of Institute of Public Health (IPH), Bangalore, succeeded in exposing how government's tobacco board was engaged with a tobacco PHOTO CAPTION: Satish Kumar Tripathi, State industry event. He went to Karnataka Consultant to National Tobacco Control State High Court that directed the Programme Tobacco Board to withdraw sponsorship to the Global Tobacco Networking Forum 2010 which was slated to be held in Bangalore from October 2 to 8, 2010. According to a news item published in The Hindu, "a Division Bench comprising Justice DV Shylendra Kumar and Justice HS Kempanna passed the order on a public interest litigation (PIL) petition by the Institute of Public Health, challenging the action of the Tobacco Board in sponsoring a tobacco event. The Bangalore-based IPH had dragged the Tobacco Board to court stating that it violated World Health Organisation (WHO) norms. The NGO said that the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control was adopted on May 21, 2003 and it came into force on February 27, 2005. It said India ratified the treaty in February 2004 and as per the guidelines it was not supposed to support or sponsor any tobacco-related event. Moreover, government participation violates Article 5.3 of the WHO framework convention on tobacco control." It said the board's sponsorship of the meet violated Section 5 of Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products (Prohibition of Advertisement and Regulation of Trade and Commerce, Production, Supply and Distribution) Act, 2003.

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On its part, the board said it had spent Rs. 3,26,620 to meet the expenditure on transport for the delegates to visit the tobacco-growing areas and auction platforms in Karnataka. The Bench, in its order, asked the board to take back the amount it had spent on the event. The logo of the government had to be removed from this industry event, and no government representative was permitted to attend this meet.

PHOTO CAPTION: Dr UN Rai, Lucknow Nodal Officer of National

Tobacco Control Programme and Chief Medical Superintendent, Balrampur Hospital, Lucknow

UNDP’s RESPONSE AGAINST AWARD TO ITC:
When the Rio+20 United Nations Summit was taking place, ITC Limited (an Indian corporation, whose primary business is selling cigarettes - a highly addictive and deadly product) was presented the 2012 World Business and Development Award for its “transformational rural initiatives in social and farm forestry programmes in India” (in possibly an independent event held in Rio). Led by NATT leaders including those in India, a complaint was duly submitted to UNDP along with other key officials. Excerpts from the letter written to UNDP:

“...What shocks us more is that this award is co-instituted by an agency whose lifesaving mission is dedicated to human development, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). We would like to draw your attention to the fact that though ITC Limited claims to be a diversified conglomerate, it is the largest producer of cigarettes and the largest buyer, processor and exporter of leaf tobacco in India. The company is not only a big player in tobacco and cigarette business in India, but sells tobacco to nearly 50 countries across the world. Here, we would like to mention that this has been a longstanding strategy of the industry to distract attention from the deadly effects of its business. For example, Altria bought Kraft in the early 2000’s, for which they received widespread criticism and eventually sold it out (Source: http://www.stopcorporateabuse.org/sites/default/files/Kraft_boycott_impact_analys is.pdf ).
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As you are well aware, the tobacco epidemic is the largest preventable cause of death on the planet, killing nearly six million people every year. Approximately one person dies every six seconds due to tobacco-related diseases, and this accounts for one in 10 adult deaths. Up to half of current tobacco users will eventually die of a tobacco-related disease. Moreover tobacco is a common risk factor for major non-communicable diseases such as heart diseases, stroke, cancers, diabetes, and respiratory illnesses, among others, that constitute up to two-thirds of deaths worldwide. The tobacco industry, as a strategy, continues to inject large philanthropic contributions into social programmes worldwide, including social forestry, to create a positive public image and to distract attention from its core business in

PHOTO CAPTION: Cloe Franko, NATT leader and Senior

International Organizer, Challenge Big Tobacco campaign, Corporate Accountability International

tobacco.

