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TENGKU AMPUAN AFZAN TEACHERS TRAINING INSTITUTE KUALA LIPIS

TRAINEES NAME: AMUTHA PERMAL (870312 01 5404) THINAGARAN MUTTHUSAMY (871226 06 - 5629 COURSE/UNIT: PROGRAM PERGURUAN PENDIDIKAN RENDAH PENGAJIAN EMPAT TAHUN (MATEMATIK) SUBJECT: MTE 3104 DECISION MATHEMATHICS TITILE: DECISION MATHEMATICS ASSESSMENT 2: LINEAR PROGRAMMING LECTURER: MR. KUMARAVALU RAMASAMY

MTE 3104 DECISION MATHEMATICS ASSESSMENT: LINEAR PROGRAMMING

SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT TENGKU AMPUAN AFZAN TEACHERS TRAINING INSTITUTE

Question 2: a) Let assume that: x y Maximize Subject to = = Regular Fit Shirts Deluxe Fit Shirts

P = 7x + 9y 5x + 6y 600 x + 2y 160 x 0, y 0

b) Refer to the figure one for the graph. Optimal Points A B C D (60, 50) (0, 80) (0, 0) (120, 0) Values for P 870 720 0 840

The feasible region is bounded with the point A (60, 50), B (0, 80), C (0, 0), and D (120, 0). Thus, the optimal point is at the point A (60, 50). At this optimal point the value for P is 870. This is the maximum profit for the problem given.

c)
A B C Just Shirts Linear Programming Model Shirt Type Regular Deluxe 7 9 5 6 1 2 60 50 Cotton Used 600 Cotton Available 600 D E Constraints

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Profit / Shirt Cotton / Shirt Labour / Shirt Number Produced Total Profit 870

P = 7x+9y 5x+6y 600 x+2y 160 Labour Used 160 Labour Available 160

TABLE ONE
Formulas for indicated cells: A11 B11 D11 d) Refer to the Table One; we could gain back the formulae of the problem. The formulae will be, as I had been entered in the cells DE6, DE7, and DE8. The formulae in the cell DE 6 is the objective function of the problem. In the same time, the formulae in the other two cells are the constraints of the problem. Enter the data for the linear programming problem onto a spreadsheet. Enter the labels shown in column A and the variables with which we are working under Decision Variables in cells B4:B5, as shown in Figure T1. This optional step will help us organize our work. : : : =7*B8+9*C8 =5*B8+6*C8 =1*B8+2*C8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1

A Maximization Problem Decision Variables

x y Objective Function Constraints 0 0 0

Formulas for indicated cells: C7 : =7*C4+9*C5 C10 : =5*C4+6*C5 C11 : =1*C4+2*C5

<= <=

600 160

FIGURE T1
For the moment, the cells that will contains the values of the variables (C4:C5) are left blank. In C7 type the formula for the objective function: =7*C4+9*C5. In C10 type the formula for the left-hand side of the first constraint: =5*C4+6*C5. In C11 type the formula for the left-hand side of the second constraint: =1*C4+2*C5. Zero will appear in cell C7 and cells C10:C11. In cells D10:D11, type <= to indicate that each constraint is of the form . Finally, in cells E10:E11, type the right-hand value of each constraint in this case, 600 and 160 respectively. Note that we need not enter the non-negativity constraints, x 0, y

0. The resulting spread-sheet is shown in Figure T1, where the formulas that
were entered for the objective function and the constraints are shown in the box. Use solver to solve the problem. Click Tools on the menu bar and then click Solver. The Solver Parameters dialog box will appear. The pointer will be in the Set Target Cell: box. Highlight the cell on your spreadsheet containing the formula for the objective function in this case C7. Then, next to Equal To: select Max. Select the By Changing Cells: box and highlight the cells in your spreadsheet that will contain the values of the variables in this case, C4:C5. Select the Subject to the Constraints: box and then click Add. The Add Constraint dialog box will appear.

The pointer will appear in the Cell Reference: box. Highlight the cells on your spreadsheet that contain the formula for the left-hand side of the first constraint - in this case, C10. Next, select the symbol for the appropriate constraint - in this case <=. Select the Constraint: box and highlight the value of the right-hand side of the first constraint on your spreadsheet in this case 600. Click Add and then follow the same procedure to enter the second constraint. Click Ok. The resulting Solver Parameters dialog box will appear. In the Solver Parameters dialog box, click Options. In the Solver Options dialog box that appears, select Assume Linear Model and Assume NonNegative Constraints. Click Ok. In the Solver Parameters dialog box that appears, click Solve. A Solver Results dialog box will then appear and at the same time the answers will appear on your spreadsheet. (Figure T2).

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1

A Maximization Problem Decision Variables

x y Objective Function Constraints

60 50 870 600 160 <= <= 600 160

Figure T2
Read off your answers. From the spreadsheets, we see that the objective function attains a maximum value of 870 (cell C7) when x = 60 and y = 50. (C4:C5).

e) Maximize Subject to P = 7x + 9y 5x + 6y 600 x + 2y 160 x 0, y 0 The original spreadsheet, where the values will be entered: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1 A Maximization Problem Decision Variables x y Objective Function Constraints 0 0 <= <= 600 160 0 B C D E F G

Formulas for indicated cells: C7 : =7*C4+9*C5 C10 : =5*C4+6*C5 C11 : =1*C4+2*C5

The result of the problem using the solver package: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1 A Maximization Problem Decision Variables x y Objective Function Constraints 600 160 <= <= 600 160 60 50 870 B C D E F G

From the spreadsheets, we see that the objective function attains a maximum value of 870 (cell C7) when x = 60 and y = 50. (C4:C5). Thus, the maximum profit is 870 when 60 Regular type shirts and 50 Deluxe type shirt produced by the company.