According to a WHO report (Tobacco industry and corporate responsibility... an inherent contradiction, online at: http://www.who.int/tobacco/communications/CSR_report.pdf ), “The business community, consumer groups and the general public should join policymakers and the public health community in being more vigilant and critical about tobacco companies’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities, because, despite the industry’s claims, there is little evidence of any fundamental change in their objectives or their practices.” Besides having a negative impact on health, cigarette industry is a big cause of deforestation and contributes to underdevelopment. It is ironic that a company whose subsidiary or associated tobacco company contributes significantly to deforestation and underdevelopment is being awarded for forestry and development. If at all ITC is serious about 'rural transformation and welfare of tribals and poor farmers' it should stop manufacturing and selling tobacco products that are a common risk factor for major killer non-communicable diseases, the impact of which is far more worse on poor people.

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UN agencies such as UNDP have made commendable contributions to a range of development issues around the world. ITC Limited is using an ageold tobacco industry tactic to clean up its image – associating itself with a UN agency whose mission is dedicated to development – even while its primary business is selling a product that kills. UNDP must come out clearly on this PHOTO CAPTION: (left to right) Dr Surya Kant, Vice President of fundamental conflict of Indian Chest Society & Head of Tobacco Cessation Clinic KGMU; Dr interest between its UN Rai, Nodal Officer of Lucknow Tobacco Control Cell; Dr TP Singh, association with an Director, Balrampur Hospital; a nurse staff; Dr Madhu Pathak, Chief award that goes to a Clinical Psychologist (former) at TCC KGMU, family court judge and company whose main Director, Samadhan business is tobacco, and its commitment to sustainable development. UNDP should not associate itself with companies whose subsidiaries directly or indirectly brew problems it is responding to around the world. UNDP is a member of the UN Interagency Task Force on Tobacco Control whose latest focus is the implementation of the WHO FCTC that requires prohibition of all tobacco promotion. WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) under its guidelines on Article 5.3 recommends that parties to the FCTC ‘Denormalize and, to the extent possible, regulate activities described as “socially responsible” by the tobacco industry, including but not limited to activities described as “corporate social responsibility”. We would also like to register that in the absence of clear guidelines to protect association and interaction of all UN agencies with corporations that create and exacerbate health and development problems UN responds to, such conflicting situations are bound to happen. We strongly urge the UN Secretary General’s office to convene a group to draft guidelines for all UN agencies to protect their policies and programmes from interference of corporations that pose conflicts of interest, such as those responsible for tobacco deaths, limiting access to water, or food insecurity among others.
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We appeal to your high office to withdraw UNDP’s association with such an award as mentioned above or retract the award given to a company that also has tobacco as one of its business activities; and frame guidelines to protect all UN agencies from corporate interference (like Article 5.3 of WHO FCTC)…

Excerpts of UNDP's head Helen Clark's response to NATT:

“UNDP was shocked to learn that a company given an award through the WBDA
derives a substantial proportion of its profits from tobacco. UNDP does not wish ever to be associated with awards which are presented to such companies... ...this has clearly been a serious oversight in the award process. UNDP will not participate in these awards in future unless companies like this are excluded. ...UNDP is now reviewing its own guidelines to ensure that incident like this does not recur... We will also work closely with other partners within the UN system to strengthen due diligence processes and capacities.

PHILIPPINES
In 2010, a joint venture between Philip Morris Philippines and Fortune Tobacco Corporation was announced. Formally called “Philip Morris Fortune Tobacco Corporation (PMFTC)”, it controls 90% of the market share. According to K Alechnowicz and S Chapman: “Philippines has long suffered a reputation for endemic political corruption. Evidence spanning 30 years (1962–1992) reveals that foreign tobacco companies sought to work within this operating environment.” Interference in all branches of the government was reported. Some outcomes of this interference of tobacco industry included blocking of tobacco control laws. In relation to judiciary, these industry entities resorted to systematic appointing of retainer of retired judges to handle their cases and filing lawsuits against tobacco control measures. Creation of the 5.3 Committee: A 5.3 committee was established in 2009 under the leadership of Civil Service Commission Commissioner May Fernandez-Mendoza and Department of Health Undersecretary Alex Padilla. This PHOTO CAPTION: Irene Patricia committee disseminated WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Guidelines to Reyes, NATT leader & head of Department Secretaries in the government apart from Health Justice, Philippines preparing frequently asked questions (FAQs), briefing papers, warning letters and draft policies. The Committee also organized meetings to address reported interference at the local level. For example,
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it organized meeting with League of Cities to improve City Mayors’ awa reness of WHO FCTC Article 5.3.

There were major outcomes from different government entities in Philippines in response to work done on enforcing WHO FCTC Article 5.3. Land Transportation and Franchising Regulatory Board announced that they will have no partnership with the tobacco industry; Commission on Higher Education announced that they will receive no contributions from the PHOTO CAPTION: CNS Executive Director Shobha tobacco industry; National Youth Shukla awarded certificates to every Commission declared that no participant. Left image is of Somya Arora who is sponsorships from the tobacco industry receiving her certificate of participation from will be entertained; Department of CNS founder-head Health came out with a policy incorporating the principles and recommendations of WHO FCTC Article 5.3 and its Guidelines.

Philippines is an example of first known domestic legislation in the world applying the principles under WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Guidelines to the government bureaucracy

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Way forward
Identifying opportunities and challenges to use WHO FCTC Article 5.3 in our local context, participants agreed upon the following:

Respond to advertising of nicotine chewing gums by ITC:
Recommendation of Vice President of Indian Chest Society and Head of Tobacco Cessation Clinic at KGMU Dr Surya Kant was that these chewing gums should only be available upon medical prescription for tobacco cessation purposes and not sold openly.

Strategic plan for passing a policy in line with WHO FCTC Article 5.3: UP Tobacco Control Cell with support from a "Article 5.3
Committee" committed to develop a strategic plan for passing a policy in line with WHO FCTC Article 5.3. Vote For Health campaign took the responsibility to constitute this committee in 30 days and establish online communication platforms for information exchange and dialogue.

Announcement of toll free number to report violations by government's state tobacco control cell UP State Tobacco Control Cell to support a training on tobacco cessation if Vote For Health and CNS are ready to support it
with technical resource faculty and participants

PHOTO CAPTION: Dr Surya Kant Tripathi, Vice President of Indian Chest Society; Chairman of UP State Task Force

for TB control; Head of Tobacco Cessation Clinic at KGMU

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Annexure 1

Resources
  FCTC Article 5.3 Guidelines http://www.who.int/fctc/guidelines/adopted/article_5_3/en/ SEATCA Toolkit http://www.industryinterference.seatca.org/index.php?option=com_content&v iew=frontpage&Itemid=1 Health Justice: www.healthjustice.ph Citizen News Service – CNS: www.citizen-news.org Corporate Accountability International: www.stopcorporateabuse.org Toolkit on WHO FCTC Article 5.3 by International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) http://www.theunion.org/index.php/en/resources/technicalpublications/tobacco-control/item/2411-smoking-cessationand-smokefree-environments-for-tuberculosis-patientsWHO Tobacco Industry Monitoring Database http://www.who.int/tobacco/industry/monitoring/en/    

PHOTO CAPTION: WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Training participants

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Annexure 2 Agenda
WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Workshop
Lucknow, India | Saturday 7th September 2013
TIME 9:00-9:30 (30 minutes) 9:30 -10:00 (30 minutes) AGENDA Registration Welcome Objectives of the Workshop and Introductions Session 1: Background Introduction to Corporate Accountability International, NATT, WHO FCTC, industry interference, broad outline of Article 5.3. A quick overview of domestic tobacco control law (The Cigarette and Other Tobacco Products Act, 2003) Tea Break Session 1 (cont): Relevance of WHO FCTC Article 5.3 in context of our domestic tobacco control law (The Cigarette and Other Tobacco Products Act, 2003) including key examples of tobacco industry interference in India Session 2: Article 5.3 Guidelines, Tools and Technical Assistance This session will discuss Article 5.3 Guidelines and ways to incorporate them into national and state laws as well as tools, technical assistance, and networking to support the implementation of Article 5.3. Session 3: Best Practices in Implementing Article 5.3 Examples of using WHO FCTC Article 5.3 (10 minutes) (10 minutes) (10 minutes) 12:10 – 1:20pm - In India - In Philippines/ SEA - Internationally Inaugural session - to be followed by a panel discussion on tobacco industry interference Rahul Dwivedi Irene Reyes Cloe Franko Welcome: Shobha Shukla Facilitator/ Speaker Shobha Shukla

10:00-10:30 (30 minutes)

John Stewart

10:30-10:45 (15 minutes) 10:45-11:00 11:00-11:20 (20 minutes)

- Satish Kumar Tripathi, State Tobacco Control Cell - Rahul Dwivedi Shobha Shukla

11:20-11:40 (20 minutes)

John Stewart + Irene Reyes

11:40-12:10

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Moderator: Bobby Ramakant Dr Surya Kant Tripathi, Indian Chest Society and Tobacco Cessation Clinic KGMU * Dr UN Rai, District Tobacco Control Cell * Dr TP Singh, Director, Balrampur Hospital * Dr SNS Yadav, CMO * Ms Saroj Kumari, State Prohibition Officer * Dr Madhu Pathak, Clinical Psychologist * Dr Rishi Sethi, Cardiology, KGMU (TBC) * Professor (Dr) Rama Kant, WHO Director-General’s Awardee Lunch Discussion/ Open Forum Session 4: Brainstorming – Applying Article 5.3

1:20-2:00 pm 2:00-2:20 (20 minutes) 2:20-3:10

Rahul Dwivedi

(participants break into 3-4 groups led by a facilitator and choose a rapporteur) Shobha Shukla (20 minutes) Group activity 1: Identifying opportunities and challenges to use WHO FCTC Article 5.3 in our local context Group activity 2: Developing an action plan for Article 5.3 (30 minutes) (Using Article 5.3 on a problem identified in group activity of agenda item no.6 (research, fact finding and fact checking, connecting with potential partners, strategy building with partners, drafting and other action points)) Reporting back to plenary Group rapporteurs Way forward (choosing a coordinator to ensure action Bobby Ramakant plan is implemented, agree on ways to communicate and coordinate action, and connect with larger networks such as NATT) Certificates to be presented to every participant by Shobha Shukla Dr Madhu Pathak, former Judge, family court;TCC KGMU; Chief Editor, Awadh Prant; and Director, Samadhan and formal vote of thanks For more information, please contact: Rahul Dwivedi, Coordinator Advocacy Training Workshop on WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Email: rahul@citizen-news.org | Phone: +91-983-999-0966 Shobha Shukla

3:10-3:30pm 3:30 – 3:45pm

3:45-4:00

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Annexure 3 Faculty
John Stewart Cloe Franko Director, Challenge Big Tobacco campaign, Corporate Accountability International & Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT) Senior International Organizer, Corporate Accountability International & Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT) Managing Director, Health Justice, Philippines & Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT) Executive Director, Citizen News Service – CNS and Vote For Health campaign Vice President, Indian Chest Society & Head of Tobacco Cessation Clinic at KGMU Head of Lucknow unit of National Tobacco Control Programme, Government of India WHO Director-General’s Awardee, Founder Indian Society Against Smoking – ISAS UP State unit of National Tobacco Control Programme, Government of India Director, Samadhan & Former Chief Counsellor, Tobacco Cessation Clinic at KGMU Senior Advocate, UP High Court Vote For Health campaign, CNS, Asha Parivar, NAPM & Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT) Vote For Health campaign, CNS jstewart@stopcorporateabuse.org cfranko@stopcorporateabuse.org

Irene Patricia Reyes

irenepatricia_reyes@yahoo.com

Shobha Shukla

shobha@citizen-news.org

Dr Surya Kant Tripathi

Dr UN Rai

Professor (Dr) Rama Kant

ramakantkgmc@rediffmail.com

Satish Kumar Tripathi

Dr Madhu Pathak

Manu Shresth Mishra Bobby Ramakant

94157-82844 bobbyramakant@yahoo.com

Rahul Kumar Dwivedi

rahul@citizen-news.org

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Annexure 4 Participants’ list
Name Of Participants Abhishek Pathak Amit Kumar Mishra Anurag Awasthi Arvind Bhaudauria Brihaspati Kumar Pandey Dr J K Pandey Dr Shambhu Firoz Ahmad Garima Chaubey J.P Sharma Kapil Dev Kesari Harendra Vikram Lallan Chaubey Manish Mishra Manushrestha Mishra Meenu Tiwari Mitashree Ghosh Mukta Srivastava Narjis Fatima Neeraj Mishra Nishant Saxena Om Prakash Name Of Organization CBCI CARD Rural Dental society City/Dist rict Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Rural Dental society Yuva Vikas Samiti Sankalp Sewa Sansthan Maa Dakshin Kali Sodh Sansthan CBCI CARD S.A.B.R.A UPVHA Purvanchal Rural Development and Training Institute PRDTI Purvanchal Vikas Samiti S.A.B.R.A Lucknow Basti Varanasi Lucknow Sitapur Allahaba d Lucknow Ghazipur Ghazipur Allahaba d Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Contac t No. 933683 1987 983932 8221 933592 3939 902689 8216 945430 9514 800513 3302 953277 3488 945276 7238 809062 7182 983918 0521 941524 1066 941588 0372 945234 0385 941500 5095 941578 2844 941590 4049 941540 2137 830345 7877 945320 7836 941596 4243 983902 1226 993649 Email

pathakbst@gmail.com
amit282212gmail.com caringsoulsfoundation@ya hoo.co.in amit282212gmail.com yvsngo@gmail.com sankalpsewasansthan2004 @gmail.com maadakshinkali95@gmail. com firoz111@yahoo.com

upvhalko@gmail.com prdti@sify.com,kapildev_k esari@yahoo.com pvsggzp@gmail.com lallan.chaubey@gmail.co m caringsoulsfoundation@ya hoo.co.in getmanushresth@gmail.co m akm_appu@yahoo.com mita_40@rediffmail.com mukta@citizen-news.org narjiskazmi142@gmail.co m NeerajMishra1389@gmail. com nishant15may@gmail.com ramnarayanprakash@gmai

Lawyer, High Court BSA Office FPAI Vote For Health campaign/ Citizen News Service - CNS FPAI FPI UIDAI Rama Shrajan Jan Kalyan Sansthan

Lucknow Lucknow

Lucknow Allahaba

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Mishra Pradeep Dixit Preeti Gupta Preeti Rai Puja Vishwakarma Rahul Pandey Raj Kumar Ramayan Yadav Ramesh C Parmar Satish Tripathi Shri Raj Shridhar Pandey Shubham Tiwari Somya Arora S P Pathak Suryabhan Tripathi Vandana Chand Vivek Mishra Yatartha Mishra

I Reed India Cancer Aid Society Upekshi+Mahila Vikas Snsnthan FPAI DTCC Balrampur Hospital Maa Dakshin Kali Sodh Sansthan Vigyan Foundation PSI NTCP UP STCC UP Gautam Buddh Jagriti society FPI Citizen News Service - CNS STCC UP Safe Society FPI Ganga Bal Vikas Sansthan

d Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Jaipur Lucknow Lucknow Siddartha Nagar Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow Gorakhpu r Lucknow Lucknow Lucknow

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l.com Pradeep.dixit1@yahoo.co m preetigupta@canceraidsoc ietyindia.org umjus@rediffmail.com puja_tiny@rediffmail.com rahul_gemini0106@yahoo. com rmishravatsa@gmail.com vigyanfoundation@yahoo. co.in rparmar@psi.org.in tri80in@yahoo.co.in shriraj.ntcp.UP@gmail.co m spjagriti@gmail.com tiwari.shubham24@gmail. com somya1717@gmail.com satyaprakashpathak@gmai l.com Suryabhantripathi83@gma il.com VandanaChand41@gmail.c om gangamailbox@gmail.com akm_appu@yahoo.com

PHOTO CAPTION: Shobha Shukla,

Executive Director of Citizen News Service - CNS

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Annexure 5 News/ media coverage around the training

Call to contain tobacco industry
Arunav Sinha, The Times of India | September 8, 2013

LUCKNOW: A call was made to implement Article 5.3 of the global tobacco treaty to stop tobacco industry interference in public health policy at the advocacy training workshop conducted by UP State and Lucknow District Tobacco Control Cells with Vote For Health campaign in Balrampur Hospital, Lucknow on 7 September 2013. The Global Tobacco Treaty which has also been ratified by India along with 176 other countries, (formally called Framework Convention on Tobacco Control - FCTC) has Article 5.3, preamble of which states that there is a direct fundamental and irreconcilable conflict of interest between tobacco industry and public health policy. This workshop was inaugurated by Dr TP Singh, Director, Balrampur Hospital, Dr SNS Yadav, CMO; Dr UN Rai of District Tobacco Control Cell, Dr Surya Kant, Chairman of State Task Force for TB Control and HOD Pulmonary Medicine, KGMU, Shobha Shukla, CNS; and Dr Madhu Pathak, Director Samadhan. According to the Article 5.3 Guidelines, governments such as of India should refuse to treat tobacco corporations as "stakeholders" in public health policy; should not invest in the tobacco industry, should not partner with tobacco corporations to promote public health or other purposes, or should not accept the tobacco industry's so-called corporate social responsibility schemes which are really just marketing by another name, said Cloe Franko of Corporate Accountability International that also supports Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT).

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Irene Reyes, Managing Director of Health Justice that has done commendable work in Philippines on FCTC Article 5.3 said that civil society has played a key role in Philippines to ensure that there are no partnerships, non-binding, or non-enforceable agreements between tobacco industry and governments, no voluntary contributions by tobacco industry to governments, no tobacco industry-drafted legislation or policy, or voluntary codes as substitutes for legally enforceable measures, no investments by governments or public officials in tobacco industry, and no tobacco industry representation on government tobacco control bodies or FCTC delegations. There are Article 5.3 Committees in Philippines to protect health policy from industry interference.

Interaction between government and tobacco industry should be transparent and well documented, no photographs taken so that industry cannot use them to give an impression that they partner with the government, among other measures.
The key faculty for this training includes: John Stewart, Director of Challenge Big Tobacco campaign of Corporate Accountability International; Cloe Franko of Network for Accountability of Tobacco Transnationals (NATT); Irene Reyes, Managing Director, Health Justice Philippines; Dr UN Rai, District Tobacco Control Cell; Satish Tripathi, UP State Tobacco Control Cell; Prof Surya Kant Tripathi, National Vice President of Indian Chest Society; Dr Madhu Pathak, Director, Samadhan; Prof Rama Kant, WHO Director-General's Awardee; Shobha Shukla, Bobby Ramakant and Rahul Dwivedi from Vote For Health campaign and CNS. The participants identified many issues to act upon including setting up of Article 5.3 committee in the state, using the toll-free number to report violations of domestic tobacco control law (Cigarette and Other Tobacco Products Act - COTPA) among other measures.
Online at: http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-0907/lucknow/41853765_1_tobacco-industry-global-tobacco-treaty-tobaccocorporations

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